Hanover Township
History

Line Divider

Church in Hanover 1908  Hanover High  ME Church 1908 
Hanover Church                 Hanover High School              ME Church Hanover
  Contributed by Paul Petosky

Van Schoick's Fireside Inn
Van Schoick's Fireside Inn, Hanover 1910's
  Contributed by Paul Petosky

From "The History of Jackson County, Michigan"

William Clapp, of this township, in his historical reminiscences says:
    The township of Hanover is designated in the U. S. survey of the State of Michigan as township 4 south, of range 2 west.      It was organized into a separate township in 1836, previous to which time it had been embraced, with the seven other western towns of Jackson county, in one township, under the name of Spring Arbor.  At the first township meeting, which was held at the house of Amos Brown in May, 1836, Charles Parsons was chosen moderator, and Charles S. Stone, clerk pro tem.    Daniel Porter was elected supervisor and Chas. S. Stone was elected clerk.  The surface of the town is undulating.  The soil is what is known as oak openings.
    The first permanent white settler in the town was Abiel Tripp, a native of Rutland, Vt.  He moved into the town in 1832, and settled on section 3, where he died Feb. 7, 1861, at the advanced age of 80 years.  He built the first house in the district.
    Amos M. Brown was born Nov. 24, 1834, the first white child born in the town.
    Horace Williams, a native of New York, settled on section 5 over 48 years ago.  He married Miss Elizabeth Sloat, and they were the first white couple married in the town.  Mr. Williams died in 1866.
    The first death in the township was that of a Mr. Perry, who was accidentally killed while felling a tree in the winter of 1837-'8.
    The first interment in the Hanover cemetery was that of a son of O. D. Thomson, who died April 1, 1839.
    The first interment in the Baldwin cemetery was that of a daughter of Aaron Reynolds, who died in May, 1839.
    The first sermon was preached in the house of Abiel Tripp, by one Elder Fassett, a Methodist minister.  The first Methodist quarterly meeting held in the town was in the barn of Gardner Tripp, in 1842, at which there was a number of Pottawatomie Indians, who were being educated at the Albion Seminary.  Geo. Smith was the presiding elder.
    The first flouring mill in the town was built at Baldwin's, by Geo. A. Baldwin, after whom the place was named.
    The first saw-mill was built by Abraham Ramsdell, on section 36, and was propelled by water from a large spring which discharges into Farwell lake.
    The first church was built at Baldwin by the Methodists and Universalists; it was styled the Union Church.  "The First Universalist Parish of Hanover," is the title of an organization which filed articles of association at the county clerk's office, Jackson, in May, 1879.  The officers of the society are James Mitchell, Moderator; Charles A. Ford, Clerk; Gordes P. Colgrove, Treasurer; Jonas Laird, Charles P. Goldsmith, James W. Newberry, Trustees.
    The Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw railroad was projected and built through the town in 1869-70.  The inhabitants of the town paid $33,000 of the capital stock.  The township of Hanover has never furnished a convict to the State Penitentiary or an inmate to the Reform School.  There are now three post offices in the town—one at Hanover village, one at Baldwin, and one at Stony Point.
    The first justice's court was held by Daniel Porter, one of the first justices in the town, who was also its first supervisor, and was 10 times elected to that office.  He settled on section 10 over 48 years ago.  Mr. Porter died in Wisconsin in 1874; he was a native of New York.  James C. Bell came from New York, and settled at an early day on section 15.  He was three times elected supervisor of the town.  He now lives in the State of New York.
    Barnabas C. Hatch settled in the town of Spring Arbor over 48 years ago.  About 1848 he moved into the town of Hanover, of which he has been elected supervisor seven times.  He served one term as representative in the State Legislature.  In 1850 he was elected associate judge of Jackson county court.  Some 13 years ago Mr. Hatch moved to Spring Arbor, where he died Feb. 22, 1874.  He was a native of New York.
    Frederick A. Kennedy, a native of England, settled in the town in 1837.  He was four times elected supervisor.  He served one term as representative in the State Legislature.  In 1844 he was appointed marshal to take the State census of Jackson County.
    Paul Spink, born in New York, settled in Concord more than 44 years ago.  In 1876 he lived in the village of Hanover.  He served two terms as supervisor of the town.
    William Clapp, a native of New York, settled on section 31, in 1837, where he continued to reside until 1876.  He was elected supervisor of the town five times, and once appointed to that office to fill the unexpired term of Geo. W. Kennedy, who resigned in August.
    Geo. W. Kennedy was a native of Pennsylvania, and moved into the town about 30 years ago.  In 1864 he was elected supervisor of the town, but resigned the office in August, and moved into the City of Jackson.
    Edward Dodd settled at an early day on section 19.  In 1866 he was elected supervisor of the town.
    Salmon Hale, a step-son of Abiel Tripp, and a native of New York, became a resident of the town nearly 48 years ago.  In 1867 he was elected supervisor of the township.  He held the plow to do the first plowing in the district.
    William B. Thorn, a native of New York, settled on section 1 in 1846.  In 1870 he was elected supervisor of the town, but subsequently moved to Nebraska.
    Henry M. Eddy, a native of Pennsylvania, lived in the town of Spring Arbor until 1864, when he moved into Hanover.  In 1871-'3 he was elected supervisor, and in 1876 one of the deputy sheriffs of the county.
    John L. Hutchins, born in New York, was elected supervisor in 1874-'5.  Mr. Hutchins came to the township about 35 years ago.
    Gardner Tripp, a native of Vermont, settled on section 3 over 48 years ago, but removed to section 21 a year or so subsequently.  On a portion of his new farm the village of Hanover is mainly located.  Gardner Tripp died long years ago.
    Martin Tripp, son of Abiel Tripp, the first settler in the town, has been a resident nearly 48 years.  He was highway commissioner for a number of years.
    Charles S. Stone has been a resident of the town over 48 years.  He located on section 3, and was the first town clerk.
    Orrin D. Thompson settled on section 31, in 1836.  He taught the first primary school.
    James O. Bibbins, a native of New York, settled on section 20 in 1837.  A portion of Mr. Bibbins' original purchase is comprised in the plat of Hanover village.
    Nathan Shaw, a native of New York, settled on section 30, in 1840.
    William Comet, born in Rhode Island, moved into the township 44 years ago and located on section 12.
    James D. Clelland, a native of Ireland, became a resident of the town in 1833.  He located on section 6.
    James T. Snow settled on section 6 over 34 years ago.  He was born in Vermont.
    Henry Wickam, a native of Prussia, settled on section 26 in 1836.
    Matthias Calkins, a native of New York, has resided in the town over 39 years.
    John Cobb, born in Massachusetts, settled on section 4 in 1834, where he died Jan. 16, 1875.
    Jefferson Drake, a native of New Hampshire, located on section 24.  He has been a resident of the county for over 34 years.
    William Kellicutt, a native of New York, settled at an early day on section 28, removing subsequently to section 15.
    Richard Stevens, a native of England, located 44 years ago on section 9, removing later to section 16.
    Elias Allen, a native of New York, has been a citizen of the township over 34 years.
    James Folks, a native of England, located on section 18, 34 years ago.
    Augustus Griner, born in Pennsylvania, came to reside in the township over 34 years ago,
    Salah Day, born in New York, settled in the town over 34 years ago, and died Nov. 23, 1873.
    Rufus Page, a native of New York, settled on section 27, 39 years ago.    He died in 1871.
    Henry Richards, born in New York, settled at an early day on section 22.
    Marshal Fisher, a native of England, settled on section 10, removing subsequently to section 21.  Three or four years ago, while riding in his buggy, Mr. Fisher collided with a train on the Fort Wayne railroad, and was badly injured.
    John Crittenden, a native of New York, settled on section 21 in 1836.  He was the first postmaster of the township.  About 24 years ago he moved to Concord, and some 12 or 14 years ago was killed by a stroke of lightning while harvesting.
    John W. Densmore, a native of Maine, settled on section 33 in 1839.
    Gordis P. Colgrove settled in Hanover in 1839.  Mr. Colgrove was born in Pennsylvania.
    Solomon C. Crafts, born in Massachusetts, settled on section 15 about 39 years ago.
    Cornelius Sullivan, a native of Ireland, settled on section 23 in 1836, and died about nine years ago, at which time he owned 800 acres of land.
    Amos Freeman is a native of New York.  He settled in the town in 1832.
    John Rowe resided in the town about 34 years, and in the State about 44 years.  He was supposed in 1876 to be 85 years of age, and the oldest man in the township.

BALDWIN

    The oldest place in the town making any pretensions to be a village is Baldwin.  It has four or five dry-goods stores and groceries, and a good flouring-mill.  It has a graded school, the house for which was built in 1873, at a cost of $3,000.  It also has a good hotel.  It is on the Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw railroad.

HANOVER

    The village of Hanover is deserving of particular notice on account of its rapid growth and the enterprise of its citizens.  Ten years ago the ground on which it stands was a cultivated field; the place has now a number of fine stores and dwellings.  It has a fine brick school-house, built in 1873, at a cost of $8,000.  There are three churches in the place.  The Methodists built a house in 1873, at a cost of $8,000.  The Friends built a house in 1874, at a cost of $1,600.  The Universalists used the old brick school-house as a place of worship as late as 1876.  The commercial firms of the town are enterprising and prosperous.  The first store was erected in the village of Hanover in 1870, and was used as a grocery.
Of minerals, it is not known that there are any in the township.  There is an excellent sandstone quarry at Stony Point, on section 31.  The color of the stone is light gray or buff, and is frost and fire proof.  The quarry was lightly worked 40 years ago by Gardner Tripp.
    The pioneers of Hanover endured great privations and suffered much from fever and ague, or chill-fever, which was almost sure to find its way into every house.  In addition to this there was a scarcity of provisions; consequently they had to go a long distance to purchase, then go 40 or 50 miles to mill, and sometimes wait a day or two for their turns to get grinding.  They also suffered great loss and inconvenience from a worthless paper currency, which was abundantly supplied by a multitude of wild-cat banks.  The State Legislature interfered to protect the bill-holders, by appointing commissioners to examine into the condition of the banks, the officers of which would demonstrate their soundness by producing a sufficient number of kegs filled mostly with nails and old iron, the tops of which they would gloss over with a few pieces of shining coin, that never failed to satisfy the "eagle-eyed" commissioners; and after their departure, the officers of the bank, being accommodating fellows, as pioneers are known to be, would ship the same kegs for the benefit of the next bank, to be examined, which never failed to arrive in time to be taken in at the back door, again to undergo the scrutinizing gaze of the commissioners.  But times are considerably changed and the pioneers of Hanover have the satisfaction of knowing that they have acted a very  important part in the great role of Western civilization,—that they have been instrumental in making rough places smooth, and desert places to blossom as the rose.
    The election returns for November, 1880, are as follows:—Electors—Hancock, 140; Garfield, 149; Weaver, 132. Governor—Holloway, 146; Jerome, 135; Woodman, 133. Congress—Pringle, 130; Lacy, 144; Hodge, 138.  Judge of Probate—Powell, 214; Gould, 123; Anderson, 74.  Register of Deeds—Townley, 212; Kay, 116; Hinshaw, 86. Sheriff—Winney, 159; Lockwood, 93; Terry, 158 Treasurer—Wheeler, 134; Ludlow, 117; Townley, 147.

BIOGRAPHICAL

We close the history of this township by presenting personal sketches of several of its representative citizens:

Albert G. AYRES; P. O., Horton; was born in Monroe county, N. Y. , Nov. 29, 1826, son of Joseph and Charlotte (Norton) Ayres, the former a native of Massachusetts, and of Scotch ancestry; the latter a native of New York; was reared on a farm; came to this county in 1853, and settled on section 10, Hanover Township; was married Feb. 16, 1848, to Harriet O. Niles, daughter of Joseph and Lovina M. (Whitcher) Niles.  Of their 6 children 5 are living.  In politics Mr. A. is a staunch Republican.

Hon. Eugene H. BELDON, Representative from the third district of Jackson county, was born in the township of Spring Arbor, Jackson County, Mich., Dec. 14, 1840.  He attended the district school of the neighborhood and the graded school in Jackson until he was 15 years of age; then he became a pupil at the Michigan Central College, until at the age of 20 he attended the law department of the University at Ann Arbor, also studying in the office of Gov. Blair.  He never practiced law, but has been connected with farming and real-estate transactions, having accumulated a considerable valuable property.  He has held the office of Justice of the Peace and Notary Public at different times.  As Republican candidate for the Legislature he received over 400 plurality, the district giving over 300 the other way two years before.
The subject of this sketch is a person who possesses those qualities that insure the confidence, esteem and good will of his fellow-men in an eminent degree, being possessed of sterling integrity, that no amount of temptation and bribery can affect, of exemplary habits and stability of character that tends to elevate all with whom he associates, and a genial deportment that bespeaks a genuine good will for all, and which insures the reciprocation of universal friendship.  As a member of the Legislature he has been very industrious and successful, being able by his influence and standing in that body to secure the passage of important legislation, including some measures that had once been defeated.  His labors in perfecting the revision of the highway laws and successful management of its passage, together with other legislation, have elicited numerous comments of the press.  In consonance with his sympathy with the oppressed he introduced, early in the session, concurrent resolutions of encouragement to the "Irish Land League," and also gave liberally to assist their countrymen in Ireland, which was reciprocated by the League at Jackson in the passage of earnest resolutions of thanks, in his election as an honorary member, and by invitation to address a mass meeting of the League at Union Hall, Feb. 15, which was also addressed by leading men of all parties.  We bespeak for him still greater evidence of the confidence of the people.  A portrait of Mr. Belden will be found on page 875.

Alexander G. BELL; P. O., Horton; was born in Saratoga County K Y., March 17, 1816, son of John and Elizabeth (Gilchrist) Bell, natives of New York, and of Scotch ancestry.  He came to this county in 1840 and settled on section 15, this township; was married Oct. 22, 1840, to Mary A. Snow, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Wright) Snow.  He was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools of this country; was elected Clerk in 1856 and served one term; in politics is a staunch Republican.

James O. BIBBINS; P. O., Hanover; was born in Genesee County, N. Y., Oct 18, 1811, son of Amaziah and Leah (Storm) Bibbins, the former of Welsh descent and the latter German.  He was reared on a farm, and received a common-school education.  He was married May 29, 1836, to Lavina Storm, daughter of Nicholas and Hannah (Hall) Storm.  He came to Michigan in 1837, and located on section 20, this township, where he still resides.  He is the father of 9 children, of whom 6 are living; he had 1 son who served through the war and contracted a disease of which he died in the winter of 1865.

Barnwell BISHOP; P. O , Horton; was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., June 27, 1805, son of Samuel and Esther (Bathrick) Bishop, the former a native of Connecticut, and the latter of Massachusetts; was reared on a farm.  July 2, 1827, he married Eliza Burchell, daughter of Michael and Betsey (Millick) Burchell; of their 10 children 6 are living—William H., Catharine A., Theodore C, Andrew J., Charles A. and Eliza A.  He came to this county in 1856 and settled in the township of Pulaski; from there moved to Spring Arbor, and in 1861 moved to Hanover township.  In politics he is a staunch Republican.

Seth BOWERMAN; P. O., Horton; was born in New York, Aug. 7, 1829, son of Benjamin and Polly (Johnson) Bowerman, the former a native of Massachusetts, and the latter of New York.  He was married Oct. 6, 1853, to Mary Petit, who died April 16, 1866.  Oct. 6, 1866, he married Sarah Pickell, daughter of Isaac and Mary (Williams) Pickell.  Of their 9 children 6 are living—2 boys and 4 girls.  They have twice been blessed with twins.  In politics Mr. B. is a Republican.

Charles BREWSTER; P. O., Hanover; was born in Summit County, Ohio, son of Warren and Sally A. (Strong) Brewster; was reared on a farm and received a common-school education; was brought by his parents to Lenawee County in 1842, and remained there until 1861, then moved to this county.  He was married Dec. 15, 1859, to Abbie J. Bailey, daughter of Benjamin and Margaret (Burts) Bailey.  They had 8 children, viz.: Alma V., Elmer E., Adelbert W., Clara F., Milton O, Jessie M., Arthur L. and Carl M.  He is a staunch Republican, and now holds the office of School Moderator.

S. BREWSTER; P. O., Hanover; was born March 2, 1833, son of Warren and Sally A. (Strong) Brewster, natives of New York, and of English ancestry; was reared on a farm; brought by his parents to this State in 1843 and settled in Lenawee County, and in 1859 he came to this county and settled on section 36, Brooklyn Township, now Norvell.  In 1870 he moved to section 20, this township, where he now resides.  He was married Dec. 18, 1864, to Mary Jane Curtis, daughter of Orville and Lucy (Baldwin) Curtis, and of their 3 children 2 are living—Sherman S. and Warren.  In politics Mr. B. is a Republican.

Henry L. BROWN; P. O., Horton; was born in this county, March 10, 1842, son of Amos and Amanda F. (Strong) Brown, and was reared on a farm.  He was married April 6, 1876, to Mary Austin, daughter of James and Amanda (Tyler) Austin.  His father came to this county in 1863 from Niagara County, N. Y., and settled  on section 3, Hanover Township, where he remained until his death, which occurred Sept. 15, 1872.  Henry still resides on the old homestead.

William CLAPP, whose portrait is given on page 893, was born in Dutchess County, N. Y., June 4, 1805, and is a son of Henry and Damaris (Hull) Clapp.  Nov. 1, 1832, he married Abigail Smith, daughter of Levi and Dorcas (Culver) Smith.  They have had 4 children, viz.: Levi S., Mary A., Lucinda M. and Martha W.; the eldest died at the age of 10, and the youngest at the age of 2 years.  In May, 1837, Mr. Clapp came to Michigan; at Blissfield he saw the locomotive make its first trip in Michigan on the Erie &    Kalamazoo R. R.; several gentlemen stepped from the train with leather buckets and filled the tender from the River Raisin.  In July he moved on the farm he now occupies.  In 1841 he set out an orchard of grafted fruit trees, for which he went to Ypsilanti.  In July, 1857, his barn was struck by lightning and burned, with a loss of $600.  He was live times elected Supervisor of the town, and once appointed to that office to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of G. W. Kennedy; served 12 years in the capacity of Justice of the Peace, and gave $1,000 and right of way to the Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw R. R.  In politics he is a Democrat, in religion a Unitarian, and is generally esteemed throughout the county.

CharlesK. DENSMORE; P. O., Hanover; was born in Sidney, Maine, Jan. 21, 1827, son of Abiel and Abigail (Kelley) Densmore, the former a native of Maine, and of Scotch ancestry, and the latter a native of Massachusetts, and of Irish descent.  He was reared on a farm, brought by his parents to this State in 1837, and settled in Lenawee county; remained there two years, when he moved with his parents to this county, and settled in Hanover Township.  His father died in the fall of 1852, and mother Jan. 16,1876.  March 12,1848, he married Charlotte Spink, daughter of Paul and Roxie (Harlow) Spink, who died Feb. 5, 1852, leaving 1 child—a boy who followed her in a few months.  July 31,1853, Mr. D. married Clarinda M. Raymond, daughter of Albion H. and Harriet L. (Tuttle) Raymond; they had 4 children, of whom 3 are living, viz.: Albion, Harriet and Leonard.

John W. DENSMORE; P. O., Hanover; is a brother of the preceding, and was born in Sidney, Maine, Oct. 2, 1816.  He was reared on a farm, brought to this State by his parents in 1837, settling in Lenawee County, and in 1839 they moved to this county, and settled on section 33, Hanover Township, where the youngest brother still lives.  Oct. 14, 1843, he married Eunice E. Belden, daughter of Consider and Aurilla (Adams) Belden; they are the parents of  7 children, 5 girls and 2 boys, of whom 3 are living, and all reside in Hanover Township.

Thomas J. DRAKE (deceased) was born in New Hampshire March 15, 1805, son of Abraham and Lydia (Howe) Drake, natives of the same State, the former of Welsh and the latter of English ancestry.  He was married Nov. 15, 1829, to Martha P. Edmonds, daughter of Nathaniel and Saloma (Howe) Drake; came to this county in 1840, and settled in the township of Liberty, and in 1848 moved to the township of Hanover on section 24, where he remained until his death, which occurred Feb. 16,1879.  He left 1 daughter—Eliza J., who married Harris Hakes.

Henry M. EDDY; P. O., Horton; was born in Pennsylvania July 2, 1831, son of John D. and Lovisa (Dunmore) Eddy, the former a native of Vermont, the latter of Pennsylvania, and of Irish ancestry.  He was brought to this State by his parents in 1838, and settled in Washtenaw County; moved to this county in 1841, and settled in the township of Spring Arbor, and remained there 29 years.  He was married July 4,1854, to Hannah M. Schran, daughter of John and Sarah (Grose) Schran, German ancestry.  He was reared on a farm, and received a liberal education; was appointed Deputy Sheriff in 1875, and served four years; in 1872 he took charge of the railroad station at Baldwin, which position he still holds.  He owns the depot buildings, but leases the ground on which they stand.

James FISHER was born in this county Dec. 25, 1835, son of Marshall and Hannah (Head) Fisher, natives of England.  He was married June 19,1872, to Nancy B. Soule, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Hodgdon) Soule.  Of their 3 children 2 are living—James A. and Thomas M. Fisher.  He received a common-school education, and in politics is a Greenbacker.

Horace GIFFORD; P. O., Horton; was born in Canada June 30, 1817, son of Joshua and Paulina (Harrington) Gifford, the former a native of Vermont, of English ancestry, and the latter a native of Rhode Island, of Scotch descent.  He came to this county April 17, 1838, and settled on section 2, Hanover Township, where he still resides.  Sept. 8, 1840, he married Melissa Burt, daughter of Luther and Florinda (Horton) Burt; of their 3 children 2 are living—Teresa A. and Floyd M. Mr. G. is a member of the Methodist Church, and in politics a Republican.

Charles H. GOLDSMITH; P. O., Hanover; was born in this county July 24, 1848, son of Charles Y. and Minerva (Peterson) Goldsmith, natives of New York, and of English ancestry.  He was reared on a farm, and received a liberal education.  He was married April 11, 1878, to Mary A. Richards, daughter of Mason C. and Elizabeth (Robinson) Richards.  He was elected Clerk of Summit Township in 1877, and served one term.  In politics he is a Democrat.

Augustus GREINER; P. O., Hanover; was born in Reading, Pa., Sept. 18, 1819, son of Andrew and Elizabeth Greiner, who came, from Saxony, Germany, to this country and settled in Pennsylvania about the year 1815, and in 1827 moved to New York State, and in 1833 moved with his parents to Illinois, where they died.  He then came to this county and settled in Hanover Township, about the year 1837.  He was married April 19, 1849, to Mary E. Pickell, who died April 7, 1852; only 1 of their 2 children is living.  April 15, 1853, Mr. Greiner married Hannah Wickman, widow of Frederick Wickman.  Mr. G. is a member of the M. E. Church, and is a Republican.

Charles C. K. P. HATCH; P. O., Horton; was born in this county Jan. 1, 1845, son of Barnabas C. and Mary H. (Wartizer) Hatch, natives of New York, the former of Irish ancestry and the latter of German.  He was reared on a farm and received a common-school education.  March 29, 1868, he married Elmira J. Stone, daughter of Charles S. and Sarah E. (Brown) Stone.  In politics he is a Liberal.

James E. HATCH; P. O., Horton; is a brother of the preceding, and was born in Steuben county, N. Y., May 26, 1834.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1835, and was married Feb. 22, 1859, to Eleanor M. Ford, daughter of Darius and Samantha (Butler) Ford; of their 7children, 5 are living—Myrtle, Edith, Celia C, Levern and Lee F.

John A. HATCH; P. O., Horton; brother of James and Charles, was born in this county, township of Spring Arbor, Jan. 11, 1839, and was reared on a farm.  March 12, 1864, he married Angeline M. Thorn, daughter of James L. and Tanson (Bowerman) Thorn.  He was elected to the office of Constable in 1860, and served 3 years.  In politics he is a Democrat.

Abel N. HOWE; P. O., Horton; was born in Erie County, N. Y., Oct. 15, 1841, son of Edgar B. and Mary A. (Smith) Howe, natives, of New York; the former of English and the latter of German ancestry; was brought by his parents to this county in 1854; during his early life he worked at the blacksmith's trade.  In the spring of 1861 he went to Illinois and worked on a farm; returned to this county in 1862 and worked his father's farm on shares, and in bad weather worked at his trade.  He was married Feb. 22, 1866, to Mary C. Shoat, daughter of Joseph R. and Mary J. (Faulkner) Shoat.  He has held the office of Clerk of Spring Arbor Township, and also served as Supervisor two years.  In politics he is a Greenbacker.

Giles HUNT; P. O., Horton; was born in Orleans County, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1837, son of Ransom and Flavia (Spencer) Hunt, natives of New York, the former of German ancestry and the latter of English.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1842.  He was married May 22, 1859, to Mary B. Hicks, daughter of William and Ann A. Colman.  They have 2 children—Ettie B. and Ransom E.  Mr. H. has served  two terms as Deputy Sheriff.

William, HUTCHINS; P. O., Horton; was born in Orleans County, N. Y., Aug. 13, 1825, son of Isaac L. and Delia (Smith) Hutchins, the former a native of Maine and of English ancestry, the latter a native of New York, and of German descent.  He was brought to this State by his parents in 1831 and settled in Washtenaw County, and in 1834 moved to this county and settled in what is now known as Summit Township; in 1850 he moved to Liberty Township. He was married Jan. 20, 1850, to Cornelia M. Wilson, daughter of Thomas and Henrietta (Wing) Wilson.  They have 1 child-—Flora II., born March 31, 1852.  Mr. H. built a planing-mill in the village of Baldwin in 1876, which he still carries on; also owns a lumber-yard, buys all kinds of grain and produce, and is quite a useful member of society.  In politics he is a Democrat.

Lafayette E. LARKIN; P. O., Hanover; was born in the State of New York, July 29, 1847, son of Daniel and Roxy (Walter) Larkins, natives of New York, the former of Irish ancestry.  He was reared on a farm and received a common-school education.  Jan. 11, 1865, he was married to  Mary  A.Walter,  daughter of    and Elizabeth (Taylor) Walter.  They have 3 children—Miriam L., Elva G. and R. Page.  In politics he is a Republican.

Wayne MARKHUM; P. O., Hanover; was born in this county Nov. 30,1856, son of David and Ann (Burch) Markham, natives of New York, the former of Scotch ancestry.  He was reared on a farm until he was 12 years old, when he moved with his parents to the city of Jackson.  His education was very liberal, having attended the Union school in Jackson three years.  At the age of 15 he went to the village of Hanover and attended the graded school three years, and during vacation clerked in his brother's hardware store, with whom he went into partnership in 1878.

Richard MITCHELL was born in Ireland in 1813; came to this country in 1818 and settled in Canada, where he married Elsa Smades May 11, 1837, daughter of Luke and Asenath (Odell) Smades.  Of their 11 children 8 are living, to-wit: Henry M., James H., William B., Valentine, Asenath, Jacob, Ann and S. Josephus.  Mr. M. came to this county in 1854 and settled on section 15, Hanover Township, where he died July 13, 1867; the widow still resides on the old homestead.

James W. NEWBURY; P. O., Hanover; was born in Whitehall, New York, Aug. 30,1833; son of Marcena J. and Betsy P. (Fuller) Newbury, natives of New York; the former of German ancestry, and the latter of English.  He was brought to this county by his parents in 1844, who settled in Calhoun County, and came to this county in 1859.  Mr. N. was married to Climana M. Walter Dec. 29, 1861, daughter of Grove and Patty (Larkin) Walter.  They have 5 children—Willie E. J., Arthur, Frank W., Minnie J., and Murray C.  In politics Mr. N. is a Republican.

D. W. Peabody, a highly esteemed business man of Hanover, was born in Tonawanda, Niagara Co., N. Y., Oct. 15, 1846; attended common school winters until 1860; engaged in business until 1866, when he went to school again, and finally graduated at Goldsmith's College, Detroit, in 1867.  He married, and in 1873 came to Hanover, where he has since resided, engaged in the grain and other commercial business, and prominently identified with public enterprises of the place.

William PERROTT; P. O., Horton; was born in England and is a son of John Stanford and Agnes (Dunning) Perrott, of English ancestry.  He was married March 7, 1834, to Maria Rowe, daughter of James and Jane (Fewins) Rowe.  He came to this country in November, 1849, and stopped in the town of Albion, N. Y., where he remained for a period of three years, working in a foundry and on the railroad; went from there to Indiana and worked on the Wabash R. R. three years; then traded for 40 acres of land in Kalamazoo county and moved upon it.  In 1861 he traded for his present place in this county, and in 1862 moved here.  Mr. and Mrs. P. have had 6 children, 5 of whom are living, viz.: James, Agnes, Ellen M., Jane and William.

Joseph B. REED; P. O., Horton; was born in Massachusetts, July 25, 1807, son of Benjamin and Betsy (Reed) Reed, the former a native of Rhode Island and the latter of Massachusetts.  He was married Dec. 24, 1832, to Mary A. Pickett, who died March 2, 1861.  March 27, 1863, he married Charity Crego, widow of Abraham Crego, who died Sept. 17, 1869.  Of his 10 children 7 are living.  Mr. R. came to this county in 1836, and settled in what is now known as Henrietta Township; returned to the East the same year, and in 1850 came back, stopping a few months in Henrietta Townsip, then came to Hanover and settled in section 11; in 1864 he moved to section 13, same township, where he still resides.

Charles E. SNOW; P. O., Hanover; was born in Rochester, N. Y., Dec. 7, 1835, son of Charles W. and Samantha (Pette) Snow.  He was brought to this township by his parents in 1852, where he followed school-teaching till 1872.  He then commenced the study of law, and was admitted to the Bar June 26, 1879.  He received a liberal education, and was married March 14, 1859.

Alfred R. SNYDER; P. O., Horton; was born in this county, Oct. 27, 1838, son of Lewis and Polly P. (Peterson) Snyder, the former a native of New York and of German ancestry, the latter a native of Massachusetts, of English ancestry.  He was married to Asenath Mitchell, Aug. 19, 1863, daughter of Richard and Elsey (Smades) Mitchell.  He was reared on a farm, but in 1860 he purchased the grist-mill at Baldwin's Station, and moved to the village.  In 1864 he added a saw-mill, to be run in connection with the grist-mill; in 1865 he was appointed Postmaster and served five years.  In politics he is a Democrat.

Dr. Isaac SNYDER; P. O., Horton; was born in Steuben county,. N. Y., July 4, 1818, son of Lewis and Mary (Dingman) Snyder, natives of New York, and of German ancestry.  He was reared on a farm and was brought by his parents to this county in 1834 and settled in section 32, Summit Township.  He was married to Jane Vunck, May 11, 1842, who died Dec. 15, 1858.  Mr. S. was married again Oct. 22, 1860, to Sarah Wait, daughter of Duty and Hannah (Wills) Wait.  In 1845 he commenced the study of medicine at Rush Medical College, Chicago, graduated in 1847 and commenced practice in Summit Township.  In the fall of 1850 he opened a drug store in the city of Jackson, which business he continued for a period of two years.  In 1854 he moved upon his farm, where he still continued his practice.  In 1872 he moved to Hanover Township, and settled in the village of Horton; at one time he was elected Justice of the Peace and served two terms; was re elected the third term and refused to be qualified; has been a Notary Public for the last 20 years.  In politics he is a Liberal.

Lewis SNYDER, Jr., P. O., Horton; is a brother of the preceding, and was born in Otsego County, N. Y., Sept. 2, 1812.  He came to this State in 1834, stopping in Washtenaw County four months, and engaged in the brick-making business.  In the fall of the same year he came to this county, and settled in the township of Spring Arbor, where he remained 43 years, then removed to Hanover Township.  He was married Feb. 6, 1837, to Polly Peterson, daughter of Simon and Sallie (Halstead) Peterson; of their 8 children, 7 are living—Alfred R., Sarah M., Charles L., William H., Daniel S., Eliza P. and Margaret J.  In politics he is a Democrat.

Charles S. STONE; P. O., Horton; was born in Vermont, Nov. 20, 1810, son of Nathan and Clarissa (Smith) Stone, the former a native of Massachusetts, of English and Scotch ancestry, the latter a native of Vermont.  He came to this State in 1831 and settled in Ann Arbor and followed his trade of cabinet-maker three years, returning to New York winters, and back in the spring.  He came to Hanover Township in 1834 and settled on section 3.  He was married Nov. 20, 1834, to Sarah E. Brown; of their 8 children, 6 are living—Julia M., Mary H., Adelia S., Elmira J., Albert N. and Orlando C.

Cornelius SULLIVAN was born in Ireland in 1791, son of Jeremiah and Mary (Sullivan) Sullivan, natives of Ireland.  He was married in December, 1827, and emigrated to this country in 1829 and settled in Rhode Island, where he remained for a period of eight years.  He then moved to this State and settled in Washtenaw County, and in 1845 he moved to this countv and settled on section 23, Hanover Township, where he died May 26, 1871, leaving a family of 9 children— 7 boys and 2 girls.  He accumulated considerable property, leaving 932 acres to be divided among his heirs.

William SULLIVAN; P. O., Hanover; was born in this township Nov. 8, 1851, son of Cornelius and Margaret (Murphy) Sullivan, natives of Ireland and of Irish ancestry.  He was reared on a farm and received a common-school education.  Oct. 13, 1875, he married Frances E. Wiley, daughter of Alex. M. and Cordelia C. (Adams) Wiley.  They have 2 children—Cornelius M. and Charley A.  In politics Mr. S. is a Democrat.

Henry E. THOMPSON; P. O., Stony Point; was born in Hanover on section 31, June 26, 1844, son of Oren D. and Isabel (Sweet) Thompson, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter a native of New York.  He was reared on a farm and received a common-school education.  He was married June 26, 1872, to Josephine B. Underhill, daughter of Cornelius and Maria (Covell) Underhill, and they have 1 child.  Mr. Thompson's father came to this county from Connecticut in March, 1836, and settled on section 31, Hanover Township, where he resided until his death, which occurred April 5, 1877; he was a  member of the  Congregational Church and established the first Sabbath-school in this township.  He also taught the first day-school in this township, in a log school-house which was located on the present site of the village of Hanover, and the only pay he received was a soap barrel which his son has now in his possession.  In politics he was a Republican and a useful member of society.

James. L. THORN is the son of Thos. S. and Polly (Brayman) Thorn, and was born in Middleburg, Schoharie Co., IS". Y., Nov. 15, 1816; lived in that and Albany counties until 18 years old; then, in company with an older brother.  Wm. B. Thorn, emigrated to Western New York and lived in Monroe and Livingston counties three years.  In September, 1837, he walked from Caledonia, Livingston Co., to Buffalo, took passage on the steamboat Columbus across Lake Erie to Toledo, then rode on the new railroad to Adrian, which was its terminus at that date, thence tramped to Jacksonburgh, Marshall and Battle Creek, and to Thornapple river, four miles south of the present site of Middleville, Barry Co.  This region was then nearly an unbroken wilderness, and attached to Kalamazoo County for judicial purposes.  He purchased 120 acres of Government land, returned to Scottsville, Monroe Co., N. Y., where he was married in the town of Caledonia, November, 1837, to Tamson Bowerman, daughter of Seth and Mary Bowerman.  In April, 1838, Mr. T. started with others to emigrate to Michigan; took passage on the steamboat New York from Buffalo to Detroit, thence to Ypsilanti, which was as far as the M. C. R. R. was completed.  He hired a team to move his few goods to Yankee Springs, Barry Co.  At that date four townships were in one, called Thornapple.  He arrived at the house of one Calvin Hill, May 1, 1838, built a log house on his land, one and a half miles from the nearest neighbor; Indians were more plenty than whites, but were friendly until they contracted the habit of drinking Michigan whisky.  Mr. Thorn was chosen to a township office, and held various positions in transacting township business during his nine years' residence there.  At the first term of court held in Hastings, he was a member of the grand jury and appointed its clerk.  His eldest child, who is now the wife of John A. Hatch, was the first white female child born in Yankee Springs.  The second child, Louisa A., was born in Yankee Springs, and died at Marengo, Calhoun Co., aged three years; the third child, Thomas D., lives now at Mosherville, Hillsdale Co., Mich; the fourth, Caroline L., is now the wife of A. N. Stone, of Horton, Jackson Co., Mich.; all these were born in Barry County.  Mr. T. removed to Jackson county in February, 1848, and lived in Parma, near Deveraux Station, one year.  Then bought a farm and removed to this town in February, 1849.  Here their 2 children, Mary S. and Romine A., were born; Mary is the wife of W. F. Gildersleeve, of Spring Arbor, and Romine A. is living in this vicinity on a farm.  Mr. Thorn was Highway Commissioner three years; Justice of the Peace, eight years; Postmaster, four and one-half years, resigned that position on account of long-continued ill health; was a member of the Republican County Committee three years, and is now a Notary Public.  He has been engaged in farming generally, and for the last six years, in connection with his son, managed a store of general merchandise in this place at Baldwin's Station, 11 miles-southwest of the city of Jackson.

Marlin TRIPP; P. O., Horton; was born in Niagara County, N. Y., March 31, 1821, son of Abiel and Sarah (Mills) Tripp, the former a native of Vermont, and of Welsh ancestry.  He was raised on a farm, brought to this county by his parents in 1832 and settled on section 3, Hanover Township.  He was married Jan. 1, 1846, to Laura J. Stone, daughter of Nathan H. and Julia A. (Fenn) Stone, natives of Vermont.  They have 1 child—Orville S.  Mr. Tripp was elected to the office of Township Treasurer in 1854, and served one term; in 1856 he was appointed to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Andrew Brown.  In politics he is a Democrat.

Alva Van De BOGART; P. O., Hanover; was born in Genesee County, N. Y., June 27, 1825, son of John and Polly (Springer) Van Be Bogart, the former a native of New York, and of Holland ancestry, the latter a native of New Hampshire.  He was brought to this State by his parents in 1836, and settled in Washtenaw County.  In the fall of the same year they moved to this county and settled in Hanover Township, where he still resides.  He was married May 4, 1850, to Mary A. Van De Bogart, daughter of Francis and Polly Van De Bogart.  In politics he is a Republican.

Franklin WHEATON; P. O., Hanover; was born in this township Nov. 29, 1847; son of Samuel and Clarissa (Carpenter) Wheaton.  He was married to Esther E. Birdsall June 23, 1872, daughter of Steven and Serena (Eddy) Birdsall.  He loaded the first car-load of wheat that left Hanover by the Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw railroad; it was shipped to New Hampshire.  He is a Democrat.

Zebulon T. WHEATON; P. O., Horton; was born in Steuben County, N. Y., April 20, 1817, son of Samuel and Phebe (McCoy) Wheaton, of New York, and of English ancestry.  He came to this State in 1830, and for 10 years he worked on a farm.  He was married in 1840 to Laura Abel, who died May 23, 1849.  He was married again June 10, 18 — , to Eliza Cobb, daughter of John and Hannah (Lawery) Cobb, natives of Vermont, of English and Scotch ancestry.  He made a trip twice to California, traveling overland, and once by way of the Isthmus.  He is a member of the Free Methodist Church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Henry WICKMAN; P. O., Hanover; was born in Prussia Aug. 19, 1812, son of Frederick and Mary (Greener) Wickman, the former a native of Prussia and the latter of Saxony.  He was brought to this country by his parents in 1820 and settled in Pennsylvania, where they remained until 1826, then moved to New York.  He came to this county in 1835 and settled on section 26, where he still resides.  When he landed in the State of Michigan he had but 50 cents in his pocket, and has received no help from any one; to-day he is considered a wealthy farmer.  He was married Nov. 27, 1845, to Emeline Thompson, who died Nov.  24, 1849; he was married again June 5, 1853, to Mary Strong, daughter of Ansel and Mary S. (Sanborn) Strong.  Mr. and Mrs. Wickman have 3 children—William E., Frank H. and George S.  Mr. W. participated in the war between this State and Ohio, known as the Toledo war.  In politics he is a Republican.

Henry WOODEN; P. O., Stony Point; was born in Monroe County, N. Y., Sept. 13, 1835, son of Robert and Lydia (Sickner) Wooden.  He was raised on a farm, and received a common-school education.  He was brought to this State by his parents in 1846, who settled in Lenawee county, and moved from there to this county in 1877.  Mr. W. was married in December, 1866, to Sarah A. Houghtaling, daughter of Benjamin and Gertrude (Harder) Houghtaling, and their 2 children are Robert B. and Irving.  Mr. W. is Postmaster at Stony Point.   



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