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Treaty News Items

[Submitted by Nancy Piper]

 

Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) February 16, 1825
Indian Treaties
On the 18th ult., the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, ratified two Treaties, one with the Ioway and the other with the Sac and the Fox nations of Indians, both of which were concluded on the 4th of August last, by the Head Chiefs of those nations, and Commissioners on the part of the United States.
By these Treaties the Indians renounce all their claim to lands in the state of Missouri, situated between the Mississippi and Missouri river, at the entrance of Kansas river, north one hunded miles, to the north west corner of the state of Missouri; and from thence east to the Mississippi. The small tract of land lying between the rivers Desmoin and the Mississippi, and the section of the above line between the Mississippi and the Desmoin, is reserved for the use of the half breeds belonging to the Sac and Fox nations; they holding it, however, by the same title, and in the same manner, that other Indian titles, are held.
None of these tribes are permitted to settle or hunt upon any part of the ceded land after the first of January 1826 without special permission from the Superintendent of Indian Affairs.
In lieu of the land ceded by the Treaties, the United States have agreed to pay the Ioways five hundred dollars, and the same sum annually for ten years. The Sacs and Foxes are to receive one thousand dollars, and an annuity of five hundred dollars for ten years. They are also to be provided with a blacksmith, and at receive such assistance as may be necessary to aid them in the pursuit of agriculture. – Nat. Journal.


Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 2, 1825
We learn from the Savannah Republican that a certain John W. Crowell has openly avowed that he was instrumental in exciting the Creek Indians to oppose the ratification of the treaty with the United States’ commissioners; that he was prompted to do this by a determination to make as much money as he could from his Indian agency. A man by the name of Walker, agent to Crowell, states that the addresses purporting to have been from the Cherokee chiefs, avowing their determination not to be removed beyond the Georgia limits were written by him without the knowledge or consent of those individuals . Intelligence of this fact and documents in proof, have been transmitted to the War Department, where it is hoped measures will be taken to bring such hardy offenders to consign punishment. There were nay apprehensions entertained not only for the safety of the Creeks, but that a civil war would rage in their territories in consequence of the reception of those forged documents purporting to be addressed by the Chiefs of the Creek nation to the government of the United States. Hopes are now entertained that in consequence of the discovery of this plot, all differences between the state of Georgia and the Creek tribe will be harmoniously adjusted – a consummation devoutly to be wished. – Balt. Amer.


Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 2, 1825
From the National Journal, Feb. 8 -- It appears from letters just received from the superintendent of Indian Affairs, at St. Louis, that a great council of the Cherokees, Delawares, Shawances, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankashaws, and Peorias, residing west of the Mississippi, has been held; at which it was agreed to receive their red brethren from the east and to invite them to come among them as soon as possible. This subject has been in agitation for about two years; meanwhile, wampum has been exchanged in great abundance between the tribes east and west of the Mississippi, until, at last, the object of both has been agreed upon, and a deputation is now on its way to Washington, led by Colonel P. Menard, to conclude an arrangement with the President of the United States for the removal of those Indians residing on the east of the Mississippi. If the arrangement is made, it is not unlikely but it may embrace the tribes in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, except the Ottowas, and a few others, who, it is probable, would prefer to join their friends west of Lake Michigan.
The Indians consider the step they have taken as a very important one to them; and look upon its completion as essential to their prosperity and happiness. They were very agreeably surprised on learning what the President has said on the subject in his message to Congress, at the opening of the session; “Our great father,” said they to General Clarke, “must have been inspired by the Great Spirit, or have studied well our miserable situation, with a view to our future happiness, to have enamored him to speak to the great council so exactly in agreement with the wishes of the Indians, as he has in this talk to Congress.”
Thus it would seem a movement is begun upon the plan now before Congress, fore bettering the conditions of our Indians, by Indians themselves. This certainly augurs favorably to its ultimate completion. There can be little doubt from the nature of the plan and its beneficial tendency upon the Indians, but they will embrace it just in proportion as they may be enlightened to perceive its natural and happy effects upon their face.


Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 2, 1825
Indian Treaty
By a Treaty concluded at Washington on the 20th January, 1825, between the United States and the Choctaw nation of Indians, and ratified on the 19th February, the Choctaws have agreed to cede to the United States all that portion of the land ceded to them by the second article of the treaty of Doak Stand, lying east of a line beginning on the Arkansas, one hundred paces east of Fort Smith and running thence, due south, to Red River; it being understood that this line shall constitute and remain the permanent boundary between the United States and said nation; and the United States agreeing to remove such citizens as may be settled on the west side to the east side of said line, and prevent future settlements from being made on the west thereof. The United States, in consideration of such cession, and on certain conditions, agree to pay them 6,000 dollars annually, forever. – National Journal.


Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 2, 1825
A Delegation from the Cherokee Nation, consisting of three, viz: John Ross, George Lowry & Elijah Hicks, arrived in this city a few days since, on business with the Government; and on Saturday, eleven Indians, representing the Shawanese, Delawares, Kickapoos, Miamis, Piankasnaws, Senecas, Wyandots, Weas, and Pioncas, &c. The object of the last named Delegation is to make arrangements for a removal of their tribes West of the Mississippi. – ib.


Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 16 1825
Indian Treaty
Col. Campbell and Maj. Meriwether have effected a Treaty with the Creeks for all their Land, except about fifty miles square lying in Alabama. The quantity obtained, it is supposed, will amount to between four and five millions of acres, and one third of it may be considered good land. The price given for the cession is 400,000 dollars in money, and an equal quantity of land over the Mississippi, to which the Indians are to remove in eighteen months. – Georgia Patriot.


Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 30, 1825
Washington, March 19 --- The Delegation of Indians, led by Col. Menard, who visited Washington for the purpose of making arrangements for the removal of their friends from the East to the West of the Mississippi, left here on Monday morning last, after having secured the acquiescence of the Governmetn in their plan, and the adoption of measures to carry it into effect. An assemblage of Indians on the East of the Mississippi, and who reside in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois &c., is authorized to take place at Wapaghkennetta, in Ohio, where they are to be met by Governor Cass, of Detroit, as Commissioner. In connection with this general plan of removal and union, the Shawenese, formerly of Cape Gerardeau, have made arrangements to have lands assigned them West of the boundary of Missouri, in exchange for those once owned by them at Cape Gerardeau; and this trust has been assigned to Gen. Clarke, of St. Louis. The just claims of those Indians, for improvements abandoned by them at Cape Gerardeau and for injuries commited by the whites, are also directed to be settled. We learn that if the meeting, which is to take place at Wapaghkennetta, results as the Indians themselves wish it may, that the removal of from twelve to fifteen tribes and remnants of tribes, will be effected by it. – Journal.


Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 30, 1825
Savannah, March 14
Disturbance among the Creek Indians
A letter has been received in town stating that the Creek Nation is in a state of great excitement in consequence of the late Treaty and should it be ratified, fears of a civil war were strongly prevalent, unless the exertions of Mr. Henry Lamar, who was lately dispatched by the Governor for the purposes of conciliation, should tend to avert it. There is also a report that Carely McIntosh has been stabbed by the Indians, and that the life of Gen. McIntosh, his father, is threatened, should he return home. The property of the latter is stated to have been seized. A runner had been dispatched to him with a detail of these occurrences and requiring his attendance.

 


 


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