Liberty Township
History

Line Divider

From "The History of Jackson County, Michigan" 1881

 

    The first settler of this township was Moses Tuthill, who came in June, 1835, locating in the northeastern portion.  He built the first frame barn in the township in 1838, and the first frame house in 1839, which he still occupies, but it has been remodeled.  About the same time John Neely settled near him, and John Hess and Ezra Rumery settled in the southeastern part of the township, Jesse Bivins in the western part, and George Snyder in the northern.  In the fall of the same year John J. Krout, Nathaniel Pettengill and J. S. Knight came in.  In the spring of 1836 Franklin Pierce, Solomon Skiff and Palmer Barlow moved into the township, and during the subsequent fall the settlement of the township was rapid, among them Hiram Kennedy and Hiram Tuthill.
    March 3, 1837, the citizens met at the house of Solomon Skiff, to organize the township.  After much discussion as to a name for it, Jesse Bivins proposed the name of Liberty, which was unanimously adopted.  The first Monday of the next month an election was held at the same place, when 21 votes were polled, electing Ezra Rumery, Supervisor; Moses Tuthill, Treasurer; A. G. Otto, Clerk, and Jesse Bivins, Prosper Lewis, A. G. Otto and Franklin Pierce, Justices of the Peace.
    The first white child born in the township was John Neely, Jr., April 19, 1836; the first marriage was that of John Lemons and Adelia Tuthill, in April, 1837; the first death was that of Lorenzo Neely, March 6, 1837.
    The first mill in this township was a saw-mill, built by Mr. Otto in 1837, on section 23, on Grand river.  The first store was opened in Fentonville, in 1839, by Leonard Watters.  A flouring-mill, built in 1848 by Erastus B. Fuller on section 26, on Grand river, and now owned by Solomon H. Holmes, is the principal manufactory of the township at present.
    The first school in Liberty township was taught by Miss Nancy A. Tuttle, in the spring of 1838, in the house of Mr. Skiff; number of pupils, 12 to 15; the first school-house, of logs, was built in 1841, on sec. 13, the first school in which was taught by Martha Hart; in district No. 7, a frame school-house was built in 1846, and one of brick in 1874.  There are now eight school-houses in this township.
    The first sermon in this township was preached by Elder Cornell, in the summer of 1837, at the house of George Snyder.  The first church was erected in 1865, at Liberty Mills, by the Methodist Episcopal society.  There are now three church buildings in this community: one Methodist Episcopal, where services are held by Rev. Mr. Youngs; one Baptist, occupied by Rev. H. D. Allen; and one Universalist, where the principal preaching at present is by Rev. W. L. Gibbs.
    The first postoffice, "Montgomery," was established in 1837 or 1838, kept by Franklin Pierce, who also was mail-carrier, bringing the mail from Brooklyn on foot, once a week.  Marvin E. Palmer is the present postmaster.
    The present township officers are: Burr Tuthill, Supervisor; D. W. Alverson, Clerk; R. B. Lewis, Treasurer; William Moor, W. E. Kennedy, Marvin E. Palmer and J. P. Sanford, Justices of the Peace.
    In general: The first houses were log shanties, without doors or windows.  Wolves were plentiful and frequently came up to the cabins.  Deer and wild turkey abounded in the woods, so that there was no lack of wild meat.  There was also a great plenty of fish in the lakes and streams.  The most beautiful wild-flowers covered the ground, making the woods delightful.  The Indians were numerous and very disagreeable sometimes.  Bread was very scarce the first year of the settlement, and the first grist that was taken to mill was cut with the shears and threshed with a rolling-pin by Mrs. John C. Cruet, and taken to Brooklyn to be ground.  Although the pioneers endured hardships, they had many pleasures, visiting each other frequently, especially in the winter.
    The schools are well directed, the religious organizations replete with zeal, and the industrial establishments, though few, are conducted on first-class business principles.  No railroad runs through Liberty township.
    The following pioneers of Liberty township have deceased since March, 1874:
    John Neely, Sr., 1874; Daniel Shaeffer, 1875; Mrs. Willard Weatherby, 1875; Mrs. Moses Tuthill, 1875; Mrs. Robert Kerr, Sr.,    -----; Prentiss Palmer, -----; Hugh Turney, Sr.,  1876; Mrs. Ariel Cornwell, 1876; Abraham Sanford, 1876; Mr. John Sutfin, Sr., 1877; Mrs. Chauncey Root, 1877; Mrs. Eliphas  Arvis, 1877; A. Kennedy, -----; Ben. F. Loomis,  1878; Nathaniel Pettengill, 1878; Cornelius Sloat, 1878; Mrs. Geo. H. Snyder, 1878; Mrs. Samuel Selden, 1878; Oliver Bunce, 1879.

BIOGRAPHICAL

    We add here the personal sketches of many of the well-known citizens of Liberty township:

    Smith P. ANGEVINE was born Sept. 19,1826, in Clinton, Dutchess Co., N. Y., and is a son of Bartholomew and Sarah (Peterson) Angevine, natives of New York.  He was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of his native State.  When 20 years of age he learned the carpenter and joiner's trade and has followed that occupation since.  He came to Michigan in   1856, and purchased a farm of 40 acres in Rives Township, where he remained until 1862, then moved to Jackson; resided there about two years.  In 1864 he purchased the site of his present home.  Was married Nov. 30, 1851, to Rebecca Angevine, born April 6, 1824; they were the parents of 7 children, 4 of whom are now living, namely: Alice, Annie, Maryetta and Adell.  Mrs. A. died Dec. 12, 1862.  Mr. A. was again married, Sept. 29, 1864, to Thankful Childs, born May 20, 1829; they are the parents of 2 children, viz.: Charles F. and Clara B.  Mrs. A. is a member of the Wesleyan M. E. Church.  Politically he is a Republican.

    Matthew BADER is a native of Hanover, Germany, where he was born Feb. 6, 1836.  His parents were John and Mary (Rive) Bader.  When 17 years old he accompanied his mother to America and located in Jackson County.  He labored on a farm for 11 years, when he engaged on the Michigan Central railroad, remaining two years, resuming his old vocation.  In 1871 he purchased the site of his present home.  March 29, 1862, he was married to Margaret Prehell.  They are the parents of 6 children—Frank, Clarence, Matthew, William, Cora and Nina.  Mr. Bader has accumulated all his possessions by hard work.  He now owns 150 acres of land, well-improved, and valued at $7,500.  He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Baptist Church.  The parents of Mrs. Bader came to Michigan in 1843 and located in Leoni Township, residing there eight years, removing thence to Hanover, where her father died in 1870, aged 64.

    William BERNSTEIN, farmer on section 25; P. O., Liberty; was born Feb. 6,1832, in Saxon, Germany.  His parents were Carl and Johanna (Whitehall) Bernstein.  He was educated in the common-schools of Germany; emigrated to this country in 1854, and first went to Pennsylvania and worked by the month on a farm for two years, thence to Ohio, thence to Jackson and worked nine years on various farms.  In 1865 he purchased the site of his present home.  Was married March 12, 1865, to Mrs. Dorothea Marks, and they are now the parents of 2 children, namely: Charles, born March 26, 1866, and Frank, born Sept. 21,1868.  Mr. and Mrs. B. are members of the Protestant Church.  He owns 105 acres of land, valued at $40 an acre.  Politically he is a Democrat.

    Stephen BIDWELL was born July 14, 1828, in Yorkshire, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y.  His parents, Cepter and Gillian (Powell) were natives of New York.  They came to Michigan in 1834 and located in Monroe County, remaining one year, when they went to St. Joseph County, and remained about 18 months, returning to Monroe County, where both died in 1838, but 10 days intervening between their deaths.  Their son Stephen went to Lenawee County, where he remained with a cousin six years.  In 1845 he came to Jackson County; stayed one year, and went to Clinton, where he entered into partnership with an uncle in a mercantile business, which he pursued three years, when he was burned out, saving about $300; with this he purchased 30 acres of land, which he afterward gave to his grandmother.  He married Sept. 26, 1852, Mary L. Cornwell, who was born June 29, 1836.  They are the parents of 8 children, viz.: Dollie A., (Mrs. O. Richards), Henrietta I. (Mrs. L. E. Drake); Frank M., Mary E. (Mrs. F. E. Noble), Sylvester, Charlie, Stevie and Ernest.  Mrs. B. is a member of the Baptist Church.  Mr. B. is a National in politics.  His farm is located in section 17;  P. O., Hanover.

    Joseph Stacy CHOATE, farmer, section 26, was born Nov. 17, 1839, in Liberty.  His parents were Hazel and Charity (Rising) Choate, natives of Vermont, and of English-Irish descent.  His father came to Michigan in 1835 and entered 160 acres of land, and the following year made the route with two yokes of oxen and a wagon, consuming two weeks' time on the journey.  His father died Dec. 8, 1854, when Mr. Choate and his brother bought the claims of the other heirs, and divided the territory equally between themselves, Mr. C. remaining in the old homestead.  Mr. Choate's grandfather came to Michigan in 1837, and lived with his son until he died, when he became a member of the family of his grandson, with whom he lived until his death, Sept. 6, 1859, at the age of 93.  Jan. 4, 1864, Mr. Choate was married to Bellona S. De Lamater, of Columbia Township, who was born Oct. 17, 1846.  They are the parents of 4 children, namely: William H., born Aug. 13, 1864; John D., born Jan. 17, 1870; Esther C., born April 16, 1874, and Lucy Julia, born April 2, 1876.  He has held the office of Township Clerk two terms, having been elected in 1871, and re-elected in 1872, on the Republican ticket, the Democrats having a majority of 50 in the township.  In 1875 he was elected Supervisor on the same ticket, and in 1878 was re-elected on the Greenback nomination.  Politically he is liberal, but he advocates "National" principles.

    Henry J. CREGO, son of Richard and Martha (Gallup) Crego, was born July 19, 1823, in Clarence, Erie Co., N. Y.  His parents were also natives of New York.  In 1835 Mr. Crego came to Michigan with his parents and settled in Columbia Township, where he remained until he attained his majority, when his father gave him a deed of 80 acres in section 10, which has been and still is his home.  He is politically a Republican and has served two terms as School Inspector.  He has added to his original gift deed until he owns 200 acres of land, valued at $11,000.  Jan. 1, 1837, he was married to Lydia A. Russell.  Of 9 children 8 are now living, viz.: Chauncy C, Elva J., now Mrs. W. S. Knapp, residing in Kansas; Emma A., now Mrs. G. E. Jones; Herman H., Omer P., Arthur J., Carrie A., and Mattie J.  Mrs. Crego was born Feb. 6, 1828.  Mr. Crego's address is Jackson city.

    Nelson W. CRIPPEN, farmer on section 18; P. O., Horton; was born April 20, 1823, in Livingston County, N. Y.  His parents were Roswell and Huldah Crippen, the former a native of New York, and the latter of Connecticut, and of English descent.  He emigrated to this State with his parents in 1834, and located in Concord Township; after a short period they moved to Calhoun County, and remained there about five years, then to this county.  In 1851 they moved to Illinois.  His father moved to Kansas in 1858, and died in that State in 1865.  Mr. C. resided in Illinois until 1857, when he returned to this township and purchased a farm about two miles from his present home.  He was united in marriage Nov. 29, 1849, with Miss Harriet T. Cooper, by whom he has had 2 children, 1 now living—Edwin  N., born  Dec. 14, 1865; the deceased was George W.  Mrs. C.'s father came to Michigan in 1839, and moved to Illinois in 1847.  Her mother died in New York in 1838, and father in Illinois in 1857.  Mr. C. and wife are members of the Universalist society.  Politically he is a Democrat; he owns 40 acres of land, valued at $65 per acre.  He has followed the blacksmith's trade 43 years.

    Ambrose S. CROUCH, farmer, on section 10; P. O., South Jackson; was born Feb. 14, 1801, in Hebron, Tolland Co., Conn.  His parents were Richard and Beatrice (Strong) Crouch, natives of Connecticut.  He was brought up on a farm and educated in the common schools.  He came to Michigan in 1836, and entered 160 acres of land of the Government, where he has resided ever since.  He made the road running east and west by his farm.  Was united in marriage March 1, 1828, to Miss Nellie Hendricks, by whom he had 3 children, 2 of whom are now living, viz.: Richard and Nathaniel.  Mrs. C. died Jan. 17, 1832; Mr. C. was again married July 3, 1832, to Miss Mary Tuttle; they were the parents of 2 children, 1 of whom is now living—Sarah J.  Mrs. C. died June 17, 1834.  He married for his present wife Miss Mary Rhoades, and they are now the parents of 4 children, viz.: Mary, Cordelia, Ambrose and Henry.  Mr. C. is a member of the Episcopal Church, and politically is a Greenbacker.  By good, frugal and industrious habits, Mr. O. has raised himself to be one of the influential citizens of Jackson County.  He came to this county with very little means, and has acquired a large property, consisting of 416 acres of land, and is now reaping the rich reward of his early industry.

    Henry J. CROUCH, farmer on section 5; P. O., South Jackson; was born Aug. 25, 1848, in this township, the youngest son of Ambrose S. and Mary P. Crouch, natives of Connecticut and New York.  He remained at home until 21 years of age, then worked a farm on shares for one year.  In 1870 he purchased a farm on section 10 and remained there until 1875, when he sold out and purchased his present farm.  Was united in marriage Oct. 31, 1869, to Miss Ann M. Warner, born Nov. 19, 1852, in Cohocton, Steuben Co., N. Y.  They are the parents of 3 children, 1 of whom is now living—Albertie, born Aug. 1, 1873; the deceased are Alma M. and Claude B.  Mr. C. now owns 100 acres of land, well improved.  Politically he is a Republican.

    Nathaniel CROUCH was born Jan. 16, 1833, in Cohocton, Steuben Co., N. Y.  His father, Ambrose Crouch, was born in Connecticut; his mother, Nellie nee Hendricks, in New York.  They came to Michigan in 1836, and their son remained with them until seven years of age, when he returned to New York, and resided with his grandparents until he was 21.  He returned to Michigan and managed is father's farm one year on shares, when he and his brother purchased 180 acres of land, which they owned four years, and he sold out to his father and bought his present home.  He was married to Jane A. Freeman Nov. 28, 1856.  One child was born from this marriage Sept. 8, 1862, Nellie E.  Mrs. Crouch died Oct. 12, 1862, and Mr. C. was married again March 26, 1863, to Amanda Conley.  Of their 3 children 2 are yet living—Chas. F., born Sept. 21, 1866, and Nathaniel, Jr., born June 25,1875.  Mr. Crouch and his wife are members of the M. E. Church.  He is a Republican, and owns 320 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre.  He is a dealer in Norman Percheron horses, having purchased the half-blood Emperor in 1880, and in 1881, the full-blood Alan, and other blooded stock at the same time.  Address, South Jackson.

    Frank W. FOWLER is the son of Justus and Olive (Miner) Fowler.  His parents were of English-Dutch descent and natives of New York.  He was born in Spring Arbor, Jan 20, 1852.  In 1878 he purchased of the heirs to his grandfather's estate the farm where he now resides.  His grandfather entered his claim during the early history of the county.  Mr. Fowler was married Oct. 6, 1875, to Eva Waite, a native of Cohocton, Steuben Co., N. Y., where she was born Dec. 9, 1855.  She came to this State with her parents in 1858.  Mr. and Mrs. Fowler have 1 daughter, Iva E., born Oct. 7, 1876.  Mrs. Fowler is a member of the Free Methodist Church.  Mr. Fowler is a Republican, and has acted as School Inspector three years.  He owns 140 acres of land, in section 19, valued at $5,600.  P. O., Hanover.

    Uriel H. GATES, farmer, sec. 13, was born Oct. 29, 1829, in Dansville, Steuben Co., N. Y.  His father, Harry Gates, was born in Litchfield, Conn., Sept. 25, 1799.  His mother, Harriet J. Brown, was born in Rome, Oneida Co., March 19, 1809.  Mr. Gates was brought up on a farm and received an elementary education in the common school.  He worked at home until 22 years of age, when he finished his education in the Wesleyan Seminary and Female College, in Albion, Mich.  On leaving school he worked a farm three years on shares.  Dec. 18, 1855, he was married to Mary Jane Marsh, in Columbia, and they have 2 children, —Cora L., born Sept. 29, 1863, and Burt M., born Sept. 23, 1872.  In 1839 he came to this State with his parents.  After his marriage he lived on his father-in-law's farm for four years, and then moved to Calhoun County, where he remained a year, returning to the farm he had left, and after another year bought a farm.  He kept it two years and then exchanged it for his present farm.  In 1875 he built a fine brick house.  His place comprises 92 acres, valued at $75 per acre.  He is a Democrat.  The father of Mrs. Gates, Samuel P. Marsh, came to Michigan in 1834, being the fourth settler in the township of Columbia.  He died Dec. 12, 1880.

    Francis HAWLEY, son of William and Melanie (Sales) Hawley, was born in Rollin, Lenawee Co., Mich., Feb. 19, 1840.  His parents  came to Michigan in the fall of 1832.  He was reared upon the farm and received a fair education at the common school.  He remained at home until 26 years old, and July 3, 1867, he married Maryette Gibson.  She was born July 17, 1849.  After their marriage they moved to their present home.  Five children have been born to them, of whom 3 are now living, viz.: Effie M., born May 9, 1871; Otto F., May 19, 1873, and Mattie A., July 22, 1880.  One child died Oct. 30, 1865; the second, Dec. 3, 1877.  Mr. Hawley owns 40 acres of land, valued at $2,800.  Politically, he is a Republican, and he served three months in the civil war.  In addition to agriculture, he is agent for the sale of all kinds of church furniture and school supplies, also of the Victor folding and lock school-desk, manufactured by Thomas Kane & Co., Chicago, Ill.

    Josiah HAWLEY, farmer, on section 16; P. O., South Jackson; was born Sept. 6, 1830, near Rochester, N. Y.  He was brought up on a farm, and received a fair education in the common schools; was brought to Michigan in the fall of 1832, and located in Adrian; thence he removed to Lenawee County, thence to this county, where he has resided ever since.  Was married Dec. 14, 1854, to Miss Jane Snyder, and they are now the parents of 3 children, namely: Lina, Lillie, now Mrs. C. A. Alverson, and Harriet.  Politically, he is a Republican, and owns 100 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.  He is a self-made man, having no start in life, securing all he has by hard work.

    Nicholas P. HOUGHTALIN, son of Benjamin F. and Gertrude (Harder) Houghtalin, natives of New York, and of German descent, was born April 14,1828, in Livonia, Livingston Co., N. Y.  He was reared on a farm and received an elementary education in the common school.  In 1846 he emigrated with his parents to this State and located in Somerset, Hillsdale Co., Mich.; he remained at home until 24 years of age; in 1852 he came to this township and purchased the site of his present home.  When he purchased the farm he was obliged to borrow $100 to make the first payment, paying 17 per cent, interest on the amount; the first year the crops were a failure, but by hard work and economy he has accumulated considerable property.  Was united in marriage March 18, 1852, to Miss Nancy A Crawford, and they became the parents of 2 children, viz.: Esther A. and Rose M.  Mrs. H. died April 22, 1857.  He was again married Sept. 16, 1860, to Miss Sarah C. Babcock; she died Aug. 20, 1864.  He married his present wife, Mrs. Sabra Town, March 16, 1869, by whom he has had 2 children, viz.: Cora B. and Gertrude.  He has held the offices of Justice of the Peace, Constable and Deputy Sheriff, and now holds the office of Notary Public.  Mr. and Mrs. H. are members of the M. E. Church, and give liberally to all good causes.  Politically, he is a Democrat and a member of the Andrew Jackson Association.  He owns 160 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; is a farmer on section 11; P. O., Jackson.

    Noah KEELER, farmer on section 15; P. O., Liberty; was born Feb. 16, 1812, in Butternut, Otsego Co., N. Y.  His parents were Ebenezer and Annie (Ames) Keeler, natives of New York, and of English descent.  When 18 years of age, he learned the carpenter and joiner's trade; he followed that business until 1839, then commenced farming, following that occupation ever since.  In 1837 he emigrated to Michigan, and in 1838 he purchased 117 acres of land; afterward he returned to New York and remained until 1839, when he returned and has resided in this township ever since.  Was united in marriage May 13, 1832, to Miss Mary A. Young; they were the parents of 4 children, of whom 2 are now living, viz.: Frances, now Mrs. J. Hawkings, and Ransom.  Mrs. K. died Nov. 14,1864.  He was again married May 14, 1865, to Miss Hannah Pickett; she died April 18, 1880.  He married his third wife, Mrs. Jane R. Gibbins, Jan. 9, 1881.  He has held several township offices.  He owns 300 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre.   Politically, he is a Democrat and a member of the Pioneer Society.  Mr. K. has seen much of the hardships of pioneer life, and this country change from a howling wilderness to a beautiful and fertile land.

    Wallace E. KENNEDY, breeder of and dealer in Spanish Merino sheep, on section 26, was born March 14, 1844, in Liberty Township, his present residence.  His parents were Allen and Mary J. (Haight) Kennedy, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter of Massachusetts and of English descent.  He was brought up on the site of his present home, receiving a fair education in the district school.  At the age of 21, he traveled in Illinois a year, married, and himself and wife spent about six months visiting in Illinois and Wisconsin.  In 1866 he purchased a farm, for $1,700, going in debt for the whole; two years afterward he sold it for $2,400; lived one and a half years with his father-in-law, then bought a farm of 53 acres at Liberty; exchanged places with his father three years, then returned and resided at Liberty again two years, when, Jan. 7, 1875, his father died, and he was appointed administrator of the estate; in settling he bought the place, 180 acres, on which he has since resided.  He is a member of the Congregational Church.  In 1877 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and in 1880 he was census enumerator.  Politically, he is a Republican.
    His marriage took place Dec. 14, 1865, espousing Miss Clara R. Chapman, who was born Jan. 14, 1846, in Eckford, Calhoun Co., Mich., and their 2 children are, Evarts A., born Sept. 13, 1866, and Cora M., born Nov. 17, 1868.  Mrs. Kennedy is a member of the Universalist society.  Her father, Mr. Chapman, is a native of the State of New York, and was born Sept. 10, 1817; he was reared to manhood in Phelps, Ontario County, and came to Michigan in 1841; worked on a farm, by the month; in 1842 he moved into this township, and worked by the month one year, then purchased a farm, resided on it two years, sold it, and for a time worked for various persons by the month and year; then he bought another farm, on which he lived until 1875.  In 1842 he married Miss Lydia A. Eaton, who was born Sept. 27, 1823, in Manlius, Onondaga  County, N. Y.  They are now living with their daughter, Mrs. Kennedy.
    Portraits of both Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy appear on pages 948-9 of this volume.

    Miller KERR, farmer on section 15; P. O., Liberty; was born in this township Oct. 10, 1840.  His parents were Robert and Carlinda (Miller) Kerr, natives of New York, and of Irish-Dutch descent.  He was brought up on a farm and received an elementary education in the common schools.  His parents came to Michigan in the spring of 1837, and located in this township.  His father died Oct. 6, 1864, and mother Jan. 26, 1875.  When his father arrived in this township he had but 75 cents.  He has always lived at home, and still resides on the old homestead.  Was united in marriage April 5, 1866, to Miss Emma J. Slaght, who was born April 6, 1842; they are the parents of 4 children, viz.: Georgiana, born March 9, 1869; Robert B., born July 24, 1871; Eleanor P., born Dec. 18, 1872; and Maud B., born Aug. 11, 1874.  He now owns 160 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.  Politically, he is a Democrat.  He has been a hard-working, industrious man all his life, and is a highly respected citizen of his community.

    Abraham H. KIPP was born Nov. 12, 1829, in Flatbush, Ulster Co., N. Y.  His parents, Abraham and Sally (Turk) Kipp, were of Dutch descent.  His mother died when he was nine years old, and his father bound him out for seven years to a man named Andrew Wolven, who lived at the foot of the Catskill mountains.  There he received treatment so abusive that two years after he ran away, working his passage on a steamboat on the Hudson river, and went to New York city in search of an uncle; but his journey was a failure and he returned to Albany.  There he engaged as a driver on the canal, but having been worsted in the fights it was impossible to keep out of, and thrown several times into the canal, he changed his vocation to that of book agent.  He followed this pursuit at intervals for fire years, alternating this employment with rafting on the Alleghany river.  In 1849 he went West to take observations and returned the same year.  In 1850 he went to Illinois, worked out by the month and saved $100, then purchased 80 acres of land at $1.25 per acre.  He sold it and doubled his money.  He traveled through Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Virginia and Kentucky, and engaged in speculating.  In 1858 he visited friends in Michigan.  He decided to return permanently to Michigan, which he did, and was married March 10, 1858, to Miss Huldah Every.  She was born Aug. 22, 1837.  They have been the parents of 3 children, viz.: Flora E., born Aug. 10, 1860, died March 24, 1864; Frank W., born Feb. 12, 1865, and Charlie M., born June 28, 1871.  Mr. Kipp lost one eye when a small boy playing with a gun.  He has held the office of Notary Public eight years, and was appointed for four years more by the Governor, Jan. 26, 1881.  Has held various township offices during the past 20 years.  He purchased his present homestead, containing 138 acres of land, in 1859; it is valued at $50 per acre.  He is a Democrat, and both himself and wife are members of the Free-Will Baptist Church.

    Philetus LEWIS, farmer and stockman, was born July 5, 1833, in Newfane, Niagara Co., N. Y.  He was reared on a farm and educated in the common school.  His parents were natives of New York, and were of Dutch descent.  At the age of 11 he was brought to this State by his parents and remained with them until he was 21 years of age, when he went to California and remained until 1872.  In that year he returned to Michigan and purchased the site of his present home, 160 acres, valued at $8,000.  Nov. 25, 1874, he married Arvilla M. Root.  She was born May 21, 1853.  They are the parents of 2 children, viz.: Edith A., born June 7, 1876, and Clara M., born Feb. 1,1879.  Mr. Lewis' parents were among the first settlers in this township.  In 1842 his brother John entered a farm, and dying two years after gave it to his father, who lived on it and died in 1867.  His wife, the mother of Philetus, is still living, and at 84 is yet an energetic woman.  Stephen Cace, her father, was born in Massachusetts, May 1, 1770.  His wife was born in New Jersey Nov. 28, 1777, and died July 20, 1841.  Mr. Cace was in the midst of the scenes of the Revolution, and up to within a few weeks of his death was in the habit of relating, hours at a time, the incidents he remembered, his acquaintance with Washington and other prominent personages, also his experience in the war of 1812, where he was a drum-major.  He lived with his daughter, Mrs. Lewis, for many years before his death, which occurred April 10, 1872.  He was 102 years old.  All his life he was what is known as a gentleman of the old school, courteous and affable to all.  He was blind nine years before his death, but the peevishness and unrest of second childhood never came upon him, and he died as he lived, esteemed and honored.  He voted every Presidential election from Washington to Grant's second term, and was a radical Republican.
    The family record of John and Phebe Lewis is as follows: John Lewis, born Aug. 27, 1794, died March 10, 1867; Phebe (Cace), born Aug. 29, 1797.  They were married April 19, 1814.  Their children were born in the following order: Jacob, Dec 11, 1815, died May 10, 1852; Rachel M., Feb. 8, 1818; John Q., Jan. 29, 1820, died April 21, 1844; Cornelia, March 23, 1822; Sarah E., April 20, 1824, died Oct. 27, 1850; Ann C, Julv 6, 1826, died Feb. 14, 1853; Stephen, Nov. 29, 1828, died Oct. 7, 1865; Adeline and Angeline, Feb. 8, 1831, the first died May 8, 1854, the last in Aug., 1832; Philetus, July 5, 1833; Emery A., Jan. 21, 1836; Margaret O, May 18, 1839, died Oct. 17, 1878; Robert B., Sept. 17, 1841.  The mother survives 5 of 13 children.

    James R. LOOMIS was born May 15, 1840, in Alexandria, Genesee Co., N. Y.  He received a farmer's education and training, and in 1844 accompanied his father to Michigan, where they located in Liberty.  He remained with his father until he was 21, and for four years after he worked by the day in summer and taught school winters.  In 1865-'66 he worked farms on shares, and in 1867 rented the place which is now his own, and which he purchased in 1868. He owns 150 acres, valued at $9,000.  He has held the offices of School Inspector and Justice of the Peace.  Politically he is a Democrat.  He was married April 9, 1865, to Miss Cordelia Crouch, and they are the parents of 4 children, viz.: Franklin A., Mary D., Cora E, and George H.  Mrs. Loomis was born Sept. 5, 1844.  Mr. Loomis has made his own way in life, receiving from his father $5 to be applied in the purchase of a watch.  The Indian trail from Detroit to Chicago runs across his land, and on his farm is an Indian burial ground, where are hundreds of mounds scattered in every direction.  Many of these have been examined, and cavities discovered.  Mr. Loomis has a great number of relics, badges, arrows, Indian pipes, flints, etc.

    Wolcott MARSH was born in Pompey, Onondaga Co., N. Y., June 23, 1825.  His parents, Samuel T. and Polly (Barnes) Marsh, were natives of Connecticut and of English ancestry.  His father died July 21, 1829, and his mother Feb. 26, 1872.  In 1839 he came to Michigan and lived with his brothers two years, working on the farm summers and attending school winters.  He worked out several years by the month, until 1850, when he went to California, where he engaged in mining on a claim of his own.  He returned in 1853 and purchased the farm where he now resides.  April 24, 1855, he was married to Helen M. Gates.  They are the parents of 6 children—Treat W., Fred M., Edith P., Harry J., Uriel C, and Amasa W.  Mrs. Marsh was born July 10, 1836, and died Jan. 15, 1874.  Mr. Marsh is a Democrat.  He owns 90 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre.  When he first worked for his brother he had $5 per month; his next pay was $6, and the next year received $8.  He remembers them as hard times.

    Benjamin PATCH was born March 6, 1824, in Vermont, and is a son of Asa and Hannah (Weaver) Patch, natives of Vermont and Rhode Island, and of English ancestry.  He was brought up on a farm and educated in the common schools.  His father died in 1833, and mother in 1864.  In 1838 he emigrated to Michigan with his uncle and located in Liberty, where he resided seven years, then went to Moscow and worked by the month on a farm, thence to Litchfield, Hillsdale Co., Mich.  In 1849 he purchased a farm of 160 acres in that county, where he remained about 15 years, when he sold out and purchased the site of his present home.  Was married Feb. 12, 1849, to Lois Sutfin, who was born Jan. 6, 1828, and by whom he has had 7 children.  The living are—Anthony J., Polly, now Mrs. J. Palmer; Stephen A., George L. and Gifford.  He and his wife are worthy members of the M. E. Church.  Politically he is a Greenbacker.  Mr. P. started out in life a poor boy, but by hard work and perseverance he has made himself a pleasant home.  He owns 109 acres of land, valued at $55 an acre. 

    Anthony L. PELHAM, of Liberty Township, was born in Middletown, Delaware Co., N. Y., Sept. 24, 1818.  His father, Abram Pelham, was a pioneer of Delaware County, and a native of Winchester County.  He was a farmer by occupation, a Mason of high rank, and an officer in the State militia.  Mr. Pelham's grandfather, Richard, was a military man and served his county and lost his life in the American Revolution.  Mr. P.'s mother was Mary, nee Every.  He came to Michigan in 1835, and first settled in Bridgewater, Washtenaw Co., where he resided 14 years.  He next lived in Barry County seven years and then moved to Columbia, where he lived 20 years.  In 1881 he sold his Columbia farm and moved over the township line into Liberty, where he now lives in independence, surrounded by the comforts of life and a family of 7 children—Avery, Addison, Stella, Frank, Cora, George and Alice.  Stella is now Mrs. James Sickley, a farmer of Woodstock, Lenawee Co.  Mr. Pelham married Miss Ann Eliza Banker, daughter of Fredrick Banker, a millwright of Saline, Washtenaw Co., the ceremony taking place June 10, 1847.

    Nathaniel PETTENGILL, wife and 4 children, moved from Andover, Windsor Co., Vt., to this State in 1835.  He entered land on section 13, built a log hut 12 feet square, and thatched it with hay.  For beds they had two bunks, and had a table fastened against the wall.  Their cooking was done out of doors until cold weather came, when they built a fire-place of turf and logs in one corner of the room.  The structure had one door and one window covered with greased paper.  The Indians were more plenty than agreeable, and according to their custom fired the prairie in the spring and fall.  The small abiding place of the family was protected from the flames by raking away the leaves and wetting the hay thatching.  The flames in consequence leaped from tree-top to tree-top, and left the hut unscathed.  A small pig in their possession was penned next the house to protect it from the bears and wolves.  They walked 10 miles to church, often driving wolves from the path.  After living in this manner three months they built a log house, where they lived one and a half years.  Mr. Pettengill married Sophia Putnam, in Andover, May 16, 1823.  They were the parents of 6 children, 2 of whom are now living, viz.: William, born May 28, 1824; and Maria, born Feb. 6, 1826.  The latter was married in 1849, and is Mrs. M. P. San-ford.  Mr. P. died June 20, 1878.  Himself and wife were both members of the Baptist Church.

    William PETTENGILL, farmer, section 36, Somerset, was brought up on his father's farm and received a common-school education.  At the age of 15 he lost the use of his left leg, and for three years was unable to do any work.  At 19 years of age he apprenticed himself to B. F. Eggleston, of Jackson, to learn the trade of a tailor.  He remained two years, but was obliged by illness to leave the position.  In the fall of 1844 he went to Brooklyn and commenced his trade again, with E. Martin, whom he accompanied to Ann Arbor and finished learning the business.   He afterward worked in various shops as a journeyman in Michigan and New York.  In 1856 he returned to this State and worked alternately on the farm and clerked in his brother's store in Liberty.  April 5, 1848, he married Emmalissa Huff.  They were the parents of 1 child, which died.  Mrs. P. died Feb. 28, 1850.  April 19, 1857, he married Celina B. Raymond, of Rochester.    They lost their only child.  In 1857 he moved to his father's farm, which he superintended six months, then moved to Liberty, going into company with his brother in a general store.  In 1867 he disposed of his interest and removed to Jackson, where he remained until 1879, and then took possession of the old homestead.  He and a brother were drafted, but he was disabled and his brother was Postmaster.  He is a Republican.
    The personal reminiscences of the Pettengill family are of great interest as affording samples of the experiences of the pioneers of Michigan.  Food was almost unattainable, save through exertions and resources that sound like romance in relation.  Mr. Pettengill's family once were obliged to cut some wheat before it had matured, dry it, pound it out, boil it and eat it with milk, as no other subsistence could be procured.  At another time they lived wholly on potatoes and salt; the latter came from Monroe, hauled with other supplies by ox teams—usually two or three yokes— wallowing through the mud in which they sank to their sides, and often through fires that ran through the woods singeing the hair off the poor beasts.  It was not uncommon for the driver to find himself with one leg submerged to his body, and an attempt to extricate himself would end in the plunging of an arm to the shoulder in the same element.
    In two years after the arrival of this family they were alternately alarmed, interested, and finally amused by the performances of a family of 12 wolves that lived in the swamps and on the borders of Grand river.  Each of the brutes was readily distinguishable by his voice.  Regularly with nightfall came their concerts, a heavy coarse voice leading, a shriller one following, and the 10 tenors joining in the chorus.  They ceased at the close of their vespers in orderly rotation, the oldest desisting first, and so on until the music ended in the fine squeal of a youngster.
The routing of the camp of blue racers is also related, of which all were killed at the outset but one, that sprang from his assailants into the top of a small tree, which was broken down and hung to the ground.  His snakeship landed in the branches and gave battle, stretching several feet in the air and seemingly looking about for some means of defense.  Finally he flung himself toward the eldest son, a boy about 11 years old, who hit him as he flew through the air and killed him.  He was seven feet long, the average length of the entire lot.
    Mr. Pettengill and his son William went out one night to search for the cows and saw a bear approaching.  They hid, and when he reached the top of the knoll William sprang and the alarmed brute went down the hill rolling over and over, the boy after him and gaining, until the bear plunged into some brushwood.  This was genuine frontier life.

    Gross G. POND, son of Josiah and Naby (Gates) Pond, natives of Vermont, was born Jan. 6, 1828, in Cohocton, Steuben Co., N. Y.  He was brought up on a farm and educated in the common schools.  He came to this State with his parents in 1845; remained at home until 21 years of age; was united in marriage Nov. 6, 1850, with Miss Rhoda Orvis, and they became the parents of 1 child—Cynthia, now deceased.  Mrs. P. died Feb. 20, 1852.  Mr. P. again married July 11,1852, Miss Sarah Huestis; they have had 2 children, viz.: Emma A., born Feb. 23,1854, died Dec. 26, 1878; and Sereno G., born Sept. 23, 1855.  He worked a farm on shares about 7 years.  In 1859, he went to California, returning in 1860.  He bought the site of his present home of his father in 1861; being desirous of going to Nevada, where he was employed by the Yellow-Jacket Mining Company, he sold his farm back to his father, remaining in the employ of that company until 1867, when he returned and worked a farm on shares for three years, then purchased the old homestead, where he now resides.  He built a beautiful brick residence in 1880.  His wife is a member of the M. E. Church.  Mr. P. is a member of the Masonic order.  Politically, he is a Democrat.

    Livermore S. PRESCOTT, farmer, section 24; P. O., Hanover; was born May 4, 1823, in Uypsum,  Rockingham Co.,  N. H.  His parents were John and Lydia (Drake) Prescott, natives of New Hampshire, both deceased; the former died June 11, 1837, the latter in February, 1877.  He was brought up on a farm, and received a limited education in the common schools of his native State.  Mr. P. came to Michigan in 1843, and located in Tecumseh, where he remained a short time; from there he moved to this county, where he has since resided.  When he was 21 years of age, he drove stage from Tecumseh to Adrian.  He was united in marriage, Oct. 8, 1845, to Elizabeth Powell.  They were the parents of 1 child, now deceased.  Mrs. P. died March 29, 1869.  For his second wife he married, Oct. 28, 1871, Helen Melrose, by whom he has had 6 children, 5 now living, viz.: John P., Agnes, George T., Vianna M., and Livermore S., Jr.  Mr. P. now owns 220 acres of land, nearly all of which is under cultivation.  Mrs. P. is a member of the Presbyterian Church.  He is a liberal and kind-hearted man, and is much respected by his neighbors.

    Arthur B. ROOT, son of William Root, now a resident of Summit Township, was born April 13, 1846, in Ingham Township, Ingham Co., Mich., and is of English descent.  He was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of this county.  He resided in Ingham until three and a half years of age, then moved to Summit Township, and remained there about 27 years.  Afterward he purchased a farm in this township, where he has since resided.  Was married June 10, 1875, to Miss Ellen Nixon, and they are the parents of 2 children, viz.: Nettie S., born March 1, 1876,  and William, born Feb. 21, 1880.  He owns 80 acres of land, which he values at $70 per acre.  Mr. R. resides on the farm entered by his grandfather in 1837.  Politically, he is a Republican.    P. O., South Jackson.

    Aaron O. RUSSELL, son of John and Almeda (Coleman) Russell, natives of Massachusetts, and of Scotch-Welsh descent, was born in Somerset, Niagara Co., N. Y., Aug. 29, 1830.  Was brought up on a farm and educated in the common schools.  He came to this county with his parents in 1835, locating in Columbia Township, where he resided until 1857, then started out in the world for himself; he purchased a farm of 40 acres in Montcalm; after residing there two years, sold out; thence went back to Columbia, thence to Hillsdale County, thence to this township, thence to Blackman; in 1865, he settled in Liberty, where he has since resided.  Married Miss Ann Eliza Huestis, Dec. 25, 1854; they were the parents of 1 child, now deceased.  He built his present residence in 1869, and owns 104 acres of land, valued at $65 per acre; farmer, section 26; P. O., Liberty.  Politically, he is a Democrat.

    Cornelius STOAT was born July 4, 1811, in Montgomery, Orange Co., N. Y.  His parents were David and Charity (Alsduff) Sloat, natives of New York.  He was reared on a farm and received a liberal education in the common schools of his native State.  When 18 years of age he learned the carpenter and joiner's trade, but on account of poor health he followed it only a short time.  In 1831 he emigrated to this State with his parents, locating in Sharon, Washtenaw Co.; here he remained until 1840, when he purchased a farm in Liberty Township, where his estimable wife now resides.  Was united in marriage Nov. 7, 1833, to Miss Mary Becker, born Sept. 6, 1815, in Williamsburg, Dundas Co., Canada.  Children were— Ellen A., now Mrs. C. P. Hammond; Mary A., now Mrs. L. J. Curtis; Lottie I., now Mrs. S. Smith; Jane E., now Mrs. P. D. Hawley; Francis T., now Mrs. N. Hawley, and Libbie R., now Mrs. I. Hayes.  Mr. S. died March 8, 1878; he lived esteemed and died lamented.  Politically  he was a Democrat.

    John STRAIGHT, farmer section 2, was born March 1, 1804, in Hartford, Washington Co., N. Y.  His parents, Elijah and Polly (Rexford) Straight, were natives of Connecticut.  He was brought up a farmer, living at home until he was 21.  In 1846 he came to Michigan and purchased the farm where he now resides.  He married Mrs. Sophia Bryant in March, 1826.  She was born July 10, 1794.  Four of their 5 children are living, viz.: Lydia A., wife of D. Davis; Elijah J.; Phebe J., wife of Jeremiah Mattison, and Harriet I., wife to F. P. Smith.  Mr. Straight is practically a self-made man, setting out in life with no assistance.  He now owns 120 acres of land, valued at $4,800.  He is a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and politically is a Democrat.  His wife is a Baptist.  The farm is managed by his son-in-law, J. Mattison, who married Phebe Straight Nov. 24, 1859.  Mr. M. was born in Shaftsbury, Bennington Co., Vt., May 1, 1833.  He came to this State in 1855, and located in Jackson County.  At the age of 22 he learned the carpenter and joiner's trade.  Mr. and Mrs. Mattison are the parents of 2 children, viz.: Norman J. and George W.  Mr. M. is a Democrat, and both himself and wife belong to the M. E. Church.  Mr. M. has held the office of Constable 10 years, seven of them consecutively.  He lost the use of two fingers by the accidental discharge of a gun, the contents lodging in his arm.

    Sylvester A. STRONG, Representative from the Third District of Jackson County, was elected in 1878, serving two terms.  He was born Sept. 10, 1833, in St. Lawrence County, N. Y.; came with his parents to Michigan in 1835; became a resident of this county in 1840, and has since resided here.  He received a common-school education, and chose a farmer's life.  He has several times been elected to official positions in this township, including, Treasurer, Highway Commissioner and Justice of the Peace.  Was married March 18, 1855, to Miss Melissa A. Cornwell, who was born Feb. 20, 1833, in Scipio, Cayuga Co., N. Y.  His mother died Feb. 28, 1863.  His father is now 79 years of age and a resident of Jackson.  Mrs. S. is a member of the Baptist Church.  Politically he is a Greenbacker and a strong Prohibitionist.  He erected a beautiful residence in 1880; owns 140 acres of land, valued at $65 per acre.  He is engaged in buying live-stock.  P. O., Horton.

    Aaron B. SUTFIN was born in Yates County, N. Y., in 1823, and was a son of John and Polly (Baird) Sutfin, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of New Jersey.  They were the parents of 12 children, who were remarkable for their large size and great strength.  They came to this State in 1834, where Mrs. Sutfin died at the advanced age of 93.  Aaron B. was first married in 18— to Sarah E. Lewis, daughter of John and Phebe Lewis, of this county, who died in 1850.  Their children were—Christina and Agnes, both deceased.  In 18— Mr. S. married Adaline Lewis, a sister of his former wife, and they had 1 child, Phebe, now Mrs. Charles Price.  Mrs. Sutfin died in 1854, and in 1862 Mr. S. married his present wife, Mrs. M. A. Sutfin, daughter of Ariel and Mary Ann (Rathbon) Cornwell, the former a native of Cayuga County, N. Y., and the latter of Preston, Iowa.  Mr. C. came to this State in 1836, and voted the first Abolition ticket in his township; it was the only one polled at that election.  Mrs. Sutfin was born Aug. 30, 1837.  She has considerable literary talent and contributed many poems and sketches to the local papers, which have been favorably received, Among these are the following: ''Legend of Devil's Lake," "Last Night in the Old House," and "First Night in the New House."  Her 2 daughters, Belle B. and Matie A., received their education at the Union school at Hanover under the instruction of Professors Perry and Haskins.  The eldest daughter was graduated at that school in June, 1881.  Guy C. is Mrs. Sutfin's only son.  Mr. Sutfin now owns 252 acres of land, 160 of which is in this county.

    Calvin TOWN (deceased) was born June 17, 1824, in St. Lawrence County, N. Y.  He was the son of William and Mary Town, natives of New Hampshire; they came to Michigan in 1846 and located in this township.  Calvin was united in marriage Jan. 6, 1847, with Miss Sabia J. Strong, and they were the parents of 7 children, 6 of whom are now living, viz.: Helen A., now Mrs. G. M. Doty; James, Wilbur, Inez I., now Mrs. J. R. Newman; Emeline Jr. and Bertie A.  Mr. Town was highly esteemed as a man of integrity, and liberality in all worthy causes.  He was a Deacon in the Baptist Church in South Jackson many years before his death, which occurred Aug. 18, 1861.  Mrs. Calvin Town was born July 13, 1827.  Wilbur W., second son of Calvin Town, was born May 9, 1854, in this township, where he has since resided.  He was brought up a farmer and received a good education in the common schools.  After the death of his father he remained on the farm, aiding his mother in its management until he was 20 years old, when he purchased 80 acres of it which he has well improved and values at $4,800.  He was married June 26, 1875, to Rose Houghtalin, who was born April 12, 1857.  They are the parents of 2 children, viz.: Floyd, born Aug. 4, 1876, and Tracey, born Sept. 9, 1879.  Mr. Town is a Republican.  P. O., Jackson.

    Willard W. TUBBS, son of David and Olive (Kimpton) Tubbs, natives of Vermont, and of English descent; was born Aug. 4,1809, in Rutland, Jefferson Co., K. Y.; was brought up on a farm and received an elementary education in the common schools.  He remained at home until 14 years of age, then followed farming for five years; then learned the comb-maker's trade, and followed that business four years.  He came to Michigan in 1839, and located in Washtenaw County, remaining there about four years, then moved to Napoleon Township, this county, and purchased a farm; remained there four years, and traded that farm for the site of his present home.  After farming four years he rented his farm to his nephew on shares and followed the blacksmith's trade three years in Liberty, then sold out and returned to his farm, where he has resided ever since.  Was married Aug. 7, 1832, to Miss Betsey Sarlls, who was born Sept. 19, 1813, and they are now the parents of 4 children, of whom 2 are living, viz.: Frances, now Mrs. G. Loomis; and Ellen, now Mrs. A. Brower.  Mr. and Mrs. T. are worthy members of the M. E. Church.  Politically, he is a Republican.  He now owns 225 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre.  Mr. T. is a self-made man; he had very little when he commenced in life, but by perseverance and economy has accumulated considerable wealth, and is esteemed by all who know him.

    Moses TUTHILL (deceased) was born Oct. 26,1808, in Suffolk County, N. Y.  His parents, Noah and Abigail Tuthill, were natives of New York, and of English ancestry.  He attained his majority and education in New York, coming to Michigan in 1832, when about 24 years of age.  He located near Manchester, where he remained two years.  He returned to New York for a year, coming back to Michigan in 1835, when he purchased a farm in section 12, this township, where he resided until his death, Feb. 16, 1881.  At 16 years of age he learned the carpenter's trade, and  worked at it about 15 years.  Nov. 1, 1832, he married Jane Neely.  She was born Nov. 18, 1802, and died April 27, 1839, leaving 1 son, Hiram.  Mr. Tuthill was remarried March 4, 1841, to Lydia Collins.  She was born April 10, 1808, and died May 2, 1875.  She is survived by 1 son, Noah, who manages the estate of his father.  Mr. Tuthill during his life held the official positions of Township Treasurer, Justice of the Peace, Road Commissioner, and was Postmaster for a number of years.  He was among the very first settlers in Liberty, and built the first frame house and first barn in the township.  He was a Democrat and a member of the Universalist Church.

    John I. VAN SCHOICK, farmer on section 31, was born in Sharon, Schoharie Co., N.Y., Feb. 5, 1818.  His father, Joseph Van Schoick, was a native of New Jersey.  His mother, Sarah Van S., was born in the State of New York.  The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of New York, and was brought up on a farm.  He came to Michigan in the spring of 1848, and located on the place he now owns.  His father, who lost his sight, and was totally blind for eight years before his death, came to Michigan with his son and died in 1853.  His mother died in 1868.  Mr. Van S. married Dec. 29, 1847, A. Darling, of Gaines, Orleans Co., N. Y.  She was born in Niagara County, N. Y., Jan. 4, 1831.  They are members of the Universalist society, and have had 6 children, 5 of whom are now living, as follows: Clara, now Mrs. Keyes; Cora May, now Mrs. Geo. W. Cary; Emma D., now Mrs. Albert Densmore; Charles J., Jenney and Ezra D.  Mr. Van S. has held the office of Road Commissioner, and owns 143 acres of land, 10 of which are in Round Lake.

    Perry O. WETHERBY was born Feb. 12, 1822, in Manlius, Onondaga Co., N. Y., where he attained his majority and education.  His parents, Willard and Phebe (Brown) Wetherby, were natives of New York.  In 1845 he came to Michigan and purchased the farm where he now resides.  His parents came to Michigan in the spring of the same year.  He married Mary E. Haynes Nov. 3, 1847; she was born in Steuben County, N. Y., Aug. 19, 1822.  Her father Jonathan Haynes, was a native of New York, and located in 1830 at Nankin, Wayne Co., remaining there four years, removing to Somerset, Hillsdale Co., Mich., where he died in 1863.  Her mother, Lovice C. Haynes, was born in New York, and died in Somerset in 1874.  Of 5 children born to Mr. and Mrs. Wetherby 3 are now living—Arthur W., Heber D. and Charles K.  The deceased children were—Ellen A., and Chauncey P. Wetherby.  Mrs. W. is a member of the M. E. Church; Mr. W. is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and owns 120 acres of land, valued at $7,800. Politically, he is a Democrat.


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