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Benzie County, Michigan
Biographies
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LORENZO BAILEY was born in Westmoreland, Oneida County, N.Y., in 1809, and is a brother of Rev. Charles E. Bailey. Oct. 14, 1844, He was married to Miss Mary E. Chamberlain, of Vermont. They have had and lost five children. The last, a young man, highly esteemed, met his death in Crystal Lake. The boat in which he was sailing capsized and his efforts to save the young lady who was with him resulted in death from disease of the heart, to which he was subject. The coming of Mr. and Mrs. Bailey to Benzonia has already been told. They still reside in the village in the home they built on a delightful site which commands a wide and interesting view. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & C o.; 1884]

ALBERT E. BANKS, lumberman and merchant, Frankfort, was born in Chenango County, N. Y., Nov. 23, 1847. He came with his parents to Cass County, Mich., when twelve years of age, and remained there some six years, employed in school studies and in mercantile work. He then spent several years in a wholesale boot and shoe store in Chicago, but became identified with a lumbering enterprise in Frankfort, Benzie County, Mich., in 1871. He had previous to this time, became interested in mercantile business in Niles, and also in Edwardsburg, Mich. He has also owned real estate and business interests in Elkhart, Ind., and in Manistee, Mich., and now owns estates in Grand Rapids and Cassopolis, Mich., but for the last seven years he has devoted his attention almost exclusively to the lumbering and mercantile interests in Frankfort. Mr. Banks commenced life without financial resources, but invested his earnings with good success and soon accumulated a handsome capital; but in 1875, through the complications of other partners, these resources were swept from his possession. But, undaunted by these reverses, and favored with credit by Chicago capitalists who knew his integrity, he shortly after resumed business entirely on his own account, and has once more achieved encouraging success. He has formerly owned the mill at Platte River, and an interest in the Island mill in Frankfort. He built the Banks mill in South Frankfort, one of the finest circular mills on the shore, and refitted the broom handle factory for use as a lath and picket mill; and has bought and refitted the Blacklock machine shop and foundry in South Frankfort. He was the first to put in operation a steam ferry boat on the lake. He built the "May Store" and associate buildings, the largest store in the place. He a lso built and stocked the "Brewer Store," and sold it within one month from th e time of completion. He remodeled and enlarged the "Ford Buildings." And also the Frankfort Furnace Company's stores and dock, and has erected two adjacent stores of commodious size. In November, 1883, for purposes of business convenience, Mr. Banks entered into the formation of a stock company, known as the Frankfort Lumber Company, the officers being: -- A. E. Banks, president; T. F. Anderson, vice-president; H. B. Anderson, secretary and N. A. Fletcher, of Grand Rapids, treasurer. They conduct one of the largest general mercantile enterprises on the shore, the sales reaching to about $100,000 per year. They deal in all varieties of commodities, cash drafts, sell exchange, etc., and thus accommodate the business public in all available ways. Mr. Banks' marriage was on April 25, 1871, to Miss Lucetta Pearson, of Cass County, Mich. Their elegant and commodious residence on Forest Avenue was erected in 1882, at a cost with appurtenances of about $10,000. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

ABRAM G. BUTLER, manufacturer and fruit grower, Frankfort, was born in Deposit, Delaware county, N.Y., Dec. 16, 1820. At the age of fourteen years he went to Binghamton, N.Y., and spent two years, partly in school and partly in mercantile work. He then spent one year as clerk in the store of his brother, William a. Butler, of Detroit. Next he attended college one year in Cincinnati, under the tuition of the well known astronomer, Gen. O. M. Mitchell. Later he removed to Marshall, Mich., and served for some time as teller in the Bank of Marshall, and then was for some time engaged in commercial business in the firm of Hayes & Butler. On Jan. 1, 1846, he was married to Miss Charlotte M. Be ll, daughter of Judge D. V. Bell, late Auditor-General for Michigan. She was born in New York City July 31, 1829. They have one son, Digby B., and two daughters, Sarah and Emily T. In 1848 Mr. Butler sold his commercial interest in Marshall, and became teller in the Michigan Insurance Bank, Detroit. Three years later, for the improvement of his health, and to secure the payment of a large debt that was due from the St. Clair Bank to the Michigan Insurance Bank, he went to St. Clair and engaged in the manufacture of lumber, flour, etc., in the interest of said parties. When this work was completed he removed to Fond du Lac, Wis., and was engaged in general banking business for nearly ten years. From there in 1861 he went to Chicago and engaged in the commission and grain business. In the spring of 1868 he came to Frankfort, Benzie County, Mich., in the interest of the Frankfort Land Company, became agent for all their property in the County, made nearly all the original sales of their estates, and also made business investments of his own in the place, and has thus become a permanent resident. In 1871 Frankfort was made a port of entry, and Mr. Butler was appointed deputy collector of customs, and has retained the position ever since. Mr. Butler is also proprietor of a large gang saw-mill which has a capacity for cutting over 100,000 feet of lumber per day. He is now, in 1884, engaged in sawing on contract 200,000,000 feet of pine lumber, known as the Corning tract of pine. He also has a mill for flouring and custom work, with two run of stones for flour and one run for feed, capable of grinding over 100 bushels of wheat per day besides the feed. He also has a beautiful fruit farm about a mile from town, with forty acres devoted to fruit. Most of the trees are already in bearing, and consist of choice selection of apples, pears, peaches, plums, quinces, cherries and grapes, and a large crab apple orchard, and also various other farm productions. The whole estate is kept in the highest state of cultivation, and presents a most prosperous and inviting aspect. He also has forty acres of beautiful farm land east of the village, and five acres of fruit grounds northeast of town in fine condition, besides various estates of village property. His new and elegant home residence is on Leelanaw Avenue. Mr. Butler has served two years as county treasurer of Benzie County, but chooses exemption from official position. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

D. B. BUTLER, son of the subject of a previous sketch, is associated with his father in the lumber and real estate business at Frankfort. He graduated at the University of Chicago in the class of 1868, when he became a resident of Frankfort. On the organization of Benzie County he was chosen as its first judge of probate. He left in 1870 to take charge of the public high school in Pittsfield, Ill., and afterward assumed the superintendency of public schools at Buda in the same state. After holding the position two years he removed to Manistee, Mich., where he remained for seven years, engaged in the legal profession. In 1881 he returned to Frankfort and entered his present situation. Mr. Butler is now, in 1884, circuit court commissioner for Benzie County. He has a wife and two children. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

ALONZO B. CARRIER, editor of the Frankfort Weekly Express, was born in Angola, Erie County, N.Y., June 28, 1846. He came with his parents to Elsie, Clinton County, Mich., in the spring of 1858, and spent three years on a farm. He then for two years attended school in Grand Rapids. On Jan. 3, 1864, at the age of seventeen years, he enlisted as a private in Company B, First Michigan Veteran Volunteer Cavalry, and joined the regiment at its rendezvous at Kalamazoo, and went with it to the front at Stevensburg, Va., where Custer's brigade, of which the regiment was a member, was then encamped. He was with the regiment in its battles, including those of the Wilderness, Sheridan's raid around Richmond, Yellow Tavern, Trevilian Station, Weldon Railroad and Bermuda Hundred. He went with Sheridan to the Shenandoah Valley, participating in the battles of Berryville, Shepardstown, Front Royal, Opequan, Winchester, Cross Keys and various other engagements. After the battle of Cross Keys he was an attache at the headquarters of the famous Michigan Cavalry Brigade until mustered out by special order of the war department in February, 1865. After being discharged he came to Benzonia, Mich., to join and care for his mother, Mrs. Sarah A. B. Carrier, who had now removed to that place. He father, Deacon Chauncey T. Carrier, regimental quartermaster of the First Michigan Cavalry, had died in the service in July, 1864. He was one of the original founders of the Benzonia colony. Mr. A. B. Carrier, after spending three years in Benzonia assisting his mother, entered the employ of Geo. A. Douglass & Co., at Frankfort, as clerk and bookkeeper, and remained two years. On April 1, 1870, the firm of Carrier, Woodward & Co., organized by Mr. Carrier for the term of three yea rs, opened a store of general merchandise and carried it on through the term successfully. From April, 1873, to October, 1875, he carried on a real estate, insurance and collection business in Frankfort. He then went to Grand Rapids and for nearly four years held the responsible position of deputy clerk of the United States circuit and district courts for the western district of Michigan, resigning to accept the secretary and treasurership of the Grand Rapids Chair Company - the largest organization of the kind in the west. After a successful management of the concern for a year and a half, more than doubling its sales in that time, he resigned to accept the position of general southern and southwestern agent for the Berkey & Gay furniture company of Grand Rapid s - the largest furniture manufactory in the world. In this, also, he was eminently successful. While serving as U. S. clerk he was for two years general secretary of the Y. M. C. A., which was at that time carrying on the most successful work of that kind in the west. In July, 1882, he purchased the Frankfort Weekly Express, assuming personal control Jan. 1, 1883. Mr. Carrier's thoroughly practical education, his personal experience of pioneer life, and all that that implies, his enlarged knowledge of men and things, his extensive travel in, and consequent acquaintance with, a large majority of the states of the Union, give him special fitness for success in his journalistic enterprise. He is thoroughly identified with all the various interest of Benzie County, and believes that a live, practical, local newspaper may be made a mighty engine of power for the advancement of the material, social, literary, educational, fraternal and religious interests of the community. He has filled numerous official trusts, municipal and fraternal. He was prominently identified with the organization of the Grand Army of the Republic in Michigan, holding the position of assistant adjutant general, and is one of its most enthusiastic members. In politics he is an uncompromising Republican, believing fully in organization, but abhorring all political machines, and clinging ever to the flag and the Union. Mr. Carrier's marriage was on May 28, 1870, to Miss Lottie E., daughter of Henry Woodward, Esq., of Frankfort. They have been bereaved of two lovely daughters. Their surviving daughter is Gertrude Pearl. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

LUCIUS W. CASE, Benzonia, was born in Gustavus, Ohio, Feb. 12, 1815. He was reared and educated in his native place, and resided there during his early manhood, engaged in agriculture and mill business. On March 27, 1844, he was married to Miss Emeline R. Fitts, also of Gustavus. She was born in Huntington, Conn., in 1820. Their children are Edward P., Nancy W., Walter N., Alden B., now Rev. A. B. Case, of Howard, Dak, Charles E., William L., Albert B. and James Walker. Mrs. E. R. Case died, Dec. 27, 1866. Mr. Case's second marriage was on Sept 3, 1868, to Mrs. Rosanna C. Fitts, also of Gustavus. She was born there in June 25, 1824. In the spring of 1860 Mr. Case and his family removed to Benzonia, Benzie County, Mich., purchased lands, prepared them a home and entered upon pioneer life. When he first came to Traverse Region no propellers could land at Frankfort. His cattle, when they arrived there, were backed off the gangway of the steamer into the lake, and on rising in the water were guided ashore by persons with boats. One valuable ox, left to follow his mate, lost sight of him as he started for the shore, and swam quite round the steamer, looking wistfully for a chance to get on, and then swam far out into the lake, but finally caught a side view of the bank and turning swam ashore and lay down on the beach almost exhausted. The goods were put on small boats and were brought in by poling the boats up the Aux Becs Scies River. Their supplies they got mostly at Traverse City. It took four days to go and return with an ox team. They camped in the woods one night in going one in returning, refreshing the team with browse from the trees. In 1864 Mr. Case erected a saw-mill, the first permanent mill built in the locality. He continued business in the mill until age seemed to invite his retirement, and the mill was then transferred to his sons, Walter N. and W. L. Case, who still conduct the business. The water power which drives the wheel is a beautiful spring stream, rising only a little over a mile above the mill, yet furnishing a full supply of water almost unaffected by freshets or by drouth; and now abounding with most excellent fish. Mr. Case also took 330 acres of government land which he has chiefly divided among his heirs. His beautiful residence is on the home farm, near the mill. He has served several years as highway commissioner and as township treasurer. Religiously Mr. Case and family are Congregationalists. He held the office of deacon in that body since the organization of the church in June, 1860. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

MORRIS CASE, farmer, Homestead, was born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Dec. 11, 1837. His youth and early manhood were spent in his native state. He was employed chiefly on a dairy farm. In 1860 he came northward, purchased lands in Benzonia, Mich., prepared a home, and with his family entered upon pioneer life in 1861. In 1863 he located lands in Homestead, and in the following year they renews their experiences of former times, and again faced the stern aspects of forest culture and homestead improvement. He now has nearly ninety acres under cultivation on his homestead farm; has a flourishing orchard of choice selections of fruit, and excellent dwelling, and other good farm buildings. His marriage was on April 13, 1861, to Elizabeth Corson, of Crawford County, Penn. She was born there Dec. 18, 1837. Mr. Case has served as school officer, constable, highway commissioner, township treasurer and supervisor. He has also been sheriff of Benzie County two years. Religiously they are members of the Congregational Church, and he is a deacon and trustee in that body. When Mr. Case settled in Homestead there were only eight or nine families in the township. He had to open a road three-fourths of a mile to reach his premises. Shortly after his road was filled with trees by a wind storm, and took one week of labor to reopen it. In 1867 they revisited their native home, and in returning came with a team. Four weeks were required in coming through. His was the second wagon brought through the large swamp south of Benzonia. On a few rods of it were cross-wayed, and their journey was in the night, yet they came safely through and arrived in Benzonia at nine o'clock in the evening. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

WILLIAM H. CHAMBERS, hotel-keeper, Frankfort, was born in Crawford County, O., Sept. 22, 1840. His youth and early manhood were spent in his native state. On Sept. 8, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served his country in the suppression of the rebellion until honorably discharged on May 16, 1865. He returned home and in April, 1867, he and his brother C. C. Chambers, came to Benzie County, Mich., when there were only some five houses where Frankfort now is. They spent some three years in the erection of buildings in the community. On June 23, 1869, Mr. Chambers was married to Miss Ella M. Slyfield, daughter of Dr. A. H. Slyfield, of Frankfort. She was born in China, Mich., in 1850. They have had two sons, Jay C. and Ralph H. In March 1870, Mr. and Mrs. Chambers removed to Ohio, where he spent several years in agricultural employment. In 1877 they returned to Frankfort and he purchased the Delbridge House, and opened it and since then has conducted it under the name of the Park House. It is beautifully situated at the west end of Main Street in full view of Lake Michigan, and of the harbor, and of most of the village, and but a short distance from the boat landing. It is capable of entertaining over forty guests and furnishes first-class accommodations to its patrons. It was the first hotel completed and opened in Frankfort, and was first kept by James B. Delbridge. Religious services were at one time held in it by Rev. Dr. Duffield, of Detroit. Masonic communications also have been held in it. Thus it has been variously devoted to the public convenience. Mrs. E. M. Chambers died June 5, 1880. Mr. Chambers' second marriage was on Sept. 2, 1883, to Miss Lida Culver, of Frankfort. She was born in Haldimand County, Canada, Jan. 25, 1853. Mr. Chambers is school assessor and justice of the peace in Frankfort. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & C o.; 1884]

CHARLES S. COLLIER, harbor inspector, Frankfort, was born in Claremont, Sullivan County, N. H., Aug. 29, 1835. He came with his parents to Genesee County, N. Y., in 1848. About four years later they came to Pontiac, Mich., and engaged in farming. Two years later his father died and the responsibility of conducting the home interests and business fell especially upon him from that time. He continued on the home farm until 1859, when he left for California. On June 24, 1858, he was married to Miss Emma Francis, also of Pontiac. She was born in Troy, Oakland County, March 17, 1836. Their children are Charles F., Athaline E., Harry S. and Birney Morton. In April 1861, Mr. Collier returned from California, and then spent some years longer on the home farm. In 1868 he came to Frankfort, Benzie County, and spent five years in the employ of the Frankfort Land Company, having charge of the lumber yard and out door business. Since that time he has served in his present position as harbor inspector. In 1873 Mr. Collier was appointed by Gov. Bagley as inspector-general of lumber for Benzie District, and has been closely identified with the inspection of lumber ever since. Mr. Collier also received an appointment as local state road commissioner, and had charge of the construction of the bridge across the head of Aux Becs Scies Lake. Mr. C. has some 400 acres of real estate in Benzie County. His beautiful home residence is on Forest Avenue, Frankfort. He has served eight years as justice of the peace, two years as supervisor of Crystal Lake Township, and now, in 1884, is serving in his fifth term as township treasurer. Fraternally Mr. Collier has served twelve years as worshipful master of Crystal Lodge, 270, of Free and Accepted Masons. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

JOHN B. COLLINS, druggist and postmaster, Frankfort, was born in Erie County, N. Y., April 18, 1833. He lived on a farm until nineteen years of age, and then went to Rochester as clerk in a drug store. In 1856 he left his native state, came to Charlotte, Mich., and was engaged in the drug business some four years. On leaving there he spent about three years in traveling through New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Virginia, and then engaged in business as a druggist at Rochester. In 1866 he returned to Michigan and engaged in the drug business in Rockford, and two years later removed to Frankfort, Benzie County, and opened business on Main Street. Since then he has purchased his commodious business stand on the corner of Main and Fourth Streets, and is enjoying a steadily enlarging patronage in all departments of his trade, consisting chiefly of drugs, paints and stationery. In the summer of 1868 he was married to Miss Josephine B. Lapham, daughter of Hon. Smith Lapham, of Rockford. She was born there Oct. 28, 1848. Their children are Roy L., Gracie, Agnes and Dudley F. Mr. Collins has a pleasant home residence in Frankfort, on Forest Avenue, ten acres of other real estate within the village limits, and a farm of forty acres six miles from town, and holds stock in a gold and silver mine in Colorado. Before coming to Frankfort he had served as town clerk and as justice of the peace, and he has been postmaster of Frankfort sixteen years. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

LAWRENCE W. CRANE, proprietor of mill, South Frankfort, was born in County Wexford, Ireland, in 1841. He left his native country at about twelve years of age, came to New York State and thence to Chicago, Ill., where he was for eighteen months clerk in F. Scammon's drug store. From there he came to Herring Creek, Mich., in 1855, and remained about eighteen months. He then spent nearly five years chiefly in Muskegon, part of the time in marking and tallying lumber, and part of the time in head sawing in the mills. Next he bought and interest in a saw-mill in Calhoun County, and remained there about eighteen months and then had charge of Pillsbury & Bradley's mill in Muskegon, as engineer, for some two years. Later he came to Manistee and took charge of the large gang saw-mill of Tyson, Robinson & Co. He remained in their employ until the mill was burned in the fall of 1868. He then removed to Frankfort, Benzie County, in the interest of George S. Frost, Esq. He cleared out the river, manufactured the lumber for the harbor, etc. In the spring of 1870 he commenced business on his own account, started the lumbering interest on the Aux Becs Scies River, and controlled the lumber business of the place until the time of the Chicago fire, when, through financial reverses, arising from misplaced confidence in employees, Mr. Crane was suddenly reduced almost to poverty, but by determined effort and perseverance he soon rose above the reverses, and resumed business, and this time with pleasing success. In the last three years the business has risen to a paid up value of some $75,000. They have about 5,000 acres of farming lands in Benzie and Manistee Counties. His mill has a cutting capacity of about forty thousand feet per day. Mr. Crane's marriage was on Nov. 21, 1866, to Miss Annette Rawlinson, of Grand Rapids. She was born in Chester, Ottawa County, Jan. 8, 1849. Their living children are Martin, Annastasia, James R., Berenice B., Ellen and Elsie. Mr. Crane, though subject for a time to severe business reverses, has been rewarded for his integrity, ambition and perseverance by the high esteem and cordial friendship of his patrons and fellow citizens. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

ROBERT S. DAY, farmer, Platte, Benzie County, was born in St. Joseph County, Mich., Dec. 9, 1834; remained in that county engaged in farming till 1862, when he enlisted in the Eleventh Michigan Infantry and served three years in the army of the Cumberland under Generals Rosecrans, Thomas and Sherman. Was wounded at Missionary Ridge and Chickamauga. After being mustered out of service came to Platte, Benzie County, and engaged in farming. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

CHRISTIAN C. FORNEY, superintendent of boom, Frankfort, was born in Ohio in 1848. He entered the service of the United States government in the fall of 1863 and served as clerk on the levee at Nashville, Tenn., until March, 1864, when he enlisted in the Nineteenth Ohio Veteran Volunteers, and after four months' service was detailed on detached service, as acting orderly for Gen. Samuel Beatty. He was honorably discharged Nov. 25, 1865, after the rebellion was quashed. He returned to Ohio but had contracted disease in the army, and in 1869 sought relief by a trip to Kansas, where he remained over four years. Leaving there he came to Monroe Center, Mich., and a year later to Frankfort, where he still resides. He has for the last six years been chiefly in the employ of Mr. A. G. Butler. His marriage was in 1870 to Miss Lydia J. Challender, of Longton, Kan. She was also a native of Ohio. Their children are Lorenzo, Clara, Cora, Stella and Myrtle. Their pleasant residence is on James Street, near the Market Square. Mr. Forney is justice of the peace in Frankfort, and also an officer in the G. A. R. His great grandfather was a veteran in the Revolutionary war. He had three uncles in the late Mexican war, and three uncles and fourteen cousins in the war of the late rebellion. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

WILLIAM H. FRANCIS, attorney-at-law, Frankfort, was born in Ingham County, Mich., Jan. 29, 1843. His youth and early manhood were spent in his native county where, also, he pursued his literary studies. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Second Michigan Cavalry and served his country in defense of liberty and the Union until honorably discharged in the fall of 1864. During his term of service he contracted inflammation of the eyes, which by mal-treatment was so aggravated that he lost his sight for about four years, but obtained relief in the fall of 1867. After the close of his service he returned to Ingham County, and in the fall of 1868 commenced the study of law with Judge Pratt, of Mason. He was admitted to the bar in that county in 1872, and practiced there until 1873, when he removed to Frankfort, Benzie County, and opened practice on Main Street, where he still pursues his legal profession with success. On July 12, 1872, he was married to Miss Mary Sutton, of Ann Arbor, Mich. She was a native of Pennsylvania and was born in June, 1848. Their children are Herbert P., Robert H., Leon S., William Wirt and Mabel. In the fall of 1874 Mr. Francis was elected prosecuting attorney, and served four years. In the fall of 1878 he was elected to the state legislature from Leelanaw and Benzie Counties. Since his return from there he has continued his legal practice as before. He also conducts a fruit farm of twenty acres about a mile from town. He has an orchard of 1,800 trees, consisting of choice varieties of apples, pears, peaches, plums, quinces and cherries, and also a small vineyard. His residence is on his farm. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

EUGENE B. FROST, fruit-grower, Frankfort, was born in Marcellus, N. Y., Jan. 10, 1826. He was bereaved of his father in infancy, and came with his mother to Pontiac, Mich., when eight years of age. Here he spent his youth and early manhood. On Dec. 13, 1848, he was married to Miss Sarah Jane Andrews, of West Bloomfield, Mich. She was born in Whitestown, N. Y., April 30, 1828. Their children are Eugene B., Clara J., Horace C. (deceased by drowning), Newton A. and Ellen N. They came to Frankfort in June, 1867, when there were only two dwellings in the place. They took lodgings in a barn until they erected a dwelling, which he did forthwith. Mr. Frost then entered the office of the Frankfort Land Company, in which his brother, George S. Frost, of Detroit, was one of the principal stockholders, and took charge as agent in the sale of their lands, and in the arrangement of the locality for a village. Mr. Frost, in later years, has devoted his attention to fruit-growing. He has a fine fruit plot connected with his beautiful residence on Leelanaw Avenue, two acres well filled with trees in the northeast part of town, and 120 acres of land on the shore of Crystal Lake, with some thirty acres cleared, which he also intends to devote to fruit. He has some very choice selections of apples, pears, plums, quinces and cherries, and some small fruits. He has served as justice of the peace, and is now, in 1884, superintendent of the poor. He has also served as school officer, and as deputy county clerk. Religiously, he and his family are Congregationalists, and he has been for many years trustee of the society. The barn in which Mr. Frost and family at first lodged in Frankfort was afterward refitted and used as a church and schoolhouse. Rev. A. H. Fletcher was the first Congregational pastor in Frankfort, and he remained nine years. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

JOHN GREENWOOD, blacksmith, Gilmore, was born at Three Rivers, Canada, Feb. 27, 1827. At the age of seventeen years he went to Chicago, shortly after to Michigan City, and thence to New Buffalo. He remained here over six years and learned the blacksmith's trade. From there he went to Cedar River, Wis., and, nine months later came to Ludington, Mich. On July 3, 1860, he was married to Miss Caroline Robar, of Ludington. They have six sons and five daughters. From Ludington Mr. Greenwood came to Manistee, and about a year afterward purchased a farm in Gilmore, Benzie County, and began preparing for himself and family a home in the forest. His family resided for three or four years near Betsie Lake, and he spent a large part of his time blacksmithing. Later he carried on blacksmithing in Frankfort for some seven years. In 1862 they removed to the farm. There, as before, they often passed through severe pioneer privations and disadvantages, being without roads and without markets, and with no supplies nearer than Portage of Manistee, and with frequently but scanty supplies even there. Sometimes the scant quantities brought in to Frankfort for the people had to be divided among them in proportion to numbers, by those who sold them. Now, however, Mr. Greenwood and family have nearly sixty acres of their beautiful fam land under cultivation, and have nearly thirty acres of thriving orchard, of apples, plums, cherries, pears, peaches, and grapes and other small fruits in abundance. They have an elegant and commodious dwelling, and other excellent buildings, and enjoy a rich reward for their former sacrifices and toils. On one occasion Mr. Greenwood started from Manistee in the forenoon, on snow-shoes, to go along the beach of the lake to his home near Betsie Lake, carrying about fifty pounds of provisions on his back. A fierce storm of wind and snow arose, at times almost smothering him. He, however, reached Herring Creek about four P.M., removed his snow-shoes, boots and socks, wrung the water from his socks, reclothed his feet and started again. Tried to go past his farm to his residence, fell back twice with his load in trying to climb the bank of the lake, and then went around by the mouth of the river and through a dense thicket of understood to his home. He arrived about 11 o'clock P.M. with his cap and clothing frozen to his person and with feet so much frozen that for three days he could not leave his house. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

RAMIRO EVANS, millwright, Frankfort, was born in Eaton County, Mich., May 25, 1840. He spent his youth and acquired his occupation in his native place. On Oct. 11, 1860, he was married to Miss Mary W. Dittmer, also of Easton County. She was born in New York, Oct. 4, 1844. Their children are John D., Inez C., Serena A. and Maggie Finetta. They came to Frankfort in February, 1867. Mr. Evans spent some time in carpenter and joiner work, and later built and put in running order two mills in Frankfort, the Island mill and the Evans and Crane mill, which he owned eight years. Since 1881 he has devoted his time chiefly to the superintendence of the engines, saws and general machinery in the large gang mill belonging to A. G. Butler, Esq., of Frankfort. His pleasant home is on Forest Avenue. He has been three years president of the Red Ribbon club, and for two terms W. C. T. of the I.O. G. T. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

JOHN J. HUBBELL, county treasurer, Benzie County, was born in Chenango, Erie County, Penn., July 8, 1844. His ancestors were early settlers in the region of Bridgeport, Conn., in 1640. Mr. Hubbell removed with his parents to Ashtabula County, O., when about six years of age, and remained there some twelve years. Several years of this time he spent in the Kingsville Academy. On May 5, 1862, he landed in a small boat from the propeller Susquehanna at the mouth of the Aux Becs Scies River and walked on foot by a trail to Benzonia to join his father and brother. During the next season he assisted his father in the erection of a small log grist-mill, the first built, he thinks, between Traverse and Ludington. He also assisted to cut the first road southward from Benzonia for several miles, that wagons from the south might come in. In the summer of 1862 he and Mr. H. E. Stewart, now of Grand Traverse, with the aid of only a pocket compass, marked the first trail directly through the woods from Benzonia to Glen Arbor, then a wooding point on Lake Michigan for propellers. They started with a five days' supply of provisions, but on the second morning hung part of them on a sapling to await their return. They reached the Arbor that night and returned the next day, bringing with them some stock and making plain the trail. Rev. E. E. Kirkland and son and Mr. William Willson came in with them and became the first residents of Homestead. Mr. Hubbell spent the historic "cold New Year's," Jan. 1, 1864, in the dense forest hunting fo r Rev. A. Barnard and wife and seven children, then supposed to be lost in attempting to reach Benzonia. They subsequently arrived in safety. On Sept. 7, 1864, Mr. Hubbell, in company with three others, enlisted in Battery G, First Michigan Artillery, these four making up the quota for Benzie county, out of 800,000 men then called for. His service was rendered chiefly in the gulf department. He was honorably discharged in August, 1865. He returned to Benzonia and, in partnership with his father, erected the new Benzonia flouring-mills. On June 14, 1866, he was married to Miss Sarah M. Huntington, daughter of W. O. Huntington, Esq., of Benzonia. She was born in Lynn, Mass., April 25, 1844. Their living children are Clarence W., Rena G., Lottie M., Myrtle A., John J. and Harlow H. Mrs. Hubbell died May 1, 1884. In 1869 Mr. Hubbell and family removed to Missouri, where he spent nearly six years, chiefly in surveying and engineering. Returning he invested in the mill property, and to that business since then he has devoted careful attention. Officially he has served several years as school director in Benzonia, and has been president of the Benzie County Horticultural Society almost ever since its organization, and since 1882 has been treasurer of Benzie County. Religiously he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

WILLIAM S. HUBBELL, miller, Benzonia, was born in Bridgeport, Conn., in 1812. He removed to Gustavus, Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1832. In August, 1833, he was married to Miss Eliza Case, daughter of A. Case, Esq., of Gustavus. She was born in Simsbury, Connecticut. Their living children are Lucius W., Helen L., John James, Buel C. and Elizabeth J. In 1861 they removed from Ohio to Benzonia, Benzie County, Mich., before either the township or county were organized they came in by the way of the Aux Becs Scies River. There were then only three families in Frankfort. Mr. Hubbell at once purchased lands and prepared a pioneer home in the wilderness. Soon after he erected a small log-mill, and athus furnished means for the home manufacture of flour, greatly to the relief and convenience of the settlers. The stones for the mill were brought in a small boat from Glen Arbor to Aux Becs Scies River, and thence up the river by poling the boat along with poles. In this way all supplies had then to be brought in. No wagon roads had then been built. The first year's grinding in the mill, 1863, was 800 bushels. In about 1867 a small stock company was formed for commercial purposes, and a store was commenced in a building built by Mr. Hubbell, on the east side of the creek. In the fall of 1877 the firm B. C. Hubbell & Co., (W. S. Hubbell being the other partner) was organized. The business was conducted by that firm some three years. Since then various changes have occurred. The business is now, in 1884, conducted by C. E. Case. Mr. Hubbell has also been engaged in lumbering, and in agriculture and in fruit growing. He was the first president of Benzie County Agricultural Society, and still remains in that responsible position. In 1875 Mr. Hubbell was postmaster of Benzonia post office, but only served a short time. He has served as township clerk and as township treasurer, and has four times been elected justice of the peace. He was one of the committee for the organizing of the county. He has served two years as deputy county treasurer, and fulfilled all the duties devolving on the principal treasurer. He has belonged to a temperance society since 1831. Religiously, Mr. and Mrs. Hubbell are Congregationalist. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

REV. AMARIAH JOY was born in Putney, Vt., May 15, 1809. He took his preparatory course at South Reading, Mass., and graduated in Waterville College, Maine, now Colby University, in 1835, and at Newton Theological Institute in 1838. He then served fifteen years as pastor in the regular Baptist churches in Maine, New Hampshire and Ohio. In 1863 he removed to what is now Joyfield, Benzie County, Mich., then unorganized, and with his wife and son spent the first winter four and a half miles from any settler. He assisted in organizing the township which was named for him, and he sees with pleasure the advance of settlement around them, and also the social, educational and above all the religious progress of the place. He has suffered severely from ill-health, but when health has permitted he has often preached twice on a Sabbath in various parts of this and adjoining counties. He preached the first sermon preached by a Baptist minister in the Grand Traverse Region, and baptized the first person baptized there by a Baptist minister. He organized the church at Acme, and assisted in organizing that on the peninsula, and in organizing and supplying churches in various other places. His homestead consisted of 160 acres, and was the first taken in the township. He has about twenty acres under cultivation, has a thriving orchard, a good dwelling, and pleasant home surroundings. He secured the institution of the Joyfield Post office, and has been postmaster twenty years. It was the second post office started in the county. Mr. Joy's marriage was on Nov. 15, 1888, to Miss Louisa Dwelly, also of Maine. She was born there Dec. 2, 1811, and resided in her native state until their removal to Ohio in 1853. She was early distinguished as a scholar, and commenced writing for the country press at sixteen years of age. They have three children, Frances R., now Mrs. Ingle Barker, Adelia C., now associate principal of Mount Carroll Female Seminary, at Mount Carroll, Ill., and William A.   May death with these veteran pioneers be as peaceful as life has been event ful.  [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery ...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

WILLIAM S. JOY, farmer, Joyfield, was born in Kennebunk, Me., Dec. 2, 1845. His early youth was spent chiefly in Ohio. On Dec. 28, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Forty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in the service of his country, and was honorably discharged Sept. 8, 1862, by reason of disability through injuries received in the battle of Pittsburgh Landing. In July, 1863, he came with his parents to Joyfield, Benzie County, Mich., and has had full and deep experience of the stern realities of pioneer life in Northern Michigan. He located 160 acres of land and now owns in all 200 acres. He has twenty-five acres under cultivation, about two acres of orchard in prosperous condition, and an inviting home. After his return from the war, he attended two terms at the Dennison University, Grandville, Ohio. His marriage was on Nov. 2, 1871, to Miss Sylvia L. Reed, of Joyfield. They have two living sons and three daughters. Mr. Joy has been school officer some fifteen years, and township clerk about twelve years, and is now, in 1884, postmaster of Joyfield post office. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

FRED KERN, merchant, Frankfort, was born in Paderborn, Prussia, March 20, 1828. He came to the United States in July, 1848, located in the city of New York, and was employed as an entry clerk in a bond ware house in West Street. From there he went to St. Louis, and was salesman in the first class grocery of Mr. Powell, but had to leave at the end of two years, because of ill health. He went to Sandusky, Ohio, and was salesman in the leading general store in that city, in the employ of Mr. Charles Converse for one year. He then came to Detroit, Mich., chiefly because of having friends there from his native country, and entered the employ of Mr. James A. Hicks, afterward of the firm of Hicks, Palmer & co., and remained one year in the retail department, and two years in the jobbing department. Then, at the urgent solicitation of friends he opened a commercial business at New Baltimore, Macomb Count, and in 1862 added the manufacture of flour barrel staves, heading and hoops, in large quantities, and continued until 1866. His health was now failing and he sold his entire business interests and real estate there, and spent one year at Marine City in mercantile business with his brother-in-law, but, not pleased with the climate there, he came to Frankfort, Benzie County, and made some investments in real estate, but soon after returned to Marine City, and with some others invested in the building of a steamer, the "George S. Frost." On this he moved to Frankfort in 1868, and opened business as a pioneer general merchant, and has ever since enjoyed a satisfactory and enlarging patronage from the village and surrounding country. He commodious store with well selected stock is on the corner of Main and Fourth Streets. Mr. Kern's marriage was in 1852, to Miss Belinda Gallagher, of Detroit. She was born in Ireland and came to America in infancy. Their living children are John J., Rudolphus W., Mary, Gertey, James M., and Anna. Besides his business block and residence on main Street, Mr. Kern has two lots on Forest Avenue, and also owns a prominent dock, warehouse and saw mill. He is agent for the Goodrich Transportation Company, and their steamers land at his dock. He has never been a seeker for political office, but delights to labor for the social and educational improvement of his community, and views with pleasure the present achievements in the school accommodations of Frankfort, won by hard and lengthened effort. His eldest daughter was the first graduate in the Frankfort Union School, and graduated with such honors that she was chosen as assistant teacher, and has succeeded so well that she has been elevated to and now, in 1884, holds the position of principal in the high school department. In Frankfort and New Baltimore, Mr. Kern has served as school officer some fifteen years. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

CHARLES LAVEAUX, farmer, Frankfort, was born in St. Johns, Canada, May 12, 1840. He came to Grand Traverse when fifteen years old, and was two years in the employ of Hannah, Lay & Co. Later he spent some time in Chicago, Green Bay, Herring Cre ek, Illinois, and other places, then lived seven years in Glen Arbor and came to Frankfort, Benzie county, in 1855. He carried the Benzonia mail nearly four years. Carried the first mail from Frankfort to Pierport, and continued it eight years. Carried the mail one year to Glen Arbor. Was married Oct. 28, 1870, to Miss Margaret M. Coggshall, of Frankfort. She was born in Salem, N. Y., Oct. 18, 1842. He has thirty acres of cultivated land about one mile from town with seven acres in choice varieties of apples, pears, plums, peaches and grapes and small fruits. When he first came to Frankfort there was only one shanty on the north side of the river. There were three families on the south side. On about the middle of December, 1861, or later, he and Mr. John Cushmire, a Mr. Marshall and a young girl started from Frankfort in a small boat for Glen Arbor on a Saturday morning. During the day a fierce wind arose. Mr. L. wished to turn back, but Mr. Marshall refused, and in the night while working the boat fell overboard and was drowned. The rest drifted before the northeast wind all night, made sail southward the next day and made the shore at Portage on Sabbath night. He has been overseer of highways and highway commissioner in Frankfort.  [The Traverse Reg ion, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

BENJAMIN F. LINCOLN, of the firm of Hall & Lincoln, Frankfort, was born in Wareham, Plymouth County, Mass., Sept. 4, 1831. He was educated in the common schools and learned the hardware business in Wilmington, Del. In March, 1852, he went to California. After working a year in the mines he went to Portland, Ore., and in the winter of 1853, located in Corvallis, Ore., where he conducted a hardware establishment until 1857, when ill health compelled him to return to the east. In 1860 he was married to Miss Annie A. Lombard, of Acushnet, Mass. In 1862 he located in Lyndon, Vt., and was again engaged in the hardware business until December, 1865, when he closed out that branch of business and engaged in the lumbering enterprise with his present partner, D. P. Hall, Esq. He is in 1884 still engaged in the lumber and hardware business. He has filled various local offices, and from 1876 to 1878 was a member of the Vermont legislature. His present residence is in Lyndon, Vt.  The lumber firm of Hall & Lincoln, Frankfort, formerly that of Hall & Simmons, was organized in 1879, partners D. P. Hall and B. F. Lincoln. They own no mills in Frankfort, but stock two mills for lumber and one for shingle. Their stock of logs in 1884 is over thirty million feet. One-half the lumber is shipped to western markets and the rest to Tonawanda, N.Y. a large part of their work is the manufacture of pine lumber from the Corning tract, consisting originally of 8,300 acres. Messrs. Hall & Lincoln also own some 8,000 acres of pine and hard wood lands in Benzie and Grand Traverse Counties. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & C o.; 1884]

STUART MACKIBBIN, superintendent Union Schools, Frankfort, Mich., was born of Scotch ancestry, in Geneva, Wis., Nov. 22, 1860. He s pent his youth and received his education in his native state. He began teaching in the schools of Geneva at seventeen years of age, and has ever since made teaching his employment. During the years of 1880 and '81 he was tutor in the college in Valparaiso, Ind. Next he taught in the city of Columbia in that state, but in the summer of 1883, he resigned his position there because of ill health, removed to Frankfort, Mich., and accepted a position as superintendent of the Union Schools, being the first to occupy that office in the place. Mr. Mackibbin is chiefly a self-educated person. He has only enjoyed six years at school as a pupil, yet has acquired a knowledge of the courses of Latin, Greek and German, and also of the Mathematics usually taught in the colleges. His schools made most commendable progress during the year ending June, 1884, and his graduating class, the first in Frankfort, passed the examination with honor to itself, its instructors and the school. Mr. Mackibbin's school strength is as an organizer. In this he takes especial delight and has pleasing success. Politically he is a Democrat, and has from boyhood taken a lively interest in the political issues of his country. Fraternally he is a Free Mason of the Knight Templar degree. Religiously he is a member of the Presbyterian Church. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

PETER S. MEABON, a native of Erie County, Pa., came to Frankfort in 1862, and in February, 1864, enlisted in the First Michigan Light Artillery, Battery M. He was the first volunteer who enlisted from Frankfort. He was honorably discharged in August, 1865. During his term of service he suffered severely from erysipelas and chronic diarrhea, and later he has become lame and crippled from sciatic rheumatism, and is now dependent on the kind labors of his wife for support. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

JOHN A. MERTZ, farmer, Homestead, was born in Germany, Aug. 31, 1850; came to New York in 1860, and thence to Houghton County, Mich., on Lake Superior. He spent five years in working in the copper mills, and later was engaged somewhat in shoemaking, but more largely as a barber. In 1868 he removed to Wisconsin, and three years later visited Illinois, and then came to Frankfort, Mich.; resided near there five years, and then removed to the township of Homestead; spent three years on a rented farm, and then purchased 180 acres in Sections 28 and 33, where he now resides. He has fifty acres now under cultivation, a thriving orchard of choice selections of fruit, and a good house and other farm buildings. His marriage was on July 1, 1872, to Miss Susan M. Potter, also of Homestead. She was born in Ohio, June 14, 1853. Their children are John William and Minnie May. His father, A. Mertz, was a miner, and went to Lake Superior mining region in 18542, being one of the first to engage in mining in that region. Mr. and Mrs. Potter, parents of Mrs. Mertz, came to Homestead, where Mrs. Mertz now resides, in 1868, when no clearing had yet been done on the place. He at once prepared a dwelling and engaged in improving the lands. He died in 1878. Mrs. Potter now resides with her daughter and son-in-law. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

JOHN H. MILLER, proprietor of billiard hall and confectionery, Frankfort, was born in Canada, in 1850, and came to Manistee, Mich., in 1872, and for nearly three years was clerk in the City Hotel. He then spent about two years at Lake Superior, and came from there to Frankfort to visit a dying brother; and in the summer of 1881 opened his present business stand, on Main Street. His marriage was on Dec. 4, 1881, to Mrs. Wilhelmina Michel, of Frankfort. She was born in Germany in 1850. The have one infant daughter. Mrs. Miller has one son, Henry Michel. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

JOSEPH OLIVER was born in Pennsylvania, Oct. 24, 1820. He came to Manitou Island, Mich., some thirty-eight years ago. Two years later he came to Manistee, and four years after this to Betsie River, now Frankfort, being the first settler in that region. He for some time owned fourteen acres at the mouth of the river, and sold it to Mr. Resden, a surveyor, who re-surveyed the country all around as far as Traverse. He used to bring provisions for the surveyors from Manitou and move his own quarters along as occasion required. Has spent many years in fishing, hunting and trapping. Has sold $300 worth of furs in one winter, consisting chiefly of otter, mink, beaver, fisher, marten, lynx and wild cats. His first wife was Miss Lydia Wasrage, of Muskegon. His second was Miss Margaret Robar, of Frankfort. His son, Joseph, is now captain of the barge Rumble. Mr. Oliver built the first house in Frankfort, near where the Park House now is, before any one else arrived and settled. Mr. L. A. Doby came next, and next Mr. Coggshall. There was then one mill at Manistee and one at Stronach. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

CHARLES H. PARKER, farmer, supervisor of Joyfield, was born in Gowanda, Erie County, N.Y., July 31, 1833. He spent his youth in his native state. In 1855 he graduated at the New York State Normal School, Albany. He was then engaged in teaching until 1857. He then spent some time in traveling. He spent some months in Guayaquil, Ecuador, S. A. He went thence to California, arriving in 1858. There again he was engaged in teaching, in Placerville, for about three years. On Oct. 1, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Fifth California Volunteer Infantry, and served as commissary sergeant most of his time. He was honorably discharged Dec. 12, 1864, at El Paso, Texas. Shortly after he became clerk in the commissary department at Fort Selden, New Mexico. Later, after nine years absence, he returned to his former home in Hamburg, in June, 1866. In November following he started for the Grand Traverse Region, Mich., arriving in Traverse City Nov. 6, 1866. A few days later he located a homestead in Joyfield, Benzie County, and began preparing a home in the lofty forest, but still spending part of his time in teaching. In 1870 he was elected supervisor of Joyfield, but soon resigned that office, and served as clerk and registrar of Benzie County during 1871 and 1872. On Jan. 31, 1872, he was married to Miss Lizzie A. Keillor, of Pleasanton, Mich. She was born in Iona, Canada, April 10, 1851. Their children are Francelia M., Addie E. and Warren Stuart. Since his term of clerkship expired he has been engaged in agriculture and horticulture, and has about 1,500 choice fruit trees, mostly in bearing. They consist of apples, pears, peaches, plums, cherries, quinces and grapes and other small fruits. He made a specialty of nut bearing trees, including butternut, black walnut, chestnut, hickory, almond and hazel nut. He has served as justice of the peace sixteen years, township superintendent of schools about six years, and is now, in 1884, serving in his third year as supervisor of Joyfield. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

CAPTAIN JONATHAN PENFOLD, Frankfort, was born in England, April 26, 1850. He came with his father to Blue Island, Ill., when about seven years of age, and from there went to Middleport, Niagara County, N.Y. Here he spent his youth and received his education. In May, 1867, he came to Frankfort, Benzie County, Mich. He thinks there were then only three settlers on the north side of Betsie River - Mr. R. Ball, Mr. William H. Coggshall and Mr. Jacob Voorheis. Mr. Penfold was for a time variously employed as occasion required. He did the first piece of work on the Frankfort furnace. Later, he accepted a position as foreman for Delbridge & Welsh, and continued in the occupation as fore man some seven or eight years. he then purchased the steam tug Jennie Ball, and since then has been engaged in the work of removing wrecked vessels from the beach to their destination, and in all other forms of tug work. His marriage was on Oct. 24, 1883, to Miss Flora M. Watson, of Frankfort. She was born in Pontiac, Mich., May 1, 1865. He has served as constable and as deputy sheriff of Benzie County. His beautiful residence is on Leelanaw Avenue in front of Fifth Street, Frankfort.[The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

REV. JOHN PETTITT, was born near Gettysburg, Penn., in 1799, and was reared and educated in his native state. He entered the ministry in the Congregational church when about thirty years of age. He labored some six years in Akron, O., and nearly twenty years in Bucyrus, O., besides various labors elsewhere bestowed. In 1867 he came to Benzonia, Benzie County, Mich., to take part in instituting and sustaining a Christian colony and college for the promotion of education, industry and moral culture. He was abundant in gospel labors in Benzonia, Homestead and elsewhere, often preaching three times a day. In his doctrinal views Mr. Pettitt aimed to be a fully orthodox. In his financial business he was economical and successful. In his gifts to the church and benevolent enterprises he was beneficently liberal. But his life work came suddenly to a close. On returning from his usual labors on a Sunday evening he was taken suddenly ill, and in less than an hour he was called from labor to reward. His death was on May 11, 1879. His first marriage was to Miss E. Agnew. No children. His second was to Miss E. A. Marshall; issue, one son, Charles M. This third marriage was to Miss Ann E. Boyd. They have three sons, Thomas Boyd, James Agnew and William J., and one daughter, Bessie, deceased in 1875. Mrs. Pettitt still resides in the pleasant home where her husband died. The sons are prosperously settled on large and valuable farms, mostly left them from the father's estates. Thomas B. has a wife and three daughters, and is supervisor of Benzonia; James A. has a wife and three children and has been under sheriff of Benzie County; and William Jay, now bereaved of his companion, has one daughter, Bessie, and has been township treasurer of Benzonia.

AUGUST SCHMIDT, merchant, Frankfort, was born in Mainz, on the Rhine, in Germany, April 5, 1846. He left his native country and came to New York, March 1, 1865. He had previously passed the merchants' school in Germany, and had been five years clerk and bookkeeper, and at once entered the employ of Mr. Francis Wagner, importer of groceries, but left them nearly a year later at the call of his uncle to come to Leelanaw County and engage in agricultural work. In May, 1866, he left there for Chicago. From there he went to New York, from there to Germany and thence to Switzerland; then back again to Germany, and thence again to New York. There he spent five years in business, and then went by the way of Frankfort, Mich., to Milwaukee, and spent another five years in business. On Sept. 30, 1877, he was married to Miss Bertha Prier, of the firm of Loeffelholz & Prier, of Milwaukee. She was born there Jan. 24, 1857. They have one daughter, Clara, born in Milwaukee, Sept. 20, 1878. In May, 1880, he returned to Frankfort, purchased a business stand and opened a full stock of groceries on Main Street, and since then has added an excellent baker and a most enticing sock of confectionery. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Maccabees, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Free and Accepted Masons. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

ALONZO J. SLYFIELD, M.D., Frankfort, was born in Concord, Vt., June 1, 1825. He came with his parents to Michigan when seven years of age, landing beside a floating bridge in Pine River, in St. Clair, from the old steamer Gratiot. There, chiefly, he spent his youth and early manhood. He studied medicine in Hyde Park, Vermont, with Dr. A. Morse, having previously spent three years in medical research among the Indians. On his return to St. Clair he opened a drug store, and commenced the practice of medicine on the eclectic system. On Dec. 10, 1848, he was married to Miss Alice J. Latham, of China, St. Clair County. She was born in Greenwich, Washington County, N.Y., May 26, 1826. Their children are Nellie M., now deceased, Charles B., Mary, now deceased, Edwin R., Elmer E., George W., and Jennie A. In August, 1853, after a severe illness, Mr. Slyfield accepted a situation as keeper of the lighthouse on Manitou Island, and remained there nearly ten years. From there he removed to Empire Bay, purchased lands, and opened a pioneer home for himself and family. Late in the fall he left his family alone and returned to Manitou for a boat load of provisions, and became weather bound there for about three weeks. In his third attempt to leave he had the help of another person and succeeded. That night the ice formed heavily on the bench, closing up all transition for the winter, but he had made good his escape and joined his anxious family with unspeakable satisfaction. He resided there part of two years, and then he became the keeper of the lighthouse at Point Betsie and remained nearly twenty-two years. The instruction of his children he secured partly by private teaching in his family and partly at the school in Benzonia. While at Point Betsie the doctor resumed his medical practice, and endured severe hardships in visiting the sick throughout the neighborhood. During one winter he went repeatedly to Almira and vicinity to visit and treat those who became ill through want and hardship. He waded the Platte River eighteen times, standing barefoot on the ice to dress himself at the shore, and then resumed his journey on snowshoes, in snow four feet deep. He was one of the first purchasers of village lots in Frankfort village. He thinks Mr. Coggshall made the first and he the second purchase of building lots in the place. The doctor now has a beautiful residence on Forest Avenue, and other property in the village, and 200 acres of real estate south of the river. He has served as justice of the peace eight years, and six years as county coroner. The wreck of the J. Y. Scammon in 1854 is thus described by Mr. Slyfield. "While seated here alone, watching my light tonight , my thoughts drift back to a scene of twenty-five years ago. On the 8th of June, 1854, I was keeper of the South Manitou Island light. The wind that day blew from the northeast a living gale, and, strange to say, snow fell to a depth of six inches, but owing to a rain, it soon melted away. The sea was running high, and seemed as though it could not grow larger, but still the storm increased. In the height of the storm a brig was seen making for the island. It proved to be the brig J. Y. Scammon, owned by Hannah, Bay, & Co., of Grand Traverse. I saw the doomed vessel slowly nearing the beach, and, knowing she would soon be ashore if her anchors did not fetch her up, and among the breakers that were dashing and boiling and foaming white against the shore, and perhaps drown the crew, I came to the conclusion that something must be done to get communication to them. The thought came to me like a flash to write a note and send it to them in a bottle. I then took a small rope and bottle in my hands, held them aloft, and made signs to the crew to send me a small line, which they soon understood, and fastening a line to a buoy and throwing it overboard, was but a moment's work. It soon reached the shore. I attached the bottle containing a note and it was hauled on board, and the passengers, as well as crew, were not long in learning my design, and a shout of joy went up from every mouth. The note was, 'Can I render you any assistance? If so, send word by bottle.' The answer came back per the same trusty little messenger, saying, 'Our big chain has parted, and the small one will not hold us long. Look out for us ashore.' I patrolled the shore and in about an hour after that, the brig came on broadside. The men launched a spare spar over the rail, the end resting in shoal water. The mate mounted it, and slid down, and wading through the water, was helped ashore. Next followed four ladies, who came ashore in about the same manner, the mate and I assisting them as they came in reach. And so the crew were safely landed, much to their joy. "I still have in my possession a spyglass, whi ch I purchased from the captain. On it is engraved the name of 'J.Y. Scammon,' and while in daily use it often reminds me of the wrecking of the brig nearly a quarter of a century ago, when the marine interest, now grown to gigantic proportions, was yet in its infancy. "On our return with the shipwrecked crew to the lighthouse, we found that du ring my absence I had been blessed by the arrival of an eight-pound blue-eyed boy, and there was indeed a feeling of happiness in the station that night, and I felt satisfied that I had accomplished more that day than on any other day of my previous life. That child has grown up to manhood, and from his early years has always been a careful watcher for the safety of lives from wrecks; and has while quite young assisted me in saving the crew from another wreck, under similar circumstances. He has spent his whole life in handling boats in the surf, and on the old lake at his occupation of fishing. He, at such times, is careful, considerate and cool, and would be a valuable acquisition to the United States Life Saving Service."  [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descript ive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

HIRAM M. SPICER, horticulturist, supervisor of Crystal Lake Township, was born in Mount Morris, N.Y., Dec. 28, 1838. He spent his youth and early manhood in his native state, employed chiefly in mechanical work and school teaching. On Jan. 14, 1861, he was married to Miss Diana E. Kennedy, of Edmeston, N.Y. She was born there July 9, 1845. They have one son, C. Elmer, born Jan. 4, 1862. In September, 1863, Mr. Spicer enlisted in Company L, Twentieth New York Cavalry, and served his country in defense of liberty and the Union, until honorably discharged, Aug. 11, 1865, after the close of the war. On one raid from Dismal Swamp to Albermarle Sound, Mr. Spicer rode 120 miles in twenty hours, and had been on active duty without intermission seventy-two hours. The exhaustion, however, overpowered him. typhoid fever followed, and for several weeks he lay helpless in the hospital. After the war was over he returned home, and in the fall of 1867 he came to Frankfort, Benzie County, Mich., purchased land in Crystal Lake Township, began preparing a home in the forest, and was joined by his family in the spring of 1868. Work had been begun on the harbor, and he and Messrs. Hooper & Oliver furnished most of the piles for the entire harbor. Mr. Spicer is now devoting his attention largely to the culture of fruit. He has twenty-one acres of beautiful fruit farm land with choice selections of apples, pears, peaches, plums, quinces, cherries, grapes and small fruits, and inviting home surroundings. Mr. Spicer takes an active interest in the political issues of his country. He took a leading part in the organization of the Greenback party in this community. He has been twice nominated for the state legislature, and received a very liberal vote from his own party and many other persons. He has served in all nearly ten years as supervisor of Crystal Lake Township, besides serving in several other minor offices, and his name has been continuously prominent in the official circles of his community. His son, C. E. Spicer, though still a young man, holds the responsible position of principal of the public school in South Frankfort, and is enjoying most commendable success. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

CHARLES A. VOORHEIS, superintendent of mill, Frankfort, was born in Ypailanti, Mich., Aug. 17, 1846. He went from there to East Saginaw in 1850, and remained there until the outbreak of the rebellion. In the fall of 1862 he enlisted in Company C, Seventh Michigan Cavalry, to serve in defense of his country. His fiercest conflict with the rebels was the battle of Gettysburg. There he received a gunshot wound in the right ankle, and because of disability arising therefrom, he was honorably discharged in January, 1864, and has since received a pension. He returned to Saginaw, and later graduated in the Goldsmith's, Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College in Detroit, and in the spring of 1865 engaged as bookkeeper in the firm of Buhl, Ducharne & C o., wholesale hardware merchants. Next he spent a year with J. James & Son, also hardw are merchants, and in the fall of 1867 came to Frankfort and was engaged in the hardware business until the spring of 1874, when he sold his commercial interest to Mr. Upton, and entered the employ of Mr. A. G. Butler, as superintendent of the mill. This situation he has occupied ever since. Mr. Voorheis' marriage was on Dec. 3, 1873, to Miss Lalla Butler, of Frankfort. She was born in Detroit, May 7, 1850. Their living children are Bessie, Kate, Max Butler and Vincent Kittredge. He has a cultivated farm of sixty acres east of town, with six acres of fruit bearing orchard on it. He also owns 200 acres of real estate in Springdale. His enticing home is on Forest Avenue. Fraternally he belongs to the Free Masons, and to the Grand Army of the Republic. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & C o.; 1884]

ISAAC VOORHEIS, physician and surgeon, Frankfort, was born in Steuben County, N.Y., June 5, 1832. He came with his parents to Oakland County, Mich., in infancy, and spent his youth there in school studies and agricultural pursuits. Later he entered the dental profession and practiced for some fourteen years in Pontiac, in one stand. His suite of rooms was three times consumed by fire, and as often rebuilt and furnished. His marriage was on Oct. 11, 1853, to Miss Eliza M. Johnson, also of Oakland County. They had one son, Elton Il. Mrs. E. M. Voorheis died in 1873. Mr. Voorheis' second marriage was on Nov. 1, 1874, to Miss Ann E. Francis, of Pontiac. She was born there in 1842. They have one daughter, Mabel. While pursuing his dental profession in Pontiac he also read medicine with Dr. C. E. Fuller. In 1867 he opened medical practice in Frankfort, Benzie County, on the homeopathic system, and has enjoyed a steadily enlarging patronage until the present time. He has a beautiful residence on Leelanaw Avenue, a dwelling on Main Street, and a pleasant fruit farm of twenty acres on Michigan Avenue, where he has a choice selection of apples, pears, plums and cherries. He has received a compliment from Chicago merchants as furnishing the best plums grown in the United States. They have sold at five cents each on the market. He has received $60 for the fruit of one tree in one season. Fraternally the Doctor is a Free Mason, and glories in brotherly love, relief and truth. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

JACOB VOORHEIS, retired merchant, Frankfort, was born in Seneca County, N.Y., May 10, 1814. He came with his parents to Bloomfield, Oakland County, Mich., in 1823. In this vicinity he spent his youth. He received his later education at the Pontiac Academy. In the fall of 1836 he was married to Miss Lucy A. Frost, of Pontiac. She was born in Onondaga County, N.Y., Jun 30, 1818. She died at Milford, in October, 1844, where they had gone to reside shortly after marriage. After her death Mr. Voorheis spent some years in Detroit and vicinity employed in teaching. Mr. Voorheis' second marriage was in October, 1845, to Miss Harriet Kittredge, of Lowell, Mass. She was born in Dracutt, Mass., Oct. 30, 1820. Their living children are Charles A., Mary E. and Hattie E. In the winter of 1850 Mr. Voorheis went to East Saginaw and entered the employ of W. L. P. Little & Co., as chief bookkeeper and cashier, and remained there until the fall of 18 66. He was now suffering severely from paralysis, and concluded to remove to Frankfort, Benzie County. He first reached the place from Traverse by way of Benzonia. Soon after he chartered a vessel, and brought in and opened a stock of general merchandise. Two years later, on the arrival of his son, Charles A. Voorheis, he closed up the general department and merged his capital with his son into a hardware business, which some years later was sold to Mr. Upton. In 1873, for sanitary reasons, Mr. and Mrs. V. made a tour to California, spending over six months in various parts of the western world. Since then his time has been mostly occupied in behalf of home and local interests. When he first came to Frankfort the place was almost all in its native wilderness, and he and Mrs. Voorheis have had full and deep experience of pioneer adventure, disadvantaged and hardship, but now look out with rich gratification upon the substantial business blocks beautiful residences, and progressive industrial, social, educational and religions enterprise of the growing town of Frankfort, their chosen home. Mr. Voorheis has served as justice of the peace and as county treasurer of Benzie County, besides filling various other official trusts. Religiously, they are members of the Congregational Church. The Sabbath school was formed in his room, in 1867, and he and Mrs. V. still retain their official positions in the school. He has been superintendent some fifteen years. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

TIMOTHY M. WALKLEY, hotel keeper and postmaster, Homestead, was born in Madison, Conn., Nov. 27, 1822. He removed with his parents to Chautauqua County, N.Y., in childhood, and thence three years later to Warren County, Penn. Here he spent his youth and early manhood, employed in lumbering and other industrial pursuits. On June 6, 1847, he was married to Miss Jane Edmunds, of Wrightsville, Penn. She was born in Oneida County, N.Y., in 1821. Their children are Ann Eliza and Frank L. and an adopted son, John Lindell. In September, 1865, he made a tour through Ohio, Indiana Illinois to Beloit in Wisconsin, and thence by way of Milwaukee to Northport, Mich. From there he came to Traverse City, and shortly after located lands in Homestead, Benzie County, prepared a dwelling, and with his family entered the pioneer home in November, 1866. They brought in their goods from Traverse City on wagons, by a mere winding track through the woods, and were two days in coming twenty-five miles. Hay for three years had to be brought from Traverse City, sometimes costing $40 per ton, delivered. At times only one bale could be brought at once. Mr. Walkley owns in all 600 acres of land. On his home farm he has some forty-five acres under cultivation, has a thriving orchard of 200 trees, including apples, pears, plums, cherries, quinces and grapes, and various other small fruits. He has also from the first kept a place of public entertainment. The hotel is situated on the stage road between Benzonia and Traverse City, and affords first-class accommodations for the traveling public. One of his first customers was H. H. Noble, Esquire, of Elk Rapids. In the summer of 1876 Mr. & Mrs. Walkley and son visited the Centenn ial Exhibition. They went by way of Erie and Warren and Harrisburg, and thence to Baltimore, and thence to Washington, visiting the Capitol, the White House, the national monument, the agricultural grounds, and various other rare scenes. They then proceeded to Philadelphia and enjoyed a true centennial season of entertaining sight-seeing. On Pennsylvania's day, 265,564 persons passed through the Centennial gates. Returning by the way of Rome, N. Y., they visited the friends of Mrs. Walkley, and later after, revisiting his own friends in Warren County, Penn., they came joyously home, well repaid for the time and funds expended. Mr. Walkley has been township treasurer five years, and highway commissioner six years. He is now, in 1884, justice of the peace, and has been postmaster of Homestead post office since 1867. Fraternally he belongs to the I. O. O. F., and to the Order of Free and Accepted Masons. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

FRED A. WATSON, of the firm of F. A. Watson & Co., Frankfort, was born in Ponti ac, Mich., Aug. 2, 1853, and has, during most of his life since attaining his majority, been associated with his father in business pursuits. He has, however, spent three years in Plano, Ill., in the employ of the Marsh Harvester Company. In the spring of 1880 he returned to Michigan, and formed the business relations which he now sustains in the above named firm. His marriage was on Nov. 9, 1881, to Miss Jennie Curtis, of Plano, Ill. She was born in the state of New York, April 23, 1860. They have one daughter, Tella, born in Frankfort, Nov. 19, 1882. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

THOMAS WATSON, of the firm of F. A. Watson & Co., Frankfort, was born in Engla nd, Aug. 20, 1834, and came to Pontiac, Mich., in 1851, and was for some time engaged in the manufacture of furniture. His marriage was in the fall of 1855, to Miss Annie Chandler, also of Pontiac. She also was a native of England, and was born in 1836. Their living children are Fred A., Ida E. and Flora May. In 1867 their business estate was consumed by fire. In 1869 they removed to Frankfort, Benzie County, and engaged in the furniture and undertaker business. In 1880 a planning-mill was added to their former business investments, under the firm name of F. A. Watson & Co. This mill with its contents was totally consumed by fire in October, 1881, but was forthwith rebuilt and the business continued. The work of the firm consists in planning and matching flooring, and in the manufacture of furniture and moldings of all kinds, and in all varieties of custom work. Undertaking also receives the closest attention. In the fall of 1882 a small saw-mill was added for the preparation of stock for the firm, and also for general and custom work. Their business stand is prominently located on Main Street, adjacent to the Clark dock. Mr. Watson has been a member of the public school board in Frankfort, and has seen with pleasure the success of school interests in their town. Mrs. Watson has a pleasant fruit farm north of town with four acres already planted with choice varieties of apples, pears, cherries, plums and grapes, and other small fruits. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

ALFRED N. WHITCOMB, clerk and registrar, Benzie County, was born near Easton Rapids, Mich., Feb. 1, 1847. His father, Timothy Whitcomb, was one of the early settlers in Eaton County. In 1853 his parents removed to Allegan County. He attended the Kalamazoo high school three years, and in 1866 he graduated at Eastman's business college, in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. He then remained at home until he attained his majority. On April 9, 1868, he was married to Miss Ellen E. Chandler, of Kalamazoo County. She was born there July 27, 1849. Their children are Ida L., born Dec. 6, 1869; Leon Alva, born July 21, 1876; Floyd, born March 13, 1879, died March 24 1879, and Edith Mabel, born Nov. 27, 1881. In 1878 Mr. Whitcomb removed with his family to Homestead, Benzie County, purchased lands and prepared them a home in the waving forest. He cleared seventy acres, erected buildings, planted nearly 300 orchard trees, and secured inviting home surroundings. With the exception of teaching school two winters, he never worked out to support his family. At the first election he ever attended in Homestead he was elected township clerk and justice of the peace, and served in each office nine years. He was township superintendent of schools two years and school assessor over nine years. In 1882 he was elected county clerk and registrar, resigned his township positions and removed to Benzonia, and since January, 1883, has given unremitting attention to his official duties. In the spring of 1884 he sold his farm, with appurtenances, for about $3,700. Fraternally he is a Free Mason and exults in brotherly love, relief and truth. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

GEORGE W. WILTSE, of the firm of Wiltse Bros., Frankfort, was born in Norwich, Ontario, Oct. 2, 1842. He was bereaved of his mother at nine years of age. He came to Coopersville, Ottawa County, Mich., in the spring of 1856, and spent over two years chiefly in farming. From there with his father and three brothers he came to Frankfort, Benzie County, then a part of Grand Traverse County, in July, 1859. Five men with wheelbarrows were digging a channel from Betsie Lake into Lake Michigan to prepare a harbor. The first frame building in the place was then just being erected. During the first year Mr. Wiltse and his friends worked chiefly on the harbor. The next year they located them a homestead and began making improvements on their lands in the forest. In 1875 he and his brother, Hiram Wiltse, engaged in harness and saddlery business in Frankfort, and continued until 1883, when they dissolved partnership and Mr. G. W. Wiltse erected a store on Main Street, and he and his brother, M. D. Wiltse, opened a large stock of groceries and provisions, accompanied by a first-class bakery and are receiving a steadily increasing patronage. Mr. Wiltse's marriage was on Dec. 24, 1867, to Miss Abbie M. Farley, of near Frankfort. She was born in Buckland, Franklin County, Mass., July 9, 1851. They have one daughter, Lulu D. Their residence is on Main Street. Religiously they are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & C o.; 1884]

HIRAM WILTSE, saddler, Frankfort, was born in Oxford County, Ontario, Jan. 22, 1838. He also came to Coopersville, Mich., in 1856, and to Betsie river, now Frankfort, in 1859. He was engaged as cook for the old pier company for about one year. He then spent three years in trapping and with good success. Later he was cook in the lumber camps at Portage Creek. On Oct. 22, 1865, he was married to Miss Delia E. Boss, of Portage. She was a native of New York State. They have one son, Charles Orson. Mr. Wiltse spent several years in farming near Frankfort. Engaging in the harness business with his brother in 1875, he has given steady attention thereto ever since, and has now an extensive patronage. He was one of the first settlers in the place, and was one of the judges in the first fair in Benzie County. He has served as school inspector and highway commissioner. Mr. and Mrs. Wiltse and their son are all members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

MARSHALL D. WILTSE, of the firm of Wiltse Bros., Frankfort, was born in Oxford County, Ontario, March 17, 1846. He was associated with his father and brothers in Ottawa County, and in their pioneer engagements in Frankfort and vicinity. He continued in the farming enterprise until June, 1883, and in the fall following entered the firm of Wiltse Bros., as already mentioned. His marriage was in 1865, to Miss Alice R. Morgan, of Frankfort. She was a native of Wisconsin. They have two children, Albert and Bertha May. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

GEORGE C. WOODWARD, merchant, Frankfort, was born in Oakland County, Mich., and was married Aug. 9, 1877, to Miss Rose McGee, of Lansing, Mich. She is a native of Erie County, Penn. They have two daughters, Frances and Nellie. He is a partner in the firm of H. Woodward & Son, Frankfort. Mrs. Woodward has been three years a member of the cou nty board of school examiners, of which, in 1884, she is secretary. She is also school inspector of Crystal Lake Township. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

HENRY WOODWARD, merchant, was born in Somersetshire, England, March 18, 1819. He came with his parents to Tompkins County, N.Y., in 1825. Here he was reared and educated, spending his early time chiefly in agricultural pursuits. On Sept. 11, 1842, he was married to Miss Frances Tracy, of Ithaca, N. Y. She was born there in 1823. Their children are: Helen, now Mrs. H. D. Osborne; Emily, now Mrs. L. D. Jenks; George C.; Charlotte E., now Mrs. A. B. Carrier; John H.; Edward T.; Maswell W., and Milo H. In 1844 they removed to Oakland County, Mich., where he purchased lands and improved them, and thus in three instances prepared inviting homes and sold them to purchasers. Thus he secured capital for further and other investments. In 1867 he came to what is now Frankfort, Benzie County, and made investments in real estate, and in 1868 erected a dwelling and was joined by his family, and forthwith started a dock and made other improvements. He cleared some twenty acres on his farm lands, and his first crop of wheat yielded twenty-eight bushels per acre, and the second thirty-six bushels. His was the first crop in the place threshed with a threshing machine. Later he made investments in commercial business in Frankfort, which was conducted by Mr. George C. Woodward and Mr. A. B. Carrier for three years. Then Mr. Carrier retired and since then Mr. Woodward has, with his son, given attention to the business personally. They carry a well selected sock of general merchandise, and their business location on Main Street is one of the most desirable in town. Their dock and warehouse are also, in 1884, the best in the place, and they are agents for the various lines of steamers from all points of travel. Mr. Woodward also conducts a furniture store in a stand adjacent to the general store, and keeps on hand a fully supply of goods in that line, and in April, 1884, he, with his son, John H. Woodward, opened a large and elegant stock of clothing in the same building, and they have a large and increasing trade. He also owns in Benzie and Manistee Counties some 360 acres of real estate, besides numerous village lots in Frankfort. His commodious residence is on Leelanaw Avenue. Mr. Woodward was the first supervisor of Crystal Lake Township after the organization of Benzie County. He has served four years as justice of the peace and six years as superintendent of the poor. He also holds the office of notary public. [The Traverse Region, Historical and Descriptive: With Illustrations of Scenery...; Chicago: H.R. Page & Co.; 1884]

James Richard Wright
Born at Tallmadge , O., June 27, 1814. Entered Oberlin College in 1835; graduated from the classical course in 1838, and from the seminary in 1841. Married July 31, 1844, to Sarah Holmes Vincent; ordained at Sheffield, O., 1848, and preached there 1845-58, 1867-69; Ridgeville, 1855-62, and also at Napoleon, 1855-59; at Lena and Wauseon, 1859-62. Then he went to Benzonia , Mich. , where he preached until 1867. He then removed to Santa Clara Co., Cal. Here he kept a summer resort for tourists until 1887, and for many years was in the fruit business assisted by his eldest son. He continued to be active in S. S. work, and preached occasionally until a short time before his death, Sept. 2, 1897. He was the father of ten children, of whom three sons died in young manhood.  [Source: Necrology Oberlin College For The Year 1897-8. Transcribed by: H elen Coughlin]

 


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