Genealogy Trails

Prince George's County, Maryland
Biographies

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ANDERSON, Frank Yarborough of Birmingham, Ala., is a native of Prince George's county, Md. His parents were Charles F. and Jane Hauserd Anderson, both of whom were natives of England. He spent his youth in Maryland attending the local schools. He entered Columbia college and graduated from the law department. In 1870 he located in Mobile, Ala., and for several years gave his attention to special land claims before the department at Washington. While in Mobile he formed the acquaintance of some English capitalists who first purchased the Alabama & Chattanooga railway. They reorganized the company which managed the railroad, and named it the Alabama Great Southern. They built the New Orleans & North Eastern railway, and purchased the Alabama & Vicksburg, and added to it the Vicksburg, Shreveport & Pacific, and then leasing the Cincinnati Southern they formed the Queen & Crescent system. Mr. Anderson allied himself to these capitalists almost at the inception of their American business ventures. He at once removed to Birmingham, and took the office of land commissioner of the Alabama Great Southern railway, as well as of the Alabama State Land company. He has managed the department with great skill. His duties have been enlarged until today he has charge of the land department in the whole system, and holds for sale about 1,500,000 acres lying along the railroad from Georgia to Texas. His department averages in sales about $1,000,000 annually, and it is worthy of remark that in all his entire service for the company he has never been required to give a bond, and never a dollar's loss to the company has been on his accounts. On May 22, 1882, he married Lucy Winston, daughter of Doctor Paine of Valley Head, Ala. Her mother was a daughter of William O. Winston, first president of the Will's Valley railroad, and afterwards merged into the Alabama Great Southern. Mrs. Anderson was born and reared in Valley Head. In the family are the following children: Frank Y., Pelham H., Winston P., Benjamin P., Mary J., Kate L., Lucy W. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson affiliate with the Presbyterian church. Mr. Anderson is a Democrat, but he never mixed with politics. He has been president of both the Southern and Commercial clubs. He is now president of the Jefferson County Sanitary commission. He and family stand high socially. He spends his summers at Valley Head, where he has a delightful summer home.

Source: Notable Men of Alabama Vol. II, Joel Campbell Dubose (1904) submitted by FoFG mz


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BEANES, Scipio was born in Prince George's county, Maryland in the year 1793. When he was about twenty years of age, he removed to the city of Washington. Beanes was born a slave, and having obtained permission of his master to attend a school conducted in that county, he obtained the elementary principles of an English education. In 1818, his master made him a present of his freedom. The next year he married a Miss Harriet Bell, of Washington. About the first of the year, 1825, Beanes "experienced a change of heart," and united with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Sometime after, having been commissioned by the local church as an "exhorter," still later, he was commissioned by Bishop Allen to make a visitation of the churches on the Eastern Shore. His work there was quite successful. He remained laboring in this work as long as his health permitted, "but his delicate constitution, the severity of the winter, and the bad accommodations which were afforded, compelled him to abandon the field and return home. In his homeward journey the snow was so deep that he was compelled to quit the saddle, and on foot pursue his journey, leading his horse nearly the whole distance from Annapolis to Washington.” He was seized with deep pulmonary affection, and he was advised by his physician to seek some warmer climate. In 1826, he left for Portau Prince, Haiti, to improve his health. He remained there one year, his health improving, and in the meantime he performed valuable missionary services. On his return to this country, he met the General Conference, and he was commissioned as a regular missionary to Haiti from the African Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1828 he returned to Haiti. After a year or so there he again returned to this country, and in 1832 he went back to Port au Prince, "the Lord blessing his labors in the souls added to the Church." Of him, Bishop Payne, the historian of the A. M. E. Church, further says:
"His health improved at first, then began to fail. He was a great sufferer, but a patient, uncomplaining one, and without flinching he continued to labor. It was his wife's desire to return home, but the rapid encroachments of the disorder prevented this, and he was content to remain and die in Haiti, saying:
"Heaven is as near to Port au Prince as to Washington.'' He literally finished his life and his labors together, for we are told that he had baptized and administered the Lord's Supper on a Sabbath (January 12, 1835), and went home to Heaven the next morning at dawn, in the 42nd year of his age. He was generally beloved by the people, it seems, and esteemed as well. We are told that he performed the marriage of the French ambassador, Mr. Denny, himself a Methodist. His labors were confined, so said his wife, entirely to the city of Port au Prince, because his health did not permit him to travel over the Island. So much we know of the life and death of our first worker in the foreign missionary field of the West Indies."

Submitted by: K Torp

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bowie Governor of Maryland 1869-1872

BOWIE, Oden, like his predecessor Thomas Swann, a successful railroad executive, was born at'Fairview, Prince George’s County, on November 10, 1826, the son of William D. and Eliza (Oden) Bowie. The only Mexican War veteran to have been elected governor, he descended from a long line of ancestors who had distinguished themselves in public service, and had long been prominent in Prince George’s County. His father had served as a member of the County Levy Court, a two-term member of the House of Delegates, and a colonel of militia. His mother was the daughter of Benjamin Oden, a landholder with mercantile interests. Oden Bowie received his early education at home under a private tutor. When he was only nine years of age, he was sent to the preparatory school of St. John’s College in Annapolis. He remained there for several years. Then he entered St. Mary’s College in Baltimore, from which he was graduated in 1845. Shortly after leaving college, he enlisted as a private in the Baltimore and Washington Battalion, a military organization which was one of the very few Eastern units to have been recruited for service in Mexico. During the war, he participated in some of the more important battles. At Monterey, he displayed such bravery that he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant. Later, President James K. Polk appointed him a captain of Voltiguers, of which Joseph E. Johnston, who earned fame during the Civil War, was the lieutenant colonel. The climate of Mexico, however, seriously affected his health, so he was compelled to return home before the close of the war. The Legislature subsequently passed resolutions expressing 'the thanks of his native State for distinguished gallantry displayed during the three days’ siege of Monterey.

Following his return from Mexico and the restoration of his health, Bowie entered polities in 1847, becoming a candidate for a seat in the House of Delegates from Prince George’s County but he was defeated. As he was not quite twenty-one years of age, his opponents used his youth against him by raising doubts about his eligibility with the result that he lost by only ten votes. In 1849, he was once more a candidate for the House of Delegates and was the only Democratic candidate to be elected from Prince George’s County in that year. He served during only one session, that of December 1849, because the adoption of the Constitution of 1851 cut short all terms of office. Two years later, on December 3, 1851, he married Alice Carter, the daughter of Charles H. Carter, of neighboring Goodwood. They had seven children, and Oden and Alice Bowie made their home atFairview, the governor’s ancestral estate of about one thousand acres which he had inherited from his father, living there for the remainder of their lives.

Bowie was inactive politically between 1849 and 1861. During that interval, he became associated with the old Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company, becoming its president in 1860. The work on the road was interrupted by the Civil War, but it was completed after 1865 as the result of Bowie’s dynamic management. He held that office until his death, even after that road had become a part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system. Largely because of his efforts, the Pennsylvania Railroad secured permission to extend its Pope’s Creek Branch into Washington, a move which later precipitated a railroad war with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Although Bowie had served in the House of Delegates for one term prior to 1860, it was not until after that date that he became a State-wide political leader. In 1861, he was a candidate for the State Senate from Prince George’s County as a Peace Democrat, but he was defeated because of military interference by the Federal troops in the State election. Although he was an ardent Democrat and a warm sympathizer of the South, he had opposed secession. During the war, he used his efforts to preserve the Democratic party organization, and it was in part due to his efforts that the party was later enabled to regain control of the State. He was chairman of the Democratic State Central Committee during the war and was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention of 1864 which nominated George B. McClellan for President. The Constitution of 1864 provided for a governor and a lieutenant governor. In the only election to be held under this document, the Democratic Party nominated Bowie for Lieutenant Governor, but he was defeated by Christopher C. Cox, the Union Party candidate, who polled 41,828 votes to Bowie’s 32,178. In 1867, Bowie was elected to the State Senate from Prince George’s County, where he served on several important committees including that of federal relations. Early in the same year, the people of Maryland had approved the calling of a constitutional convention to revise the Constitution of 1864, and when the new Constitution was adopted in September of 1867, it restored the franchise to many thousands of Marylanders. At the election of November 5, 1867, Oden Bowie who had been to a great extent instrumental in bringing about the change, was the Democratic nominee for governor. Out of the 85,744 votes cast, he received 63,694, and he carried into office with him a Legislature which contained no Republican members. Under a provision of the Constitution of 1867, the first elected governor was to serve for three years, while all future governors were to serve full four-year terms. Bowie qualified as Governor on January 8, 1868, although he was not inaugurated governor until January 13, 1869. He continued in office until January 10, 1872, when William Pinkney Whyte succeeded him. In his inaugural address, he pleaded for reconciliation, for like several of his successors he had to face the problem of the restoration of the State’s services after a war. 'National legislation must be directed not only to the restoration of the dissevered States to their proper orbits, and to the pacification of the country, but its financial condition and necessities. The burdens of war must be relieved by the return of peace. He went on to warn his fellow Democrats that 'an excess of power [is] dangerous to all parties.' He cautioned 'against political excesses and any divergence from right in the mere interest of party or person.' Pleading for the union, he told the members of the Legislature 'of fanaticism, of crime, of bloodshed we have had more than enough— enough of self-debasement for self-advancement —too much of mere party strife. Patriotism should now awaken us to the true and material interests of the country.' Just as later Governors Emerson Harrington and Herbert O’Conor had to face the problems of restoring State government services after a major conflict, so Oden Bowie had to face those dealings with those needs interrupted by the Civil War. Unlike the first two who had to settle issues growing out of global conflicts, Bowie had to resolve those dealing with internal strife. Harrington and O’Conor had occupied the governorship both before, during and a short period after the war, while Bowie’s administration did not start until nearly four years after the end of the Civil War.

During his administration, Bowie had to solve problems of a business nature. Among the leading issues settled during his term of office was that pertaining to the dispute with Virginia over the oyster beds. He also took the lead in the collection of arrearages from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad together with the repayment of money loaned by Maryland to the United States government during the war. He opposed the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in its fight to block the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad from linking New York with Washington by direct railroad line. He advocated a free railroad law under which citizens might construct a railroad whenever they desired and could furnish the necessary capital, converted the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal into a paying enterprise, and took the initiative in the passage of legislation dealing with road improvement and the betterment of public education. He proved to be an able governor and an able business man. During Bowie’s administration, the new Government House was completed, because the State had sold the former Executive Mansion. It hadnot been completely furnished when he left office, since like so many building projects, it 'has cost more than was originally designed.' Bowie favored the public school system which had been instituted under his predecessor. But, he urged that the taxes being paid by colored taxpayers for educational purposes, be set apart for the education of the colored children 'and that educational facilities be extended to this class of our population and such encouragement given as will show that we have due concern for their welfare and prosperity. At the close of his administration when he retired from politics, he became the President of the City Passenger Railway Company which had the franchise to operate the street railway of Baltimore City. At that time the value of the railway’s stock was low; the company had paid no dividends for several years. The company also owed the city its park tax arrears, while its equipment and trackage was in poor condition. Under Bowie’s management, the company changed from horse to rapid transit operations, reduced its park tax arrearages, and enhanced the value of its stock. Bowie managed the company for over twenty years and under his guidance it flourished.

In 1870, while he was still governor, Bowie became the president of the Maryland Jockey Club. He was instrumental in the acquisition of Pimlico Race Track by the Club, while the meetings at Pimlico under his management drew national attention. Governor Bowie loved horses and during his lifetime he was a noted owner and breeder of famous racers. At one time, his stables contained such horses of national reputation as 'Crickmore,' 'Catesby,' 'Compensation,' 'Oriole,' 'Bessie,' and 'Belle.' Bowie had a nervous breakdown in 1890 following which his physician ordered him to give up his horse racing at once. However, even after he sold his stables, he continued to breed horses and other animals, all of which earned many prizes at agricultural exhibitions. While Bowie devoted much time to his business interests in Baltimore, he continued to reside at Fairview. He was an almost daily passenger on the Pope’s Creek train commuting between Baltimore and his home near Collington, during which he invariably occupied his favorite seat, the third from the rear on the left-hand side of the last coach of the train. He was so anxious to secure this seat that he would usually send a boy from his office to board the train and to occupy the seat until he arrived. Bowie was outspoken to all persons and on all occasions. The Sun told the story that while he was attending church near his home, he felt the minister had preached too long. He became restless during the sermon, and taking his watch out of his pocket several times, he snapped the case shut very loudly before he returned it to his pocket. After the service, the clergyman came up to him and asked him how he enjoyed the sermon. 'Too long, too d— long; why one-half of these people (pointing to the congregation) will get home to cold dinners. The Sun went on to note that in spite of his outspokenness, the two were the closest of friends and Bowie was a most liberal supporter of the church.

Oden Bowie died at Fairview, on December 4, 1894, after a short illness. After funeral services at his home, he was buried in the family cemetery situated several hundred yards from the house where he was born, lived and died. He was mourned as a public spirited citizen and [one who was] intensely loyal to his State. He was a man of strong convictions, strong likings and antipathies. Whilst courteous he was perfectly frank and outspoken and entirely too courageous to be deceitful. He had no fancy whatever for being conspicuous or appearing in the public prints, but much preferred being let alone. He was a good citizen and an honest man, and many friends will mourn his death.

Source: Archives of Maryland; transcribed by Tammie Stills


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BOWIE, Thomas Fielder, (grandnephew of Walter Bowie and brother-in-law of Reverdy Johnson), a Representative from Maryland; born in Queen Anne, Prince George’s County, Md., April 7, 1808; attended Charlotte Hall Academy in St. Mary’s County, Md., and Princeton College, Princeton, N.J.; was graduated from Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., in 1827; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1829 and commenced practice in Upper Marlboro, Md.; deputy attorney general for Prince George’s County 1833-1842; member of the State house of delegates 1842-1846; unsuccessful candidate for Governor in 1843; unsuccessful candidate for election in 1850 to the Thirty-second Congress; member of the State constitutional convention in 1851; member of the judicial committee assisting in framing the State’s new constitution; presidential elector on the Whig ticket in 1852; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1855-March 3, 1859); was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1858 to the Thirty-sixth Congress; resumed the practice of his profession; died in Upper Marlboro, Md., October 30, 1869; interment in the Waring family burying ground at Mount Pleasant, near Upper Marlboro, Md.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present; transcribed by Tammie Stills


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BOWIE, Walter, (granduncle of Thomas Fielder Bowie), a Representative from Maryland; born in Mattaponi, near Nottingham, Prince George’s County, Md., in 1748; attended Rev. John Eversfield’s School, near Nottingham, the common schools in Annapolis, and Craddock’s School, near Baltimore, Md.; engaged in agricultural pursuits, was a large landowner, and also was interested in shipping; member of the State constitutional convention in 1776; captain and, later, major of a Prince George’s County company during the Revolution; member of the State house of delegates 1780-1800; served in the State senate 1800-1802; elected as a Republican to the Seventh Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Richard Sprigg, Jr.; reelected to the Eighth Congress and served from March 24, 1802, to March 3, 1805; declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1804 to the Ninth Congress; died near Collington, Prince George’s County, Md., November 9, 1810; interment in the family burying ground on his estate.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present

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CALVERT, Charles Benedict, a Representative from Maryland; born in Riverdale, Prince Georges County, Md., August 24, 1808; completed preparatory studies at Bladensburg Academy, Md.; was graduated from the University of Virginia at Charlottesville in 1827; engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock breeding; member of the State house of delegates in 1839, 1843, and 1844; president of the Prince Georges County Agricultural Society and the Maryland State Agricultural Society; vice president of the United States Agricultural Society; founded the first agricultural research college in America (later the Maryland Agricultural College at College Park), chartered in 1856; one of the early advocates for the establishment of the United States Department of Agriculture; elected as a Unionist to the Thirty-seventh Congress (March 4, 1861-March 3, 1863); was not a candidate for renomination in 1862; resumed agricultural pursuits; died in Riverdale, Prince Georges County, Md., May 12, 1864; interment in Calvert Cemetery.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present; contributed by A Newell

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DCarroll
(Library of Congress)

CARROLL, Daniel, (uncle of Richard Brent, cousin of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, and Charles Carroll 'Barrister''), a Delegate and a Representative from Maryland; born in Upper Marlboro, Prince George’s County, Md., July 22, 1730; educated at the Jesuit School at Bohemia Manor, Md., and at St. Omer’s College, France; returned to Maryland in 1748; Member of the Continental Congress, 1781-1783, signing the Articles of Confederation on March 1, 1781; appointed a delegate on May 26, 1787, to the convention that framed the Federal Constitution, and signed the Constitution; member of the first State senate of Maryland and up to the time of his death was a member of the senate of Maryland, or the executive council of Maryland; elected as a Pro-Administration candidate to the First Congress (March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791); took an active part in fixing the seat of government for the United States; appointed by President Washington on January 22, 1791, as one of the commissioners to locate the District of Columbia and the Federal City and served until July 25, 1795, when he resigned; engaged in agricultural pursuits, his farm being the site of the present city of Washington; died at Rock Creek (Forest Glen), near Washington, D.C., May 7, 1796.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present; transcribed by Tammie Stills

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CARROL, John, clergyman, bishop, author, was born in 1735 in Marlborough, Md. He was the first Roman Catholic archbishop of Baltimore. He was the author of Concise View of the Principal Points of Controversy Between the Protestant and Catholic Churches; and Discourse on General Washington. He died in 1817 in Georgetown, D.C.

[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

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CONTEE, Benjamin, (uncle of Alexander Contee Hanson and granduncle of Thomas Contee Worthington), a Delegate and a Representative from Maryland; born at ”Brookefield,” near Nottingham, Prince George’s County, Md., in 1755; attended a private school; served in the Revolutionary War as lieutenant and captain in the Third Maryland Battalion; member of the State house of delegates 1785-1787; member of the Continental Congress in 1788; elected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the First Congress (March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791); was not a candidate for renomination in 1790; traveled in various European countries, and studied theology; continued theological study on his return to the United States, and was ordained a minister of the Episcopal Church in 1803; was pastor of the Episcopal Church at Port Tobacco, Charles County; was serving as presiding judge of the Charles County Orphans’ Court at the time of his death; died in Charles County, Md., November 30, 1815; interment at “Bromont,” his former home, near Port Tobacco, Md.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present; transcribed by Tammie Stills

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COVINGTON, Leonard, a Representative from Maryland; born in Aquasco, Md., October 30, 1768; received a liberal schooling; entered the United States Army as a cornet of Cavalry March 14, 1792; commissioned lieutenant of Dragoons in 1793, and joined the Army under General Wayne; distinguished himself at Fort Recovery and the Battle of Miami; promoted to a captaincy, and resigned September 12, 1795; engaged in agricultural pursuits; member of the State house of delegates for many years; elected as a Republican to the Ninth Congress (March 4, 1805-March 3, 1807); appointed lieutenant colonel of Light Dragoons on January 9, 1809, and colonel February 15, 1809; was in command at Fort Adams on the Mississippi in 1810 and took possession of Baton Rouge and a portion of West Florida; was ordered to the northern frontier in 1813, and appointed brigadier general August 1, 1813; mortally wounded at the Battle of Chryslers Field November 11, 1813, and died at Frenchs Mills, N.Y., on November 14, 1813; remains were removed to Sackets Harbor, Jefferson County, N.Y., August 13, 1820; place of burial now known as Mount Covington.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present

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DUVALL, Gabriel, a Representative from Maryland; born in Prince George’s County, Md., December 6, 1752; completed preparatory studies; studied law; was admitted to the bar and practiced; member of the Governor’s council in 1783 and 1784; elected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the Third Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John F. Mercer; reelected as a Republican to the Fourth Congress and served from November 11, 1794, to March 28, 1796, when he resigned; appointed chief justice of the general court of Maryland on April 2, 1796, and resigned in 1802; appointed First Comptroller of the Treasury December 15, 1802, and served until his resignation November 18, 1811; elected judge of the court of appeals of Maryland on January 16, 1806, but declined to serve; appointed by President James Madison on November 15, 1811, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and served until his resignation on January 15, 1835, because of deafness; died near Glenn Dale, in Prince George’s County, Md., on March 6, 1844; interment in the Marcus Duvall estate "Wigwam" family burial ground near Glenn Dale, Md.


Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present - submitted by A Newell

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LEE, Thomas Sim, (father of John Lee), a Delegate from Maryland; born near Upper Marlboro, Prince Georges County, Md., October 29, 1745; completed preparatory studies; held several local offices; member of the provincial council in 1777; governor of Maryland 1779-1783; Member of the Continental Congress in 1783; member of the house of delegates in 1787; declined to serve in the convention which drafted the Constitution of the United States, but consented to serve in the state convention for the ratification of the Federal Constitution in 1788; again governor of Maryland 1792-1794; effected the organization of the state militia while he was governor and took an active part in the suppression of the Whisky Insurrection in western Pennsylvania and Maryland; appointed to the state senate in 1794, but declined to serve; again elected governor, but declined in 1798; retired from public life and engaged in the management of his estate, “Needwood,” in Frederick County, Md., until his death, November 9, 1819; interment in a private cemetery at Melwood, Prince Georges County, Md.; reinterment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery, near Upper Marlboro, Md., April 17, 1888.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present; transcribed by Tammie Stills

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PRATT, Thomas G (1804 - 1869)
Govenor of Maryland - 1845-1848 Whig

Born:  Washington, D.C.February 18, 1804
Father:  John Wilkes
Mother:  Rachel (Belt) Prat 
Marriage:  September 1, 1835 to Adelaide MacKubin Kent
Children:  Rachel, Thomas H.G., Constance, John Glenn, Florence, Adeline
Education:  Georgetown College, Washington, D.C.; Princeton College; studied law in the office of Richard S. Coxe, Washington, D.C.
Religious affiliation:  Episcopalian
Positions held: 
            Maryland House of Delegates, 1832-1836 
            President, Executive Council, 1838 
            Maryland Senate, 1838-1841 
            Governor of Maryland, 1845-1848 
            State Director, Annapolis & Elk Ridge Railroad Company, 1848, 1854-1857 
               U.S. Senator, 1850-1857 
            Delegate, Democratic National Convention, 1864 
            Delegate, Union Convention, Philadelphia, 1866
Died:  November 9, 1869
Burial:  St. Anne's Episcopal Church Cemetery, Annapolis

Source: Archives of Maryland


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ROSS, David, a Delegate from Maryland; born in Prince Georges County, Md., February 12, 1755; appointed by General Washington major of Grayson’s additional Continental regiment January 1, 1777, and served until December 20, 1777, when he resigned; upon the death of his father devoted his time to the management of the family estate; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1783 and commenced the practice of his profession in Frederick County, Md.; Member of the Continental Congress 1787-1789; died in Frederick County, Md., in 1800.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present; transcribed by Tammie Stills

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Sasscer (Pictorial Directory of the Victory Congress - 79th)

SASSCER, Lansdale Ghiselin, a Representative from Maryland; born in Upper Marlboro, Prince George’s County, Md., September 30, 1893; attended the public schools, Central High School, Washington, D.C., and Tome School, Port Deposit, Md.; was graduated from Dickinson Law School, Carlisle, Pa., in 1914; was admitted to the bar the same year and commenced practice in Upper Marlboro, Md.; served during the First World War 1917-1919, being overseas for thirteen months as a first lieutenant in the Fifty-ninth Artillery; resumed the practice of law; member of the State senate 1922-1938, serving as president in 1935 and 1937; delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1924 and 1936; vice chairman of the committee on reorganization of the State government in 1939; elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-sixth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Stephen W. Gambrill; reelected to the Seventy-seventh and to the five succeeding Congresses and served from February 3, 1939, to January 3, 1953; was not a candidate for renomination in 1952 but was unsuccessful for the nomination for United States Senator; resumed the practice of law; was a resident of Upper Marlboro, Md., until his death there on November 5, 1964; interment in Trinity Cemetery.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present

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small (Pocket Congressional Directory 83rd)
SMALL, Frank, Jr., a Representative from Maryland; born on a farm in Temple Hills, Prince George’s County, Md., July 15, 1896; attended the public schools and received technical education at the National Automobile College in 1914 and 1915; operated several farms; engaged in banking and the automobile business 1923-1957; served in the State house of delegates in 1927 and 1928; member of the board of county commissioners 1930-1934; member of the Republican State Central committee 1934-1942, serving as chairman for four years; member of the Maryland Racing Commission 1937-1952, serving as chairman in 1951 and 1952; president of Clinton Bank, Clinton, Md., 1928-1972; delegate, Republican Conventions, 1940, 1944, and 1956; elected as a Republican to the Eighty-third Congress (January 3, 1953-January 3, 1955); was unsuccessful for reelection in 1954 to the Eighty-fourth Congress; engaged in real estate, 1954-1973; Maryland Commissioner of Motor Vehicles from April 29, 1955, to April 15, 1957; vice president of the Equitable Trust Co. of Baltimore; died in Washington, D.C., October 24, 1973; interment in Resurrection Cemetery, Clinton, Md.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present

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SPRIGG, Richard, Jr., (nephew of Thomas Sprigg), a Representative from Maryland; born in Prince George’s County, Md., in 1769c; member of the State house of delegates in 1792 and 1793; elected as a Republican to the Fourth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Gabriel Duval; reelected to the Fifth Congress and served from May 5, 1796, to March 3, 1799; elected to the Seventh Congress and served from March 4, 1801, until his resignation February 11, 1802; appointed associate judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals on January 27, 1806; died in Charleston, S.C., in 1806.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present

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Governor of Maryland, 1819-1822 (Democrat; Whig after 1820s)
SPRIGG, Samuel another wealthy landowner and a descendant of Thomas Sprigg, who had emigrated to Maryland in 1655, was the son of Joseph and his second wife Margaret (Weems) Sprigg He was in all probability born in Prince George’s County, but both the date and the place are unknown. Buchholz estimated that Sprigg was born about 1783.1 Almost nothing is known about his early life, his brothers and sisters, his education or his career before he became governor. After his father’s death in 1800, his uncle Osborn Sprigg adopted him, and when the latter died in 1815, he inherited 'Northampton,' the family estate of over 1,000 acres in Prince George’s County. Samuel Sprigg married Violetta Landsdale on January 1, 1811. They had two children.

Sprigg was elected governor on December 13, 1819, succeeding the incumbent Federalist Charles Goldsborough. A virtual unknown when he took office, his election was preceded by 'one of the closest and most exciting contests ever held in the State' For the first time since 1811, the Republicans captured control of the General Assembly, and as the result of Sprigg’s election, they turned their attention to internal improvements and unsuccessful attempts to secure reapportionment. Samuel Sprigg qualified as governor on December 20, 1819, and gave the State a vigorous and intelligent administration. He 'prefigured the later spoils era by a wholesale purge of Federalist officeholders.'3Sprigg favored the increase in means of communication by the building of roads and canals. The movement for the chartering of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, although unsuccessful during his administration, grew out of his insistence upon internal improvement. The reform movement which had resulted in his election, failed again because of Federalist opposition. These obstructionist tactics only increased Republican agitation for later Victories. In 1820, Sprigg was re-elected, again defeating Charles Goldsborough. In that year, the Federalists made a last-ditch effort to return to power, and almost succeeded in defeating Sprigg, but in this they were unsuccessful. Following their defeats in 1819 and 1820, they went into eclipse and never again emerged as an effective political party within Maryland. The Republicans, as the result, became firmly entrenched in office for many years."The national 'Era of Good Feeling' was reflected in Sprigg’s messages to the Legislature. On December 30, 1820. he congratulated it 'upon the general union of opinion and harmony of sentiment at home.' He went on to call such opinions and sentiments 'the highest reward, which our able and virtuous chief magistrate, and those associated with him in the management of our national concerns, can receive at the hands of a free and enlightened people, standing upon this high and exalted eminence in popular opinion, scarcely a speck of party has been visible in his re-election to office.

Sprigg left the governorship on December 16, 1822, and returned to 'Northampton.' Not too much is known about his life after his retirement from office except his long affiliation with the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, his presidency of the board, and his efforts to complete this waterway. Sprigg died at his home on April 21, 1855 and was buried at St. Barnabas' Church in Prince George’s County. Later his body was removed to Oak Hill Cemetery in Georgetown, D.C. Sprigg left an estate valued at nearly $50,000, including sixty-one slaves.

Source: Archives of Maryland; transcribed by Tammie Stills

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SPRIGG, Thomas, (uncle of Richard Sprigg, Jr.), a Representative from Maryland; born in Prince George’s County, Md., in 1747; served during the Revolutionary War as ensign in the Maryland
Battalion of the Flying Camp from September to December 1776; appointed the first register of wills of Washington County, Md., in 1777, and served until September 29, 1780, when he resigned;
appointed lieutenant of Washington County by the governor and Council of Maryland December 21, 1779; elected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the Third Congress and reelected as a Republican to the Fourth Congress (March 4, 1793-March 3, 1797); died in Washington County, Md., December 13, 1809.

Source: Biographical Directory of the Unite States Congress - 1774 - Present; transcribed by Tammie Stills

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