BERKSHIRE COUNTY, MASS. IN THE CIVIL WAR
A History Of Massachusetts in the Civil War
by William Schouler published 1871

 

    BERKSHIRE is the most westerly county in the Commonwealth. It is bounded north by Bennington County, Vermont; west by Rensselaer and Columbia Counties, New York; south by Litchfield County, Connecticut; and east by Franklin, Hampshire, and Hampden Counties, Massachusetts. In parts it is rough and hilly, but has many beautiful and picturesque streams and valleys. The Housatonic and Hoosick are its chief rivers; the former empties into Long Island Sound, and the latter into the Hudson River. The Hoosack and Grey-lock, which are partly in the town of Adams, are its chief mountains. Under the former, a tunnel for a railroad, four miles in length, is being made; and the latter is the highest land in Massachusetts. Its largest towns are Pittsfield, the county seat ; and Adams, in which there are many large and flourishing manufactories. The largest portion of the people, however, are agriculturists. The Boston and Albany Railroad passes through the centre of the county, east and west, connecting it with Boston and the Hudson River. There are several other railroads in the county, which centre at Westfield.
    There are thirty one towns in Berkshire, but no city. The entire population in 1860 was 55,120, and in 1865 it was 56,960. an increase in five years of only 1,846. The valuation in 1860 was $24,186,962, and in 1865 it was $27,937,444, being an increase in five years of $3,750,482.
    According to returns made by the selectmen in 1866 from all the towns in the county, it appears that the whole number of men furnished by Berkshire for the war was five thousand three hundred and fifty six, which is not far from the exact number required to be furnished ; but it cannot have included the surpluses to the credit of which they were entitled. These surpluses amount to three hundred and eighty eight men. Every town in the county furnished its full quota of men upon every call made by the President, and each had a surplus at the end of the war, with the exception of Mount Washington and Tyringham, and these had the exact number required of them. No town in Berkshire, nor in the State, fell short of its contingent.
    The aggregate expenditure of all the towns in the county on account of the war, exclusive of the money raised and expended for State aid to the families of volunteers, was five hundred and ninety thousand six hundred and ninety seven dollars and nineteen cents ($590,697.19). The amount raised and expended by all the towns for State aid to the soldiers' families during the four years of the war, and which was reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was two hundred and sixty two thousand forty nine dollars and sixty one cents ($262,049.61), making a grand total of $852,746.80.
 
The war records of the towns are as follows
 

 
ADAMS
 

    Incorporated Oct. 15, 1778. Population in 1860, 6,924; in 1865, 8,298. Valuation in 1860, $2,543,095; in 1865, $3,350,551.
The selectmen in 1861 were Alpheas Smith, Elisha Kingsley, John W. Richmond ; in 1862 and 1863, Lysander Johnson, Luther C. Hosmer, John W. Richmond; in 1864, Lysander Johnson, A. G. Plumb, William H. Wilkinson ; in 1865, John F. Arnold, A. G. Plumb, John W. Richmond.
    The town clerk in 1861 was A. J. Ray; in 1862 and 1863, Mark F. Adams; in 1864 and 1865, H. S. Millard: The town treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was W. W. Freeman; in 1863, George A. Lapham; in 1864, C. H. Ingalls; in 1865, E. W. Wilkinson.
    1861. Adams is one of the prominent towns in Massachusetts, and the mere official record of its doings during the four years of the war gives no adequate conception of the spirit of the people. A great many public meetings were held, and many prominent citizens said many and did many wise and patriotic  things, which do  not  all appear upon  the  official records of the town.
The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 29th of April; at which a committee of seven was appointed, with authority " to use the funds of the town to the amount of twenty thousand dollars, to furnish aid to such military companies from the town as may be called into the service of the United States, and to aid their families when not otherwise provided for." On the 22d of June the town held a meeting, and voted that the care of the families of volunteers be intrusted to the selectmen, and that they be authorized " to use the moneys of the town as may in their opinion be needed;" with the distinct and separate understanding " that such aid is in no sense a charity, but what of right belongs to families of volunteers."
    1862.    A regular town meeting was held on the 22d of July, at which it was voted " that one hundred dollars be paid from the town treasury to each person who shall enlist under the call of the Governor as one of the quota of the town."    [This was the call of the President for 300,000 three years volunteers.]
The call for three hundred thousand men for nine months' service followed in August.    When that call was received, and Adams was informed of the number of men which it was to provide to meet its contingent, on recommendation of the town authorities " all business in the town was suspended for three days, and the time was devoted to raising the quota of the
town : S. W. Bowerman was the leading person in the work."
    1863.    Prom the transcript of the town records which we have received from Adams, it does not appear that any official action was taken by the town during this year; although we doubt not that recruiting was continued all the time, and State aid continued to be paid to the families of the soldiers.
    1864.    At a legal town meeting held on the 2d of July, it was voted to pay henceforth a bounty of  one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three years' military service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; the selectmen were also instructed to continue recruiting after the present demand for men was filled, "in anticipation of a future call." There appears to have been no further action taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during the war.
    The selectmen in 1866 reported that Adams had furnished nine hundred and forty five men for the war, which we believe to have been an error of at least one hundred; for, had that number been furnished, the surplus of men would have been at least one hundred more than it was. Adams filled its full quota upon every call made by the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of forty three over and above all demands. Twenty nine were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and twelve thousand one hundred and three dollars ($112,103.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $2,338.73;
in 1862, $9,410.17;
in 1863, $11,270.23;
in 1864, $14,690.38;
in 1865, $10,000.00.   
Total in four years, $47,759.51.

    A Ladies' Aid Society was organized very early in the war, of which Mrs. Miles Sanford was president, and Mrs. J. T. Robinson secretary. The society held weekly meetings, and their disbursements "amounted to more than ten thousand dollars."

 
ALFORD
 

     Incorporated Feb. 16, 1773. Population in 1860, 542; in 1865, 461. Valuation in 1860, $320,018; in 1865, $340,490.
The selectmen in 1861 were William Stoddard, Stephen M. Church, Horace S. Fitch; in 1862, Jonathan Baldwin, Orville J. Brusil, Russell Prindle ; in 1863, Ezra C. Ticknor, Jonathan Baldwin, Orville J. Brusil; in 1864, Ezra C. Ticknor, Henry W. Smith, E. K. Williams; in 1865, William Stoddard, Elihu Church, Horace S. Fitch.
    The town clerk in 1861 was Henry W. Smith; in 1862, William K. Calkins ; in 1863, Elihu Church; in 1864, William E. Calkins; in 1865, Giles S. Halett. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Ezra C. Ticknor; in 1865, James H. Edwards.
    1861.    There does not appear to have been any action taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year.
    1862.    There having been a call made, July 4th, for 300,000 men, by the President, of which Massachusetts was to furnish fifteen thousand, each town was assigned its quota;  therefore, on the 21st of July, a legal town meeting was held, to consider the means which the town should take to fill its quota; and it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer (" or seventy five dollars to each drafted man, in event of a draft ") who shall enlist for three years, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town.    Nine men immediately enlisted, and each received a bounty of one hundred and thirty five dollars, ten dollars having been added
to the town bounty "by some of the loyal men of the town."
Another meeting, properly called, was held on the 26th of August, at which  the town "Voted, to authorize the select men to pledge the credit of the town to any amount that may be necessary, to pay to each volunteer soldier required of this town, under the late call of the President for 300,000 nine- months men, the sum of three hundred dollars."    Under this vote, nine men enlisted, and each received a bounty of three hundred   dollars.    November   4th,   The  selectmen  were  instructed " to furnish aid  to  the  families of volunteers  from Alford in the United States military service."
    1863.    On the 19th of December a town meeting was held, and Ezra C. Ticknor was appointed " to be an agent to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town."    He enlisted two men, to each of whom was paid a bounty of one hundred and twenty- five dollars.
    1864.    April 7th, The town voted, w to pay one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer to the extent of its quota under the late call of the President for 200,000 men.    Under this vote, no volunteer was procured; but nine men were drafted, each of whom paid three hundred dollars commutation money." Another legal town meeting was held on the 2nd of July.    The 1861. selectmen were authorized " to borrow money sufficient to pay one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer, not to exceed ten," who would enlist and be credited to the quota of the town.  Under the above vote, the selectmen procured, by voluntary subscription, eleven hundred and twenty five dollars; and they procured three volunteers, paying two of them $550 each, and the other $500. The $1,125 with the $375 allowed by the town made $1,500, leaving the agent (H. W. Smith), who procured the men, $100 out of pocket, besides a liberal contribution towards the $1,125. The town, by a vote, refused to refund to its agent the $100 advanced by him, to save them from another draft. December 27th, The selectmen were authorized " to procure five volunteers, and pay to each a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars." "Five were procured, and received the bounty."
    Alford furnished thirty three men for the war, as reported by the selectmen in 1866. It must have furnished at least fifty five. At the end of the war, after having furnished its quota upon every call of the President, Alford had a surplus of four over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was five thousand three hundred and forty eight dollars ($5,348.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town to aid the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, 00;
in 1862, $669.47;
in 1863, $1,316.00;
in 1864, $646.68;
in 1865, $302.66.
Total amount in four years, $2,934.81.
    In regard to the work done by the ladies of Alford, we make the following quotation from a letter: well their sympathy in our struggle for national life; and many a poor wounded soldier blessed the unknown giver, as be shared in those comforts our ladies knew so well how to supply."

 
BECKET
 

    Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population in 1860, 1,578 ; in 1865, 1,393. Valuation in 1860, $431,652; in 1865, $478,120.
The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Stephen W. Carter, Milton Barnes, Almeron Edwards; in 1863 and 1864, Timothy F. Snow, Stephen W. Carter, James N. Cross; in 1865, Stephen W. Carter, Miner Chaffee, Nathan W. Harris.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was Mark P. Carter. The town treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Nathan W. Harris; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Mark P. Carter.
1861.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 7th of May; at which it was voted to appropriate two thousand dollars, for the benefit of volunteers who may enlist in the military service from Becket; and a committee, consisting of Wright Barnes, Miner Chaffee, and J. Norcott, was elected to have charge of the disbursement of the money.    On the 20th of June another town meeting was held, at which the treasurer was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be necessary to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, residing in Becket, as limited by law, and bounties to volunteers who may enlist from this town.
    1862.    A properly warned town meeting was held on the 26th of June, at which it was voted to authorize the town- treasurer to borrow money for the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families.    Another meeting was held on the 24th of July, at which the treasurer was directed to borrow three thousand dollars, " to make up the amount paid by subscription to twenty volunteers, for three years' service, who had enlisted and been credited to the quota of the town."    The town also voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist to the credit of the town.
    1863.    No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year, although bounties were continued to be paid, and also State aid to the families of volunteers.
    1864. On the 8th of July a town meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer for three years service, who should enlist and be credited to the town, " under the present call of the President, or under any future call he may make." On the 6th of December the selectmen were directed to procure as many volunteers " as they may deem necessary," and on the 27th the treasurer was authorized to borrow " whatever amount of money should be necessary to fill the contingent of the town." This policy appears to have been continued until the end of the war.
    The selectmen in 1866 report that the town, furnished one hundred and two men for the war; but as Becket furnished its full quota on every demand made by the President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of seven over and above all demands, it must have furnished at least one hundred and fifty men. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated by the town, and expended on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was sixteen thousand three hundred and eighty seven dollars ($16,387.00). This includes what was raised by private subscription, and allowed for commutation.
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war, for State aid to soldiers' families, and afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, $242.88 ;
in 1862, $2,297.84;
in 1863, 13,044.57;
in 1864, $2,721.34;
in 1865, $1,300.00.
Total amount in four years, $10,606.63.

 
CHESHIRE
 

Incorporated March 14, 1793. Population in 1860, 1,533; in 1865, 1,650. Valuation in 1860, $646,-771; in 1865, $675,997.
    The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were George W. Fisher, John Burt, Orin Martin.
The town clerk during the same years was E. F. Nickerson and the town treasurer during the same period was B. M. Cole.
    1861.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 18th of May; at which it was voted to authorize the selectmen to " borrow or raise money " sufficient to carry out the provisions of the recent act of the Legislature in relation to the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers.
    1862.    On the 28th of July a special meeting was held, to consider the best means to fill the quota of the town under the late call of the President for three hundred thousand volunteers for three years' service.    The selectmen were authorized to pay each volunteer who enlists and is credited to Cheshire a bounty of one hundred dollars.    September 10th, By vote of the town
the selectmen were directed .to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months' service, who enlist and are credited to the quota of the town.
    1863.    At the annual meeting held on the 2d of March, the town voted to place the whole matter of paying State aid to soldiers' families with the selectmen, who were to act according to their discretion; and on the 26th of September they were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to volunteers.
    1864.    On the 5th of April a town meeting was held, at which the selectmen were authorized to borrow money, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years' military service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; and at another meeting, held on the 16th of December, they were
directed to continue recruiting and the payment of bounties, " to fill the anticipated quota of the town " under another call of the President for volunteers;  and to borrow, not exceeding ten thousand dollars.
    By the return made by the selectmen in 1866, Cheshire claims to have furnished one hundred and fourteen men for the war. The real number furnished was doubtless about one hundred and fifty, as at the end of the war Cheshire had a surplus of sixteen, after having filled its quota upon every call made by the President for men. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifteen thousand seven hundred and fifteen dollars ($15,715.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, $260.40 ;
in 1862, $2,132.23;
in 1863, $3,314.03;
in 1864, $1,774.41;
in 1865, $1,000.   
Total amount in four years,   8,220.77.

The ladies of Cheshire " furnished a large amount of material for the soldiers, which was forwarded by them to the army."

 
CLARKSBURG
 

    Incorporated March 2, 1798. Population in 1860, 420; in 1865, 530. Valuation in 1860, $107,505 ; in 1865, $133,234.
The selectmen in 1861 were Dennis Thayer, James Mixer, Hiram Brown ; in 1862, Waterman Brown, John Page, Joseph Miner; in 1863, Waterman Brown, Joseph Miner, Hiram Brown; in 1864, Joseph D. Clark, Ezra W. Gleason, Joseph Miner, Jr.; in 1865, Richard Shattuck, Laban Clark, Henry Worthy.
    The town clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Waterman Brown; in 1864, William W. Gallup; in 1865, Charles W. Briggs. The town treasurer in 1861 was Joseph Clark; in 1862 and 1863, Joseph B. Wheeler; in 1864, Waterman Brown; in 1865, Eleazer Ketchum.
    1861.    No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year.
    1862.    The first meeting to act upon war matters was held on the 22nd of July; at which five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of five
men who would enlist in the military service for three years, to fill the quota of the town.    August  18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of fifty dollars to each volunteer who enlists for nine
months and is credited to the town; and to pay " to any man five dollars who procures a volunteer that is accepted."
    1863.    No action appears to  have been necessary by the town during this year to keep its quota filled.
    1864.    June 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years' military service, and be accepted and credited to the town. This bounty was continued to be paid until the end of the war.
    Clarksburg furnished forty two men for the war, which was a surplus of two over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid to soldiers' families, was six thousand three hundred and thirty three dollars and seventy three cents ($6,333.73).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for State aid to soldiers' families during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $153.48;
in 1862, $953.35;
in 1863, $1,361.48;
in 1864, $1,102.30;
in 1865, $400.00.
Total amount, $3,970.61.


 
DALTON
 

    Incorporated March 2, 1798. Population in 1860, 1,243 ; in 1865, 1,137. Valuation in 1860, $733,646 ; in 1865, $988,160.
The selectmen in 1861 were Charles O. Brown, Henry A. Hale, David Smith; in 1862, David C. Smith, Henry A. Hale, Henry A. Burton; in 1863 and 1864, David C. Smith, Henry A. Burton, William K. Cleveland; in 1865, David C. Smith, Austin S. Pease, Wells A. Laflin.
    The town clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Henry Ferre; in 1865, H. M. Parker. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Burr Chamberlain; in 1865, William H. Wharfield.
    Whatever was done by the citizens of Dalton during the years 1861 and 1862 in relation to the war was done without the action of the town in its corporate character, as there is no entry upon the town records during those years having relation to the war.
    1863.    At a regular legal town meeting held on the 9th of March, the town voted to raise one thousand dollars w towards paying part of the expense for volunteers."    It was also —
    Voted, That the town approve of the course pursued by our selectmen last year, in offering bounties for volunteers for the military service of the United States, so as to fill up the quotas of this town, as made out by our State authorities, and in answer to each of the calls made by the President for volunteers in July and August, 1862.
    Voted, That the town assume the responsibilities of the selectmen for the expenses incurred by them in borrowing money to pay the aforesaid bounties; provided, the bounties paid to each volunteer actually accepted and sworn into service does not exceed one hundred dollars.
    Voted, That the present board of selectmen be instructed to renew, with interest, the notes given by the past board of selectmen for such borrowed money, or otherwise take such action as will secure the desired result
    On the 30th of September another town meeting was held, at which the selectmen were authorized w to borrow such sums of money as may be necessary to be paid to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under an act to provide for the reimbursement of bounties paid to volunteers."
1864. A town meeting was held on the 5th of July, at which it was voted " to raise by tax and pay the sum of one hundred and twenty five dollars as a bounty to each volunteer who shall enlist from the town of Dalton for the term of three years, under the anticipated call of the President. It was also
    Resolved, That each citizen of Dalton, liable to do military duty under the late enrollment, who will subscribe and pay to the chairman of the selectmen the sum of forty dollars as a fund to procure volunteers or substitutes, shall, if drafted, be entitled to enough money to provide a substitute, in case a sufficient sum be raised for each man called for; otherwise, shall receive pro rata from the fund.
    Resolved, That the selectmen be a committee, with authority to appoint a sub-committee, who shall call on every citizen tax-payer, with a proper subscription paper pledging each subscriber to pay his proportion ; provided, three fifths of the taxable property of the town be represented by the subscribers, the proportion to be made from the assessors' valuation of a certain sum, not to exceed eight hundred dollars to each man called for, as part of the fund for procuring volunteers or substitutes to fill the quota of the town under the anticipated call of the President
    Another meeting was held on the 28th of July, when David C. Smith and Wells Laflin were appointed a committee " to go to Springfield, and try to get the names from the list."
The selectmen in their return in 1866 claim that Dalton furnished eighty one men for the war; but as the town filled its quota on every call of the President for men, and had a surplus of seven at the end of the war, over and above all demands, it probably furnished about one hundred and twenty five men, including those who paid commutation money. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was three thousand seven hundred and sixty two dollars and eighty one cents ($3,762.81). This does not include the money raised by subscription, of which there must have been at least ten thousand dollars.
The amount raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, 00;
in 1862, $416.60;
in 1863, $998.40;
in 1864, $1,018.81;
in 1865, $891.66.  
Total in four years, $3,325.47.


 
EGREMONT
 

    Incorporated Feb. 13, 1760. Population in 1860, 1,079; in 1865,928. Valuation in 1860, $452,030; in 1865, $587,619.
The selectmen in 1861 were Milo Talmadge, Edmund Crippen, Milan Brown; in 1862, Benjamin Baldwin, Calvin Benjamin, Samuel B. Goodale; in 1863, Samuel B. Goodale, George C. Benjamin, Seymour B. Dewey; in 1864 and 1865, Seymour B. Dewey, James H. Rowley, Joshua R. Layton, Jr.
    The town clerk and town treasurer during all of these years was Joseph A. Benjamin.
    1861. The first meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 30th of May; at which it was voted to instruct the treasurer to borrow one thousand dollars for aid and assistance to the families of the inhabitants of the town who had entered, or might afterwards enter, the military service of the United States to fight against the Rebellion.
    1862. July 21st, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three years, and be mustered into the military service, and be credited to the quota of Egremont. To which was added whatever bounty allowed by the Government. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay said bounty. Nine persons immediately enlisted. Another meeting was held on the 28th of August, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service, to fill the quota of the town. Seventeen men immediately stepped forward in the meeting, and signed the enlistment roll. An adjourned meeting was held on the 16th of September, when six more men signed the enlistment rolls. During these two meetings, many gifts and premiums were offered by citizens to encourage recruiting, such as watches, money, and other valuables, w for the next volunteer." October 13th, It was resolved, "that the town indemnify, and save harmless, the selectmen and town treasurer from all suits, actions, claims, costs, charges, and expenses arising, or which may arise, against each or all of them, by reason of any thing done by them in the discharge of their duties as officers of said town in aiding to subdue the Rebellion." This resolution was unanimously adopted, and eight more names were added to the enrolment-list.
    During the years 1864 and 1865, several meetings were held, to devise ways and means by which to recruit volunteers, pay bounties, and keep the quota of the town filled. The selectmen were given full power to recruit, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever money was required to pay bounties and State aid to the soldiers' families.
    Egremont reported in 1866 to have furnished ninety three men for the war; most probably about one hundred and thirty, as it had a surplus of six over and above all demands at the end of the war. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid to the families of volunteers, was twelve thousand two hundred and ninety four dollars ($12,294).
    The amount of money raised and expended by Egremont for State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of .the war, and which was reimbursed to the town by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $55.14;
in 1862, $648.56;
in 1863, $1,428;
in 1864, $1,192;
in 1865, $800.
Total, amount, $4,124.70.

 
FLORIDA
 

    Incorporated June 15, 1805. Population in 1860, 645 ; in 1865, 1,173.# Valuation in 1860, $119,316; in 1865, $152,523.
The selectmen in 1861 were S. A. Kemp, William White, E. W. Thatcher; in 1862, S. A. Kemp, E. W. Thatcher, E. M. Vincent; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, S. A. Kemp, Sylvanus Clark, H. W. Burnett.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was W. P. Brown. The town treasurer during the same period was Nathan White.
    1861.    No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, on matters relating to the war during this year.
    1862.    July 21st, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to the number of six who should enlist for three years, and be mustered in
and credited to the quota of the  town.  They  were   also authorized to borrow six hundred dollars  to pay the   same. October 13th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers for nine months' service.
    1863.    January 26th, The selectmen were directed to procure substitutes to complete the town's quota of nine month men.
    1864.    January 18th, The bounty to recruits for three years' service was fixed at one hundred and twenty five dollars; and the selectmen were directed to recruit volunteers to fill the quota of the town, and to borrow money for that purpose. They were also instructed " to open a recruiting office, and to advertise the same."
1865. March 6th, The selectmen were authorized to keep on recruiting, and to pay the same bounty, "to fill all quotas of the town on any future call of the President for volunteers."
We have been unable to ascertain the exact number of men which Florida furnished for the war, but probably it was about seventy five. We know, however, that at the end of the war the town had completed, in full, all demands made upon it for men, and had a surplus of five over and above these demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was four thousand nine hundred and eighty dollars ($4,980).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, $40 ;
in 1862, $402.60 ;
in 1863, $975 ;
in 1864, $600.27;
in 1865, $300.51.
Total amount, $2,328.38.


 
GREAT BARRINGTON
 

    Incorporated June 30,1761. Population in 1860, 3,871; in 1865, 3,920. Valuation in 1860, $1,843,798; in 1865, $2,177,071.
The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Walter W. Hollensbeck, Henry Foote, John Burgherst; in 1863, John M. Seeley, George Church, B. F. Gilmore; in 1864 and 1865, John M. Seeley, George Church, Charles J. Taylor.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war, and for many years previous thereto, was Isaac Seeley. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, was Egbert Hollister.
1861. On the 22d of April, three days after the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment had been attacked in Baltimore, and the first blood had been shed in the Rebellion, a call for a public meeting was issued, inviting the inhabitants of Great Barrington, and the adjoining towns, to attend a public meeting at the town hall, on the 24th, at 3 o'clock, P.M., for the purpose of adopting prompt measures to aid the Government of the United States in sustaining the Constitution, executing the laws, and suppressing the traitorous rebellion now existing in the Southern States." The meeting was largely attended by ladies and gentlemen of Great Barrington, w and by a few persons from the adjoining towns." Joseph Tucker  who soon afterwards went out first lieutenant in the Forty ninth Regiment Nine months Volunteers, and who lost a leg in the service, and is now Lieutenant Governor of the Commonwealth was chosen temporary chairman. The meeting was opened with prayer by Rev.. Horace Winslow. David Leavitt was made permanent chairman, and was assisted by several vice presidents and secretaries. Hon. Increase Sumner presented and read a preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously adopted. The preamble set forth the fact of the Rebellion, " one of the results of which has been the shedding of Massachusetts blood, thereby consecrating the 19th of April, 1861, with the immortal memories of April 19th, 1775." The first resolution sets forth: 1st, That the crisis demands the exertion of every American patriot to arrest the progress of treason and rebellion. 2nd, We pledge, w in the spirit of loyalty, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor, in maintaining the authority of the Government;" w that we go for upholding and sustaining the flag of our Union for ever, and will protect it against insults and indignities from foes without, and from traitors within." The third urges the organization of one or more military companies in Great Barrington, for active and immediate service, and that money be raised to aid the volunteers and their families.
The fourth we copy entire:

    Resolved, That, as citizens of this great American Confederacy, participating in the common history and glories of the American Revolution, oar chief desire is peace, the general welfare, and the blessings of liberty, in all the States, and among all the kindred and races within that Confederacy; and that harmony and good fellowship, without more bloodshed, may be speedily restored. But if it be otherwise ordered, and traitors and rebels persist in their deeds of treason and rebellion, then, trusting in the favor and strength of Almighty God, who sustained our FATHERS in their sufferings and battles for freedom, we will contribute all our might to conquer and punish the offenders.
A committee of thirteen was appointed, to carry out " promptly and energetically " the purpose of the third resolution. This committee presented, w forthwith," an enlistment paper; and several young men immediately signed it, " amidst great applause." A subscription paper was also drawn up, and presented; w and, in a few minutes, forty seven hundred dollars were subscribed, all of which, with the exception of thirty dollars, by citizens of Great Barrington."
    The first legal town meeting was held on the 8th of June, at which liberal measures were adopted to provide for the payment of State aid to the families of the volunteers, in accordance with the act of the Legislature passed at the late extra session; and the treasurer of the town was authorized to borrow two thousand dollars, " to serve as a fund for that purpose."
    1862.    A call having been made by the President for an additional three hundred thousand men July 4th, a legal town- meeting was held on the 19th of July; at which it was voted
"that it is our bounden duty, now, henceforth, and for ever, to give our obedient, ready, and earnest response to the call; and we do respond accordingly."    The selectmen were authorized to recruit volunteers, and to pay each a bounty of one hundred dollars who enlists for three years, and shall be mustered in and credited to the quota  of the town.     David  Leavitt,  Edwin
Hurlbert, and Mark Humphrey were chosen to assist the select men in recruiting; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow forty eight  hundred dollars, to meet the  expense.     Another
meeting was held on the 28th of August, at which it was voted to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months' service. The treasurer was again directed to borrow money.
    1863.    On the 22nd of August a town meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay State aid  to the families of men who may be drafted.     On the 8th of December, Dr. David
Campbell was appointed recruiting agent for the town, receiving a vote of thanks  for  his former services, and  "for the fidelity and patriotism he has exhibited, ever since the commencement of the war, in procuring volunteers for the  service."
    1864. On the 18th of June a town meeting was held, at which it was voted to fix the bounty to each volunteer, for three years' service, at one hundred and twenty five dollars. Several other meetings were held during the year, to encourage enlistment's, at which nothing of especial interest was done.
    Great Barrington was reported by the selectmen in 1866 as having furnished four hundred and thirty men for the war, which is about the number the town furnished, and which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands made upon it during the war. Seventeen were commissioned officers. The total amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty five thousand six hundred and ninety one dollars and eighty two cents ($25,691.82).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $651.48;
in 1862, $3,854.97;
in 1863, $6,422.58;
in 1864, $5,371.26;
in 1865, $3,200.
Total amount in four years, $19,500.29.

The ladies of Great Barrington formed a Soldiers' Aid Society on the 2d of May, 1861, which met once a week, to do soldiers' work, until the close of the war. We have not been able to procure a detailed account of their labors, but this fact may be taken as an illustration of their entire course. Immediately after the battle of the Wilderness, in May, 1864, they raised twenty two hundred and eighty two dollars for the benefit of the sick and wounded.

 
HANCOCK.
 

    Incorporated July 2, 1776. Population in 1860, 816 ; in 1865, 967. Valuation in 1860, $494,484; in 1865, $490,299.
The selectmen in 1861 were Gardner Eldridge, H. H. Whitman, C. P. Lapham; in 1862, H. H. Whitman, D. H. Gardner, J. C. Gorton; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, H. H. Whitman, R. L. Mason, James R. Whitman.
The town clerk during all the years of the war was Charles B. Wells. The town treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Thomas E. Hadsell; in 1864, M. L. White; in 1865, Silas G. Danley.
1862.    The first legal town meeting,   to  consider  matters relating to the war, was held on the 25th of July; at which, on motion of Calvin P. Lapham, seconded by Rufus L. Mason, it was
Resolved, That the selectmen be authorized to borrow, on the credit of the town, nine hundred dollars, to pay nine volunteer soldiers one hundred dollars each, as a bounty; that being the number of volunteers called for by the State authorities.
This bounty was to be paid when the men were mustered in and credited. The town also authorized the selectmen to draw from the treasury money to pay State aid to the soldiers' families, as provided by law. September 3d, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service, and to borrow money for that purpose.
1863.    March 2nd, The acts of the selectmen, in borrowing money to pay aid to the soldiers families, were approved.
1864.    August 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer for three years' military service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the
town ; and the same amount " to any person who shall, before a draft takes place, procure a substitute, and who shall be credited to the town."    The selectmen were also authorized to employ an agent to  recruit volunteers.    This system was continued until the end of the war.
    Hancock furnished seventy men for the war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was nine thousand four hundred and fifty five dollars ($9,455).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, 00;
in 1862, $244;
in 1863, $327.79;
in 1864, $293:57;
in 1865, $275.
Total amount, $1,140.41.

    The ladies of Hancock were busy during the whole of the war " in devising means, and sending to the soldiers articles for their comfort, in the field, hospital, or wherever they could be found."

 
HINSDALE.
 

    Incorporated June 21, 1804. Population in 1860, 1,511; in 1865, 1,517. Valuation in 1860, $557,661; in 1865, $801,775.
The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were William H. Carson, Clark Prince, Ezra B. Tracy; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, William H. Carson, Lysander M. Francis, Ezra B. Tracy.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was John Cady; the town treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Henry A. Deming; in 1865, Ameroy E. Taylor.
    1861.    We regret that the returns we have received from Hinsdale are not so full and complete as we wish they might have been.   We find, however, that the first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 10th of May, at which the town appropriated two thousand dollars, to be used by the selectmen as might be required by the Government of the United States, for war purposes."
    1862.    A legal town meeting was held on the 9th of October, at which  four  thousand  one hundred and fifty dollars were appropriated for the payment of bounties to volunteers, " the selectmen having expended that amount in furnishing men, in obedience to the call of the President of the United States."
    1863.    At a town meeting held on the 6th of April, thirteen hundred  dollars were  appropriated  " for the payment of expenses of recruiting volunteers."
    1864.    On the 4th of April the town voted one thousand two hundred and eighty five dollars for the same purpose.
    1865.    April 29th, Four thousand two hundred and eighty- nine dollars and three cents were appropriated to reimburse citizens " who had subscribed and paid money for raising volunteers."
The selectmen in 1866 reported that Hinsdale had furnished eighty five men for the war, and the town clerk in 1870 reports that Hinsdale furnished but seventy three men, when the fact is, that Hinsdale furnished at least one hundred and fifty men; for it furnished its full quota on every call of the President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of fifteen over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was nineteen thousand and ninety nine dollars and eighty two cents ($19,099.82).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of enlisted men, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $103.14;
in 1862, $860.64;
in 1863, $1,682 ;
in 1864, $2,000;
in 1865, $1,400.
Total amount in four years, $6,045.78.

The ladies of Hinsdale contributed in garments and money for the soldiers, independent of their own labor, to the value of three hundred and fifty dollars.

 
LANESBOROUGH
 

    Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population in 1860, 1,308; in 1865, 1,292. Valuation in 1860, $641,549; in 1865, $661,048.
The selectmen in 1861 were Stephen T. Whipple, William A. Talcott, Ezra H. Sherman; in 1862 and 1863, Stephen T. Whipple, Ezra H. Sherman, Luther H. Washburn; in 1864, Stephen T. Whipple, Jared D. Northale, William H. Meade.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was William A. Fuller. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Jedediah W. Newton; in 1864, William A. Fuller; in 1865, Charles B. Whitney.
    1861. The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 10th of December; at which the selectmen were authorized to expend such sums from the treasury as they may deem necessary for the relief of the families of volunteers, who are in the military service, and belong to Lanesborough, as the law in relation thereto provides.
    1862.    August 28, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist in the military service, either for three years or for nine months, and be credited to the quota of the town.
    1863.    No meeting of the town, in its corporate capacity, appears to have been held during this year, at which votes were passed having relation to the war.
    1864.    April 11th, The town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer who would enlist in the military service of the country for three years, and be credited to the     quota of Lanesborough; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever sums of money were necessary to pay the same.    This was continued until the end of the war.
The selectmen, in 1866, reported that Lanesborough furnished one hundred and thirty men for the war, which was about its proportion, and which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of that raised for State aid, was twelve thousand nine hundred and forty seven dollars and ninety one cents ($12,947.91). A considerable amount was also raised by private means, which is not included in the foregoing.
The money raised and appropriated by the town for State aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of the war, and afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, $50.40;
in 1862, $629.08 ;
in 1863, $1,292.00;
in 1864, $1,104.00;
in 1865, $780.17.   
Total amount, $3,856.45.

 
LEE
 

    Incorporated Oct. 21, 1777. Population in 1860, 4,420; in 1865, 4,034. Valuation in 1860, $1,731,778; in 1865, $1,682,411.
The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were William G. Merrill, Edwin Morgan, Sylvester S. May ; in 1863, Sylvester S. May, John Stall man, George R. Sturges; in 1864, Sylvester S. May, William G. Merrill, James Bullard; in 1865, James Bullard, William G. Merrill, Alonzo Bradley.
    The town clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Thomas A. Omar; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Jonathan F. Cook. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Otis S. Lyman; in 1864 and 1865, Joseph C. Chaffee.
1861.    The first legal town meeting, to consider war matters, was held May 4th, which was opened with prayer by Rev. Nahum  Gale, D.D.    Voted, that a military company of at
least sixty four men be enrolled " to hold themselves in readiness for a call into active service."    On  motion of Marshall Wilcox, Esq., it was
Resolved, That the inhabitants of Lee deem it important that the Government of the United States should have the hearty and earnest encouragement and active assistance of every loyal citizen in suppressing the treasonable rebellion which aims at the overthrow of our laws and the Constitution of the land; and that as citizens of Lee, actuated by a love of our country and of universal liberty, we are ready to share in the common effort of sustaining our Government; and, as a town, we assure those of our citizens who shall enter into the service of the Government as volunteer soldiers, that their families dependent upon them shall be well and honorably provided for and sustained during their entire absence.
    The resolution was unanimously adopted, and the selectmen were authorized to borrow three thousand dollars. Isaac C. Ives, William Taylor, Harrison Garfield, and John Branning were joined with the selectmen in the expenditure of the money. The selectmen were also authorized to procure a suitable room for drilling purposes.
    1862.    April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money for the payment of aid to the families of volunteers. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years' service who has enlisted, or who may enlist, to the number of thirty seven,  said bounty to be paid when properly mustered in and credited; and the select men were authorized to borrow thirty seven hundred dollars to pay the same.    August 28th, It was voted to pay the same amount of bounty to volunteers for nine months' service, to be paid by notes running for nine months with interest; but if any volunteer "thus raised be dishonorably discharged, said note to be void." October 11th, It having been found that the notes thus given could not be negotiated, and were therefore unsuited for the purpose, the town voted to pay the bounty in money.
    1863. July 25th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of drafted men. September 26th, Voted, to raise seven thousand two hundred and forty seven dollars and fifty two cents to settle bounty money, as provided in section 9th of chapter 218 of the Acts of 1863.
    1864. April 9th, The bounty for volunteers for three years' service was fixed at one hundred and twenty five dollars, which was the amount paid to each until the end of the war. Several meetings were held during the year to appropriate money for State aid and recruiting purposes, and power was given to the selectmen to recruit men, borrow money, and pay bounties.
    The town of Lee, according to the return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished two hundred and ninety five men for the war; but as the town furnished its full quota of men upon every call of the President, and had a surplus of fifteen at the end of the war, over and above all demands, it is clear that the number furnished must have been at least four hundred, including those who paid commutation money. Fifteen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty one thousand six hundred and fifty four dollars and fifty six cents ($21,654.56). This is exclusive of the money contributed by citizens to encourage recruiting, which was quite large in amount.
    The sum raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $1,367.71;
in 1862, $4,905.59;
in 1863, $6,253.61;
in 1864, $5,149.55;
in 1865, $3,100.00.
Total amount in four years, $20,776.46.
    In regard to the work done by the ladies of Lee, William J. Bartlett, Esq., writes, "that $1,005.17 in cash was sent to the Christian Commission during 1863 and 1864, of which the ladies of Lee contributed $470.10; they also sent four boxes of comfortable things to the soldiers, valued at $175." A lady informs us that, "besides the four boxes sent by the ladies of Lee to the Christian Commission, several other boxes, far more valuable, were sent by them to the hospitals, of which no record has been preserved. I remember one worth one hundred dollars, sent to Miss Dix at Washington. As to the value and destination of the other boxes, or their number, I cannot speak definitely."

 
LENOX
 

    Incorporated Feb. 26, 1767. Population in 1860, 1,711; in 1865, 1,667. Valuation in 1860, $821,416 ; in 1865, $827,539.
The selectmen in 1861 were Phineas Cone, Luther Sears, Luther S. Butler; in 1862, Henry W. Taft, Luther S. Butler, William Deming, Jr.; in 1863, William Deming, Jr., Luther S. Butler, Chauncey E. Dewey; in 1864, William Deming, Jr., Phineas Cone, Chauncey E. Dewey; in 1865, Albert G. Belden, Chauncey E. Dewey, Luther S. Butler.
    The town clerk in 1861 and 1862 was William S. Tucker; in 1863, Willis C. Cook; in 1864 and 1865, David E. Bangs. The town treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was George J. Tucker; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Josiah C. Arnold.
    1861. The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May; at which the following preamble and resolutions were read, and unanimously adopted:
Whereas, The rebellion, which has been for many months in progress in the Southern portion of the country, has, through the forbearance of the Government, and in the hope of a peaceful solution of existing difficulties, been allowed to assume formidable and dangerous proportions, and its leaders, aiming at nothing less than the subversion of the Government, have inaugurated an offensive war; And whereat, it is the duty of all citizens in this time of peril to stand together for the support of the CONSTITUTION and the UNION, and to be ready for any sacrifice and any duty which the defence and preservation of our free institutions may require; And whereas, the citizens of the town of Lenox, in the preparation for and conflict of the AMERICAN REVOLUTION, manifested a zeal and devotion worthy of emulation by their sons and successors, therefore
    Resolved, That the sum of one thousand dollars be, and it hereby is, appropriated for the purpose of disciplining the militia of the town, furnishing them with arms and equipment's, and for the aid and equipment of such inhabitants of the town as shall engage in actual service in the militia of the Commonwealth, or of the United States.
    Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed, who shall be authorized to expend a sum of one thousand dollars, or any part thereof as they shall deem advisable; and that they be authorized to expend thereof a sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, in furnishing arms, equipment's, and military instruction to the militia of the town, under such rules and regulations as they may prescribe.
    Resolved, That the town will pay to any inhabitant thereof, being a non-commissioned officer or private, who shall voluntarily engage in the service of the United States, the sum of five dollars per month in addition to the pay allowed by the Government, upon the production of a certificate from the aforesaid committee that he is an inhabitant, and of his said service, payable at such time as the committee shall deem proper.
    It was then voted that Henry W. Taft, Albert Langdon, William Deming, Jr., William D. Sedgwick, and Luther S. Butler " be the aforesaid committee." An adjourned meeting was held on the 13th of May, at which the first resolution was amended by inserting $2,000 instead of $1,000."
    1862.    At a legal meeting held on the 3d of March, five hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers.   On the 22d of July the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of eighteen men who would volunteer for three years in the military service to fill the quota of the town, the bounty to be paid when mustered in and credited; and Albert Langdon, James H. Collins, David £. Bangs, and Chauncey Sears were appointed to assist the selectmen in recruiting the volunteers.    At a meeting held on the 25th of August, it was voted to pay the same amount of bounty to volunteers enlisting to fill the quota of the town on the call for nine months men.    The selectmen were authorized to borrow, not exceeding thirty five hundred dollars, for the payment of bounties and for State aid.
    1863.    On "the first Monday in April" the town appropriated fifteen hundred dollars for State aid to soldiers' families.
On the 5th of October, several of the citizens having been drafted, and each having paid three hundred dollars commutation money, the town voted " that it is right and just that this burden should be equally and ratably divided among the inhabitants of the town, and not be permitted to fall upon a few individuals, some of whom are ill able to bear it." It was then voted that three hundred dollars be paid to each of the drafted men who had paid commutation to that amount.
    1864.    On the 11th of April twelve hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid.    On the 31st of May the selectmen were authorized to borrow money, and to  pay to each person who furnishes a substitute, and has him credited to the quota of Lenox, the sum of one hundred and twenty five dollars.    June 16th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to reimburse citizens for money contributed by them to encourage enlistment's to fill the quotas of the town under the last two calls of the President for men.    December 17th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow three thousand dollars to pay bounties.
    1865.    Two meetings were held April 3d and 15th, at which thirty eight hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families.    June 20th, The selectmen were authorized to raise money, and pay each citizen the money which he had contributed to pay bounties and encourage recruiting during the war.
    The selectmen in 1866 reported that Lenox furnished one hundred and sixty men for the war, which, exclusive of those who paid commutation, is about the correct number. Lenox at the end of the war had a surplus of sixteen, over and above all demands. Seven were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand six hundred and forty two dollars and fifty seven cents ($14,642.57).
    The amount raised and expended during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, 00;
in 1862, $982.89 ;
in 1863, $2,516.55 ;
in 1864,$2,936.71;
in 1865, $2,200.00.   
Total amount in four years, $8,636.15.

" The ladies of Lenox organized a Soldiers' Aid Society in
1861,    and were constantly sending on boxes of clothing and
other articles until the close of the war."

 
MONTEREY
 

    Incorporated April 12, 1847. Population in 1860, 758; in 1865, 737. Valuation in 1860, $306,184; in 1865, $292,117.
The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Newton Brewer, Merrick D. Mansir, Daniel A. Garfield; in 1863, Lemuel J. Townsend, Reuben R. Brewer, Orin H. Munson; in 1864, Albert Rewey, Orin H. Munson, Amos E. Langdon; in 1865, Orin H. Munson, Norman S. Sears, Virgil S. Abbott.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was A. J. Fargo.    The town treasurer in 1861 was W. C. Langdon; in
1862,    1863, 1864, and 1865, John G. Mansir.
    1861.    No action appears to have been taken by the town concerning the war during this year.
    1862.    The first legal town meeting, to  consider  matters relating to the war, was held on the 31st of July; at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and ten dollars to each volunteer to the number of ten, who would enlist for three years and be credited to fill the quota of the town.    They were to recruit the men "in such manner as they might select," and to pledge the credit of the town for the amount of money they might require.    Mr. John D. Bidwell paid of his own means a gratuity of ten dollars to each of the ten men who subsequently enlisted.    October 21st, The town ratified the action taken by the selectmen in filling the quota of the town, under the call for volunteers for nine months;  they having paid to each volunteer who enlisted for that term of service, and was credited to Monterey, a bounty of one hundred dollars.    It was also voted to pay that amount of bounty to any one who should thereafter enlist to the credit of the town, either for three years or nine months, and an additional sum of five dollars w to any persons who will now enlist to fill a supposed deficiency of four."
    1862 March 2d, The selectmen were directed to continue the  payment  of State aid to the families of volunteers, as heretofore.    November 3d, The payment of State aid to the
families of such volunteers as had died in the service of their country was directed to be continued the same as hitherto ; also to the families of drafted men.
    1863.    June 14th, Twenty five hundred dollars were appropriated for recruiting purposes to fill the quota of the town ; and the selectmen were authorized to employ, if necessary, agents to aid them in their work.    They were also authorized to pay two hundred and fifty dollars to each person who would procure a substitute, said amount to be paid when the substitute was mustered in and credited to the town.    Five persons availed themselves of this offer.
    Monterey was reported in 1866 as having furnished fifty eight men for the war, which is less than the actual number. It had a surplus of eight at the end of the war, over and above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was three thousand eight hundred and forty eight dollars and forty four cents ($3,848.44).
    The amount raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of volunteers, and which was subsequently refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, $35.19 ;
in 1862, $377.13 ;
in 1863, $1,079.00;
in 1864, $988.33;
in 1865, $550.00.
Total amount, $3,030.65.

    Of the ladies of Monterey, the town clerk says, w All through the war they prepared clothing and other necessary articles for the soldiers."

 
MOUNT WASHINGTON
 

    Incorporated June 21,1779. Population in 1860, 221; in 1865, 233. Valuation in 1860, $79,294; in 1865, $87,676.
The selectmen in 1861 were D. P. Turner, Isaac Spurr, Milo Smith; in 1862, Orrin C. Whitlock, Gilbert Race, Cyrus Lampson ; in 1863, Robert Campbell, Samuel Slater, D. P. Turner;
in 1864, D. P. Turner, Isaac Spurr, Samuel Slater, Jr.; in 1865, Orrin C. Whitlock, Isaac Spurr, Samuel Slater.
    The town clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1864, was Ira Shutt; in 1863 H. S. Goodale; in 1865, Samuel Slater, Jr. The town treasurer in 1861  and 1862 was Milo Smith; in 1863 and 1864    Ira Shutt.
    1861.    No legal town meeting appears to have been held, to act upon matters relating to the war, during this year.
    1862.    At  a regular town meeting, held on the 30th of August, it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer who should enlist in the military service of the United States and be credited to fill the quota of Mount Washington.
    1863.    The only action by the town, in its corporate capacity, which had reference to the war during this year, was at a town meeting held on the 9th of August; at which the selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever money might be necessary to pay during the year State aid to the families of soldiers.
    1864.    On the 4th of April the selectmen were authorized to borrow money for aid to the soldiers9 families.   August 25th, The selectmen were authorized to pay to each volunteer, who should enlist for three years' service, and be credited to the town, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars; and they were directed " to enlist troops for this purpose.'
    1865.    April 3d, Voted, to raise money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers during the year.
Mount Washington furnished twenty men for the war, which was in exact fulfilment of all demands made upon it. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five dollars ($1,885.00).
The amount of money raised by the town for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, 00;
in 1862, $236.95;
in 1863, $245.00;
in 1864, $609.00;
in 1865, $150.66.
Total amount, $1,241.61.

 
NEW ASHFORD
 

    Incorporated Feb. 26, 1781. Population in 1860, 239 ; in 1865, 178. Valuation in 1860, $112,993 ; in 1865, $108,662.
The selectmen in 1861 were Elihu Ingraham, Jr., Alfred Jordon, Jotham Beach; in 1862 and 1863, Elihu Ingraham, Jr., William B. Dewey, Van Ness Mallory; in 1864, Elihu Ingraham, Jr., Van Ness Mallory, Quincy A. Roys; in 1865, Elihu Ingraham, Jr., Hosea Beach, Phinehas Harmon.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was Phinehas Harmon; the town treasurer for the same period, Hosea Beach.
    1861.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters in relation to the war, was held on the 5th of November; at which it was voted * to pay the family of Charles Goodell fifty dollars, he having volunteered in the military service of the United States."
    1862.    August 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of seventy five dollars to each volunteer "who has already enlisted" in the military service, and been credited to the quota of the town.
    1863.    At a meeting held on the 2d of March it was voted to pay to each volunteer, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred dollars.    On the 6th of August this bounty was increased twenty five dollars.
    1864.    February 18th, The bounty to each volunteer who should enlist and be credited to the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war.    The money to pay which was to be raised by taxation.
    New Ashford furnished twenty three men for the war, which was a surplus of one over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of that paid for State aid to soldiers' families, was one thousand three hundred and eighty five dollars ($1,385.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $52.00;
in 1862, $76.00;
in 1863, $144.00;
in 1864, $68.40;
in 1865, 00.  
Total amount, $340.40.

 
NEW MARLBOROUGH
 

    Incorporated June 15, 1759. Population in 1860, 1,782; in 1865,1,649. Valuation in 1860, $616,976; in 1865, $616,727.
The selectmen in 1861 were Harry Rhodes, Martin E. Sheldon, James Andrew; in 1862, Martin E. Sheldon, J. Andrew, Grove Gaylord; in 1863, J. Andrew, Aaron Smith, Warren Walker; in 1864, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, Henry Sisson; in 1865, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, William C. Kasson.
    The town clerk in 1861 was Salmon K. Norton; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Seth Pease. The town treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Dyer Stanard; in 1863, Theron Warner; in 1864 and 1865, Benjamin Wheeler, Jr.
    1861.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the  2d of December, with special reference to the act of the extra session of the Legislature respecting the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers; at which, after proper  consideration, it was voted that the selectmen be instructed to provide every volunteer's family, belonging to the town, with all the aid named in the
act referred to; also that they have authority to borrow whatever money they may require for that purpose.
1862.    A special town meeting was held on the 23d of July, to take action in regard to furnishing the quota of men required of the town in the recent call of the President for three hundred thousand volunteers, for three years' military service; at which it was voted that the selectmen be authorized to direct the town treasurer to borrow a sum of money sufficient to pay to each volunteer the sum of one  hundred  and  twenty five dollars, to be paid when such volunteer has been accepted and sworn into the service; provided the number does not exceed the quota of the town.    To this amount, George Stevens, Esq., a citizen of the town, added, from his own means and of his own accord, the sum of five dollars to each of the bounties.   Another meeting was held on the 29th of August, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who shall volunteer for nine months' service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; and to authorize the treasurer to borrow money sufficient to pay the same.
    1863.    A meeting was held on the 22nd of September, at which the following vote was passed :
Voted, To raise the sum of two thousand seven hundred and thirty five dollars and ninety cents, as the proportion of the town of New Maryborough, for reimbursing the Commonwealth for bounty money, assumed by said Commonwealth; and appropriate the same for the payment of said proportion, in accordance with section 9, chapter 218, of the Acts of the Legislature of 1863.
    1864.    At the town meeting held April 4th, five thousand seven hundred and  fifty  dollars were  appropriated " to pay bounties to volunteers who have enlisted, or may enlist," to fill
the quota of the town, said bounty to be paid when the volunteer is mustered in and credited; and " to reimburse those who have  paid  money  on  subscription  for  the  above   purpose."
Another meeting was held on the 4th of June, at which the town voted to instruct the selectmen to enlist thirty men, " in anticipation of a future call of the President of the United States for more men for the military service; " and the town treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. On the  5th of December, Grove Gaylord and Warren Walker were chosen a committee " to procure men enough for the military service to clear the town from draft, in anticipation of a future call from the President."  The treasurer was authorized to borrow money.
    1865.    At a town meeting held on the 6th of March, it was voted to "raise twenty seven hundred dollars, to be paid to those who have paid, or help to pay, commutation money; and that said money be paid by the treasurer of the town to said persons, on the 1st of January, 1866."
    New Marlborough furnished, according to the returns made by the town clerk in 1870, one hundred and fifty nine men for the war, which, including the men who paid commutation, is about its exact proportion; but which does not include twenty four men who enlisted in Connecticut regiments, and for which the town received no credit. New Marlborough filled all of its quotas, and at the end of the war had a surplus of twenty two over and above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty five thousand seven hundred and seventy eight dollars and fifty two cents ($25,778.52).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for aid to soldiers' families, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $61.20;
in 1862, $1,050.53;
in 1863, $2,527.52;
in 1864, $1,757.20;
in 1865, $1,500.00.
Total in four years, $6,896.45.

 
OTIS
 

    Incorporated June 13,1810. Population in 1860, 998 ; in 1865, 962. Valuation in 1860, $256,822 ; in 1865, $311,595.
The selectmen in 1861 were Elam P. Norton, Samuel A. Jones, Pardon Perry; in 1862, Samuel A. Jones, Nathaniel J. Kenyon, Pardon Perry; in 1863, Alanson Crittenden, Marcus Phelps, Lorenzo Webb; in 1864, Alanson Crittenden, Isaac J. Norton, Amos D. Cotton; in 1865, Elam P. Norton, Samuel Hamilton, John Hunter.
    The town clerk and town treasurer during all the years of the war was Joseph L. Waters.
    1861.    May 11th, The town voted to pay each soldier seven dollars a month while in the service,  and State  aid to each family ; provided " the Legislature does not make the pay of the soldiers as good as the foregoing."
    1862.    March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who
shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. August 26th, The selectmen were authorized to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months' service.
    1863.    April 6th, Voted, to raise by tax fifteen hundred dollars for State aid to soldiers' families. November 3d, The selectmen were instructed to use whatever money may be received from the State, as the proportion of Otis of bounty money paid to volunteers, "to cancel the indebtedness of the town for the same, and for no other purpose."
    1864.    March 7th, The selectmen were directed to pay "the same bounty to colored men enlisting to the credit of the town, as we pay to white men." May 9th,  The bounty for three- years  volunteers was fixed  at  one hundred  and twenty five dollars.  The selectmen were authorized to  borrow two thousand dollars for recruiting purposes, " and to refund to the ten drafted men who entered  the service or  paid  commutation money, each, the sum of one hundred dollars." June 24th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow three thousand dollars for recruiting purposes. August 31st, Voted, w that the agents of the town for recruiting be directed to pay four tenths of the cost of a substitute to any enrolled militia-man of said town who will put a substitute into  the army, said substitute  to answer on the present quota of the town; said payments not to exceed four hundred dollars for a three years man, three hundred for a two years man, and one hundred for a one year man."  Fifteen hundred dollars  were  appropriated for this purpose. December 1st,   The treasurer was   instructed   to borrow two thousand dollars for recruiting purposes, provided the men subject to draft raise five hundred dollars.
    1865.    March 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever money was necessary to pay State aid to the soldiers' families.
Otis furnished one hundred and thirteen men for the war, which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirteen thousand seven hundred and forty one dollars and seventy four cents ($13,741.74).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, 00;
in 1862, $700.73;
in 1863, $1,590.00;
in 1864, $2,073.40;
in 1865, $1,030.80.   
Total amount, $5,394.93.

 
PERU
 

    Incorporated July 4, 1774. Population in 1860, 499; in 1865, 494. Valuation in 1860, $218,200; in 1865, $214,930.
The selectmen in 1861 were Turner Joy, Dwight Rockwell, B. J. Geer; in 1862, B. J. Geer, E. W. Pierce, J. M. Stowell; in 1863, E. W. Pierce, J. M. Stowell, S. Shamway; in 1864, E. W. Pierce, S. Shamway, James Barnes; in 1865, E. W. Pierce, J. M. Stowell, J. S. Barnes.
    The town clerk during the years 1861, 1862, and 1863, was S. B. Fench; in 1864 and 1865, S. S. Bowen. The town treasurer during all the years of the war was Ebenezer Haskell.
    1861.    The first legal  town meeting, to  consider  matters relating to the war, was held May 13th; at which it was voted that " the treasurer borrow five hundred dollars to be appropriated to the benefit of volunteers in our country's service, and their families, if needy; that each volunteer shall receive eight dollars a month aid, or such sum as the district convention may
agree upon.    All of said appropriations are to be subjected to a committee of three."
    1862.    July 19th, Voted, "that the treasurer borrow the sum of five hundred dollars to pay bounties offered to the four volunteers, as far as it will go."    September 17th, Voted, "to pay all the nine months volunteers that have been, and that hereafter may be, secured for our present quota, one hundred and twenty five dollars each."    Voted, "that  each of the  above  named volunteers shall receive twenty five dollars in hand as Boon as sworn into service, and that Mr. Edwards  shall receive one hundred and twenty five dollars at that time."
    1863.    September 21st, Voted, "to adopt the measures contained in section 9, chapter 218, of the Acts of 1863, and raise money as there provided."
    1864. March 22d, Voted, "that the selectmen be instructed to procure as many volunteers as may be thought necessary to fill our quota, by appropriating for each what money the law allows ; and the sum that may be expended beyond the one hundred and twenty five dollars, or the limit of the law, be, and is hereby voted, and the selectmen be instructed to assess on the polls and estates of the inhabitants of Peru said sum." The selectmen were authorized to use the credit of the town to pay bounties. August 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer " to fill the present call." The treasurer was authorized to borrow six hundred and twenty five dollars. One man in each school district was chosen to canvass the town for recruits. December 5th, The selectmen were directed to raise as many recruits as possible in anticipation of other calls, "without limiting the amount of bounty paid."
    Peru furnished forty four men for the war, which was a surplus of three over and above all demands. None of them were commissioned officers. The whole amount appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State aid, was three thousand three hundred and sixty dollars ($3,360.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, is as follows:
In 1861, $72.83;
in 1862, $311.03;
in 1863, $319.50;
in 1864, $240.00;
in 1865, $225.00.   
Total amount, $1,168.36.

 
PITTSFIELD
 

    Incorporated April 21, 1761. Population in 1860, 8,045 ; in 1865, 9,679. Valuation in 1860, $5,059,907 ; in 1865, $6,378,878.

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were John C. West, Henry Colt, and Chauncey Goodrich.
    The town clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was James Warriner; in 1865, James M. Barker. The town treasurer during all of these years was Josiah Carter.
    1861. A large meeting of the citizens of Pittsfield was held on the 18th of April; at which a committee was appointed to aid the volunteers of the Pittsfield company, which had been ordered to join the Eighth Regiment at Springfield and proceed to Washington for a service of three months; and to make suitable provision for the comfort of their families during their absence. At a legal town meeting, held on the 22d of May, the action of the citizens' committee was approved; and the committee were authorized to continue in the performance of their duties.
    1862.    March 3d, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of volunteers according to the statutes of the Commonwealth, and two thousand dollars were appropriated for that  purpose.    August 2d,  The selectmen  were  directed  to recruit men to fill the quota of the town, and to t ^+ bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to Pittsfield.    The following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, That the forces of the United States should be adequate to suppress domestic insurrection and to repel foreign invasion; and that, in order to maintain the authority of this Government and the integrity of the Union, the militia of the United States ought at once to be placed upon a war footing, so that a million of soldiers, if necessary, in addition to the     Federal armies now in the field, may be in readiness to respond immediately to any draft which may be made by the Government of the United States. August 25th, The bounty to each volunteer was raised to one hundred and fifty dollars. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money.
    1863.    No action appears to have been taken by the town in regard to bounties during this year. The selectmen continued to recruit men as before.
    1864.    March 7th, A vote of thanks was passed to the gentlemen who had made a record of, the volunteers belonging to Pittsfield and compensation was  allowed "to  the  recruiting officers."    June 27th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same.    December 7th, The bounty was increased to one hundred and fifty dollars, and so remained until the end of the war.
Pittsfield furnished twelve hundred and one men for the war, which was a surplus of eighty two over and above all demands. Fifty eight were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and twenty thousand and ten dollars and seventy two cents ($120,010.72).
    The amount of money raised and expended for State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed to the town by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $976.12;
in 1862, $5,161.34;
in 1863, $8,162.00;
in 1864, $1,200.00;
in 1865, $10,781.53.
Total amount, $36,980.99.


 
RICHMOND
 

    Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population in I860, 914; in 1865, 913. Valuation in 1860, $489,346; in 1865, $502,277.
The selectmen in 1861 were Martin Slosson, H. B. Stevens, John Fairfield; in 1862, Martin Slosson, Alanson E. Gaston, John Fairfield; in 1863, Lewis C. Sherrill, Alanson E. Gaston, E. S. Rowley; in 1864 and 1865, E. S. Rowley, John Fair-field, George Cook.
    The town clerk in 1861 and 1862 was E. Williams; in 1863 and 1864, John Sherrill, 2d; in 1865, H. B. Stevens. The town treasurer in 1861 was E. Williams; in 1862, John A. Sharp; in 1863, Rufus L. Hall; in 1864, John Sherrill, 2d; in 1865, H. B. Stevens.
    We have been unable to obtain a full and consecutive abstract of the votes passed at the various town meetings, in relation to the war during the four years of its existence. Several were held each year, at which money was appropriated for the payment of bounties to volunteers, and State aid to their families.
    In 1866 the selectmen made a return, in which they stated that the number of men furnished by Richmond for the war was seventy two, which was probably the number of enlisted men who were inhabitants of the town, and did not include those who were enlisted in other places, or who paid commutation money, and were credited to Richmond ; for the town must have furnished at least ninety five men, as it filled its quota upon every call made by the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of five over and above all demands. Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was seven thousand six hundred and ninety dollars ($7,690.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of volunteers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, 00;
in 1862, $231.15;
in 1863, $594.19;
in 1864, $624.50;
in 1865, $300.00.
Total amount in four years, $1,749.84.

"The ladies of Richmond sent several boxes of clothing, books, dried fruits, sweetmeats, and other necessaries and comforts, to the soldiers in the field and hospitals, at different times during the war."

 
SANDISFIELD
 

    Incorporated March 6, 1762. Population in 1860, 1,589; in 1865, 1,411. Valuation in I860, $544,922 ; in 1865, $612,943.

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Lucian Hotchkiss, Edward C. Wolcott, Milton Abbey; in 1863, Lucian Hotchkiss, Edward Phelps, Joshua M. Sears; in 1864 and 1865, Samuel C. Parsons, Orlow Wolcott, Edward Ingham.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was W. W. Langdon. The town treasurer during the same period was John O. Barker.
Sandisfield is one of the very few towns in the Commonwealth from which we have failed to obtain a full and consecutive narrative of its proceedings during the war. We know, however, in general terms, that meetings were held during each year, at which money was appropriated for the payment of bounties to volunteers, and State aid to their families.
By the return made by the selectmen in 1866, they claim to have furnished one hundred and sixty eight men for the war, which we believe to be almost, if not exactly, correct; for Sandisfield filled its quota upon every call made by the President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of thirteen over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand one hundred and forty four dollars ($30,144.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers families, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $25.42;
in 1862, $515.01;
in 1863, $1,636.90;
in 1864, $1,532.34;
in 1865, $1,450.00.
Total in four years, $5,159.67.


 
SAVOY
 

    Incorporated Feb. 20,1797. Population in 1860, 904; in 1865, 866. Valuation in 1860, $268,439; in 1865, $273,400.
The selectmen in 1861 were Willis W. Barnett, Emerson L. Mason, Orin Tower; in 1862, Melvin Bowker, Caleb Brown, Edward Mason ; in 1863, Melvin Bowker, George Hall, Ambrose B. Perkins; in 1864, Emerson L. Mason, Henry P. Tyler, Willis W. Barnett; in 1865, Harrison Snow, Henry P. Tyler, Ambrose B. Perkins.
    The town clerk during all the years of the war was Harrison Snow. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was William Sherman; in 1865, Henry F. Bliss.
    1861.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 21st of September;  at which "the town, by a yea and nay vote, twenty three yeas to
seven nays," voted w to hire a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars, in anticipation of money that may be reimbursed by the State, to pay aid to the families of soldiers."
    1862.    At a town meeting held on the 23d of July, it was voted to raise, by assessment  "upon the inhabitants of the town, according to what they are actually worth," a sufficient
amount of money to pay a 'bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years' military service, and be mustered in and credited to the town; also, to exempt from taxation their property, while in the service; also, to assess a tax of one dollar upon each poll, "for the benefit of the volunteers, in addition to their bounty;" also, to pay each volunteer " ten dollars in advance, and the balance when mustered in and credited." At a meeting held on the 8th of September, it was voted to pay the same amount of bounty to volunteers who enlist, and are credited, in the nine months' service; and on the 15th of November the selectmen were authorized to pay the same amount of money to men who may be drafted, belonging to the town.
    1863.    At the town meeting held on the 11th of April, it was voted to raise one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers; and on the 13th of November the selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of deceased soldiers.
    1864.    At a meeting held on the 28th of March, w the chairman of the selectmen was directed to go to Boston and ascertain if the quota of the town on the previous calls had been filled;" and that " he be authorized to secure volunteers to fill all calls up to the present time, if they can be obtained at a reasonable rate.”     On the 6th of June the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars w to each recruit who enlists to the credit of the town, up to March next."
    1865.    At a meeting held on the 13th of March, the town voted to raise one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers; and the selectmen were directed
to continue recruiting, w to keep the quota of the town always full."
Savoy furnished about ninety five men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, and including $2,466.84 raised by private subscription, was nine thousand two hundred and forty one dollars and sixty three cents ($9,241.63).
The amount of money raised and expended during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $60.69 ;
in 1862, $669.47;
in 1863, $1,175.95;
in 1864, $651.00;
in 1865, $500.00.
Total amount in four years, $3,058.11.


 
SHEFFIELD
 

    Incorporated June 22, 1733. Population in 1860, 2,621; in 1865, 2,461. Valuation in 1860, $1,103,-728; in 1865, $1,206,820.
The selectmen in 1861 and the four succeeding years were E. E. Callender, Abner Roys, Henry Burtch.
    The town clerk in 1861 and 1862 was W. B. Saxton; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, John D. Burtch. The town treasurer in 1861 was W. B. Saxton; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, and 1865, John D. Burtch.
    1861. The first legal town meeting, to consider war matters, was held May 4th. Oliver Peck was chosen moderator. It was voted that the moderator and clerk of the meeting petition the Governor, in behalf of the town, for w the immediate assembling of the Legislature of this Commonwealth." " On motion of E. F. Ensign, a resolution passed at a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Sheffield, held on the 18th day of June, 1776, was read, and ordered to be put on file." A committee of five was appointed " to report a series of resolutions." The committee were G. A. Root, E. F. Ensign, Z. Candee, Archibald Taft, and Leonard Tuttle. They reported, 1st, That two thousand dollars be raised for the proper equipment and pay of citizens who may volunteer in the military service; 2nd, That each volunteer be paid by the town nine dollars a month while in the service; 3d, That the families of soldiers shall receive comfortable assistance; 4th, That G. A. Root, Samuel H. Bushnell, Leonard Tuttle, T. B. Strong, and H. D. Train be a committee with full powers to expend the money; 5th, That said committee be authorized to borrow, not exceeding four thousand dollars, on the faith and credit of the town ; 6th, That said committee shall receive no compensation for services, "and that their charges for necessary expenses shall be submitted to the selectmen for approval; " 7th, The town treasurer was instructed to pay all drafts made upon him by said committee; 8th, The committee was * to proceed immediately to form
a military company." The report was accepted, with only one dissenting vote. The four thousand dollars was to be raised by a tax; and the treasurer was directed to keep a separate and distinct account " of all money raised and expended in conformity with the foregoing resolutions." November 5th, Voted, that the sum of five hundred dollars, " or such part thereof as may be deemed necessary, is hereby appropriated to the payment of such bounty, and allowances to the wives, children, and parents of volunteers, as is allowed by the laws of this Commonwealth."
    1862.    July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town. A committee of one from each school district was appointed "to solicit enlistment's, and to report to the chairman of the selectmen weekly."    The treasurer was authorized to borrow money, and the committee already appointed was "to solicit subscriptions of money to be given volunteers."  August 23d,
    1863.    Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service, and the selectmen to borrow money for the purpose. A committee of five was appointed to procure volunteers.    November 4th, Voted, to borrow, not exceeding two  thousand  dollars, for aid  to  the families of soldiers.
    1864.    September, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of men who have been drafted.  December 26th, Voted, to pay the selectmen and recruiting officers fifteen dollars for each new recruit, and twenty five dollars for each veteran recruit, enlisting
to the credit of the town; voted, to pay their expenses, and three dollars a day while engaged in recruiting.
    1865.    April 4th, Voted, to raise three thousand dollars to procure volunteers, and to fix the bounty at one hundred and fifty dollars.    The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same.    May 4th, The sum to be borrowed was increased to four thousand dollars. June 18th, The selectmen
    were authorized to recruit thirty five men to fill the quota of the town " at the cheapest possible rate," and to borrow " such sums of money " as may be required for that purpose.  
    1866.     August 13th,
Voted, to recruit five men, and to pay each a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars; voted, that there be deposited with the State Treasurer " one hundred and twenty five dollars each for ten men for recruits." Henry Burtch was chosen " to investigate in regard to re-enlistments for this town/9 December 13th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow four thousand dollars, to pay bounties for thirty two men to fill the quota of the town.
    1865. April 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. A vote of thanks was passed to the selectmen who had served through the years of the war, and who declined a re-election, for their services in procuring recruits during the Rebellion.
Sheffield furnished two hundred and sixty nine men for the military service, which was a surplus of eight over all demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money raised and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand and thirty three dollars and sixty eight cents  ($30,033.68).
The amount of money raised and expended by the town for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $80.36;
in 1862, $1,867.56 ;
in 1863, $4,859.71;
in 1864, $4.300.00;
in 1865, $3,400.00.   
Total amount, $14,507.63.


 
STOCKBRIDGE
 

Incorporated June 22, 1739. Population in 1860, 2,136 ; in 1865, 1,967. Valuation in 1860, $976,256; in 1865, $1,323,883.
The selectmen in 1861 were Daniel Fairchild, William Darbe, Reuben Lynch; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Henry M. Burrell, William Darbe, Henry D. Palmer; in 1865, M. Warner, Mason Van Deusen, Carl ton Curtis.
The town-clerk during all the years of the war was E. Sey¬mour. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Nathan A. Waters; during the years 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, E. Seymour.
1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 3d of May; at which it was voted to borrow, not exceeding two thousand dollars, for the purchase of suitable clothes and equipments for the volunteers who shall go into the military service from "that town and vicinity." The selectmen were also directed to take charge of the arms and equipments " now on their way from the Adjutant-General, that they may be properly kept and returned when demanded/' June 15th, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the laws of the Commonwealth.
1862.    April 7th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow, not exceeding one thousand dollars, for the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families during the year.    July 26th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years, when mustered into the military ser¬vice, and credited to the quota of the town.    The selectmen were authorized to immediately open a recruiting-office, and to borrow money to pay the bounties.    August 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, and to borrow money to pay the same.
1863.    August 1st, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to the families of volunteers; also, the expense of transportation of the drafted men from Stockbridge to the military camp at Springfield, and to borrow money, if necessary, for that purpose.   
1864.    November 3rd, The selectmen were appointed to solicit subscriptions to pay bounties to volunteers who may enlist to fill the quota of the town "under the last call of the President."    Voted, to abate the poll-taxes of all soldiers in the service belonging to Stockbridge.
1865.    May 21st, Voted, to raise and assess the sum of three thousand one hundred and sixty dollars, in addition to the eight hundred appropriated April 4th, to fill the quota of the town, and to pay what has already been paid by subscription.    June 1st, The selectmen were instructed to recruit twenty-five more volunteers,  to apply to the next call for men."
1866.    November 7th, Rev. A. H. Dashiell, Charles Goodrich, and Professor F. Hoffman were appointed to "take into consideration the subject of erecting a monument to the memory of the soldiers of Stockbridge who had fallen in the war."
1867.    Stockbridge furnished about two hundred and thirty-six men for the war, including those who belonged to other places, and those who paid commutation-money, which was a surplus of twenty-six over and above all demands. Eight were commis¬sioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifteen thousand and twenty-nine dollars and fifty-six cents ($15,029.56).
The amount of money raised and expended by the town for State aid to soldiers9 families during the four years of the war, and afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $378.64; in 1862, $2,049.53; in 1863, $3,450.19; in 1864, $3,263.62; in 1865, $2,000.00. Total amount, $11,141.96.
The ladies of Stockbridge organized a Soldiers' Aid Society, and " held meetings almost every week during the war to do soldiers' work, and forwarded at different times large quantities of under-clothing and other valuable articles to the army and hospitals, to the money value of several thousand dollars."
A very handsome brown-stone monument has been erected to the memory of the men of Stockbridge who died for their country in the war of the Rebellion. The cost of the monu¬ment was twenty-six hundred dollars. It is erected near the centre of the village, to which it is an ornament, as well as an honor to the memory of those who fell.

 
TYRINGHAM
 

    Incorporated March 6, 1762. Population in 1860, 730 ; in 1865, 650. Valuation in 1860, $293,228 ; in 1865, $299,594.
The selectmen in 1861 were E. G. Hale, J. M. Northup, J. G. Garfield; in 1862, E. G. Hale, J. G. Garfield, A. G. Sweet; in 1863, J. M. Garfield, G. W. Garfield, C. E. Slater; in 1864, E. G. Hale, H. Clark, Orson Webster; in 1865, E. G. Hale, Daniel Clark, John Canon.
    The town clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was J. W. Wilson; in 1865, Albert C. Heath. The town treasurer in 1861 was Elijah Garfield; in 1862, Charles E. Slater; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, A. C. Heath.
    1861.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters connected with the war, was held on the 1st of July; at which the selectmen were authorized to borrow money for the payment of State aid to families of volunteers.
    1862.    April 7th, "Voted, that the selectmen borrow and pay over to the families of volunteers, at the end of each month, the amount the  State allows."    July 23d, Voted,  to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who  shall enlist within ten days for three years' service, and be credited to the quota of the town.    August 21st, Voted, to pay three-
years volunteers a bounty of two hundred dollars, and those for nine months one hundred dollars.
    1863.    April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers.
    1864.    April 4th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer for three years' service. S. D. Thatcher was appointed recruiting agent for the town, with authority to pay, if necessary, a bounty of three hundred dollars to three years volunteers, under any future call of the President for men; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money for that purpose.    Voted, to assess a tax of thirty two hundred dollars.
    1865.    April 3d, Voted,  to  pay the  expenses  heretofore incurred in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the town ; and to raise fifteen hundred dollars by taxation, for recruiting purposes in the future, and commutation money to drafted men. The amount of commutation to free a man from service who hud been drafted and accepted was three  hundred dollars.    The town allowed to each drafted man in Tyringham, who had been accepted, two hundred and fifty dollars for commutation money; the remaining fifty dollars he was to provide himself.
    Tyringham furnished about seventy four men for the war, which was the exact number required to fill its quotas under the several calls of the President for volunteers. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was six thousand nine hundred and sixty dollars ($6,960.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, $310.14;
in 1862, $564.37 ;
in 1863, $656.00;
in 1864, $160.00;
in 1865, 00.   
Total amount, $1,681.51.


 
WASHINGTON
 

    Incorporated April 12,1777. Population in 1860, 948; in 1865, 859. Valuation in 1860, $299,622; in 1865, $289,398.
The selectmen in 1861 were Charles Crosier, Edmund Spencer, James M. Chapel; in 1862, D. W. Dunham, Charles Crosier, Alanson S. Pomeroy ; in 1863, Charles Crosier, Alanson S. Pomeroy, John M. Crane; in 1864 and 1865, D. W. Dunham, Simpson Bell, Charles Coates.
    The town clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, was J. S. Brooker. The town treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was John M. Crane; in 1863, D. W. Dunham; in 1864, Samuel O. Brooker; in 1865, George Abbott.
    1861.    There does not appear to have been any formal town meeting held during this year, to act upon matters relating to the war; although a number of popular meetings were held,  at which addresses were made by prominent gentlemen of  the county, among whom were Charles M. Emerson, of Pittsfield, Judge Page, William M. Walker, and others.
    1862.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon  matters relating to the war, was held on the  1st of September; at which it was voted to pay a bounty w of seventy five dollars to each of the seven volunteers who enlisted for three years, and one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service."
    1863.    There appears to have been no action taken by the town in regard to the war, in its corporate capacity, during this year; none probably having been necessary.   
    1864.    On the 11th of April a town meeting was held, at which it was voted w to raise one hundred and twenty five dollars for each volunteer under the last call of the President; " also, " that the selectmen be instructed to go to Boston, and, if possible, "procure a sufficient number of men to fill the quota of the town." A gentleman for whom we have a high regard, and who knew w all about it," writes: w War meetings were held to encourage enlistment's, to help the noblest and best of governments the sun ever shone upon; and young men volunteered, in cases not a few, where their parents refused granting their requests to join the Union army, and being under age were thus kept at home,"
Washington furnished about one hundred men for the service, and filled its quota upon every call made by the President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of one, over and above every demand made upon it. Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was six thousand dollars ($6,000.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows :
In 1861, $94.85 ;
in 1862, $662.08;
in 1863, $1,298.39;
in 1864, $977.21;
in 1865, $600.00.   
Total amount, $3,632.53.

"The ladies of Washington met on various occasions, and prepared lint and bandages for the wounded soldiers in hospitals."

 
WEST STOCKBRIDGE
 

    Incorporated Feb. 23, 1774. Population in 1860, 1,589; in 1865, 1,621. Valuation in 1860, $602,010: in 1865, $613,816..
The selectmen in 1861 were Franklin B. Cone, Daniel A. Treat, Charles E. Rees; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, George W. Kniffen, Henry T. Ford, Thomas W. Barnes; in 1865, Henry T. Ford, Charles S. Platt, John P. Pomeroy.
    The town clerk and town treasurer during all the years of the war was William C. Spaulding.
    1861. The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 18th of November; at which the selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by law. The treasurer was directed to keep a separate account of the money so expended, and to report the amount at the next annual meeting.
    1862.    March  10th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to the families of volunteers residing in the town ; and the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for the term of three years, and be mustered into the military service, and credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay said bounties. It was also voted to remit the payment of poll taxes assessed and paid by persons who have enlisted, or who shall afterwards enlist, in the military service.    August 18th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money, and pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months' service, and be credited to fill the quota of the town.
    1863.    March 10th, Seventeen hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the year. July 27th, The selectmen were directed to pay the same amount of State aid to the families of men who may be drafted as is paid to the families of volunteers.  December 29th, The selectmen were authorized "to draw from the treasury fifteen dollars for every new recruit, and twenty five dollars for every veteran recruit, enlisting to the credit of the town,  to  be  paid  in  advance of the premiums allowed by Government
    1864.    March 7th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid during the year to the families of soldiers residing in West Stockbridge. March 28th, Voted, to raise fifteen hundred dollars by taxation for recruiting purposes. The selectmen were authorized to borrow that amount, in anticipation of the tax,  "as they may require;"  also, to raise one thousand dollars by taxation, to pay fifty dollars to each volunteer " who has not received that amount of local bounty;" and to refund to citizens money which they have voluntarily contributed to encourage enlistment's. The selectmen were directed to make such arrangements as they might judge expedient to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town. April 8th, The selectmen were authorized to take such action " as they may deem proper under the act of the Legislature approved March 28th, 1864; " which act allowed money to be raised by taxation to pay bounties to volunteers, but limited the amount to be paid to each volunteer to one hundred and twenty five dollars." On the 9th of July, the town voted to avail itself of the provisions of this act. August 9th, The selectmen were authorized to pay the bounty prescribed by the act of March 28th, 1864, in gold.
    1865. March 6th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the year. May 13th, Voted, to raise by taxation sixty five hundred dollars, to refund money subscribed and paid by citizens to encourage recruiting.
    West Stockbridge furnished one hundred and sixty men for the war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid paid to soldiers' families, was seventeen thousand and twenty six dollars and thirty two cents ($17,026.32).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and afterwards reimbursed to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
 In 1861, $22.63;
in 1862, $1,217.02;
in 1863, $2,097.86;
in 1864, $2,161.04;
in 1865, $1,800.00.   
Total amount, $7,298.55.


 
WILLIAMSTOWN
 

    Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population in 1860, 2,611; in 1865J 2,563. Valuation in I860, $1,173,222; in 1865, $1,160,587.
The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John R. Bulkley, William E. Johnson, Nathan Field; in 1863 and 1864, Harvey T. Cole, William E. Johnson, Daniel Dewey; in 1865, Calvin R. Taft, Daniel Dewey, William E. Johnson.
    The town clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Daniel Dewey; in 1865, Samuel T. Mather. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Harvey T. Cole; in 1865, J. H. Whipple.
    1861.    The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters in relation to the war, was held on the 3d of June; at which five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to the families of volunteers belonging to Williamstown.
    1862.    March 10th, The selectmen were directed to continue to assist the families of volunteers."    Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist
for three years' service, and be credited to the quota of the town.    Messrs.  St. R.  Hoxey, Harvey T. Cole, Calvin R. Taft, and Daniel Dewey were chosen a committee, with authority to borrow thirty one hundred dollars to procure volunteers and pay bounties.    Two hundred dollars were allowed for the personal expenses of said committee while in the performance of their duties.    September 6th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers for nine months service.
    1863.    January 6th, The selectmen were directed to recruit volunteers to fill the quota of the town, and to pay each man, when properly credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of
one hundred and fifty dollars.    March 14th, w Voted, to pay State aid to the families of all persons belonging to Williamstown in the military and naval service of the United States."
    1864.    August 8th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty five dollars to each volunteer for three years' service, when credited to the quota of the town; and to appoint " a recruiting agent to be nominated by a meeting of the enrolled men of the town."    A recruiting agent was appointed.    December 20th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers under the new call of the President for more men ; and the selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay said bounties and the expenses of the recruiting agent. December 30th, "Voted, that the selectmen vigorously prose cute the work of enlistment until there shall be forty men enlisted."
    1865.    March 13th, The selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families during the year.
    Williamstown furnished two hundred and sixty men for the war, which was a  surplus of eighteen   over  and above all demands. Six were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifteen thousand four hundred and fifteen dollars  ($15,415.00).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $451.64;
in 1862, $2,045.27;
in 1863, $2,734.01;
in 1864, $4,300.00;
in 1865, $2,400.00.   
Total amount, $11,930.92.


 
WINDSOR
 


    Incorporated July 2, 1771. Population in 1860, 839; in 1865, 753. Valuation in I860, $337,275; in 1865, $303,324.
    The selectmen in 1861 were James Whitmarsh, Reuben Pierce, H. L. Allen; in 1862, Ellison Axtell, A. L. Clark, A. W. Warren; in 1863 and 1864, C. Baldwin, H. N. Winslow, James Whitmarsh; in 1865, James Whitmarsh, H. N. Winslow, George Hathawny.
The town clerk during all the years of the war was Chapin Converse. The town treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1864, and 1865, was Norman Miner; in 1863, Solomon Capen.
    1861. The first legal town meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 10th of May, at which a committee was appointed to canvass the town for recruits for military service. Another committee was appointed to confer with the authorities of the adjoining towns to agree upon some uniform plan of recruiting. The town voted to pay each volunteer credited to Windsor, while in the service, eight dollars a month, and to furnish him with a uniform and equipment's, not to exceed in cost twenty five dollars; also, to provide for the comfortable support of his family.
    The town records do not give farther particulars in regard to the ways and means used by the town to raise money and furnish recruits, as the practice was to leave these matters with a committee, with full powers to act as they thought best for the interest of the service and the best good of the town.
    Windsor furnished ninety eight men for the war, which was a surplus of thirteen over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was nine thousand six hundred and eighty seven dollars and seventy one cents ($9,687.71).
    The amount of money raised and expended by the town for State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows:
In 1861, $27.34;
in 1862, $647.91;
in 1863, $1,194.83;
in 1864, $1,139.00;
in 1865, $800.00.
Total amount, $3,809,08.



 

Back to Berkshire Co. Military home page

Back to Berkshire County home page

©Barbara Ziegenmeyer