Concord Township
History


Line Divider



Concord
              Street View 1934 1919 Opera
              House Concord Depot 1910s
All pictures contributed by Paul Petosky

From "The History of Jackson County, Michigan"

   
    The first settler in the township of Concord was John Acker, who came in November, 1831, with his family. He remained here alone during the succeeding winter, which set in that month. The following May William Van Fossen came and put up his cabin; in June Thomas McGee moved into the settlement thus begun, and put up a home for the accommodation of his family. A colony was formed before the close of 1832, and thus the nucleus of a prosperous community was formed.
East Side Main St 1909
    Up to 1836 Concord was a part of the town of Spring Arbor, when it was set off into a distinct township, but included at that date all the territory now comprised within the townships of Pulaski and Concord. In 1837, the next year, however, Pulaski was made a distinct town, and the present limits of the township of Concord were established. The first town meeting was held at the store of Ira Jacobs in April, 1836; Thomas McGee was elected supervisor, and Isaac Van Fossen township clerk.
    Since that period the township has grown into great importance; from very limited beginnings the people have st
eadily progressed, until now Concord is one of the richest divisions of a great and prosperous county. The small political efforts of the people in the elections of 1832-'34-'36 have been immensely augmented, so that the political contest of 1880 within the township created much interest, and at its termination showed the following results: — Electors—Hancock, 73; Garfield, 221; Weaver, 95. Governor— Jerome, 216; Holloway, 105; Woodman, 67. Congress—Lacey, 206; Pringle, 61; Hodge, 122. Senator—Goodwin, 246; Wilson, 57; Palmer, 86. Sheriff— Lockwood, 209; Winney, 74; Terry, 106. Judge of Probate—Gould, 210; Powell, 77; Anderson, 102. County Clerk—Van Horn, 220; Covert, 74; Moe, 95. Eegister of Deeds—Ray, 255; Town ley, 65; Henshaw, 67. Treasurer— Ludlow, 216; Wheeler, 76; Townley, 91. Prosecuting Attorney— Sharp, 228; BaThe
              Old Mill 1910rkworth, 72; Hewlett, 88. Representative—Bel-den, 214; Chappel, 93; Strong, 71.
    The first school was opened in 1835, and taught by Miss Mary McGee. In the fall of 1835, Isaac and William Van Fossen erected and put in operation a saw-mill, and in 1837 started a flouring-mill. Ira Jacobs opened the first store in 1836. In 1838 Andrew Brown erected a flouring-mill on the Kalamazoo river, one mile east of the town. The first tavern was opened by Jerry Reynolds; it was located about one mile east of the present village of Concord.
    The village of Concord is located on section 27.  The Air-Line road which passes through the place renders it an excellent point for manufacturing purposes.  All the various branches of business are represented here, and some of the merchants have a very fine trade.  There is also a bank in the village, which is also doing an extensive business.  The public school is well graded, and stands high among the schools of the county.  The Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist and Universalist churches, the two former of which were built in 1837, are substantial structures.  In former years the village profited much from the passage of emigrants over the old stage route between Jackson and Jonesville.  Situated as it is in the midst of a rich agricultural district, there is every reason to believe that within a very few years the village will raise itself to the dignity of a town, and hold within its limits numerous industrial establishments.
    The township is well watered, possesses a soil of sandy loam, capable of producing the best crops.  Good timber exists in abundance, and though the marshes are numerous, a little outlay would render them capable of the highest cultivation.
    The first Free Methodist society of Jackson county was organized in Concord Township in the winter of 1868, by Rev. E. P. Hart.  Rev. John Billings was the first minister taking charge of the work.  Rev. A. V. Leonardson was sent on the work in 1869, and visited Napoleon, and during the winter of 1870, Rev. E. P. Hart organized a society there.  Rev. John Campbell came to Spring Arbor and held a protracted meeting, and a society was formed in 1872.  The organization in Jackson city was effected the winter of 1873.  Societies were also formed in Sandstone, West Concord and Jefferson.
    Wilder Lodge, No. 176, I. O. 0. F., was organized Dec. 14, 1871, with eight members, whose names we cannot fully obtain, as the records were destroyed by fire Jan. 14, 1877. The charter officers were: J. W. Hungerford, N. G.; R. H. Hungerford, Y. G.; Isaac Ormsby, R. S.; G. J. Cole, P. S.; W. I. Hungerford, Treas.  The present officers are: A. W. Severance, N. G.; J. B. Pomroy, V. G.; G. A. Stahley, R. S.; C. H. Hovey, P. S., and J. Bigelow, Treas.   The number of members at present is 65.

BIOGRAPHICAL

Following are personal sketches of some of the more prominent citizens of Concord township, whose lives constitute an essential feature of the history of the community.
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    Jabez ALLMAN, farmer; P.O., Concord; was born in England Jan. 2, 1823, son of Major and Margaret (Axby) Allman, the former of German ancestry, and the latter of English; was brought to this country by his parents in 1830 and settled in Canada; remained there until 1838, when he moved to White Pigeon, Mich., with his parents.  He learned the trade of harnessmaking at Marshall, and in 1844 went to Homer and opened a shop for himself.  March 12, 1845, he was married to Elizabeth Darling, daughter of Ezra and Charlotte (Ganunary) Darling; they have had 11 children, viz. :—Amos E., Edwin L., Charlotte E., William H., Mary L., M. Frank, John W., Margaret M., Sarah A., Elmer J., Joseph H.  In 1848 Mr. A. bought a farm of 39 acres on section 32, Concord Township, and he has kept adding to it until now he owns a farm of 240 acres, worth $65 per acre; is a member of the M. E. Church, and in politics a staunch Republican.
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    A. M. BAKER was born at Albany, N. Y., in 1838.  Soon after his birth his parents removed to Hamilton, N. Y., where he received his earlier education.  When he was 16 years of age he started West alone; remained in Indiana a short time, and went to Centralia, Ill., where he was employed in a store.  In 1860 he went to Cairo, Ill., where he held a position in the postoffice; in a short time he received an appointment in the mail service which he held about three years, when he resigned and went across the plains to Virginia City, Montana, and engaged in mining and prospecting, and followed this business three years.  In 1867 he came East to St. Louis by the Missouri river, and in a short time again entered the mail service, where he remained until 1873, when he came to Concord and embarked in mercantile pursuits; since that time he has remained here.
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    Harvey BAKER, P. O., Concord, was born in Genesee County, N. Y., April 22, 1825, son of Shubal and Lucinda E. (McIntyre) Baker, the former a native of Connecticut, of English ancestry, and the latter a native of Massachusetts and of Scotch ancestry; was reared on a farm.  August 21, 1849, he married Emily M. Baker, daughter of Samuel P. and Mary J. (Fuller) Baker, and of their 13 children, 11 are living, to-wit: Charles H., Mary E., James F., H. Lafayette, Eva M., Frank A., Jessie B., Lawry C., Mertie E., Ernest G. and Grace E.  He came to this county in 1849, lived in Pulaski Township 18 months and worked at brick-laying and plastering, and in 1851 moved to Concord Township and settled on section 15, where he still resides.  He has held several offices of trust and responsibility in the township; in politics a "Greenbacker."
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    William A. BAIN, farmer; P. O., Albion; was born in Genesee county, N. Y., July 23, 1820; son of Nathan and Abigail (Bean) Bain, natives of New Hampshire and of Scotch ancestry.  He came to Jackson county in 1837 and settled on section 8, Concord Township.  He was married June 9, 1842, to Catharine Gillespie, who died April 9, 1853.  April 1, 1855, he married Phebe A. Luce, daughter of Zebulon and Rachel (Tompkins) Luce, and of his 12 children, 5 are living, 2 belonging to his first wife and 3 to the last.  In 1873 he moved to the city of Albion for the purpose of schooling his children, where he remained five years and then returned to his farm.  He has held several offices of trust in the township; in politics is a staunch Republican.
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    Josiah BIGELOW, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in Genesee County, N.Y., May 22, 1825, son of Jacob and Lois (Putnam) Bigelow, the former a native of Vermont, of English ancestry, and the latter of New York.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1836 and settled on section 34, Concord Township.  Here the mother died Oct. 4, 1847, and the father, Oct. 21,1879.  Mr. Bigelow was married Oct. 7, 1847, to Ann Jennett Fitch, daughter of Gerard and Jennett (Cushman) Fitch, and of their 5 children, 4 are living, viz.: William F., Mary J., Lois C, Sara E. Mr. B. has held several offices of trust in this township.
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    W. F. BIGELOW was born in the town of Concord, Mich., May 16, 1852, where the greater part of his life has been passed.  He received his education at Michigan University, graduating in 1875 with the degree of B. S.; he studied law at Jackson, where he was admitted to the Bar; he practiced at East Saginaw, Mich., with John J. Wheeler until the fall of 1879, when he came to Concord and embarked in journalism.  He established and now edits Our Home Enterprise at Concord.
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    Thomas BORNOR (deceased) was born in Devonshire, England, Aug. 12, 1825, is the son of William and Susannah (Smith) Bornor, natives of the same place, who emigrated to this country in 1852, locating in Genesee County, N. Y., and remained there three years, where he worked by the day and month.  He had $4.50 in his pocket when he landed in Genesee County, with a wife and 3 children.  In 1855 Mr. Bornor came to Jackson County and settled in Smithfield, where he remained two years; he then purchased a farm of 60 acres in Concord township; in 1864 traded his land for 120 acres on section 3 of the same township, where he remained until his death, which occurred March 7, 1879.  He was a member of the school board for several years.  The family consists of 4 daughters and 3 sons, viz: Phoebe, Elizabeth, William C, Minnie A., Morris G., Edwin T. and Ida May.
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    Richmond BRIGGS, P. O., Parma, was born in Wyoming County, K. Y., May 9, 1812; son of Pardon and Betsey (Cook) Briggs, the former a native of Connecticut, of English ancestry, and the latter a native of Rhode Island, of English ancestry; was reared on a farm, and came to this State in 1830; stopped in Wayne County three years, and then came to this county and settled on section 2, Concord Township, where he still resides.  He was married April 10, 1839, to Caroline Chapman, who died April 13 1843.  He was married again June 4,1843, to Mary Swift, daughter of Thedosius and Polly (Winchester) Swift, and their 3 children are William C, George W. and Louisa I.  They also took a girl baby of five weeks old to raise, which they consider the same as their own; her name is Martha M.  Mr. B. has held the office of Justice of the Peace for nine years.
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    Jesse B. BURROUGHS, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in New York, Sept. 15, 1832, son of Jesse B. and Phoebe (Whitford) Burroughs, natives of Vermont, of English ancestry.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1833, and settled in Pulaski Township, and remained there until 1836, when they moved to Concord Township, and settled on section 36, where the father died June 14, 1859.  He was married Oct. 11, 1854, to Harriet D. Roberts, daughter of Eben and Polly (Stoddard) Roberts, and their children are—Alice A., now the wife of Edward Bartlett, and Lathian W.  In 1863, Mr. B. bought 100 acres of land on section 24, Concord Township, and in 1879 sold it and bought 160 acres of sections 9 and 16, where he still resides.  He held the office of Constable five years. In politics he is a Democrat.
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    Franklin A. CARPENTER, P. O., Concord, was born in Jackson County, Mich., Oct. 30, 1845; son of Alanson and Eliza (Hart) Carpenter, the former a native of Massachusetts, of English ancestry, and the latter of New York, of Scotch ancestry.  He was married to Elizabeth Curtiss, Oct. 2, 1871, daughter of Moses and Elizabeth (Baron) Curtiss.  Of their 5 children 4are living—Edward B., born Aug. 28,1872; Lilian E, born Aug. 18, 1874, and died Feb. 2, 1879; Nellie I., born May 15,1876; Arthur F., born Sept. 14, 1877, and Sarah M., born Aug. 29,1880.  His father died Aug. 9,1868; he then took charge of the place, and in 1879 traded it for a stock of hardware and some village property in Concord.  He is a consistent member of the Baptist Church, and in politics a Prohibitionist.
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    William D. CHAPPLE, farmer; P. O., Albion; was born in England, July 14, 1832, son of Jacob and Jane (Daniel) ChappLe, who emigrated to this country in 1841, and settled in Stafford, N. Y., and remained there until 1860.  He was married Sept. 23, 1851, to Emma L. Lewis, daughter of Richard and Mary (Hearn) Lewis.  In 1860 they moved to Wisconsin and remained there until the spring of 1863, when they came to this county, and settled in Concord Township, in section 5, buying 65 acres of wood land, which he commenced to clear; he afterward bought 65 acres more, also wood land; he has now 102 acres under cultivation.  In 1866 he went to Calhoun County and took charge of the county poor-house, where he remained five years, and in 1871 moved back upon his farm.  He has held several offices of trust in this township.  Of his 3 children, 1 is living—Percy E., who now holds the position of Assistant Cashier of the First National Bank at Marseilles, Ill.
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    James M. COYKENDALL, farmer; P. O., Albion; was born in Yates County, N. Y., March 31,1816, son of Joel and Margaret M. (Strubell) Coykendall, natives of New Jersey, the former of Holland and the latter of German ancestry.  He was married May 12, 1839, to Sophia Winfield, daughter of Henry and Mary (Wilson) Winfield.  He came to this county Oct. 13, 1847, and settled in Grass Lake Township, where he remained until 1854, when he moved to Leoni Township, and remained there until 1863; then he moved to Concord Township, and settled in section 6, where he still resides.  He is a member of the M. P. Church, and in politics a staunch Republican.
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    Andrew CUTTER, farmer; P. O., Parma; is a son of William and Lucy Cutter, nee Calier, and  was born Nov. 22, 1824, in Troy, N. Y., of which place his father was also a native, and his mother, of Connecticut.  Sept. 10, 1842, Mr. Cutter came to Michigan and settled in Jackson, and in 1852 moved to the farm on which he now resides, section 12, Concord Township.  In June, 1855, he married Amanda L., daughter of Lewis and Alvira T. (Graves) Band, the former born in New York, the latter in Vermont, both of English parentage.  Their 2 children are Nellie A., born Jan. 29, 1867, and W. Louie, born July 4, 1874.  In the fall of 1842, Mr. Cutter became Deputy Postmaster under Hon. G. B. Cooper; also served under Wilbur F. Storey, now of the Chicago Times.  Mr. Cooper's successor was Deputy a year and a half after James A. Dyer succeeded Mr. Storey.  Under Buchanan's administration in 1858, Mr. Cutter was appointed Deputy U. S. Marshal by Robert Davis, Davis being superseded by John L. Butterfield.  Mr. C. was reappointed in 1860, for the purpose of taking the census, and took the enumeration in six townships.  Since 1852 he has devoted much attention to breeding and rearing fine blooded live stock, especially fast horses. He now owns the famous "Black Cloud," which has a record of 2:2l 1/2  and has a national reputation; the blooded Kentucky horse, "Joe Baker," and the celebrated Mambrino horse, "Waxey."  In religion Mr. Cutter is a liberalist, and in politics a life-long Democrat.
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    John, FALLS, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in Ireland Aug. 15, 1807, and is a son of Andrew and Rebecca (Little) Falls, of Irish ancestry.  He came to this country in 1825 and settled in Hunter, Greene Co., N. Y., and remained there until 1832, when he went to Wayne County, where he remained until 1835, then came to this county, and settled on section 23, Concord Township, where he still resides.  He was married May 3, 1835, to Mary E. Mead, daughter of David and Ann (Brown) Mead.  He bought 80 acres of land when he came here, for which he paid $300; he has added to that until now he owns 332 acres, which are worth about $50 per acre.  His wife died Nov. 28, 1875; of their 10 children 8 are living, viz.: Rebecca, born March 15, 1836; Caroline, born March 29, 1838; Mary, born June 29, 1839; Jane, born Sept. 5, 1841; Maria, born May 6,1843; Ellen, born July 24, 1846; Emily, born Nov. 4, 1849, died Dec. 9, 1854; John W., born Jan. 1, 1853, died Nov. 21, 1854; George A., born Dec. 12, 1855; Emma, born June 23, 1861.  In politics, Mr. F. is a Democrat.
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    William H. FINDLEY, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in Calhoun County, Mich., May 21, 1841, son of Gabriel R. and Effie (Lusk) Findley, natives of New York, the former of Irish ancestry, and the latter of German.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1852, and settled on section 32, Concord Township, where the father still resides.  He was married March 25, 1863, to Mary A. Mann, daughter of Daniel and Miranda (Sears) Mann.  Their 3 children are—Millie M.. Bertha M. and Charles C.  The same year he was married he bought 164 acres of land on sections 23 and 26, upon which he moved.  He is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics a Republican.
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    Hon. W. F. GOODWIN was born at Canandaigua, N. Y., in 1812, where he lived until 1842, when he came to Michigan.  In 1845 he came to Concord to reside, and followed milling and mercantile pursuits.  In 1867 he was a member of the Constitutional Convention, and has been elected a member of the Legislature from his district three times; in the fall of 1880 he was elected State Senator from his district.  He began life poor, but by industry and a close attention to his business has acquired a fine property and has risen to prominence in his county.
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    Benjamin F. GRISWOLD was born in Niagara County, N. Y., March 1, 1824, son of John C. and Betsey (Welsh) Griswold, natives of JNew York, and of Irish ancestry.  He was brought to this State by his parents in 1825 and settled in Wayne County, where they remained until 1834, then moved to this county and settled in Concord Township, on section 1, where the father and mother died.  He was married in 1847 to Anna Scott, who died Feb. 15, 1858.  He was married July 4, 1858, to Elizabeth Miller, daughter of Peter and Eleanor Miller.  April 3, 1872, Mr. Griswold took his own life; no cause could be given for this rash act; he was a moral and upright man, loved and esteemed by his large circle of friends.  He left 6 children—Ethel M., Eli A., John C, Anna E., Minnie E. and Grant B.
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    Delos W. HAVILAND, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in Dutchess County, N. Y., April 26, 1823, son of Benjamin and Fanny (Wixon) Haviland, natives of Connecticut, the former of English ancestry.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1836 and settled on section 10, Concord Township.  He was married Sept. 5, 1849, to Eliza French, daughter of William and Priscilla (Loomis) French.  In the spring of 1849 he bought 75 acres of land on section 34, Concord Township, for which he paid $7.25 per acre; said land is now worth $100.  In politics he is a staunch Republican.
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    Hiram C. HODGE was born at Stamford, Bennington Co., Vt., Feb. 22, 1821; son of Warner I. and Sarah (Chesebro) Hodge, natives of Adams, Berkshire Co., Mass.; their ancestors were English in the main, with French and Welsh blood intermixed.  They removed from Vermont to Adams, Mass., when H. C. was but two years old and remained there until 1836, giving their 10 children a common-school education; 8 of the children lived to maturity.  Those who were old enough, including the subject of this sketch, worked in a cotton factory several years, their father being the clerk of the firm known as Anthony & Hoxie.  In 1836 the family left Massachusetts for Michigan, where the father had the year previous entered a quarter section of land in Pulaski, Jackson Co., which is yet owned and occupied by members of the family.  Mr. H. commenced teaching school at 15 years of age, devoting all his spare time to study, preparatory to the study of the law.  He commenced his law studies with the Hon. Fidus Livermore, of Jackson, and completed the same in the office of Messrs. Tallman & Dean, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1848.  March 28, 1849, he left Michigan for the newly discovered El Dorado—California.  Here he took an active part in advocating the adoption of a Free State Constitution; held several offices of trust while there in the county of Nevada, which he helped to organize.  Mr. H. has been quite an explorer and traveler, having visited and written up for the press, most parts of the continent.  His travels have extended through every State and Territory of the Union except Alaska, and also Mexico and Central America.  He has been a member of both Houses of the Michigan Legislature, and served with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents.
    Representing the important county of Jackson in the Senate in 1878-'9, he took an active part in all important legislation, winning the esteem and confidence of his fellow Senators.  In 1880 he was the N. G. B. candidate for Congress, running ahead of his ticket.  He is now and has been for several years past, living on his pleasant and well-cultivated farm just west of the business part of Concord village.
    Mr. H. has been a writer for many of the leading papers of the Union, both East and West, and on his return from Arizona, where he had been nearly three years, he wrote a work on that Territory in 1877 which has had a large sale and created a great interest in that wonderfully rich mineral Territory.  He is yet an active man, full of energy, taking an interest in all public matters, and although not rich, is in good circumstances and enjoys life and society His motto is, "Examine all things and hold fast to everything which is for the good of humanity."
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    Leonard HUMPHREY, P. O., Parma, was born in Wayne County, N. Y., July 10, 1814, son of Ira and Abigail (Field) Humphrey, the former a native of Vermont, of Scotch ancestry, and born in 1777; the latter a native of Massachusetts, of English ancestry, and born in 1789.  In 1835 he, in company with his father, came to this county and bought 160 acres of land on section 3, Concord Township; returned to New York State in the fall, and the next spring (1836) moved upon the place where he still resides.  He was married Jan. 1, 1840, to Anna C. Humeston, daughter of James and Lydia (Knapp) Humeston.  He held the office of Notary Public two terms; has been Superintendent of the Union Sunday-school over 40 years, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church.  In politics he is a Republican.
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    Eli HUTCHISSON was born in Chenango County, N. Y., Aug. 15, 1800, son of Ephraim and Martha (Sexton) Hutchisson, natives of Massachusetts, the former of English ancestry, and the latter of Welsh.  He was married to Huldah Chamberlain March 6, 1825, the daughter of Elias and Eunice (Aldrich) Chamberlain.  They have had 9 children, 6 of whom are living, viz.: Martha, George S., Huldah, William H. H., Eli T. and Samuel C.  The 5th son, William H. H., enlisted in the 1st N. Y. Mounted Rifles, in August 1862, and served until May, 1865; enlisted as a private,  and was promoted from time to time until he was discharged; he held the office of Orderly Sergeant.  Mr. H. came to North Concord station, Jackson county, in 1865, and took charge of the railroad station, a position he has held ever since.  He held the office of Justice of the Peace in New York State 30 years.
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    Lot F. KEELER, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in this county Oct. 1, 1843, son of Lewis and Damaris B. (Blake) Keeler, the former a native of Vermont, and of English ancestry, the latter of New York, and of French and Welsh ancestry.  He received a liberal education, and was married June 14,1871, to Sarah R. Warner, daughter of John P. and Sarah A. (Heydenbink) Warner.  The result of this union was 5 children, of whom 4 are living, viz.: Lewis W., born April 23, 1872; Fanny E., April 15, 1875; Mabel E., March 29, 1877; and Olive L., July 26, 1880.  At one time, Mr. K. held the office of School Inspector of Concord Township; he is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church and has been the Ruling Elder for the last seven years; for several years was Superintendent of the Sunday-school.
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    Dr. W. N. KEELER is the oldest resident physician in Concord, and was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., in 1832, where he lived during his earlier years.  In 1847 his parents removed to this county, since which time he has remained here.  In the year 1853 he graduated at the Eclectic Medical College, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and at once located at Concord.  His genial manners and superior qualifications have won for him a large circle of friends, and he now has the leading practice in his town.
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    Horace KNOWLES, P. O., Parma, was born in Livingston County, N. Y., May 31, 1844, son of Jerod and Levina (Farwell) Knowles, natives of Vermont.  He came to this State in 1865 and stopped in Genesee County three months, when he came to this county, worked by the month and earned money enough to buy the undivided half of 80 acres.  In March, 1870, he married Miss M. Rice, daughter of Edwin P. and Sibley H. (Whitney) Rice.  The same year he moved upon his farm.  They have 3 children— Laura E., Alvin E. and Blanche.  In politics Mr. K. is a Republican.
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    Samuel MALCOM, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in Massachusetts, May 19, 1815, son of Charles and Lucy (Rice) Malcom, natives of Massachusetts, the former of Scotch ancestry, and the latter of English.  He came to this county in 1837, and settled in Sandstone Township, where he worked out by the month, and also worked land on shares.  He was married July 14, 1834, to a Miss Kinney, who died April 15, 1846, leaving 2 children.  June 13, 1848, he was married to Harriet Drake, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Finley) Drake; 2 of their 3 children are living, and 1 belonging to the first wife, making a family of 3 children living, viz: Louisa A., Hattie L. and Byron D.  Mr. Malcom is one of the Trustees of Corporation of the village of Concord.  In politics he is a Republican.
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    Daniel S. MANN, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in this county July 31, 1841, son of Daniel and Miranda (Sears) Mann, natives of New York, the former of English ancestry.  He was reared on a farm, and received a liberal education.  He was married Oct. 3, 1873, to Ellen E. Keeler, daughter of Lewis and Damaris B. (Blake) Keeler.  Mr. Mann's father came to this county in 1836, and stopped in the township of Parma, and in 1840 he moved to Concord Township and settled on section 20; remained there until 1872, then moved to the village of Concord, where he died May 21, 1876, of heart disease, after an illness of three days.
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    Lathrop MARSH, farmer; P. O., Albion; was born in Otsego County, N. Y., Dec. 13, 1813, son of Spencer and Louisa (Wood) Marsh, the former a native of Connecticut, and the latter of Massachusetts, and of English ancestry.  He came to this county in 1845, and settled on section 18, Concord Township.  He was married in May, 1854, to Eveline Devmaly, who died May 25, 1872.  He was married again to Ann G. Coy, Oct. 30, 1872, daughter of Cyrus and Rebecca (Bunnell) Coy.  He has 3 children—Ida G., Delia G. and Jennie M.  In politics Mr. M. is a Democrat.
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    Erastus G. OLCOTT, farmer; P. O., Parma; was born in Madison County, N. Y., March 21, 1829; son of Israel and Laura (Adams) Olcott, natives of New York and of English ancestry.  Mr. Olcott was married Dec. 25, 1852, to Maria E. Taber.  He came to this county in 1856, and settled in Sandstone Township, where he remained until 1858; he then moved to Concord Township and bought 80 acres of land in section 3, for which he paid $9 per acre; said land is now worth $60 per acre.  Mr. O. is a Republican.
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    George W. OSBORN, fanner; P. O., Concord; was born in Greene County, N. Y., Nov.. 2, 1841; son of William and Jane (Tompkins) Osborn, natives of the same State, the former of English ancestry.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1856, and settled on section 18, Concord Township.  He was married Jan. 19, 1871, to Emily H. Taylor, daughter of James and Rachel (Leech) Taylor, and their 3 children are Rachel L, Vola J. and Ralph H.  Mr. O. is a consistent member of the M. E. Church.  He owns a farm of 120 acres on section 14, Concord Township, worth $60 per acre.
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    E. A. PARKER, present manager of Concord Mills, was born at Batavia, N. Y., in 1822, where he lived until he was 29 years of age, and where he acquired his education.  He learned the trade of miller at Bushville, Genesee Co., N. Y.  In 1850 he came to Michigan, and located at Jonesville, Hillsdale Co.  Since coming to this State he has been in the milling business at Jonesville, Litchfield, Grass Lake and Concord, and has acquired the reputation of a first-class miller.
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    William F. PARKINSON, farmer; P. O., Albion; was born in Erie County, N. Y., Nov. 9, 1819; son of Sylvanus and Sarah (Ferris) Parkinson, natives of New York State, the former of Scotch and English ancestry, and the latter of Irish.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1836, and settled in Concord Township, section 5.  He was married July 9, 1845, to Celinda Gibbs, daughter of  Elmore and Elizabeth (Buel) Gibbs.  Their 3 children are James A., born Sept. 26, 1846, now practicing law in Jackson; John Le Nam, born Jan. 7,1851, in the grocery trade at Jackson, and Hiram Buel, born March 4, 1852, still living at home.  Mr. Parkinson is a Republican.
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    William, PASSMORE (deceased) was born in England Dec. 18, 1811; son of John and Agnes (Buckingham) Passmore, both of English ancestry.  He came to this country in 1852, and stopped in Genesee County, N. Y., where he remained two years.  He was married March 28, 1852, to Phoebe Kingdon, daughter of Joseph and Phoebe (Barrow) Kingdon.  In 1854 he moved to this State, stopping in Calhoun County two years, and in 1856 moved to the township of Parma.  The first 12 months he worked a rented farm, and then worked six months by the day.  In the spring of 1856 he moved upon a farm of 60 acres of his own on sections 4 and 9, Concord Township, where he died Sept. 24, 1878, leaving 4 children— Charles W., born Dec. 18, 1853; John F., born June 18, 1857; Carrie A., born Feb. 11, 1859, and Effie M„ born March 1, 1864.
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    Daniel PERRY (deceased) was born in Genesee County, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1823, son of Daniel and Mamie (Hitchcock) Perry, natives of Massachusetts, the former of English ancestry.  He was brought to this county in 1832, and settled on what is now known as Moody hill, near the city of Jackson.  In 1834 he moved with his parents to Concord Township, where Oct. 15. 1851, he was married to Theoda L. Welsh, daughter of James and Keziah (Barrett) Welsh.  The result of this union was 2 children—Frank S. and Nelson W.; they have an adopted daughter, Etta M.  His father gave him 80 acres of land on section 14; he bought other pieces adjoining until he owned 200 acres, worth about $65 per acre.  His death occurred April 2, 1871.
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    Joseph PERRY, brother of the preceding; P. O., Concord; was born in Pennsylvania Nov. 2, 1813.  Nov. 24, 1836, he married Diana Woodworth.  He then in company with his father bought 360 acres of land on sections 14 and 15, Concord Township, where his wife died.  He was married again, to Rachel Teeter, July 1, 1849; she died Feb. 14, 1881; of their 12 children, 9 are living.  The oldest son died in the army of a gunshot wound received Dec. 31, 1862, at the battle of Stone River.  The second son also died in the service of his country.  Mr. Perry held the office of Justice for four years, and for 15 or 16 years was one of the School Board.
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    Austin POMROY (deceased) was born in Madison County, N. Y., Jan. 23, 1804, son of John and Deborah (Foster) Pomroy, natives of Connecticut.  He came to this county in 1835 and bought 160 acres of land on section 30, Concord Township; returned to New York that fall, and April 28, 1836, was married to Betsey Randall, daughter of Henry and Sarah (Robinson) Randall.  They immediately moved to his farm in this county, where he remained until his death, which occurred March 23, 1877.  He was several times elected to the office of County Surveyor, and also held various offices of trust in the township.  He was a member of the Presbyterian Church and one of its Elders for 34 years.  He was loved and esteemed by all who knew him.
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    Lyman B. RAY (deceased) was born in Livingston County, N. Y., Feb. 14, 1839, son of John and Hannah (Bishop) Ray.  He came to Jackson County in 1864, and bought 120 acres of land on section 9, Concord Township, for which he paid $22 per acre; said land is now worth $80.  He was married March 10,1864, to Miss Short, daughter of Josiah and Sarah P. (Carpenter) Short; their 6 children are— G. Walter, born Jan. 12, 1865; J. Norton, born June 19, 1866; Graves J., born Nov. 19, 1870; Ralph L., born Sept. 25, 1872; Anna M., born Oct. 25, 1874; Lyman B., born May 28, 1879.
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    Mark RAY, P. O., Concord, was born in Bennington County, VT., July 20, 1814, son of John and Elizabeth (Langdill) Ray, and of English ancestry, the latter a native of New Hampshire, of Irish and Scotch ancestry.  In 1818 he moved with his parents to New York, and in 1855 came to this State and bought 160 acres of land in Macomb County, and then returned to New York.  He was back and forth several times up to 1852.  April 6,1843, he married Elvira J. Hartson, daughter of Alpheus and Laura Richardson.  In 1852 he moved to this county and settled in Concord Township, in section 14, where his wife died June 22,1859, leaving 2 children— Emily A., born June 12, 1845; and Frank A., born July 16, 1849.  Mr. R. held several offices of trust in the township, and during the war served as enrolling officer for Concord Township.  He is a Republican.
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    Charles ROOT was born in Wayne County, N. Y., Feb. 16, 1821, son of Daniel and Rhoda (King) Root, the former a native of Massachusetts and the latter of New York.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1835, and settled in section 10, Concord Township.  His father was a shoemaker, of whom he learned the trade, and in 1841 he left home and went to work for himself.  In 1844 he opened a shop in the village of Concord with Mr. Malcolm; in 1848 Mr. M. sold his interest to Jerry Reynolds; they continued the business until 1857, when Mr. Root bought Mr. Reynolds' interest and continued the business alone until 1874, when Mr. Severance bought a half interest.  Mr. R. has applied himself very closely to business, having taken but six weeks' vacation since 1844 (he then attended the Centennial), and in that time he has not lost one day from sickness.  He actually wore a hole through an inch and a quarter floor with his boot, standing at his cutting board.  Mr. Root was married Oct. 3, 1849, to Lucretia Scranton, daughter of Elnathan and Lucretia (Andrews) Scranton; the result of this union was 4 children—3 boys and 1 girl.  Mr. Root is a member of the Universalist Church, and in politics a Greenbacker.
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    George S. SCRANTON, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in Genesee County, N. Y., Jan 22, 1826, son of Elnathan and Lucretia (Andrews) Scranton, the former a native of New York and of English ancestry; the latter of Vermont, of English ancestry.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1843 and settled in section 32, Concord Township, where the father died Aug. 5, 1855.  He was married Aug. 21,1856, to Elizabeth F. Hodge, daughter of Homer and Roxanna (Paine) Hodge.  He lived on the old homestead after he was married until 1871, then moved to the village of Concord where he still resides.  They have 2 children—Dan S. and Ella F.  He held the office of School Inspector two terms; is a member of the First Universalist Church, and is Treasurer of the same; in politics a Republican.
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    Nathan SHOTWELL, farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in Genesee County, N. Y., May 14, 1826, son of Isaac M. and Edna (Pound) Shotwell, the former a native of New York, the latter of New Jersey.  He was married May 2, 1850, to Phebe B. Gardner, daughter of George W., and Diana (Berry) Gardner.  The result of this union was 5 children—Rozilla P., Ambrose M., Cassius C, Ida A., and Manly N.  He came to this county in 1868 and settled in Concord Township, on section 22; he bought 106 acres of land for which he paid $8,000; said land he now values at $100 per acre.  He has quite an afflicted family; his eldest son was born blind and the youngest having very little use of his arms and lower limbs.  The oldest son graduated at the blind institute at Batavia, N. Y., also in the full English course at the Normal school in Ypsilanti.  He is now Principal of the literary department of the Little Rock, Ark., school for the blind; also publishes a bi-monthly paper at Little Rock, called Our Reporter.  Two years ago last winter he was instrumental in getting a bill through the State Legislature for the relief of the blind in Michigan.
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    George L. SMALLEY was born in the town of Hampton, Saratoga Co., N. Y., in the year 1821.  Here he lived with his parents until 1834, when the family removed to Michigan.  His education was received at Concord, Jackson Co., and during the earlier part of his life worked at mechanical work.  In 1854 he went to Jackson where, in company with his brothers, he embarked in mercantile business.  In 1858 he was elected Sheriff of Jackson County, in which position he served two terms.  At the end of this time he was appointed Deputy Provost Marshal of the same county and held this office until 1864, when he resigned.  He then went to Chicago, where he has since been engaged in the manufacture of horse-shoe nails, and is now Superintendent of the Northwestern Horse Nail Co.  He is also interested in fine stock, and with his brothers, has a fine farm called "Burr Oak Farm," located in the eastern edge of Concord village.  The prime object of this farm is the raising of thoroughbred cattle and sheep.  They have now nine blooded Holstein cattle that are exceedingly fine; they also have some thoroughbred Cotswold sheep.  Their farm contains about 400 acres and has every facility for the development of fine stock.
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    William SPRATT (deceased) was born in Connecticut June 20, 1788, son of William and Elizabeth (Sealey) Spratt.  He came to this county and settled on section 21, Concord Township, and remained there until his death, which occurred Sept. 18, 1850; he left a family of 6 children.  He was married to Alma Harvey when he was about 22 years old.  He bought 320 acres of land in this county, for which he paid $9.50 per acre; said land is now worth $100 per acre.  Albert L. Spratt, a bachelor, and his maiden sister, Adelia, reside on the old homestead.
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    William H. SPRATT (deceased) was born in Hampton, New York, March 12, 1812, son of William and Alma (Harvey) Spratt, the former a native of Connecticut, and of Scotch ancestry.  He was married to Polly Clements Feb. 7, 1833, daughter of Johnison and Lucy (Worden) Clements; they have had 3 children, of whom two are living—William H., and Mary M., now the wife of H. K. Billings.  Mr. S. came to this county in 1835 and bought 60 acres of land on section 20, Concord Township; remained there until 1849, when he sold and moved upon a farm he had previously bought on section 26, Concord Township; remained here until 1871; when he moved to the village of Concord, where he died March 10, 1872.  The widow remained in the village two years after his death, then moved back to the farm, where she still resides, with her daughter.
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    Tallmadge STEVENS, lumber merchant, Concord, was born in Newark, N. J., Dec. 8, 1816; son of Ebenezer and Chloe (Fairchilds) Stevens, natives of Connecticut.  In 1840 he went to Marshall, Mich., where he engaged in the mercantile business, bringing his goods with him from Connecticut; remained two years and then moved his stock of goods to Concord, where he continued in the same business until 1849.  In the meantime he built a saw and grist mill in Spring Arbor; went out of the mercantile business, engaged in milling until the fall of 1850, when his mill was destroyed by fire.  The value of the mill was $9,000, and there was an insurance of $3,500.  The same year Mr. S. went to Racine, Wis., where he was engaged in buying grain and wool; in 1851 bought Congress Hall and ran that until December, 1853, when he sold his hotel and went to Madison and rented the Capitol House, furnished it at a cost of $18,000, and had, in connection, a first-class livery stable; remained there two years, sold his interest for $20,000, then purchased a hotel at Beaver Dam, which he conducted one year; in 1857 went to St. Louis, Mo., where he followed the practice of medicine (homeopathy) and farming; remained there until 1863; ran a hotel at Little Bock, Ark., till 1865, sold out for $30,000; returned to Kalamazoo, Mich., and engaged in farming and fruit-growing; in 1868 went to Battle Creek and rented the Potter House and furnished it; in 1869 sold out and came to Jackson, where he purchased the furniture of the Marion House, and conducted it until 1870, when he was burned out, saving a small portion of his furniture, which he took to Greenville and furnished the Webster House, and remained there until 1873; went to Langston, where he ran a saw-mill one year; returned to Concord and embarked in the lumber business, and has remained since.  He married for his first wife Louisa Humphrey, March 8, 1841; she died in Madison, Wis., Sept. 22, 1855, leaving 3 daughters.  For his second wife he married Rebecca Bigelow, Nov. 15, 1856; there were 2 daughters; of the 5 children there are 3 living —Mary H., Sarah L. and Hattie P.
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    J. Blake STODDARD was born in this county May 17, 1838, son of Samson and Maria (Blake) Stoddard, natives of New York, the former of English, and the latter of Scotch and English ancestry.  Dr. Stoddard, the father of J. B., came to this county in 1830, and settled in what is now the city of Jackson.  In 1836 he moved to his farm in Concord Township, where the subject of this sketch was born; he attended the district schools of the county until he was 19 years old, then he went to Albion and attended the college two years; in 1860 took charge of his father's farm, and in 1861 he enlisted in the 6th Mich. Vol. Inf., Co. I, as 4th Sergeant.  He was at the taking of New Orleans; was wounded at Baton Rouge, Aug. 5, 1862, receiving four gunshot wounds in his legs; said wounds have always troubled him, having to bandage them until the present time.  He was sent to the hospital at New Orleans, where he remained until November, 1862, when he was discharged.  In the spring of 1863 he took charge of the old homestead, which he has conducted ever since.  Sept. 26,1865, he was married to Miss E. A. Ray, daughter of Mark L. and Elvira J. (Hartson) Ray, and they have 1 girl—Rena E., born Nov. 1, 1867.  In 1862 he moved from the farm to the village of Concord, and engaged in the mercantile business until 1877, when he sold to his brother, who still carries on the business.  In politics Mr. S. is a Republican; took the census of Concord Township in 1880.
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    Albert H. TUCKER, dealer in agricultural implements and produce; P. O., Concord; was born in Essex County, N. Y., June 7, 1831, son of Calvin and Nancy (Thayer) Tucker, the former a native of Vermont, and of English ancestry.  He came to this county in 1859, and settled in Concord and engaged as salesman for Dodge & Whitman until 1864, when Mr. Whitman bought out Mr. Dodge and took Mr. Tucker as partner.  In 1867 Mr. Tucker sold to Whitman, and bought out Mr. Olmsted, who was with Mr. Dodge; in 1871 he sold to Dodge, and went into the produce and lumber business; in 1873 he bought a stock of drugs and groceries of Mr. Morrill, and carried on the business until 1876, when he sold out and went into the produce and agricultural trade with his brother, which business they still continue.  He was married July 26,1857, to Sarah H. Bigelow, daughter of Jacob A. and Louisa (Putman) Bigelow; of their 5 children, 4 are living, viz.: Frank H., born Nov. 3, 1861, died Sept. 18, 1864; Mary H., born Oct. 27, 1865; James A., born Aug. 10, 1868; Rebecca G., born Nov. 4, 1870; Abram K, born May 18, 1874.
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    Andrew J. VAN WORMER, farmer; P. O., Albion; was born in Allegany County, N. Y., Jan. 15, 1831, son of Jeremiah and Eunice (Wattles) Van Wormer, the former a native of New Hampshire, of Holland ancestry, and the latter of Massachusetts, of French ancestry.  He was brought to this county by his parents, in 1835, and settled on section 17, Concord Township, where his father died Dec. 5, 1851.  Andrew still owns the homestead.  He was married Feb. 13, 1853, to Emily M. Gregory, daughter of Noah and Lucinda (Hacket) Gregory.  The result of this union was 6 children, of whom 4 are living.  He owns a farm of 185 acres and a fraction, worth $75 per acre; he has buildings to the amount of about $4,500.  He is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church, and has been their local preacher for the last four years.  Previous to that he had held several offices in the Church, and last fall was elected Superintendent of the Sunday-school.
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    Uriah WADE (deceased) was born in Massachusetts July 31, 1796; was taken by his parents to New York State in 1800, where he remained until 1835, then came to this county, and bought 80 acres on section 33, Concord Township.  In the spring of 1836 he moved upon the place, where his wife died the same year.  He was married again, March 5, 1838, to Mary Gates, daughter of Asa and Mary (Robinson) Gates.  Mr. Gates died Oct. 11, 1871, and his wife Nov. 14, 1879, leaving a family of 10 children.  He was a member of the M. E. Church, and in politics a Republican.  Mr. Wade gave liberally to the railroad, and also gave the right of way through his place.  Oct. 6, 1871, as he was crossing the railroad track, with his team, the engine struck the wagon and threw him out and injured him, so that he died five days afterward.
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    Casinnis YOUNG, Jr., farmer; P. O., Concord; was born in this county May 21, 1843, son of Casinnis and Elizabeth (Young) Young, and of German ancestry.  He was married Dec. 3, 1868, to Mary E. Rodenbach, daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Webber) Rodenbach.  The result of this union was 1 child, Franklin C, born Nov. 13, 1870.  The father of the subject of this sketch came to this county in 1836, and settled on section 20, Concord Township, where the son now resides. He bought 80 acres of land, for which he paid $4 per acre; said land is now worth $85 per acre.


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