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Ironton City

Charlevoix Co MI



Ironton, MI (Grange Hall) (1914) - contributed by Paul Petosky



I R O N T O N The Traverse Region - H. R. Page & Co., 1884

The village of Ironton is composed mainly of the interests of the Pine Lake Iron Co., their furnace being located at this point. The general office of the company and the officers are as follows: President, R. N. Cherry; vice-president, James Otis; treasurer, H. G. Dolph. The company began operations at this point in 1879, but did not begin the manufacture of iron until 1881. The site selected was peculiarly well adapted to the necessities of their business, being in a heavily wooded section and also upon the tine of navigation. The village is situated upon the west shore of the South Ann of Pine Lake, a short distance above the point at which it branches from the lake. Between 200 and 300 men are employed by the company, and a village naturally followed the establishment of so extensive an industry. A store was started by the company as soon as the works were under way, and in 1880 the postoffice of Ironton was established with Mr. Hildreth as postmaster. In 1882 a new, large school building was built, and during that year the Methodist Society built a house of worship. Another church building is to be erected during 1884.

The company own about ninety acres of land at this point, between forty and fifty of which was platted by E. K. Robinson, county surveyor, in the spring of 1884. There are about fifty dwellings belonging to the company; 86,000 cords of wood are annually consumed by the works, and the product in 1884 will reach 15,000 tons of iron. To produce that amount of iron 30,000 tons of ore are brought from the Menomonie Range.

Early in 1883 Mr. James Otis came here from the city of New York, and was the first member of the company to reside here. In February, 1884, while superintending some matters about the works, he was crushed by the fall of a heavy weight and death resulted in a few weeks. He was a thorough business man and had made himself very popular with the people of this region. Since his death, his brother, John Otis, of the Mancelona Iron Works, has been in charge of the works.

This industry is an important one to Charlevoix County. By furnishing a market for such vast quantities of wood, the land is becoming rapidly cleared, and in a short time the forest will be replaced by productive farms.

A. B. Notes, proprietor of the Pioneer House, Ironton, is one of the pioneers of Michigan. He is a native of Chenango County, N. Y., and came to Michigan in 1830. In 1864 he settled upon a homestead in the town of Banks, Antrim County, and a few years later removed to Norwood, Charlevoix County, where he also carried on farming. In 1880 he removed to Ironton and kept the first boarding-house in the place. In 1882 he built the "Pioneer House," the only hotel in the village, which he still keeps. He has a wife and three children, two sons and one daughter. One son, Frank A. Noyes, is an engineer by trade.

Aaron Box, lumberman, Ironton, is a native of Canada. In the fall of 1865 he came to Michigan and located at Traverse City, where he carried on blacksmithing for a number of years. In the summer of 1881 he removed to Ironton where he built a saw-mill which he operates. The mill cuts both hard and soft lumber, and has a capacity of about 25,000 feet a day.

John G. Peterson, merchant at Ironton, is a native of Sweden and emigrated to America in 1870. In the summer of 1880 he came to Ironton from Pittsburgh, Pa., and for about two years was in the employ of the Iron Company, working in the furnace and in the store. Ambitious to do still better for himself, he erected a building in the fall of 1882, and opened a general store, and since that time has successfully carried on the mercantile business- He has a wife and one child. Mr. Peterson is a prudent and prosperous business man, having come to this country a poor boy, and acquired by his own industry a good home and business.

BIOGRAPHICAL.

W. B. Vosburgh, one of the pioneers of Marion Township, was born in Tompkins County, N. Y„ in the year 1825. April 5, 1849, he married Cynthia Talcot, of Almira, Chemung County, N. Y. Mr. Vosburgh, being in feeble health, decided to remove to northern Michigan and locate on a farm. He located 100 acres of land on Section 4, in what is now the town of Marion. They arrived at Pine River, now Charlevoix, in May, 1862. The trip from Kalamazoo was made in a Mackinaw boat. Mrs. Vosburgh had been told that they would all be scalped by the Indians, and had armed herself with a huge carving-knife as an instrument of defense. Arriving at the mouth of Pine River, she sent some one ashore to see that no swarm of blood-thirsty savages were waiting to take scalps or steal their goods. Their first home was in a shanty, and their early experiences were full of hardships and episodes. He was often sick, and she performed the severest labor. She used to carry potatoes on her back to the village and sell them to steamboats, and then carry back Hour and pork for the sustenance of the family. The nearest neighbors were several miles distant. Sometimes potatoes and salt were all that could be got to eat, and buckwheat was pounded in a mortar fur bread. Mr. Vosburgh taught the first school in the town in a log school-house that stood on their land. The first school was in 1868. He has held the office of justice of the peace about seventeen years, and has held other town offices. They have had four children, and buried one. They have two daughters married, Fanny L., wife of Pierce Kendall, and Ida, wife of George Vosburgh. Although they have had a great deal to contend with, yet they have succeeded in acquiring a comfortable property. Few women have experienced the severities of pioneer life more thoroughly than Mrs. Vosburgh.

Thomas Smith, one of the early settlers of Marion, was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in the year 1829. In 1851 he went to Beaver Island whore he was engaged in fishing and making fish barrels. In 1858 he came to Charlevoix, or near the present site of the village, and remained a short time. For upward of a dozen years he was fishing and making barrels at different points, and experienced all the hardships incident to the early days. In 1801 he located on Section 10, in what is now the town of Marion, and made the first improvement in that part of the town. He has improved about sixty acres of land, and owned originally upward of 200 acres of land. In 1880 he sold his homestead and moved to another farm upon the opposite side of the road. He has held the offices of treasurer and justice of the peace. Mr. Smith is a thorough pioneer and knows from experience what the early comers to this region had to pass through.

William Black, farmer, Marion Township, was born in Scotland in the year 1820. Dec. 31, 1839, he was married. In early life he served an apprenticeship at the printing business and followed that trade about seventeen years. In 1848 he emigrated to America with his family and located first in New Jersey. After remaining there a few months they removed to Canada where his family remained until 1856 when they removed to Beaver Island. His chief occupation was fishing which he continued until the fall of 1865 when they removed to Charlevoix County and settled on Section 10, in what is now Marion Township. They built a log house in the wilderness and began the work of making a farm and a home. In 1878 be built a substantial frame dwelling. He has about seventy acres improved, a fine orchard and everything indicative of prosperity and comfort. He has a wife and five children. Mr. Black has held most of the town offices, and is now serving his ninth year as superintendent of poor of the county. He has held the office of justice of the peace nearly all the time he has lived in the town.

John Hammond, farmer, in Eveline Township, was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., in the year 1831. In 1846 he removed to Michigan with his parents. Nov. 80, 1853, at Loyal, N. Y., he married Mary Seaman. They have had nine children, eight of whom are now living. He was in the service about three months in 1864. In June, 1865, they landed at Charlevoix, having come from Monroe County, Michigan, in pursuit of a climate more congenial to his health. The following fall they moved to Section 18, in the present town of Eveline and began pioneer life. Mrs. Hammond taught the first school in the town. Mr. Hammond has held most of the town offices, and has done his share in the work of general development.

William Harris, of Norwood, Charlevoix County, is a native of New York. At the age of four years he came with his parents to Battle Creek, Michigan. He came to Charlevoix County in 1866, and took charge of the boarding-house for the mill of Adams A Wood, winch was built that summer at Norwood. He also took up land in the vicinity and engaged in farming, which he* has followed to the present time. He was the first supervisor of the town after it was set off with the present town of Marion from Charlevoix. He has held the office of supervisor nine terms. Mr. Harris has a family of two daughters, his wife having dud in the winter of 1877. His daughter Bertha was the first white child born in the town. The town of Marion was named in honor of his wife, that being her first name.

William J. McGeagh was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland; came to Canada in boyhood; lived in Iowa live years engaged in farming. In 1866 he came to Charlevoix County and located land in Section 18, Township 33 north, of Range 8 west, now in the town of Norwood. He has made it one of the best farms in that section of the county. In 1876 he built a grist-mill on Section 5 of the same town on a small stream known as McGeagh's Creek, putting in also a muley saw for the manufacture of lumber to supply the local demand; and in 1880 built a saw-mill adjoining the gristmill. He has made arrangements for the construction of a broom-handle factory, the country around furnishing abundant material for their business. Mr. McGeagh has held the offices of town treasurer and justice of the peace. He was married Oct. 16, 1866, to Esther J. Ridley, of Pickering, Ontario, Canada, and has four children all of whom are at home. Mr. McGeagh's enterprise, energy and business ability have won for him a deserved financial success. An excellent view of his premises is given on another page.

A. N. Chase, of Norwood, Charlevoix County, is a native of Canada, born in 1847. Ho came to Michigan in April, 1869, and worked in the pineries and lumbering which has been his employment most of his life. In 1881 he settled on the farm where he now resides, and which he had bought several years before and improved, in Section 17. He has eighty acres of winch thirty acres are cleared. April 27, 1881, he married Jennie, daughter of Sims Baker. They have one child.

Edwin Cook, farmer, Norwood Township, was born in Canada in 1838; came to Charlevoix County in April, 1879, and bought a farm in Section 24; has 135 acres, eighty to ninety acres cleared. He was married in 1862 to Barbara Law, a native of Scotland, and has five children: Mrs. William Pearl, Mrs. Robert Gregory, and three at home, viz: Janus, Edwin and Jane.

George Walker, of Norwood, Charlevoix County, was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1841; came to Canada in 1852, and to Charlevoix County in 1877. Here he bought a farm of 120 acres in Section 17, of which he has twenty-five acres cleared. In 1863 he married Adaline Brazell. a native of Canada, born in 1845, and has nine children, all of whom are at home.

S. W. Salter, postmaster, Burgess postoffice, town of Hayes, Charlevoix County, was born in Vermont in 1889; went to New York when he was six years old. He came to Michigan in the fall of 1866 and settled in Ottawa County and engaged in farming and carpentering. He came to Charlevoix County in the fall of 1880, and bought a farm in Section 11, town of Hayes. In 1882 he was appointed postmaster at Burgess postoffice. He has in connection with the office a stock of merchandise. Mr. Salter enlisted Aug. 15, 1861, in the Thirteenth New York Infantry, serving in the army of the Potomac. He was wounded Aug. 30, at the battle of Bull Run, and was discharged for disability. His wound was in the left arm, the bone being broken. He receives a pension of $14 per month. April 24, 1866, he married Mary A. Russ.

John Shapton, of Marion, Charlevoix County, was born in Devonshire, England, in 1822. He came to this country and settled in Canada in 1848. In May, 1879, he came to Charlevoix County and bought the farm now owned by his son in the town of Norwood. In 1889 he moved to Marion where he resides on a small farm in Section 16. He was married in 1848 to Sarah Sargent, a native of Cornwall, England, and has eight children, one daughter and five sons in Charlevoix County and two daughters in Canada.

Albert W. Olds, lumberman, of the town of Evangeline. Charlevoix County, is a native of Lenawee County, Michigan. He owns and operates a saw-mill on Bear Lake in Section 3, town of Evangeline. This mill was built in 1882, and has a capacity of about 25,000 feet of lumber per day, sawing mostly hard wood. Fifteen to twenty men are employed. In 1883 Mr. Olds built a dock on Pine Lake for the shipment of his lumber, one of the finest docks on the lake. He has also in connection with his sawmill, a planing-mill, and manufactures dressed lumber, siding, etc. In September, 1861, Mr. Olds enlisted in the Sixty-seventh Ohio, serving as first sergeant until the battle of Winchester, after which he was first sergeant for the remainder of his military service of fifteen months. He was then mustered out and went into the civil employ cf the government, being put in charge of saw-mills, first at Chattanooga, and afterward twelve miles from Nashville. He returned home the last of June, 1865. He has a wife and one child.

Daniel C. Burgess, deceased, was a native of New York. He came to Charlevoix County in 1809, settling on Section 8, of Town 84, Range 7 west, on the 7th of May. In the following winter he commenced building a dock and engaged in shipping, and in 1872 built a saw-mill on Swan Creek which crosses his land. He was engaged in farming and in the lumber and shipping business until his death, which occurred June 28, 1876. He left a wife, three sons and one daughter- Mrs. Burgess resides on the homestead with her youngest son Eugene, who was born in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, and came with his parents to Charlevoix County. He is managing the estate, has rebuilt the mill which was burned in May, 1882, and is actively engaged in the manufacture and shipment of lumber. The dock was washed away m 1873 and again in 1870. The present dock was built in 1881. Mr. Burgess is supervisor of the town of Hayes, which office he has held two terms previously. He has also been town clerk two terms.

George E. Foote, of Norwood, Charlevoix County, was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., in 1825. He came to Charlevoix County in 1867 and engaged in his trade of shoemaking. His residence is in the village of Norwood. He has a farm one and one-half miles north of the village. He was married March 20, 1851, to Maria Miller, of Cayuga County, N. Y., and has two daughters, Mrs. T. F. Nelson, of East Jordan, and Mrs. W. E. Brown, of Norwood.

John Newton, farmer, of Hayes Township, Charlevoix County, is a native of Huron County, Mich. He came to Charlevoix County in 1879 and settled on his present farm in Section 33, Town 84 north, Range 7 west, on the 20th of October. His family consists of a wife and two children. One child died in December, 1882.

John Raymond, of Hayes Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Albany, N. Y., in 1858. He went thence to Blissfield, Lenawee County, Mich., where he engaged in farming. In June, 1878, he came to Charlevoix County, and settled on a farm which he had previously bought. Moved to his present location in November, 1882. October 26, 1879, he married Catherine Henderson. They have two children.

John Willis, deceased, was a native of Canada. Came to Charlevoix County in 1868 and settled in the town of Hayes on Section 2, Town 83, Range 7 west, where he bought one hundred and fifty acres. He also engaged in blacksmith work. He died the year after his arrival from the effects of an accidental fall. Mrs. Willis resides on the homestead with her son Fred. The latter was born in Canada. He is now carrying on the home farm and has also a tract of one hundred and sixty acres in Section 85, Town 34, of the same range. There are also two daughters living at home, and two other sons, John, residing in Evangeline, and George, in Hayes.

C. J. Woosk, Resort Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Saratoga, N. Y., in 1881. Moved to Cayuga County with his parents in 1888, and in 1852 went to Elkhart, Ind. Was in the mercantile business till 1862, when he enlisted in the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and served till the close of the war in the western army under Generals Grant and Sherman. Served on General Sherman's staff one year and six months. When discharged from the service he returned to Indiana and resumed his former business, and in August, 1875, came to Petoskey for his health, and in January, 1870, settled on Section 86 on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. Has erected good buildings and cleared thirty acres of his farm. Has been supervisor of his township for tho past live years. Married in 1866 to Martha Windgardner, a native of Kendellville, Ind. They have three sons and one daughter.

J. W. Barnes, furniture dealer, Boyne Falls, Charlevoix County, is a native of Lenawee County, Mich, he came to Boyne Falls in April, 1875, being one of the first settlers at this point, and established his present business. He has been justice of the peace four years, postmaster one year, and town clerk. Was for six years chairman of the school board. His first wife, to whom he was married in 1864, was Harriet Camp, by whom he had two sons and one daughter. His second wife was Emma A. Howe, whose father was one of the first settlers of Boyne Falls. They have one son and two daughters. Hiram Wright of Boyne Falls, Charlevoix County, is a native of Monroe County, N. Y. He came to Charlevoix County, Mich., in 1872, and entered a homestead in Section 8, Town 82, Range 5 west. In 1882 he removed to Boyne Falls. He was one of the organizers of the town. When he came in there were but few settlers in the town, and none at Boyne Falls. Oct 80, 1858, he married Mrs. B. J. Kendall, who had one child, now Mrs. P. P. Myers, of Boyne Falls. One child has been born to them, Emma, wife of A. K. LeClear, of Boyne Falls. In August, 1862, Mr. Wright enlisted in the One Hundred and Fortieth New York Regiment, serving with the Army of the Potomac. By reason of exposure and consequent disease his sight became impaired. He was mustered out September 1865, never having lost a day's duty. He finally lost his sight altogether, and for the past three years has been in receipt of a pension.

Ezra M. Ecker, Melrose Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Canada in 1861. Came to Melrose in 1881, and took up a homestead of eighty acres and is clearing up a farm. Has built a house and made other improvements.

A. J. Stroud, sheriff of Charlevoix County, was born in Beria, Ohio. Came to Charlevoix County in 1876, for his health. In company with William Ohle, he put up at Horton's Bay, a mill which he brought from Ohio. Mr. Ohle afterward sold his interest to James S. Dilworth. The firm of Stroud & Dilworth manufacture lumber and deal in wood and hark, having their dock at Horton's Bay. Mr. Stroud was elected supervisor of the town of Evangeline, the spring after his arrival, and held the office, with the exception of one year, until 1888, when ho was elected sheriff of the county. In 1886 he married Cecilia, daughter of Miles F. Norton, of Ohio. Mr. Norton came with Mr. Stroud from Ohio and has since made his home with him. Early in the war of the rebellion Mr. Stroud, then a mere boy, ran away from home and enlisted in the Fourteenth Ohio. He was discharged on account of his youth, at the request of his father. Soon after he went into the service and was in charge of a supply train as wagon master, following the Army of the Cumberland and participating in its battles, supplying ammunition to the troops until his train was captured. He afterward had charge of government buildings at Bridgeport, Ala. Returning home in February, 1865, ho enlisted in the One Hundred and Eighty-eighth Ohio and served until the fall of that year his regiment being in the Army of the Cumberland. Mr. Stroud still suffers from the effects of disease contracted in the army. Isaac Willis, one of the early settlers of the town of Evangeline, is a native of Canada. Came to Charlevoix County in 1866 and located on Section 8 in the town of Evangeline, where he now resides, having a farm of sixty-seven acres. He was the first supervisor of the town and has held other town offices. He has a wife and nine children. The yoke of oxen with which he came in was the first team brought into the town.

Warren Willis, son of Isaac Willis, was born in Canada in 1885. Came with his father to Charlevoix County in 1860 for the purpose of locating land. He did not remain, however, but went back to Detroit. Returning in 1878 he located to homestead of one hundred and forty-six acres on Bear Lake in Section 10, Town 33, Range 6 west, town of Evangeline. Has thirty acres cleared. He married Mary Rupert, a native of Pennsylvania.

John Kilborn, Bear Lake Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Canada in 1815- Remained at home until twenty-one years of age. He then engaged in farming till 1872, when he removed to Chicago and was engaged in canvassing for several publishing houses, and in the fall of 1874 came to Petoskey and built a sawmill. Run it a few years and sold it in 1883. Now lives on a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres of line land on Section 20. Has eighty acres cleared. Has built a good house and barn, planted an orchard and is already raising small fruits in abundance. Mr. Kilborn was married in 1868 to Jane Thompson, who was born in Canada. They had one child. His second marriage was in 1872 to Honor Rice, who was a native of Canada. They have five children. Mr. Kilborn is at present township clerk. Has been township treasurer, superintendent of schools, etc.

Leonard Whitmeyer, farmer in Marion Township, is a native of Columbia County, Pennsylvania. In April, 1861, he enlisted in the army for three months' service and afterward re-enlisted, remaining in the service until the war closed in 1865. He was an excellent soldier and participated in a large number of battles. At the battle of Chancellorsville he received a gun-shot wound in the leg. In August, 1865, he was married at Davenport, Iowa, In the fall of 1870 they removed from lows to Charlevoix County and located on Section 9 in the town of Marion. Mrs. Whitmeyer taught school for several terms walking to and from her school, a distance of several miles, each day. She was an excellent teacher and a woman of great force of character. They improved their land, living in their primitive log house until 1888, when they built their present frame dwelling, which is one of the finest farm houses in the county. Mr. Whitmeyer has about thirty acres under improvement, and also owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in another locality. He is an enterprising citizen and takes an active interest in all matters of general progress.

L. C. Hamlin, township of Charlevoix, was born at Auburn, N. Y, in the year 1819. For about fourteen years he was in the employ of the New York Central Railroad Company and lived in the city of Rochester. In the fall of 1868 he came to Charlevoix County from Detroit and settled on Section 33, township of Charlevoix, where he had located forty acres of laud. During the time since 1868 he has lived several years in the village and engaged in real estate operations. He has built two houses in the village and in 1883 built a frame house on his farm. He has been twice married. In 1846 he was married in Genesee County, N Y., to Rosetta Coates, his present wife. They have had four children, two of whom are now living.

R.S.Shapton, farmer in Marion Township, is a native of Canada, and a son of John Shapton, also a resident of Marion. Mr. Shapton settled in Marion in 1876. He has 126 acres of land on Section 16, and about forty acres improved. He has a wife, but no children. Mr. Shapton is one of the thrifty farmers of the county. He is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows' fraternity. William Miller, son of Hugh Miller, one-of the early pioneers of Charlevoix County, was born in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., and came to this region with his parents. He followed fishing several years, did most of the people in this section at an early day. When he was twenty-one years of ago he took up 160 acres of land on Section 10, Marion Township. He has now about thirty acres improved, and good buildings. He has a wife and one child.

John E. Darrah, Melrose Township. Charlevoix County, was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1847; came to Kalamazoo County, Mich., with his parents in 1850 and remained there till 1862: he then went to Pennsylvania and was engaged in lumbering for two years. He enlisted in 1864 in the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, and served in the Army of the Potomac till the close of the war. Was in several battles near Petersburg, Va., and was at Farmville, Va., when General Lee's army surrendered to General Grant. He came to Clarion Station March 7. 1877, when the surrounding country was a dense wilderness, and had only one dollar and fifty cents in money, a barrel of flour and a cow to make a skirt with in a new country, having just been burned out in Kent. County, Mich., and lost all he had. He took his present farm as a homestead of eighty acres, has built a good house, cleared thirty five acres and planted an orchard of 140 trees. He now owns forty acres of land in addition to his original farm. He helped to organize the township in 1877 and has been supervisor since that time, has also been justice of the peace six years, notary public four years and was the first postmaster at Clarion. He drew up the petition for the Springvale & Boyne City State Road and secured the appropriation and helped to build nine miles of the road. Married, Jan. 1, 1870, to Ruth Lillie, who is a native of Michigan. They lost one child by death, and have an adopted daughter. Mrs. Darrah spent two winters at home alone and did the chores, the nearest neighbor being one mile and a half away, Mr. Darrah bring at the time employed in the lumber woods.
Buried at
Maple Hill Cemetery

Samuel B. Thatcher, Springvale Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Greene County, Ohio, in 1849; remained at home til the age of fourteen years, when he enlisted in the Twenty-sixth Ohio Infantry, and served in the Army of the Cumberland till the close of the war. When discharged he returned to Ohio and was engaged in selling nursery stock and farming till April. 1878, when he came to Springvale Township and took up a homestead of 180 acres, and since-that time has cleared twenty-five acres, built a house and barn and has a line orchard in hearing, and has made other improvements. He has held the office of supervisor for the past four years and has held most of the offices of his township. Married in 1871 to Maggie Fuller, who was a native of Ohio. They have two children. When the township of Springvale was organized there were only fourteen voters in town. For three years Mr. Thatcher settled in the township he carried most of his provisions on his back from Petoebey, a distance of fourteen miles. Mr. Thatcher's mother moved from Ohio with him and is living near him. Since coming to Springvale, eight years since, she has not made a visit to Petoskey.

John T. Webb, Springvale Township, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, in 1814: lived there several years and moved into the county of Miami, same state, where he was one of the pioneers if a new county. He lost his wife by death some years since, and in the spring of 1879 came to Springvale with his son, and in his old age seems to enjoy the life of a pioneer for the second time.

David T. Webb was born in 1841 in Miami County, Ohio; remained at home till the age of twenty-one years. He enlisted iu the Eleventh Ohio Infantry, and served one year in the Army of the Cumberland. When discharged he returned to Ohio and was engaged in the mercantile business for eleven years and in the sale of nursery stock for six years, and in the spring of 1879 came to Springvale Township and took up a homestead of 160 acres on Section 8. Has built a house and barn, planted an orchard and made other improvements; is at present treasurer of the township. Married in 1862 to Jennie Weathehead, a native of Miami County, Ohio. They have one son, Newton Webb.

Joseph K. Flick, Springvale Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Lancaster County, PA in 1828, an in 1832 moved with his parents to Richland County, Ohio,in 1830, moved back to Pennsylvania and in 1840 returned to Ohio and settled near their former residence: finally, in 1848, moved again to Pennsylvania and remained two years, when he returned to his home in Ohio once more, and was married to Eliza Karcar. They have two children. He then moved to Canada, and was for a few years engaged in the mercantile business; he then invented the lumberman's woolboat, and was engaged in the manufacture and sale of the same for about eight years. He came to Reed City, Mich., in the spring of 1879, remaining there till 1881, when he came to Petoskey, and in the fall of 1888, moved to his farm on Section 28, where he owns 250 acres of land.

J. H. Reigle, Chandler Township, Charlevoix County, Mich., was born in Union County, Penn July 10, 1836; remained at home till 1865, when he moved to Three Rivers, Mich., and was engaged in farming till 1876, when he came to Chandler Township and took up a homestead of 160 acres. Has cleared seventy acres, has built a house and barn, planted an orchard and made other improvements. Enlisted April 24, 1861, in the Sixth Pennsylvania Reserves and served two years in the Army of the Potomac. Has been supervisor for two years past, was treasurer two years, justice of the peace four years, and superintendent of schools two years. Married Jan. 28, 1858, to Mary A. Yeater. They have a family of thirteen children.

Captain E. C. Preteplack, Bear Lake Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Chenango County, N. Y., in 1822; moved to Crawford County, Ohio, with his parents in 1881; remained there till 1885, when they moved to Branch County, Mich. He assisted in the first survey of the Michigan Southern Railroad, and in 1843 moved to Otsego, Allegan County. Was engaged for, three years in running a flatboat on Kalamazoo River carrying wheat to the mouth of the river to be shipped by the lakes to Buffalo, and returning loaded with him. The boat was propelled up stream by setting poles. Aug. 17, 1851, he enlisted in the Sixth United States Infantry and served through the Mexican War, and two years after peace was declared, one year of that time being spent in New Orleans in recruiting service and one year at St. Paul, Minn. When discharged from the service Aug. 17, 1851, he returned to Allegan County and was engaged in farming four years, then went to California and relumed in November, 185-1, and remained on his farm till 1858, when he sold out and bought a farm in Harry County, and in 1881 enlisted in Company I, Seventh Michigan Infantry, and received a commission as second lieutenant and served in the Army of the Potomac; was promoted to be captain of his company Sept. 2, 1862; wounded in action at the battle of Antietam, Maryland, Sept. 17, 1862; resigned on surgeon's certificate and received an honorable discharge May 11, 1868. Was appointed captain in the veteran reserve corps Aug. 19, 1863, and served till 1865 when he was transferred to duty in the Freedmen's Bureau and stationed at Baton Rouge, La. Resigned his commission and returned home in September, 1866. Came to Bear Lake Township in September, 1878, and settled on Section 23, where he owns a farm of 160 acres. Has cleared fifty acres, built a house and barn, planted an orchard and made other improvements. Is at present supervisor of the township. Married, May 10, 1850, to Adaline Covey, who was born in Tennessee. They have eight living children.

Rufus H. Carley, Resort Township, Charlevoix County, was born in Vermont in 1832. Was engaged in farming till 1844, then went to Boston, Mass., and was engaged in a bakery till 1881, when he enlisted in the First Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry and served in the Army of the Potomac till the close of the war. Was at Appomattox, Va., when Gen. Lee's army surrendered to Gen. Grants came to Berrien County, Mich., in 1874, and to Petoskey in 1875, settled on a homestead in Resort Township in 1878, and has commenced to clear up a farm. Has been justice of the peace four years and still holds the office; has also been highway commissioner.
Believed to be buried at
Maple Hill Cemetery (Com Sgt Co D Mass Cav)

H. A. Bixby, Springvale Township, Charlevoix County, was born in 1845, in Ogden, Genesee County, N. Y.,and in 1848 moved to Shiawassee County, Mich., with his parents, and in 1858 moved Oakland County. He remained at home till 1861, when he enlisted in the Thirtieth Michigan Infantry and served one year in the Western Army under General Sherman. When discharged from the service he returned to Oakland County, Mich., and was engaged in fanning till 1869, when he moved to Clinton County, same state, and in 1874 came to Springvale Township and took a soldier's claim of 160 acres. Has been highway commissioner one year. He built the first house in the township. Married, Jan. 4, 1869, to Rosina Monroe, who is a native of Canada. They have two sons.

J. J. Bennett, farmer, town of South Arm, is a native of Steuben County, N. Y. In the fall of 1869 he came with his father, Calvin Bennett, to the town of Echo, Antrim County, and located on Section 2. He remained at home until 1882, when he located 120 acres of land on Section 8, town of South Arm, and is now engaged in farming. He has a wife and one child.

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