Napoleon Township
History

Line Divider

From "The History of Jackson County, Michigan" 1881

    The act of the Legislative Council of Michigan Territory, approved March 29, 1833, declared that all that part of the county of Jackson comprised in surveyed townships 3 and 4 south, in ranges 1 and 2 east, should be called Napoleon, and the first township meeting be held at the house of Aaron B. Goodwin.  The township was first settled in 1832, but was not set apart as a separate township until 1859.  The first township election was held on the 4th of April, 1859, and Roswell B. Rexford was chosen supervisor, with Brian Bently, town clerk.
    Mr. A. B. Goodwin was the first settler in Napoleon village, coming into the town in May, 1832.  He was an Indian trader, and was led into this part of the country while following his business.  He brought his family, a wife and adopted daughter, with him.  His nearest neighbor was Charles Blackman, who had settled on the Chicago road in Lenawee county a few years previous.  Mr. Blackman had taken up land in Napoleon in 1831, but did not settle upon it.  Mr. Blackman, Mr. Goodwin and Abram Bolton, of Coldwater, commenced quarrying stone from the quarry afterward owned by Morgan Case and William Allen.
    The first postoffice was opened in December, 1832.  Samuel Quigley was postmaster.  The town was named after Napoleon Bonaparte, at the request of Mr. Bolton.
    Abram F. Bolton settled in Napoleon in August, 1832, and built a log house.  His daughter, Caroline, born in November, 1832, was the first child born in the town.
    Chauncy Hawley came to Napoleon from Washington County, October, 1832.  Mr. Hawley located the southwest quarter of section 31.  Morgan Case came here in company with Mr. Hawley in 1832, and Horace Dean came at the same time.
    Among others may be mentioned Henry Hawley, Israel S. Love, Roswell B. Rexford, John T. Ford, Win. Hunt, Lyman Hunt, Samuel Quigley, and George L. Dinsmore, all of whom came in the spring of 1833.  Dr. Benjamin S. King came in the summer of this year, and was the first physician.
Louisa M. Swain taught the first school in 1833, at the house of Samuel Quigley.
    Napoleon sent out her quota at the call of the nation in the defense of her flag.  On the 28th of October, 1862, Sergeant Oscar E. Miller, Corporal G. Myron Hawley, and Privates Dwight C. Slack, Alonzo D. Palmer, and George D. Peck were buried in one grave with military honors at Napoleon.  They fell on the battlefields of South Mountain and Antietam.
    The village is situated on the Jackson branch of the Michigan Southern railroad.  It occupies a pleasant position upon a plateau, surrounded by a rich and highly cultivated agricultural section.  Stone lake is one and a half miles from the depot.  A very fine and substantial school building was erected in 1869.  It is brick, and two stories.  The village contains two churches, Baptist and Methodist Episcopal.
Lewis Case plowed the first furrow.
    The town embraces some of the finest farming lands in the county.  The soil is well adapted to wheat, and the water facilities are such that the farmers have a ready market at home, where the proprietors of the mills are prepared to purchase all that they will sell.
    The first supervisor of the township, as it existed in 1833, was Harvey Austin; the first clerk, J. H. Otis; the first assessors, Isaac Sterling, A. F. Bolton and William Hunt; first highway commissioners, James Loke, A. B. Goodwin, Isaac Sterling; the first school commissioners, John Emmons, J. H. Otis, Harvey Austin; the first overseers of the poor, A. F. Bolton, George L. Pear, William Babcock and James Loke, with the latter as township collector.
    The first district school was built in 1835, on section 6, 4 S., 2 E.  The first church was built at Napoleon for the Methodist society.  Since that early day the Baptist, Congregational and Free Methodist societies have erected pretentious houses of worship.  Now there are two brick and four frame school-houses in the township.
    John Dewey opened the first store in the village during the spring of 1835, and the last important branch of industry was inaugurated in 1875 by Hawley & Co., the owners of the steam grist-mill.  This company also run a grain-cradle factory.  The present township officers include C. R, Palmer, S. V.; T. E. Curtis, Clerk; J. Caldwell, Treasurer; William Smith and H. C. H. Dean, Drain Commissioners; R. R. Cooper, Amos Phillips, T. T .Townsend, Justices of the Peace.
    Methodist Episcopal.—The first sermon preached in Napoleon township by a Methodist Episcopal minister was in the evening of Nov. 13, 1833, the night of the great "star-fall," or meteoric shower.  The preacher was probably Rev. Colelazer, whom night had overtaken while traveling through this section.  After this, meetings were held in private houses until 1838.  They effected a permanent organization April 1, 1815, under the charge of Rev. Hiram Law, Jr., pastor of what was then the "Albion circuit," Michigan Conference, and comprised the following members: Ralph and Margaret Covert, Elsy Meeks, John and Miranda Chapman, John Logan, Peter Storm, Charles C. Dewey, Priscilla Green, Julia Ann Smith and Mary Elliott.  Of these 12, six are still living.  Soon afterward they were added to the Jackson circuit, still later to the Grass Lake circuit, and finally to Napoleon, as this place became more populous.
    In the summer of 1845 the society resolved to build a church, although it numbered but 18 members.  They appointed as trustees, E. Manly, J. Bivins, R. W. Squires, R. Covert, J. H. Chapman, Gardner Gallup and C. C. Dewey.  A lot was donated by W. S. Blackmar.  They erected a building, which they used until 1875, when they commenced a new one, now nearly completed, at a cost of $6,000.  The present Board of Trustees are, Joseph Colwell, I. Wood, S. W. Palmer, W. S. Blackmar, Samuel Finch, R. W. Square, E. P. Lapham, and the minister is Franklin Bradley.  The society is now comprised within the Detroit Conference.
    The First Baptist Church of Napoleon was organized in June, 1834.  The constituent membership consisted of the following: R. B. Rexford, Betsy Rexford, Horace Dean, Lucina Hawley, Louis Ann Hawley, Lucy Hawley, Louisa M. Swain, C. S. Swain, Paulina Austin, Morgan Case, Betsy M. Case, Elijah Weber, Sarah Weber, Joseph King, Peleg King, Ransom Jones, Day Jones, J. S. Love, Nancy Love and Lewis Case.  The first board of trustees consisted of R. B. Rexford, Horace Dean, Simon Holland, Morgan Case, J. H. Burroughs and J. S. Love. R. B. Rexford and Horace Dean were the first deacons elected.  Rev. C. H. Swain preached the first Baptist sermon in the town, two years before the organization of the Church, and became its pastor.  The following pastors succeeded him: J. D. Fulton, Salmon Morton, Norman Chase, Ezra Ruinery, D. Babcock, J. A. Keyes, Peter Van Winkle.  Robert Powell, V. Church, J. P. Wade, H. B. Fuller, Henry Davis, D. B. Davis, D. E. Hills, Frank S. Lyon.  The Church dedicated its first house of worship in 1845, and the second in June, 1871. The present membership is 150.

BIOGRAPHICAL

Following are biographical sketches of many of the representative citizens of Napoleon township.

    Solomon D. ALCOTT, farmer, section 23; was born in Lorain County, Ohio, Feb. 15, 1823, son of Seth R. and Lucy Alcott, nee Frost.  They were natives of Connecticut, and moved to Lorain County, Ohio, in 1820, where they engaged in clearing up a farm among the heavy timber, in which he continued to farm until his death, May 8, 1856.  His mother died Feb. 15, 1869, on the birthday of her son.  The subject of this sketch received what education he has by odds and ends,—some days at school and some in the timber chopping with his father, until he was 21 years of age.  He went South and worked on the railroad four months; and, concluding that occupation was not suitable to him, he returned to Ohio, and concluded to try a trade.  Accordingly, he went to Connecticut and entered a bolt factory, where he remained six months.  He then went into the Collins Ax Factory, in the same State, where he remained from 1845 till June, 1847.  He then returned to Ohio, where he again engaged in chopping for a few months, in that big timber where his father lived, and then in the summer he farmed for several months; took sick, and for one year he was compelled to sit by and recover sufficiently to enable him to farm, which he followed until 1850; he then returned to the Collins Ax Factory, where he again worked for 14 months, and in the spring of 1851 he got the California fever and started for the golden coast.  After he arrived in port he started out chopping wood the first winter, and in 1852 he took up gardening for the summer, and his luck was to lose a summer's work through the sharpness of his partner.  He then had to tug through the winter, working at whatever he could find to do, until the spring of 1853, when he entered the mines, where he remained three years and a half.  He then returned to Ohio, satisfied with the gold regions of California, and bought 50 acres of land, on which he commenced to farm.
    In 1858 he married Elizabeth Atkinson, who was born in England, Sept. 25, 1828, and was the daughter of Richard and Martha Atkins, nee Nettleton.  They came to America in 1850, and located at Ridgeville, Lorain Co., Ohio, where they engaged in farming and still reside.  The family consisted of 2 children—Seth R., born Jan. 7, 1859, and died Jan. 14, same year; and Mary M., born Jan. 4, 1871.
    In 1862 Mr. Alcott enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, in the 103d Ohio Inf., and served three years.  He was in a good many engagements during the time; was wounded at the battle of Resaca, Ga., in the right thigh and thumb, which disabled him from duty for a number of months.  He was confined in the hospital and was home on furlough a few months, and, returning to the army, he was transferred to the invalid corps, and guarded the prison at Camp Douglas for several months.  At the close of the war he returned home and engaged in farming; in the fall of 1866 he sold out his farm and moved to Jackson County, Mich., and located on a farm of 240 acres of land, which he has well improved and is quite valuable, with good, new buildings.  He is a solid Republican.

    Wm. S. BLACKMAR was born in the town of Wales, Erie Co., N. Y., Feb. 24, 1814, and was the son of Charles and Ellen Blackmar, nee Rice.  His father moved to Ohio in 1826, where he followed farming until 1829, when he removed to Lenawee County, Mich., and began a residence among the wild woods, with the savage Indian for his neighbor, and the wild howl of the wild animals.  He was one among the earliest to locate the stone quarry in Napoleon Township, which he figured in largely.  Aug. 24, 1834, he died at his home in Lenawee County, and in 1856 his mother died at the old home.  The subject of this sketch did not have the facilities in his day to educate himself, and had to obtain his education by odds and ends.  In 1844 he was married to Catherine Loucks, and they had 2 children—Octavia, now Mrs. W. H. Loomis, and Howard, who died in 1847.  Mr. Blackmar lost his wife, and in 1851 he was again married, this time to Pyra Blair, by whom he had 2  children—Ellen, now Mrs. C. Richards, and Charles, who died in 1854.  He again lost his wife, and in 1857 was married to Christiana Bulkin, and of their 4 children the surviving are—Anna and William S.  He came to Jackson County in 1857, and located in the town of Brooklyn, and continued to carry on his farming for a few years.  He then moved near the town of Jackson, and began land speculation in connection with his farming.  He then moved to the town of Grass Lake, where he located and began to improve the farm and keep a hotel, which he now owns.  He owns 180 acres of land, besides town property in Napoleon.  He is now engaged in the mercantile business in Napoleon.  He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church.

    Bethuel BROMLEY, farmer, section 4, was born in Clinton County, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1815, son of Eli and Deborah Bromley, nee Sherman, who were natives of Vermont.  They moved to New York State in 1815, where they engaged in farming and lumbering.  His mother died in 1852, and his father in 1874, in New York.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common-schools of New York State, and was raised on a farm; remained with his father until he was 25 years of age.  In 1839 he was married to Mary Ann Lewis, who was born in the same county and State, Jan. 13, 1818.  He moved in 1840 to the town of Plattsburg, on Lake Champlain, where he entered land and farmed for one year.  He then moved into the town of Chazy, where he engaged in lumbering for four years.  He then moved to Franklin County, town of Chateaugay, where he purchased 120 acres of land and began farming again, on which he lived two years.  He sold out and bought another farm of 103 acres, which he cultivated four years, selling out again and purchasing another farm of 40 acres, which he improved, and where he lived two years; trading this place for his old farm, he continued for a number of years, and in 1855 he sold out his farm and came to the State of Michigan, locating in Jackson County, Napoleon Township, on the farm he now owns.  At that time it consisted of 100 acres, which was partially improved.  He went to work, cleared up his farm, and he has added 60 more acres to it, and now owns 160 acres, which he has nicely improved with good house and barns of modern style, and which is worth $75 per acre.
    He had 2 children—Adelaide, now Mrs. A. C. Lester, and Aledero (deceased).  In 1862 he was again married, this time to Lucy Blood, who was born Nov. 11, 1837, in Vermont, the daughter of Truman and Brintha Blood, nee Burt.  By this marriage there is 1 child—Ernest K, born Oct. 31, 1864.  Politically, Mr. B. is a Democrat.

    Richard B. BRUNK, farmer, section 32, was born in Genesee County, N. Y., Feb. 16, 1842, the son of Peter and Mary Ann Brunk, nee Todd.  They were natives of New York State, and he is a farmer by occupation.  The father died in New York State and his mother in Western New York July 4, 1871.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of his native State, and was reared on a farm; at 22 years of age he came West and located in this county, where he learned the carpenter and joiner's trade under A. J. Vanwinkle; he followed that occupation from 1864 to 1875.  He was married March 25, 1868, to Emeline Smith, daughter of Chauncy C. and Harriet Smith, nee Vanwinkle; they have 1 child—Minnie E., born Dec. 30, 1875.  In 1875 he bought a farm consisting of 40 acres of land, situated on section 32, which he now has under a fair state of cultivation, and which is worth $50 per acre.  In politics he is and has always been identified with the Democratic party.

    G. W. BURTLESS, grain dealer, was born in Seneca County, N. Y., Aug. 29, 1828, second son of John and Sarah Burtless, nee Huff.  His father's occupation was that of farming.  He came to Washtenaw County, Mich., in 1836, where he continued to farm until 1877, when he moved to the town of Napoleon and retired from labor.  He died May 17, 1878, in his 82d year.  His mother still lives in the town of Napoleon.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of Michigan; at the age of 21 he began working for himself.  In 1852 he was married to Hannah Bostedor, who was born in Allegany County, N. Y., in 1832.  Their family consists of 1 child, Etta N. born in 1859.  Mr. B. came to the county in 1856, bought a farm, and returned to Washtenaw County in 1861, where he continued to farm until 1865.  He again returned to the town of Napoleon, where he carried on farming in connection with the grain business.  He now is engaged principally in the grain and coal and lime business.  His wife is a member of the M. E. Church.

    Jacob V. CARMER, Napoleon, was born in Orange County, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1802.  His ancestors were Protestant emigrants from the confines of France and Germany, who were driven from their homes by the persecutions of the Romish Church, and established themselves on Manhattan Island, when it was called New Amsterdam.  Jacob V. was the son of Thomas Carmer, and his grandfather's name was Henry Carmer; the latter married Martinta Vanderhoof and resided on a farm in New Jersey.  When Thomas was 14 years of age he learned the tinsmith's trade in New York State and commenced business at Goshen, Orange Co.  Here he became acquainted with, and married, Miss Mary Gale, daughter of Abraham Gale, Jr., whose ancestors came from England and purchased large tracts of land from the Indians.
    Jacob V., the subject of this sketch, was educated in the district schools of his native county, and of Sussex County, N. J.  When he was 12 years old he went to live with his maternal grandfather, and remained with him six years; then rented the homestead farm, containing 316 acres, nearly all of which was under improvement.  He remained on the farm six years, but was not successful.  He had saved $1,200, and with this capital went into the mercantile business with James C. Havens, and continued in the same two years.  In 1827 he married Eleanor Van Auken, daughter of Elijah and Catherine (Cole) Van Auken.  In October, 1828, went to housekeeping in New York city, and engaged in the grocery business under the firm name of Adams & Carmer.  The next spring his wife's brother-in-law, John Dunning, was admitted to the firm and a feed and flour store was added to their business.  In the fall of 1831 he started a wholesale trade in butter and cheese, under the firm name of Van Auken & Carmer.  In 1834 Mr. Canner's health failed and he was obliged to give up business for nearly two years; visited Niagara and Buffalo; came to Detroit by steamer, and to Ann Arbor by stage; visited several points and finally made a small investment in Jackson; then went to Illinois in the employ of the New York and Illinois Land Company, looking up their patent lands, grading lands, and entering other wild lands for their company; remained in Illinois five months; returned to New York in October and engaged in the dry-goods business nine years.
    Mr. Carmer was originally a Democrat, but after coming to Michigan he acted with the Whig party until the organization of the Republican party, and has voted that ticket ever since.  In 1873 he lost his wife, who was in the 77th year of her age.  Their family consisted of 7 children, of whom 3 are living, viz.: Lewis A., now living in Olean, New York; Ann Adelia, now Mrs. Rex-ford, and Jennie M., now Mrs. Colgrove, of Mason, Ingham Co.  The deceased were James H., Adelia, Catherine S. and Jesse V. A.  Mr. Carmer still resides on the home farm where he first located; his daughter, Mrs. Rexford, lives with him.  Her husband died at Nashville, Tenn., Aug. 3, 1873.  Mr. and Mrs. C. and their ancestors were Presbyterians, but after coming to Michigan they were two of the 13 who organized the first Congregational Church at Napoleon.  Mr. C. has been a very active business man and suffered all the privations and hardships incident to pioneer life.  He has done much to relieve his country from political oppressions.  A portrait of Mr. Carmer will be seen on page 967.

    Albert CASE (deceased) was born in Washington County, N.Y., July 18, 1812.  He was the son of David and Abigail Case; was raised on a farm and received his education in the common schools of New York, and was among the pioneers of the county who came to Jackson County in 1833, and located on a farm, which he began to improve until his death, Nov. 3, 1877.  He was married in 1837 to Lucy Horth, who was born in Washington County, N. Y., Jan. 17,1820.  They had a family of 4 children—-Delos, Adelbert F., Laura Ann, and William Edgar, all of whom reside in the county except the latter, who resides in Chicago, a barber by occupation.  She still resides on the homestead, which consists of 100 acres.  Her son carries on the farm for her.  She is a member of the Baptist Church of Napoleon.

    Morgan CASE was born in the town of Hartford, Washington County, N. Y., March 16, 1807.  He was the son of Daniel and Abigail Case, nee Harden; his father was a native of Connecticut, and a farmer by occupation.  He came to New York in an early day and continued to carry on farming until his death in 1848.  He was in his 65th year, and his mother died in 1845, in her 60th year.  The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools of New York, and at the age of 20 years he began to do for himself.  He worked out by the day and month, as he could, until he was 25 years old; he then, in 1832, took to himself Miss Betsy Nelson, who also was born in Hartford, Washington Co., N. Y., in 1810, and immediately after their marriage they moved West and located in Jackson County, Napoleon Township, on section 6, where they began to open a farm among the wilds of a new country.  He entered 120 acres of Government land, on which he built a log house and lived for many years; at that time there were only three other houses in the township.  Their family consisted of 3 children—Warren was the first male child born in the township, and now lives in Columbia Township; Emeline was born in 1837, and died in 1838; and Walter was born in 1839, and died in 1859.  Mr. C. now resides on the spot where he first located in the county; he is now 74 years of age, and his wife is 70.  Thus two old pioneers still live to see the vast amount of changes taking place daily.  They have been members of the Baptist Church in Napoleon, since 1831.  Mr. Case has held nearly all the township offices.  In these he used good judgment.  He now owns 500 acres of land in Napoleon and Columbia townships, which is worth at a fair valuation $30,000.

    J. H. CHAPMAN (deceased) was born Feb. 15, 1809, and was the son of Amasa and Lydia Chapman, nee Hunt, natives of New York.  Mr. Chapman was raised on a farm and educated in the common schools of New York.  He was first married Dec. 27, 1827, to Lavendee Hoxie, who was born Dec. 1, 1810, in New York State.  Mr. C. came to Michigan in 1837, where he engaged in farming.  Their family consists of 6 children, 4 boys and 2 girls—Minerva J., now Mrs. Sam. Cox; Amasa J., Franklin B., Augusta H., John D., and Lavandee, now Mrs. William Wall.  July 6, 1843, he lost his wife, and was again married, to Amanda Russell, who was born in New York Oct. 1, 1821, and was the daughter of Tartillus and Anna Russell, nee Hall.  They had 6 children, 3 of whom are now living: Lydia M., Laura F., now Mrs. Sylvester Warner, and Clarence C.  The 3 deceased are Jacob R., Lawrence H. and Anna.  Mr. Chapman died May 25, 1878, in his 70th year.  Mrs. C. still lives on the homestead with her son Clarence C, who carries on the farm.

    A. C. CLARKE, farmer, section 5, was born in Erie County, N. Y., July 29, 1816, son of Archibald S. and Chloe Clarke, nee Thayer.  His father was a native of Massachusetts, and mother of Western New York.  His father was a lawyer by occupation, and was prominent among the early settlers of New York State, and at the time of his death was a Representative in Congress.  He died while home on business Nov. 3, 1821.  The subject of this sketch received a common-school education, enough to enable him to carry on any branch of business.  His mother moved upon a farm in New York,, where they lived until 1840.   He, together with his mother and 2 brothers, came to Michigan, where they purchased a farm and carried on agriculture together for two years.  He then bought out his brother's interest in the farm and continued to carry on the same.  He was married to Jemima Litchfield, who was born in Chesterfield, Mass., Dec. 17, 1813, and was the daughter of Ensign and Mary Litchfield, nee Haden.  They have had 7 children, 5 of whom are now living—Augustus C, Reuben R., Emeline, Ellen Sophia, now Mrs. Hyde, and Ida, now Mrs. Preston.  The 2 deceased are Oscar L. and Eugene B.  He has held the office of Constable and been Deputy Sheriff for over 30 years, and was also Town Treasurer.  He now has 159 acres of land, which his 2 sons cultivate.  In politics Mr. Clarke is and always has been a Democrat.

    Byron COOLEY, telegraph operator, freight and United States Express agent, at Napoleon, was born in Oakland County, Mich., Jan. 28, 1834, the son of Samuel L. and Electa Cooley, nee Woodruff.  His father's occupation was always farming, at which he is still engaged, in Hillsdale County, Mich.; his mother died in 1846, when Byron was only a small boy, and his father afterward was married to Lydia Carter.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of Hillsdale County, and remained with his father on the farm until 23 years old, when he chose the occupation of railroading, and commenced as teamster on the M. S. & N. I. R. R., and now the L. S. & M. S. R. R., and continued to work, first at one thing and then another, until now he has charge of the present office, having continued in the employ of said road from the first until the present.  He was married in 1860 to Sarah E. Collins, who was born in New York.  Their family consists of 4 children—George, Jennie, Charles and Grace.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity at Hillsdale, Lodge No. 93.

    Freeman B. CROSBY, physician, was born in Martinsburg, Lewis Co., N. Y., June 27, 1828, son of Jonathan H. and Charlotte Crosby, nee Barnes; father was a native of Vermont, mother of Massachusetts.  They came to Jackson County in 1838, and located in Napoleon, where he engaged in farming until his death in 1866.  His mother died in 1843. The subject of this sketch, Freeman R., was educated in the common schools and reared on the farm.  In 1858 he took up the study of medicine under Dr. N. S. Whiting.  He attended courses of lectures at the University in Ann Arbor during 1859-'60 and 1862, and entered the 17th Mich. Reg., as Assistant Surgeon, under Dr. J. D. Bevier, and remained until 1864, being at Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, siege of Knoxville.  He then returned home to Napoleon, where he took up the practice of medicine two years.  He then moved to Henrietta, where he practiced 18 months.  He then returned to Napoleon, continuing in the profession.  He was married in February, 1865, to Nancy Andrews, who was born in New York.  They had 2 children, of whom 1 is living—Mattie W., born in 1869.  One died in infancy.  Mrs. Crosby died June 3, 1875.

    Ralph COVERT, Justice of the Peace, was born in the town of Ovid, Seneca Co., N. Y., March 17, 1811, son of Peter A. and Mary Covert, nee Swarthout.  His father was born May 2, 1780, in New Jersey, and his mother in Orange County, N. Y., Dec. 27, 1782.  His father's occupation was a farmer.  He died Sept. 6, 1823.  His mother died April 30, 1861.  The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm and educated in the common schools.  At the age of 16 he took up the study of music, which art he afterward taught.  In 1833 he married Margaret N. Moody, who was born in the town of Lodi, Seneca Co., N. Y., Feb. 17, l816.  In 1834 he came to Michigan and located in Washtenaw County, where he opened a new farm on which he continued to live 16 years.  He then traded for a farm in Jackson County, consisting of 160 acres, where he lived eight years, when he sold and bought 200 acres west of Stone lake.  Here he lived until 1873, when he moved to the village of Napoleon.  Their family consists of 4 children—Edward M., John, Henrietta, now Mrs. Stephenson, and Morris H.  April 19, 1872, he lost his wife, and married Sept. 27, 1873, Aurelia Lewis, who was born in Akron, Erie Co., N. Y., July 4, 1846, and was the daughter, of Geo. and Philida Lewis.  She taught school at the age of 15 for three terms, and then took up the dress-maker's trade, which she has accomplished to perfection.  Mr. Covert has held the office of Town Clerk, Road Commissioner and School Inspector.  He is now Justice of the Peace, and he has been a member of the M. E. Church over 40 years.  His wife is member of the Baptist Church.

    Horace DEAN, whose portrait will be found on page 435, was born in the township of Windsor, Vt., May 11, 1809, son of Noah and Sally Dean, nee Russell, natives of Vermont, the father a farmer.  He moved to the town of Hartford, N. Y., where he carried on farming until his death, and his mother died in the same town.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of New York, and in October, 1832, he came to Jackson County, where he entered Government land, and returned to New York in 1834, and was married to Clarissa M. Shaw, who was born Sept. 3, 1812, and immediately after their marriage they returned to this county, where they continued to farm.  He now resides on the same farm he entered in 1832.  Their family consisted of 3 children, 1 now living—Julius P., and 2 deceased, viz:—Willard F. and Horace.  They have 1 adopted child, Hattie, now Mrs. Kendrick.  He has held different offices in the township; he now owns 160 acres of land, in Napoleon Township, which is worth $60 per acre.  He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church, which he joined in New York in July, 1827.

    J. P. DEAN, farmer, section 2, was born in Jackson County, Mich., Sept. 19, 1835, son of Horace and C. M. Dean, who were among the pioneers of the county.  He was reared on a farm and received his education in the common schools of Jackson County.  He was an attentive boy, minded his own business and stayed at home with his father.  He married in 1869 Miss Lucy Maria Weeks, who was born in the same county Nov. 20, 1837; brought her to his father's house and continued to live as son and daughter in the same house till 1874, when he moved upon the farm he now owns, consisting of 120 acres, with good house of modern style and everything in abundance around him to cheer and comfort him in his declining years.  Their family consisted of 3 children, viz.: Marion L., born June 27, 1863; Nora O., born July 8, 1866; and Villa F., born March 19, 1878, died Aug. 2, 1879.  Mr. D. stands at the head of his class among the citizens of Napoleon Township.  He is generous hearted, full of fun, and believes that this is a world of enjoyment for the human family, and that each one must look out for himself in this life if he expects to reach that enjoyment necessary to make home pleasant.  He is always at the head of any enterprise which is for the good of his fellow-man.  He is a member in full standing in the Baptist Church at the quiet little town of Napoleon, and is a Republican, always ready to advance its cause and, its interests, and is a strong supporter of its leaders.

    Charles C. DEWEY was born in Boonville, Oneida Co., N. Y., Nov. 16, 1816, the son of John and Anna Dewey, nee Hawley.  They came West in May, 1835, and located in the township of Napoleon; where he engaged in the mercantile business, in connection with farming.  He died in 1871, in his 84th year, and his wife died March 2, 1879, in her 91st year.  She embraced the Christian religion, and for 60 years continued to follow its precepts.  The subject of this sketch received his education in early life, principally in the common schools, finishing up his studies at Lowville Academy, N. Y.; came with his parents to Jackson County, Mich., and assisted his father in the mercantile business, and worked at farming.  In 1848 he was married to Elizabeth Smith, who was born in 1825.  Their family consisted of 4 children; the living are May and Lilla: Emma and Lillian are deceased.  He has held the office of Justice of the Peace for 27 years, Township Clerk, School Inspector, and is classed among Napoleon's best citizens.  He owns 150 acres of land, besides town property in the town of Napoleon, and at the present time is engaged in merchandising in connection with Win. S. Blackmar.  He is a descendant of Thomas Dewey, who was born in Sandwich, Kent, England, near Dover, and emigrated to America in 1633.  In tracing down to Charles C. we have the seventh degree of relation, 248th year transcendent.  He is also one of the ardent supporters of the M. E. Church.

    Reuben H. DEYOE was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., June 24, 1831.  His father, Thomas Deyoe, and his mother, Elizabeth, nee Hart, were natives of New York, and had 10 children, 5 of whom are living, the subject of this sketch being the oldest son.  The first 10 years of his life were spent on the farm, his father being a prosperous farmer.  At the age of 12 years he went into a cotton factory to work, his father having lost all his property; from that time he took care of himself, and helped to support the family.  He staid in the factory five years, and when he left, there was no part of the machinery but what he was familiar with.  At the age of 17 he went into a blacksmith shop to learn the trade.  After a few months he bought out his employer and ran the shop himself.
    May 22, 1850, he left his native place with his family for Michigan.  Their journey was tediously slow.  They arrived in Springport, Jackson Co., Mich., June, 1850.  The spring of 1851 he bought his first farm, located two and one-half miles southeast of Springport village, making as first payment a watch, valued at $10, and $10 in work.  Then began hard work to subdue and improve his new farm, and make a home for his father and mother.  Jan. 28, 1858, he married Sarah Wellington, second daughter of William Wellington, of Springport, Jackson Co., Mich.  She was born April 31, 1836.  She lived about 13 months, dying Feb. 18, 1859.  Soon after his marriage he turned over his interest in the old farm to his younger brother for the support and care of his father and mother, the brother doing his duty faithfully by the old people.  The father died July 31, 1880, and at present the mother is tenderly cared for on the old homestead.
    After leaving the old farm, the subject of this sketch engaged in various pursuits, principally farming.  On Nov. 3, 1862, he married Kate E. Wellington, of Scipio, Hillsdale Co., Mich.  She was born May 30, 1840, in Hanover, Jackson Co., Mich., and was cousin to his first wife.  Their family consists of 2 children—Lillian S., born July 29, 1866; Jay W., born Nov. 17, 1870, both in the town of Springport, Jackson Co., Mich.
The subject of this sketch enlisted in the army of the Rebellion December, 1863.  He joined the old Michigan infantry, then changed to heavy artillery; was principally doing garrison duty,holding Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay, Ala., 10 months, from there to various points along the Mississipi river till the close of the war; was discharged Aug. 21, 1865.
    For the next seven years he lived in the town of Springport, Jackson Co., engaged principally in farming.  In the year 1872 he sold his farm, purchased another north of Tompkins Center, and in connection with farming sold groceries, and held office of Postmaster for three years.  In the fall of 1875 he purchased a large farm on Gravel Road four miles north of the city of Jackson.  March, 1877, he sold half his farm and moved into the city, Jackson; during the next three years he was engaged part of the time in selling groceries and keeping wood-yard in connection with farming.  In the fall of 1879 he came to Napoleon, fitted up a brick store near depot, and engaged in the grocery and general provision exchange.
April 4,1881 he left Napoleon for Dakota, to try his luck at wheat-raising on a big scale.  He left his family in Napoleon.

    Wm. DILLEY, farmer, section 2, was born in Erie County, town of Newstead, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1814; son of Strennahan and Aner Dilley.  His father died when the subject of the sketch  was only a small boy in New York State, and his mother afterward married Cole Quithell, with whom he resided until he had reached the 11th year of his age, when he was thrown upon his own resources for support and raiment.  He engaged at different kinds of work, mostly as a farm hand, and received his education as he could get it from most any source.  Thus he continued to work and save out of his earnings as much as he could until 1837; was married to Lucenia Hunt.  She was born in Otsego County, town of Middlefield, Oct. 10, 1811; after their marriage they continued to live in New York, where he carried on farming and coopering for 12 years, and in 1854 he came to Jackson County, Mich., and bought the farm he now owns, consisting of 160 acres of land, which he has well-improved with good house and $75 barn.  Their family consisted of 7 children, of whom only 2 are living, viz.: William and Fidelia, now Mrs. Knight; 5 deceased, viz.: Polly Ann, Eliza J., Lucenia F.; 2 died in infancy.
    His wife and daughter are members of the Baptist Church at Napoleon. Politically he is at the present time identified with the Greenback party.

    H. B. ELDRED (deceased) was born in Chautauqua County, N. Y., Jan. 9, 1832, and was the son of Carter and Keziah Eldred, nee Brace.  They were natives of Herkimer County, N. Y., farmers by occupation, and moved to Jackson County, Mich., in an early day, and located on a farm, where they continued to live until his death.  Mr. Eldred was reared on a farm and received his education in the common schools of Michigan.  Oct. 6, 1860, he was married to Belinda Edwards, who was born in Lenawee County, Mich., Oct. 17,1835.  She is the daughter of Andrew and Mary Ann Edwards, nee Burtless, who were also natives of New York, and came to Michigan in 1833, locating in Lenawee County.  Her father died April 1, 1841, and her mother now resides with her.  Their family consisted of 2 children—Louis H. and Fred O.  Mr. Eldred still resides on the homestead, which consists of 360 acres of land, which is well improved and worth $60 per acre.  They are members of the Congregational Church at Napoleon.  A portrait of Mr. Eldred appears on page 453 of this work.

    J. C. ELDRED (deceased), who was born in Warren County, Conn., May 27, 1808, was the son of Zenas and Lucy Eldred, nee Carter.  They moved to the State of New York in an early day, where they located on a farm, on which they lived until their death.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools and remained with his father until his marriage April 13, 1831, with Keziah Brace; she was born in Winfield, N. Y., May 4,1811, and the daughter of Asahel and Katie Brace, nee Curtis.  They were natives of Connecticut.  After their marriage they moved to Sheridan, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., where they farmed for five years; they then sold out and came to Jackson County, Mich., where he entered and bought some 400 acres of land, on which he continued to farm until his death, Jan. 27, 1849.  He left a family of 6 children, viz.: Henry B., Orlo E., Rufus C, Cynthia K., Zenas C. and George K.  After his death she married for her second husband William Calkins, who was born in New York, Oct. 17, 1799.  He had by his former marriage 7 children, and he continued farming until his death in 1879.  She still resides on the old homestead and is now in her 70th year, and has in her possession a few old relics, that were owned by her former relation, over 50 years old, grandfather's knee-buckles and a pair of earrings.  Of her family there is only 1 son now living, Zenas C, who resides in the city of Jackson.  Mrs. Calkins is a member of the Congregational Church at Michigan Center.

    Rufus C. ELDRED was born May 24, 1835, son of the subject of the preceding sketch.  Soon after his father's death he went to reside with an uncle, Fredrick S. Eldred, who at that time resided in Johnstown, Wis., at present Janesville, Wis.  He remained with him until he was 21 years of age, when he went to Minnesota and purchased 160 acres of land.  Remained there a year or so, after which he sold his land; from there he went to Nashua, Chickasaw Co., Iowa, where he remained in business four years.  While there he formed the acquaintance of Miss Maggie M. Woodbridge, whom he married Jan. 1, 1862, and started directly for his early home in Michigan.  He there located on a farm consisting of 205 acres, situated five and one half miles southeast of Jackson city, at what is known as Eldred Station, where he remained until his death, which occurred Sept. 3, 1873.  He was well known all through this section, and is highly respected by all who knew him.  He left 3 small children, namely: Ada H., who was born Dec. 28, 1865; Abbie D., born Feb. 14, 1868; Maggie Maude, born July 21, 1872, died Dec. 30, 1879.

    Phillip FARLEY (deceased) was born near Saratoga Springs, N. Y., May 2, 1818.  He was the son of James and Elizabeth Farley, nee Jenkins.  They are natives of New York and both deceased.  His father was a farmer, and the subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of New York, remaining on the farm with his father until he was 15 years of age.  He then went to the town of Graham, Ontario Co., N. Y., where he completed his education and learned his trade, which he followed until he was 29 years of age.
    He was married May 12, 1845, to Mary Rogers, who was born in Ontario County, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1845, and was the daughter of Samuel and Mary Rogers, nee Barkin.  They were natives of New York, her father died in 1861; and her mother, who was born May 11, 1790, still lives and resides with her daughter, Mrs. F.  They continued to live in New York until 1853, part of which time he followed farming on 40 acres of land.  They moved to Lenawee County, Mich., where they bought a farm, on which they improved and lived until 1869; they sold out and moved to the present farm, consisting of 156 acres of land, which is nicely improved and worth $75 per acre. Their family consisted of 6 children, viz.:Laura Dorlisia, born July 28, 1846, now Mrs. A. Hooven; Charles Newton, born Sept. 29,1848; Mary Jane, born May 2,1851; Sarah Elizabeth, born June 14, 1856, now Mrs. Jones Vandercook, and Carrie Inez, born April 11, 1861; 1 deceased, Phineas James, born May 25, 1859, and was killed at Battle Creek, Mich., by accident, while standing on the railroad track, Sept. 4, 1879.
    Mr. Farley died Oct. 14, 1870, in his 52d year.  His widow still resides on the farm; most of her family still remain at home with her.

    Elial GALLUP, farmer, section 32, was born in Erie County, N. Y., March 28, 1821, son of John and Polly Gallup, nee Close.  His father was a native of Vermont, and his mother of Ohio.  His mother died when he was only four years of age.  His father was a soldier in the war of 1812.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common school, and remained at home until 24 years of age.  He then commenced farming for himself; was married in 1842, to Electa Dolph.  She was born in the same county and State, March 6,1824.  Their family consists of 4 children, viz.: Reuben E., Albert H., Harriet E. and Sarah.  His father came to Jackson County, Mich., January, 1850, where he bought 270 acres of land, on which he carried on farming until his death, March 4, 1852.  Our subject came to this county Dec. 25, 1865, and purchased the farm he now owns, consisting of 85 acres of land, which he has well improved, worth $75 per acre.  In politics he is an ardent supporter of the Democratic party.

    Allen GREEN, retired, was born in Rhode Island, Oct. 11, 1789; was the 5th child of Ebenezer and Phebe Green, nee Allen.  He died in New York, in 1822, in his 60th year, and his mother died in 1843, in her 93d year.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of New York, attending the academy in Sangerford, New York, for six months.  He then taught school for 16 years in his native State.  In 1835, Dec. 23, he emigrated to Jackson County, Mich., where he purchased land of the Government, and began to open a farm, teaching school during the winter months for three years.  He first bought — acres of Government land, and afterward bought of settlers 280 acres.  He was married in 1820, to Mary Nichols.  She was born in Connecticut, May 10, 1801.  Their family consisted of 4 children.  The living are—Henry Clinton and Hopy, now Mrs. Leonard Hoskins; deceased,—Mary M., died Feb. 10, 1834, and Allen Ogden, April 6, 1873.  He lost his wife June 27, 1879, in her 78th year.  He kept the first hotel ever kept in Napoleon in an early day.  He divided his property among his children and now resides alone in the town of Napoleon, and is in his 92d year.

    Henry G. GREENE, was born in Oneida County, N. Y., October, was the 4th child of Allen and Mary Greene.  Came to Jackson County with his parents in 1835; received his education in the common schools; attended the Albion College.  At 22 he took up the general sale of lime and bought wheat.  He was married in 1870 to Ellen Shea.  She was born in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County.  He now owns 40 acres of land in Napoleon Township, worth $50 per acre, and owns property in the town of Napoleon to the value of $2,000; is a member of the M. E. Church, and also of the A. F. & A. M., No. 301.

    J. C. GRIFFIN, farmer, section 32, was born in Washington County, N. Y. , March 1, 1817, son of Oliver and Louise Griffin, nee Carpenter.  His father was a farmer and contractor in New York.  Took the first contract on the Northern canal, in N. Y. State, and threw out the first shovel of dirt from same.  He followed his occupation until 1836, when he came West and located in Jackson County, where he took the trade of shoemaking, which he followed for many years.  He then moved to Mason, Ingham Co., where in connection with his son, R. F. Griffin, he carried on the manufacturing of boots and shoes until his father's death in 1874, in his 90th year.  His mother died in 1846 in her 52d year.
    The subject of this sketch grew up under many disadvantages.  He received his education principally by odds and ends as he could find time, and when only a boy 11 years of age he worked out by the day and month, and had accumulated up to that time $30, which he had laid away.  He came to Michigan with his father, driving through.  Much of the time it rained and the mud was deep, and they could drive all day and at night look back and see their campfire of the previous night, but by persistent effort they arrived at their destination.  He then set out to work for himself, to obtain a home of his own.  His first work was in a stone-quarry, for which he received $12 per month, and then on a farm.  He continued to work by the day and month until 1843, when he had accumulated some $500.  He bought 80 acres of land on section 5, in Napoleon Township for $600.      In 1845 he was married to Julia Burge.  She was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., April 2, 1826, and was the daughter of Seth and Lucy J. Burge, nee Smith, who came to Jackson County, Mich., in the fall of 1835.  Her father died in 1853, and her mother still resides in Muskegon, with her son.  After their marriage they moved upon his farm.  He has 200 acres, all of which was obtained by his own labor.  His farm is now well improved and worth $100 per acre.  Their family consists of 3 children, Ursulus A., Elmore L. and Arrabell.  His two sons are following after their father's course of life.  They are homesteading land in the great West, in Dakota Territory.  Mr. G. is an earnest Republican, and one of the organizers of the Republican party.

    Silas F. HARVEY (deceased) was born July 25, 1800, near Lake Champlain in Vermont, where his early life was spent in mercantile pursuits.  He came to the Western Reserve in Ohio and was married at Hiram in 1837 to Betsey Henry, daughter of Reuben and Martha (Hawley) Henry, then pioneers of Napoleon, this County.  They came to Napoleon in 1839 and settled four miles west of the village.  Here were born all but their first child—Augusta P., Oct. 26, 1838; the next, Cynthia D., March 13, 1841, and Harriet, May 1, 1843, who died in her seventh year; Rhoda L., born Nov. 22, 1846, and Arthur W., Sept. 22, 1851.  Mr. Harvey died Christmas morning, 1858, after nearly 60 years of exemplary Christian life.  During the 20 years he lived in the neighborhood, he had been the means of maintaining religious worship in the old school-house, and many of the old neighbors remember how his almost inspired words and manner thrilled them the last prayer-meeting before his death.  The eldest daughter, then Mrs. Chas. E. Miller, died, and all her 3 children, in the winter of 1870.  The second daughter, now Mrs. H. F. Thomas, and the youngest daughter, now Mrs. C. H. Bany, reside in Jackson city.  The son, Arthur W., after graduating at the University and the Detroit Medical College, practiced medicine in the County for a few years.  He died, unmarried, at the home of his then eldest sister.  The following lines were written and published at the time:
WE   SHALL   KNOW   AS   WE   ARE   KNOWN.
   To the memory of Dr. Arthur W. Harvey, who died In Jackson, Jan. 30,1876.

We know he died; yet he lives again
Away from suffering and pain,
In some bright clime.
 'Twas only the casket they laid away,
The form we loved that was only clay,
Which God will raise at some future day,
In his own time.

Can he be dead while others live?
 He who loved all the earth could give
Of happiness and bliss?
Ah, no! but in the angel's land,
He lives where the redeemed stand,
A pure and spotless white-robed band,
In a brighter world than this.

And though our hearts keep asking,
why In early manhood he must die,
While others stay,
A voice comes down through all the years
Whispers sweet words to calm our fears,
And through the mist of falling tears
Shows us God's way.

A way that seems so dark and still—
We wonder can it be God's will,
This cruel pain ?—
This yearning, longing just lo know
Where heaven is,—the wish to go
With him away; we loved him so;
But all in vain.

No answer comes—no gleam of light;
God keeps His plans from mortal sight,
Nor tells us why.
By faith and not by sight we go
Along this earthly path below;
This mystery we may not know
Until we die.

Then we shall know as we are known,—
Know why our lives with grief are sown;
Shall know why Arthur died;
Shall see the weary way he trod
Was the narrow way marked out by God;
Then wait, and bow beneath the rod;
We'll know beyond the tide.

Then trust in Jesus, dry your tears;
He is better far than all our fears;
It is all right.
No pain can come to Arthur there,
Temptation can not come, nor care,
No shadows in that land so fair,—
No gloom of night.

Arthur has gone; his work is done;
Life's battles fought, the victory won;
While we must wait.
It matters not how rough the way,
How wild the storms, how dark life's day,
If the path but lead along the way
To heaven's gate.

There we shall meet loved ones at last,
Earth's wrongs made right, all sorrows past—
Each heart all purified.
We'll meet the loved again in heaven,
Where sweetest ties can ne'er be riven,
Where angels live and crowns are given,
Where all are satisfied.

C. D. T.

    B. P. HAWLEY, miller, cider and jelly manufacturer, was born in Greene County, town Baltimore, N. Y., July 15, 1837, son of James P. and Nancy Hawley, nee Vanstyke.  He was raised on a farm, and educated in the common schools of New York.  At the age of 20 years he commenced to do for himself, working out by the month and day; came to Jackson County and worked one year for J. V. Carmer, then commenced to farm for himself; worked on shares two years; bought 40 acres of land, afterward adding 40 more, on which he farmed five years; sold out and followed blacksmithing and wagon-making two years; followed threshing during the fall and in the winter.  Manufactured the Hawley Grape-Vine Grain Cradle five years; sold out, and in the spring of 1875 built the mill, at a cost of $5,000, consisting of two run of burrs; the following year he added to his mill the cider and jelly machines, at a cost of $2,000, and can manufacture 100 barrels of cider per day. During the year 1880 he made up 29,000 bushels of apples, which made 3,600 barrels of cider, and 10,000 gallons of jelly.  The mill has a capacity of 100 bushels of wheat per day; 200 of corn and oats.  He was married Jan. 18, 1861, to Mary K Hawley, daughter of C. L. Hawley; she was born in this County, Jan. 18, 1838.  Their family consists of 3 children—Erwin, Arthur and Homer.  His mill and home property is worth at a fair valuation, $9,000.  He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. at Napoleon, and is identified with the Republican party and its interests.

    Frank J. HAWLEY, butcher, was born in Greene County, N. Y., June 25, 1848, son of James P. and Elizabeth H. Hawley, nee Bedell.  His father was a farmer and a native of Connecticut; his mother of New York.  His father moved to New York when young, where he was raised on a farm and educated in the common schools.  In 1860 he moved to Jackson County, where he continued to farm until his death, in April, 1866.  His mother moved to the village of Napoleon, where she now lives with her son Frank, who was educated in the common schools of Jackson County.  He continued to follow farming until 1877, then took up the butcher trade in Napoleon, and continues to carry on the same in connection with Russell Talmage.

    Charles L. and Henry, sons of Lyman and Jerusha HAWLEY, were natives of Connecticut.  Their father was born Dec. 8, 1787, and died April 20, 1875, in his 88th year; their mother was born Jan. 5, 1788, and died in 1848, in her 62d year.  Charles L. was born in Leyden, Lewis Co., New York, May 9, 1811, and Henry was born March 26, 1813.  They were educated in the common district schools of their native County.  In 1834 their father came to this County, where he carried on the trade of carpenter and joiner, which occupation the sons followed.  They continued to work at their trade with their father for many years, until their father's health failed; they then continued the business alone.  They bought 40 acres of land and carried on farming during summer, and worked at their trade during the winter months.  In 1850 they commenced the manufacturing of the grape-vine cradle; they fitted up a shop with engine, and have continued the business to the present time, finding ready sale for all they can make.  They now own 215 acres of land, which is worth $75 per acre.  March 5, 1837, Charles L. was married to Emily Griffin, daughter of Oliver and Louisa Griffin, natives of Massachusetts; she was born Sept. 30, 1831; their family consisted of 1 daughter—Mary R., born Jan. 19, 1838, now Mrs. Perry Hawley.  July 7, 1880, Mrs. H. died.  Henry was married Sept. 18, 1844, to Amelia M. Griffin, sister to his brother's wife; she was born May 18, 1825, in New York, and they had 1 son— Wallace A., born March 11, 1848, and was married Jan. 10, 1871, to Mary E. Russell, born in New Jersey, and died May 30, 1871.  They have always lived together in the same house, and eaten at the same table.  They have spoons that have been in constant use over 100 years, and a tobacco box that was carried in the old Revolutionary war by Phineas Carrey.

    Silas P. HUTCHINSON, retired, was born in New York, May 20, 1811; son of Amaziah and Betty A. (Mack) Hutchinson, who were classed among the early settlers of Ithaca, on the head of Cayuga lake, in 1813; he emigrated to Ohio, where he died in 1823.  He was a fuller and dyer by trade, which he carried on until his death; he was in his 60th year.  His mother died in Ohio, in 1852, in her 75th year.  The subject of this sketch received his first schooling in the common schools of Ohio; attended the academy at Worthington, Ohio, three months during the winter season; at 17 years of age he returned to New York, and attended the academy at Ithaca for three years; he then clerked in a store for one year; he bought an interest in the store and carried it on five years; sold out his interest and moved to Franklin County, Ohio, where he again followed the same business five years; he again sold out his stock of goods and moved to Calhoun County, Mich., for a short time; carried on blacksmithing at Manchester, with other branches of business until 1849; came to Napoleon, where he again took up the mercantile business, which he followed 20 years; gave up the business, on account of his deafness.  He was married in 1833, in New York, to Armenia F. Crane, who was born in 1810, and died in the town of Manchester, Mich., in 1846.  Their family consisted of 3 children—Eugene W., enlisted in the 1st Reg. of Michigan, Engineers and Mechanics, in 1861, and died in May, 1862, at Huntsville, Alabama; Lyman A. was drowned in the mill pond at Manchester, in 1844, while at play on the staging; and one daughter, Frances A., now Mrs. B. F. Hawley.  In 1847, Mr. Hawley was again married, to Mary Ann Davis, born in Franklin County, Ohio, Dec. 31, 1818.  They have 2 children: Dwight W., born in October, 1850, and S. P., born in August, 1855.  Mr. Hawley is living a retired life in the village of Napoleon; both are identified with the Baptist Church at that place.

    John S. LEE, blacksmith, was born in Erie County, Penn., Feb. 18, 1852; son of Perry and Rebecca (Blake) Lee, natives of Pennsylvania.  His father was a blacksmith by occupation, and John S. in early life learned the same trade, under his father's instruction.  He received his education in the common schools of Mill Village, Erie Co., Penn., where his father still resides.  He continued with his father until he had obtained a thorough knowledge of his trade, when he commenced for himself.  He came to Napoleon and purchased property to the value of $1,600, on which he now lives, his mother resides with him.  Mr. Lee also has a brother, Winfield, who was born Feb. 24, 1847, and is a painter and engineer.  Mr. Lee has a good shop, where he is prepared to do all kinds of work in his line.  In politics he is neutral.

    Isaac I. LEWIS was born in Scottsville, N. Y., Jan. 7, 1834, son of Thomas J. and Dolly (Derby) Lewis.  His father was a farmer; he emigrated to Jackson County in 1836, and located in Napoleon Township; purchased 80 acres of Government land, and lived here until his death in 1863.  His mother died in 1845.  Isaac received his education in the common schools of this County; was only two years of age when he came here.  At the age of 16 he began to learn the carpenter and joiner's trade, which he followed for three years, then purchased a farm and turned his attention to farming for two years; worked at his trade and manufactured wagons, sleighs, cutters and buggies three years; exchanged his farm for town property and followed milling two years; built his mill and commenced the lumber business and planing-mill and carpentering; in four years discontinued the lumber trade and added a saw-mill; then added a second engine, with which he used to saw during the winter months and thresh during the summer.  At the present time it is in the best of order.  He was married in 1856 to Louisa M. Gallup, who was born in this County Dec. 24, 1839.  They have had 5 children; the living are—Minnie F., now Mrs. Myron J. Laflare; Horace M. and Morris H., twins, and Nellie.  Eugene died in 1862.

    Rev. Frank S. LYON was born in Fairfield County, Conn., Dec. 7, 1848.  In his infancy his parents moved to Tompkins County, N. Y., where he was reared to manhood and educated at Trumansburg Academy and Madison University, at Hamilton, N. Y.  He was ordained a minister of the gospel according to the usages of the regular Baptist Church at Attica, Seneca County, O., April 4, 1872, where he remained as the Pastor of the Baptist Church three years, the Church prospering under his ministry.  In 1875 he accepted a call from the Baptist Church at Manchester, Washtenaw Co., Mich., to which place he removed, and completed a successful pastorate of about three years.  At Manchester he was for weeks hovering on the line of the valley of death under a very severe attack of typhoid fever; during his convalescence he was called to the pastorate of the Baptist Churches of Napoleon and Brooklyn, Jackson County; accepting the call, the brethren of said Churches removed him and his family to Napoleon, amply providing for them, where he now resides, having been pastor here over three years, accomplishing much good and holding the esteem and confidence of the community at large, and the love and respect of the Church of which he still holds the pastorate.  Soon after his ordination Elder Lyon was married to Miss Hattie A. Crawford, daughter of W. J. Crawford, M. D., of Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, Oct. 9, 1872. The fruits of this marriage are 3 children—Mary E., William C. and Florence.  Rev. F. S. Lyon is the eldest son of Charles and Mary Lyon, who bore 6 children, 4 of them boys, and 2 girls, all of whom are grown to man and womanhood and in active pursuits of life.  The mother is living, and is a vigorous woman, but the father gave himself to his country to maintain right and liberty in 1861; was taken prisoner by the rebels and starved to death in Andersonville prison Feb. 10, 1865, leaving his family with a humble home but no means of support save the pension of the common soldier.  These circumstances threw Frank S. Lyon on his own resources, and without aid he worked and obtained his education by perseverance and trust in God.  He is of a vigorous physical make-up, of bilious-sanguine temperament, stands nearly six feet high, dark complexion, weighs 170 pounds, of good mental make-up, a strong, useful man, successful in winning souls and building up Churches under his charge; only 32 years of age.  We may reasonably expect of him usefulness and prominence.

    C. D. MORSE, farmer, section 36, was born in Nunda, Livingston Co., N. Y., June 4, 1835, son of D. D. and Susan (Van Winkle) Morse, who were natives of N. Y.  The subject of this sketch received his education in New York, and learned the trade of wheelwright with his father, for whom he worked until coming to this State.  He was married to Mary C. Noble.  She was born Dec. 15, 1844, and was the daughter of Leonard and Anna Noble, who came to the State of Michigan and located in Livingston County in 1835.  In 1873 they moved back to Connecticut, and her mother died Feb. 8, 1875, and was brought back to the State of Michigan for burial.  He now owns 121 1/2 acres of land, which he has well improved, and worth $60 per acre.  They are both members of the Baptist Church at Napoleon, and politically he is a Republican.

    D. D. MORSE, farmer, section 32, was born in Essex County, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1809, son of Dr. D. and Pearl (Marks) Morse.  They were natives of Hartford, Conn., and moved to Eastern New York in an early day, where they located on a farm, and resided until 1819; they moved to the western part of New York, where they continued to farm until their death.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of New York; in those days they had to labor under many disadvantages which the rising generation of today knows little of, and by his diligence in study he attained a good business education.  He worked at home with his father until he was 13 years old.  He then worked for three years in a cotton factory, where he learned the trade of wheelwright, which he followed from 1825 to 1854.  He was married in 1833 to Susan Van Winkle.  She was born in New Jersey, March 18, 1810.  They had a family of 4 children, 2 of whom are living—Charles D. and Clara S., now Mrs. Wright.  In the spring of 1854 they came to Jackson County, Mich., and bought a farm of 80 acres, where he engaged in farming.  His wife died Feb. 10, 1872, and he was again married, May 7, 1873, to Emeline Barrett, who was the widow of John E. Drake.  She was born in the town of Mason, Hillsborough Co., N. H., June 28, 1817.  She had by her former marriage 4 children.  He and wife are members of the Baptist Church; he is a Republican in politics.

    Court R. PALMER, farmer, was born in Madison County, N. Y., Oct. 14, 1833, son of Joshua G. and Esther Palmer, nee Randall.  His father and mother were natives of Connecticut, and came to New York in an early day, where they lived until his mother's death in the town of Lexington, Conn., in 1839.  His early occupation was that of a farmer.  He died at the home of his son, who is the subject of this sketch, Jan. 16,1868.  Mr. P. was raised on a farm in New York State, and educated in the common schools, and in 1863 came to the State of Michigan, where he bought land on section 1, where he now resides.
    He was married in 1863 to Miss Augusta Carr; she was born in Michigan.  Their family consists of 3 children—Lewis Grant, Walter Sherman and Herbert Frink.  He is Supervisor of his township, and the owner of 172 1/2 acres of land.  Is a member of the Baptist Church at Napoleon, and a leading citizen in the township, and one who has used his ability to aid in the collection of the matter pertaining to the township history of Napoleon.

    Martin F. PALMER, farmer, was born in Madison County, N. Y., March 1, 1839, son of Joshua G. and Esther Palmer, nee Randall.  His father was a farmer in York State, born in Connecticut; his mother of the same nativity.  His father died in 1868, his mother in 1849.  The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm, and came to the State of Michigan in 1854.  He returned to New York, and was married in 1856 to Mary Farley.  She was born in Madison County, N. Y.  He returned to his home in Michigan, where he continued farming.  He made several changes, when in 1869 he located on the present farm, consisting of 109 acres, and 25 acres on Stone lake.  The family consisted of 4 children—Llewellen, Edward E., Charles M. and Maria, deceased.  His present weight is 375 pounds, and has weighed 396.  His wife weighs 225, and one son that weighs 250, an aggregate of 850 pounds.  Mr. P. claims to be the first man in the State of Michigan that started to make the famous cider jelly, which he first made in 1862.  He converted 500 barrels of cider into jelly in 1880.  They are all members of the M. E. Church at Napoleon.

    Henry PELHAM, farmer, section 35, was born in Delaware County, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1834; was the son of Richard and Abigail (Every) Pelham.  They were natives of New York.  He came to Jackson County, Mich., in the fall of 1835, and located in Columbia Township; he was one of three who built the Brooklyn Mill.  He was educated in the schools of Jackson County, and remained with his father until he was 21 years of age; he then was married, in 1855, to Ellen Bolton.  She was the first white female child born in Branch County, Mich., May 1, 1830, and was the daughter of Abram F. and Lydia Bolton.  They had a family of 6 children, 3 of whom are now living—Walter B., Charles W. and James H.; Deceased—Mary L., Richard B., and Aby A.  Mrs. B. previous to her marriage, was a school-teacher, her husband being one of her pupils.  Mr. P. bought the first steam-thresher brought into the township, and has been engaged in threshing since 1861.  He and wife are members of the Baptist Church at Napoleon.

    Albert H. REED, M. D., physician and surgeon, was born in Washtenaw County, Michigan, Nov. 25, 1842, son of Nathan and Mary (Wilber) Reed; his father was a native of New York, and a farmer.  He emigrated to Jackson County in 1833, where he engaged in farming.  His mother died Sept. 8, 1858; she was in her 37th year.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the schools of his native County.  Enlisted in the 24th Michigan Infantry in 1865, and served until the close of the war, when he returned home and engaged in farming, which he followed for two years.  He entered the State University at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and graduated from that institution in 1870; he then commenced the practice of medicine in the town of Jefferson, Columbia Township, where he continued for two and one-half years, and in April, 1876, he came to Napoleon, where he now has a large practice.  He was married in 1867 to Julia A. Phelps.  She was born March 28, 1845, in New York.  Their family consists of 1 child—Jessie, born May 17,1873; they are members of the Congregational Church at Napoleon.

    Wm. H. REXFORD was born at Hartford, Washington Co., N. Y., Jan. 3, 1821.  He was the son of Roswell and Eunice Rexford.  When but six years old he, with his parents, removed to Johnsburg, Warren Co., N. Y., where he remained until he was 17 years of age, when he returned to his native town.  His education was obtained under the disadvantages incident to the times.  He was married to Harriet N. Lane, of Crown Point, N. Y., Dec. 5,1839.  She was born at Fisher's Field, N. H., Jan. 8, 1821, and was the daughter of Robert and Betsey Lane.  They settled at Johnsburg, where they resided until 1844, when they came to Michigan,—a trip not so quickly or easily accomplished then as now.  And it was only after a long and tiresome journey by canal, and an extremely rough voyage on Lake Erie, that they landed at Detroit on a beautiful Sabbath morning in July.  From thence they came to Grass Lake by rail, and from there to Napoleon with teams.  Where may now be seen fertile farms and comfortable houses, they found a forest and occasionally a log house.  But time and labor have made the "wilderness blossom as the rose."  His occupation is that of farmer and mechanic.  In politics he has ever taken a deep interest, being originally a Whig.  He was one of three who first voted the Abolition ticket in his native town, and has had the satisfaction of witnessing the fulfillment of the promises of the party platform.  Since the organization of the Republican party, he has ever identified himself with its interests.  He has discharged the duties of various town offices satisfactorily, and has also filled important Church offices.  Both he and his wife have been members of the Baptist Church since an early day.  With all their toilsome efforts to cultivate and beautify their home, they forgot not the command to ''multiply and replenish the earth."  Their family consisted of 9 children, 7 of whom are now living, the eldest being Jennie M., now Mrs. J. T. Schofield; Roswell B.; Nellie A., now Mrs. S. T. Hooker; Alma L., now Mrs. A. McColl; Alta M., now Mrs. H. R. Tibbetts; Arthur F., and Cora E.

    W. H. RILEY, farmer, section 35, was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., Jan. 5, 1819, son of Sylvester and Abigail Riley, nee Brown.  They were natives of Connecticut, and he was a farmer.  Settled in New York about 1816.  In 1836 he moved to Jackson County, Michigan, and located in Napoleon Township, where he entered Government land, and farmed until his death in 1861, at the age of 77.  His mother died in 1859, in her 69th year.  The subject of this sketch received his education in New York State, and located in this County at the age of 16; remained with his father until he was of age.  In 1842 he was married to Jane Mix.  She was born in Tompkins County, N. Y., Aug. 30, 1822, and was the daughter of Daniel and Elsie Mix, nee Miller.  They  were natives of New York, and moved to Jackson County in 1835 and located in Napoleon Township.  Her father died Jan. 15, 1878, and her mother, Jan. 16, 1879.  The family of Mr. E. consisted of 8 children, of whom 7 are now living—George F., Sylvester A., Mortimer E., Nettie, Ella, Rosa, Willie, and Ida Jane (deceased.)  He now owns 120 acres of land, on which he lives, being the old homestead of his father's, and worth $50 per acre.  Politically, he is Republican.

    Tomma H. RUSSELL, son of Tertilles and Anna Russell, was born Nov. 2, 1823, in Dutchess County, N. Y.; in 1825 his parents moved to Tompkins County, in 1831 to Cuyahoga County, in the State of Ohio, and in 1835 to Napoleon, Jackson Co., Mich.  He lived with his parents on a farm of 80 acres, bought of the Government, until 21 years of age.  The five years following he attended district school in winter and worked by the month as a farm hand during the summer, running a threshing machine through the fall months.  At the end of that time he rented a farm for three years.  The death of his father occurred Aug. 26, 1850; from that time worked the homestead in addition to the farm rented.  Tomma H. Russell was united in marriage to Mary A. Robinson, Jan. 21, 1852.  His wife was a daughter of Rev. Robert Robinson, of Addison, Pa.  His mother died Sept. 24, 1852; after her death bought out the heirs of the old homestead.  There were 11 children, 4 girls and 7 boys.  His wife, Mary A. Russell, died Dec. 27, 1859, leaving 1 daughter.  The death of 2 little girls, Alma and Laura, occurred previous to this, during the year 1859.  T. H. Russell was married to Myra B. Hendy, daughter of Col. John Hendy, of Elmira, N. Y, on the 26th day of March, 1862.  The result of this union was 5 children, 4 boys and 1 girl, only the eldest, Arthur A., and the youngest, Clara A., remaining; the twins, Carl and Carlton, died in September, 1870, and Lewis G. in February, 1872.  T. H. Russell now owns a farm of 161 acres of land, worth $75 per acre; carried on farming, and for the last three years has bought wheat at Napoleon with C. C. Smith.

    J. T. SCHOFIELD was born Aug. 1, 1835, at Winsted, Litchfield Co., Conn., and came to Michigan in 1837; was married to Miss Jennie Rexford, Sept. 25, 1862, who was born Dec. 8, 1840, at Warrensburg, N. Y., and came to Michigan in 1843.  Willie E., their eldest son, was born at Napoleon, Mich., March 5, 1864, and Lena A. was born Aug. 7, 1865, at the same place.  J. T. purchased 90 acres of land on section 19, in the winter of 1862, which he owned until May 28, 1870, when he bought the Napoleon Hotel, which he has since occupied, excepting two years.  In connection with this hotel, he is also engaged in the sale of agricultural implements, etc.

    A. R. SMITH, stock dealer, Napoleon, was born in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., March 25, 1842, son of Benjamin and Rosanna Smith, nee Crabbe.  They are natives of New York, and resided there until 1867, when they came to Jackson County, Mich., where they located in the town of Napoleon.  The subject of this sketch was educated in the schools of New York, and came to Jackson County in 1865, where he engaged in farming for a number of years.  He then sold out his farming interest and engaged in the stock business.  He ships to Detroit, Chicago and Buffalo, has shipped during 1880, 40 cars of stock; handled during the year 1880, 3,000 sheep, 1,000 hogs, besides a number of horses.  He was married in 1863 to Louisa Keene; she was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., in 1844.  Their family consists of 2 children— Cora L., born Jan. 10, 1866, and Willie R, born Oct. 10, 1872.  He now resides in the town of Napoleon, and is a member of A. F. & A. M.

    C. C. SMITH, farmer and grain dealer, section 32, was born in Aurelius, Cayuga Co., N. Y., Nov. 25, 1815, son of David and Tamaisa Smith, who was born in Connecticut and moved to New York in an early day.  His mother died when he was only 14 years old, and his father four years later, leaving him almost alone in the world.  His education was obtained in the schools of New York.
In 1834 he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for many years.  In 1840 he was married to Harriet Van Winkle, who was born in 1819.  They came to Michigan in 1852, and located in Jackson County, where he bought a farm of 195 acres.  Their family consisted of 9 children, 8 of whom are living—Eliza J.; Caroline, now Mrs. W. Homes; Antoinette, now Mrs. Steven Allen; Emeline, now Mrs. Richard Bronk; Susan, now Mrs. Arand Bonker; Grace, now Mrs. Vernon Cromwell; Charlotte, now Mrs. Luman Dunton, and Lucy.  He lost his wife April 27, 1860, and married in 1861 Mrs. Eusebia Butler, who was born in Adamsville, Washington Co., N. Y., in 1818.  She had by her former marriage 2 children—Geo. William and Charles H.(deceased).  Mr. S. has a farm under good cultivation and worth $75 per acre.  They have been identified with the Baptist Church for many years.  He is an ardent Republican.

    Rev. Wm. H. SMITH was born in the town of Islip, Suffolk Co., N. Y., on Long Island, 60 miles east of New York city.  He was the son of Israel and Julia Smith, nee Terrill.  He came to Michigan with his father May 10, 1835, and located on the farm he now owns, consisting of 168 acres.  He was reared on a farm, and educated in the schools of this County.  He was married in 1843 to Lydia Tooker, who was born in the city of New York, in 1825.  By this marriage they had 1 child, and in 1844 he lost his wife, and was again married in 1849, to Maria Meeks; who was born in Western New York in 1827, and they had a family of 8 children, 4 of whom are still living, viz.: Gilbert H., Charles C, Frank C. and Cora E.  The 4 deceased are Jesse P., Elizabeth, Maria and Lydia.  In January, 1866, he lost his mother, in her 76th year.  His father died in his 94th year.  In 1853 he took up the ministry as local preacher for the M. E. Church, and for 30 years he has continued to labor in the cause of Christ.  He is now the owner of the farm his father first bought when he came to the County, and on it resides.  He now owns 167 acres of land, which he has under good cultivation, and well improved; is a member of the A. F. & A. M. at Napoleon, and is identified with the Republican party.

    Eli A. STEPHENSON, farmer, section 4, was born in the town of Middlesex, Yates Co., N. Y., Feb. 25, 1832, and was the son of John and Sarah Stephenson.  His father was a native of England, and came to America in 1827, and was married Aug. 23, 1829; his mother was born in Kingston, Rhode Island, June 30, 1810 ; they continued to farm in New York State until 1835.  He came to Jackson County, Mich., where he entered Government land and began farming, which he continued up to his death, Oct. 25, 1879.  His mother still resides on the old homestead with her son.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of this County; and remained on the farm with his father until he was 21 years of age.  He then learned the carpenter and joiner's trade with Harmon Russell, with whom he worked for 15 years.  He then bought a farm of 20 acres, and has continued to add to it until he now has 310 acres, which he has well improved with good buildings, and worth $60 per acre.  He was married in 1859 to Henrietta Covert, who was born in 1837, the daughter of Ralph and Margaret Covert, Nee Monday.  They have 5 children, viz.: Thomas Barron, Margaret, Elmer E., Ralph C. and Leroy V.  They are members of the M. E. Church at Napoleon, and politically he is a Democrat.

    John STEPHENSON (deceased) was born in England, near Lancaster, Aug. 23, 1800, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Stephenson.  In 1827 they emigrated to America and located in New York Aug. 23, 1829.  He was married to Sally Perriman, who was born in Kingston, R. I., June 30, 1810.  After their marriage they continued to farm in New York until 1835, when they came to this County, where they located on a farm which he entered of the Government in Napoleon Township, on section 27, consisting of 120 acres.  He continued to farm until his death, Oct. 25, 1879, in his 80th year.  Their family consisted of 7 children, of whom 4 are now living, viz.: Eli A., Sally, now Mrs. C. H. Russell; John, and James C.  The 3 deceased are—Thomas, Louisa and Martha C.  Mrs. Stephenson remains on the homestead with her son, James O, in her 71st year.  He was born Nov. 8, 1839, and married Sarah R. Reynolds, who was born in Franklin Township, Lenawee County Mich., Aug. 20, 1843; their family consists of 2 children— Cecelia A., born March 11, 1869, and Maud, born Feb. 21, 1881.  He now owns 120 acres of land, which was the homestead of his father, and worth $60 per acre.  Mr. S. is a Republican.

    Christopher WATERSTREET, farmer, section 30, was born in Prussia, Nov. 27, 1825, son of Christopher M. and Anna M. (Sweeden) Waterstreet, natives of Prussia, where his father died.  His mother, who emigrated to America in 1853, and located in New York on a farm, died in October, 1864.  The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of Prussia, and worked on a farm; came to America in 1853, and in 1856 he was married to Elizabeth Knapp, who was born in Glenville, Schenectady Co., N. Y., Sept. 3, 1815.  After their marriage they continued to farm in New York.  In 1866 they came to this County, and engaged again in farming, buying 100 acres, on which they now reside.  They are members of the R. F. G. Church.  Politically Mr. W. is a Democrat.  Mrs. W. has now in her possession a few old relics which have been in the family over 150 years:—patter plate, old-fashioned warming-pan (which is a curiosity to see), a pair of candlesticks and snuffers that her mother had when she first kept house in 1805, an old dictionary which bears the date of 1800, and a Bible that has the date of  1813.

    D. J. WINCHELL, livery-keeper, was born in this township Dec. 18, 1839, a son of Aaron and Louisa Winchell, wee Griffin.  His father's occupation was that of a farmer.  He was a native of Vermont and came to this county in 1833, where he followed farming until his death in 1863.  His mother still lives on the old homestead, and is nearly 70 years old.  He was raised on a farm and received his principal education in the common schools, with the exception of one year, in which he attended the Leoni college.  In 1862 he was married to Almira H. Lewis, who was born in New York in 1844.  They have had 3 children—Reed G., Cora. C. and Fay.  He owns 160 acres of land in Napoleon Township, worth $50 per acre, besides the property in the town of Napoleon, in which he lives.  He now is engaged in the livery, feed and sale business, in which he aims to supply the demand of all in that line.  Mrs. W. is a member of the Baptist Church at Napoleon. 

 



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