WELCOME
To
Mayfield
Lapeer County Michigan



Mayfield, MI (Arbutus Lake Inn) (1940s) - Contributed by Paul Petosky

(Source: History of Lapeer (prominent men and pioneers)
H.R. Page & Co Chicago 1884)

Mayfield is bounded on the north by Deerfield, east by Arcadia, south by Lapeer and west by Oregon. The township originally contained a large quantity of pine and some of the most extensive lumbering operations in the county have been carried on here. The pine forests, however, have disappeared, the manufacture of lumber has ceased to be an industry and agriculture has become the pursuit.

There are several small lakes in the township, and the south branch of the Flint River flows across the southwest corner.

LAND ENTRIES PRIOR TO 1841.
TOWNSHIP 8 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST

Section 6. James Turrell, April 18, 1836
Section 7. James Miner, April 18,1836
Section 7. Charles Rich, May 2, 1836.
Section 7. Ezra Coo, June 9, 1836.
Section 7. George A. Sorenborger, June 9, 1836.
Section 8. James Miner, April 18, 1836.
Section 8. James Turrell. April 18, 1836.
Section 9. Douglas Houghton, May 10, 1836.
Section 10. Douglas Houghton, May 10, 1836.
Section 11. Douglas Houghton, J. A. Wells and H. G. Hubbard, June 27, 1836
Section 11. William Morris and Benjamin B. Morris, September 14, 1886.
Section 12. Douglas Houghton, H. G. Hubbard and J. A. Wells, July 6, 1836.
Section 13. Douglas Houghton, H. G. Hubbard and J. A. Wells, July 6, 1836.
Section 14. Douglas Houghton, H. G. Hubbard and J. A. Wells. July 6. 1836.
Section 14. Henry Isaacs, June 11, 1886.
Section 15. William and Benjamin B. Morris, September 14, 1886.
Section 15. Ralph 0. Markham, October 11, 1836.
Section 17. James Miner, April 18, 1836.
Section 17. James Turrell, April 18, 1836.
Section 17. Charles A. Carpenter, June 10, 1836.
Section 17. Alta E. Mather, June 16, 1836.
Section 18. John Thomas, March 10, 1836.
Section 18. Nathan Dickinson, Wm. H. Imlay and George Beach, May 2, 1836.
Section 18. Alta E. Mather, June 16. 1836.
Section 18. Stephen Thomas, July 2, 1836.
Section 18. Ira Runnels, July 14, 1836.
Section 18. Minor Y. Turrell, December 19, 1836.
Section 18. Ralph Gates, January 28, 1837.
Section 19. Richard Arms, October 8, 1835.
Section 19. Noah H. Hart, October 28, 1835.
Section 19. Richard Arms, November 9, 1835.
Section 19. Increase Van Deusen, November 9, 1835.
Section 19. John Evans, Increase Van Deusen, March 10, 1836.
Section 20. Gresham M. Williams and John Winder, March 7, 1836.
Section 20. James Miner, April 18, 1836.
Section 20. James Turrell, April 18, 1836.
Section 20. Nathan Dickinson, Wm. H. Imlay, George Beach May 2, 1836.
Section 20. James Turrell, May 6, 1836.
Section 20. Charles A. Carpenter, June 16, 1836.
Section 21. Asa Hill, July 29, 1834.
Section 21. Martin Stiles. Jr., January 26, 1836.
Section 21. Stephen Grant, April 1, 1836.
Section 21. James Turrell, April 18, 1836.
Section 21. John P. Cleveland, April 21, 1836.
Section 22. Patrick Senily, October 29, 1835.
Section 22. Stephen Grant, April 1, 1836.
Section 22. Increase Vandeusen, February 23, 1837.
Section 23. Henry Isaacs, June 1, 1836.
Section 23. John Shafer, March 16, 1837.
Section 24. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 10, 1836.
Section 25. C.C. Benjamin and J. Boutwell May 13, 1836
Section 25. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 16, 1836.
Section 26. Charles and Gasca Rich, May 16, 1836.
Section 26. Henry Isaacs and John Stevens, May 16. 1836.
Section 26. Henry Isaacs, June 1, 1836.
Section 26. Jeremiah Dunn, June 20, 1836.
Section 26. Lorenzo Spaulding, June 20, 1836.
Section 26. James Churchman, June 27, 1836.
Section 27. Patrick Scully. October 29, 1835,
Section 27. Stephen Grant April 1, 1836.
Section 27. Harvey Isaacs and John Stevens, May 16, 1836,
Section 27. David M. Woodin, November 15, 1836.
Section 27. John Shafer, November 18, 1836.
Section 27. Increase Vandeusen, January 20, 1837.
Section 27. Increase Vandeusen, February 23, 1837.
Section 28. Albert G. Southwell, May 26, 1832.
Section 28. Samuel Merlin, June 11, 1833.
Section 28. Polly Gotee, August 29, 1835.
Section 28. Joint Storum, October 16, 1835
Section 28. Isaac Anderson, November 4, 1835.
Section 28. Stephen Grant, April 1, 1836.
Section 28. Chris Logan, September 14, 1836.
Section 28. Amasa Nash, September 30, 1836.
Section 29. Martin F. Southwell, May 26, 1832.
Section 29. Christopher Logan, November 27, 1833.
Section 29. Ebenezer Watkins, February 6, 1834.
Section 29. Nathan Hurd, May 10, 1834.
Section 29. Nathan Hurd, July 11, 1834.
Section 29. Allen Goodale, May 9, 1835.
Section 29. Isaac Goodale, May 9, 1835.
Section 29. John Storum, October 18, 1835.
Section 29. Isaac Goodale, November 10, 1885.
Section 29. Noah H. Dan, December 3, 1835.
Section 29. Isaac Goodale, January 19, 1837.
Section 30. Isaac Goodale, November 10, 1835.
Section 30. O. B. Hart, February 12, 1836.
Section 30. O. B. and Alvin N. Hart, February 12, 1836.
Section 30. Edward W. Peck, April 20, 1836.
Section 30. Aaron Rood, July 1, 1836
Section 30. Isaac Goodale, January 19, 1837.
Section 31. Aaron Horton, September 18, 1835.
Section 31. Daniel Horton, September 18, 1835.
Section 31. Julius Dean, September 29, 1835.
Section 31. Cornelius Vosburgh, September 29, 1835
Section 31. Alonzo Davis, October 30, 1835,
Section 32. Oliver B. Hart, July 1, 1831.
Section 32. Olmsted Chamberlain, December 21, 1884.
Section 32. Benjamin W. Hull, May 23, 1832.
Section 32. John E. Walden, July 9, 1832.
Section 32. Joseph Swift, September 30, 1833.
Section 32. John Ryan, May 5, 1834.
Section 32. John Shaefer, September 29, 1835
Section 32. John Shaefer, October 3, 1835.
Section 33. Olmsted Chamberlain, December 21, 1832.
Section 33. Alvin N. Hart, May 23, 1832.
Section 33. Asael W. Abbott, July 8, 1833.
Section 33. Laura Stone, November 15, 1833.
Section 33. Samuel O. Holmes, June 19,1834.
Section 33. Hezekiah Warren, January 22, 1836.
Section 33. Increase Vandeusen, March 10, 1836.
Section 33. Increase Vandeusen, May 21, 1836.
Section 34. Edward Rice, May 11, 1835,
Section 34. Isaac Evans, October 8, 1835.
Section 34. Asael W. Abbott, February 25, 1836.
Section 34. Clark C. Carpenter, February 25,1836.
Section 34. Andrew Evans, March 1, 1836.
Section 34. Increase Vandeusen, May 21, 1836.
Section 34. Robert Patterson, June 20, 1836.
Section 34. John Pister, July 11, 1836.
Section 34. Benjamin Rice. August 24, 1836
Section 34. John Evans, November 14, 1836.
Section 34. Temperance Turrell. December 19, 1836
Section 35. Jehiel Davis, February 19, 1836.
Section 35. N. Dickinson, William H. Imlay and George Beach, April 2, 1836.
Section 35. Darins Lamson, May 14, 1836.
Section 35. Samuel Weston , November, 15, l836.
Section 36. Levinus C. Davis, January 23, 1836.
Section 36. Clark C. Carpenter, November 19, 1836.
Section 36. Jehiel Davis, December 19, 1836.
Section 36. John Peters, January 18, 1837.
Section 36. George L. Hill, July 21, 1837.

EARLY HISTORY,

The town of Mayfield was organized by act of the legislature, approved March 9, 1843, in the following terms: "All that part of the county of Lapeer, designated by the United States survey, as township north of range 10 east, be and the as hereby set off and organized into a separate township, by the name of Mayfield and the first township meeting shall be held at the school near Martin Stiles in said township.

As this act did not prescribe the time when it should go into operation, the qualified electors of the township present on the first Monday in April, did not think it lawful to hold their town meeting on the day specified in the first section of an act to regulate the town meetings in newly organized towns. They therefore resolved to hold a meeting as soon as the said act should take effect agreeably to part first, title first, chapter first, section second, of the revised statutes, which says every act which does not expressly prescribe the time when it shall go into operation shall take effect on the 30th day after the day, when it shall be approved by the governor. Notices were duly given and signed by John Ryan, Martin Stiles and John b. Evans,freeholders of the township, dated April 8, 1843, to hold a town meeting on Monday the 17th day of April, at the school-house near Martin Stiles' for election of officers. The qualified electors met pursuant to notice and those present between nine and ten a.m. chose Martin Stiles, moderator; Joseph Swift , Orsmus T. Carpenter, Richard Arms and Samuel Murlin, inspectors; the prescribed oath was administered by the Moderator to the inspectors, and by one of the inspectors to the moderator. John Ryan was chosen clerk, and duly qualified.

It was decided to elect by ballot two assessors to assist the supervisor in making the assessment.

The polls were declared open between nine and ten a.m. and were closed by proclamation between three and four p.m.

The result of the election was as follows; For supervisor, John Ryan; received 34 votes; for clerk, Orsmum T. Carpenter; received 334 votes; for justice of the peace, Martin Stiles received 24 votes; James M. Needham, 27; Hervey Thomas, 34; Samuel Murlin, 28; Joseph Swift 9; Amasa Nash, 6 and Thomas Pero, one; for treasurer, John B. Evans received 28 votes and Asahel W. Abbott, 6; for commissioners of highways, Levinns C. Davis received 30 votes, Samuel Murlin, 24; Aaron Horton, three and Amasa Nash 9; for inspector of schools, John Ryan received 34 votes and Christopher Farnsworth, 33; for assessors, Noah G. Farnsworth received 33 votes and Joseph Swift 34; for overseers of the poor, Richard Arms received 34 votes and Isaac Evans, 34; for constables, P. Weston received 30 votes, John B. Evans, 32, Christopher Logan, 19, Wright Goodale twenty-nine, and John Stiles, eighteen. Robert Watson was elected pound master.

The result of the election was duly declared. It was voted to raise $100 for necessary town expenses, and the further sum of $25 for the purchase of a burying ground.

At town meeting in 1845 a vote was had on the question of licensing tavern keepers; eight votes were in favor, and thirty-four against.

March 15, 1849, the township of Mayfield was attached to and made a part of the town of Lapeer. March 13, 1809 all of the township, except that portion included in the limits of the city of Lapeer, was again organized iu) the town of Mayfield, and the first town meeting was held at the school-house near Christopher Farnsworth's.

The first record of highway is headed, "road leading from Abbott's north to Farnsworth and Peck's "being" minutes of a survey made March 31, 1837, for a public highway four rods wide, by order of the commissioners of highways for the township of Lapeer, commencing at the quarter post of section 33 on the south line, running thence north to the quarter post on section 28 of the north side; town No. 8 north, of range 10 east." This is signed by Frank Lumbard and A. W. Abbott, commissioners of highways.

Following this appear the minutes of survey of a continuation of this road one mile north, survey being made November 9, 1837, and Richard Brown and Clark C. Carpenter being commissioners.

The annual report of the school inspectors of the town of Mayfield for the year 1882 shows the number of school children to have been 581, number of school buildings ten. The inspectors of election for the ensuing year were H. D. Rood, W. C. Waterbury, Otha Wiles. Robert Davis, A. J. Decker, C. W. Perkins, Thomas Cliff, C. F. Stroup, B. H. Thompson, C. L. Sheldon.

TOWN OFFICERS.

1843—Supervisor, John Ryan: clerk, Oramus T. Carpenter; treasurer, John B. Evans: number of votes. 34.

1814 Supervisor. John Ryan: clerk, John F. Bray; treasurer, John B. Evans. Number of votes, 30.

1845— Supervisor, John Ryan; clerk. Noah G. Farnsworth; treasurer, John B. Evans. Number of votes, 40.

1846— Supervisor, George S. Osborn; clerk, John Ryan; treasurer, John B. Evans, Number of votes 47.

1847— Supervisor, John F. Bray; clerk; John Ryan: treasurer, Harvey Thomas. Number of votes, 38.

1848— Supervisor, George S. Osborn; clerk, John Ryan; treasurer, Harvey Thomas. Number of votes, 45.

From March, 1849, to March, 1869, Mayfield was a part of the town of Lapeer.

1869 -Supervisor, John B. Evans: clerk. Carlton Peck; treasurer, Harvey Thomas. Number of votes, 144.

1870 - Supervisor, Henry Lee; clerk, Carlton Peek; treasurer, John B. Ryan.

1871— Supervisor. Henry Lee; clerk, George W. Carpenter; treasurer, John B. Evans.

1872- Supervisor, Horace D. Rood: clerk, Daniel Evans: treasurer, John B. Evans.

1878—Supervisor, Henry Lee; clerk. George W. Carpenter: treasurer, Harmon Owen.

1874—Supervisor, Henry Lee: clerk, George W. Carpenter: treasurer, Harmon Owen.

1875—Supervisor, Henry Lee; clerk, James E. Leete; treasurer, George W. Carpenter.

1876 — Supervisor, Henry Lee; clerk, James E. Leete; treasurer, George W. Carpenter.

1877 Supervisor, George W. Carpenter; clerk, James E. Leete; treasurer, Daniel Evans.

1878—Supervisor, George W. Carpenter; clerk, James E. Leete; treasurer, Daniel Evans.

1879--Supervisor, George W. Carpenter; clerk, James E. Leete; treasurer, Charles M. Valentine.

1880— Supervisor, George W. Carpenter; clerk, James E. Leete; treasurer, Charles M. Valentine.

1881— Supervisor, George W. Carpenter; clerk, James E. Leete; treasurer, Daniel Evans.

1882— Supervisor, George W. Carpenter; clerk, William H. Sawtell; treasurer, Daniel Evans,

1888—Supervisor, George W. Carpenter; clerk, William H. Sawtell; treasurer, Benezette C. Hough.

EARLY SETTLEMENT,

The first settler in the township was Asahel W. Abbott, who came in 1833 and settled on section 33. Here he built in 1835 a frame house with lumber from the White mill, the first mill in the county. July 3, 1830, he married Martha L., daughter of Mrs. Martha L. White, who, in 1888, came to Lapeer Township with her family. This was the second marriage in this section of country. Mr. Abbott was by trade a shoemaker and followed this occupation for many years after coming to Lapeer County, his customers coming from all parts of Lapeer county and from adjoining counties. Their nearest grist-mill was Carpenter's lower mill at Paint Creek, twenty-six miles distant, and the grain must be hauled that distance and Hour returned by ox-team in. Mr. Abbott died March 20,1873. His widow still lives on the original homestead and a portion of her residence is the house to which she came a young bride forty-seven years ago.

The same season with Mr. Abbott came Samuel Merlin and Christopher Logan from Oakland Comity. Soon after came Amos Hurd. Isaac Evans, Edward Bice, Samuel 0. Holmes. Among other of the early settlers were John Peters, on section 30, John Hill, section 36, Horace D. Rood, Richard Anus, the latter in the northwest part of the township, Samuel Weston, John B. Evans, on section 84, Warren W. Goodale. Of these there are now living in the township, Samuel Weston, Horace D. Rood, John B. Evans and Warren W. Goodale.

The pioneer preachers of Mayfield and of all this section of country were Rev. O. F. North, of the Methodist Episcopal Church and Rev. Mr. Buggies, of the Congregational Church. The latter was probably the first to hold religions services in the town, in 1884 or 1885.

Fish Lake or Stephens.

This village originated in the business enterprise of Henry Stephens. Having a large amount of pine in this vicinity which from its location was only accessible by railroad, being at a distance from desirable streams he in connection with others, by large personal contributions secured the building of a branch of the Detroit A Bay City Railroad. With Messrs. Currier, Johnson and Townsend of Almont, he built a mill on what was known as Fish Lake, which afterward became the sole property of Mr. Stephens, and which during a period of eight or ten years, manufactured a large amount of lumber and gave employment to about one hundred men.

In February, 1873, the village was described as follows: "Eight miles north of the city of Lapeer there is a small hamlet rapidly attaining the dignity of a village. This place I refer to is Fish Lake. One year ago there was not a habitation upon the spot and the site of the future village, perhaps city, was a vast wilderness of pines. It now has 275 inhabitants, and will soon have railroad communication with the outer world, as a stein of the Detroit & Bay City Railroad is in course of construction to the town. There are twenty-six private residences in the place, one large hotel in process of erection, a store, a shoe shop, a livery stable and a blacksmith shop. In the spring F. A J. Moore, of Detroit, intend to erect a large saw- mill near the town. John Copland, of Detroit, and N. Holland, of Buffalo, N. Y., will also build mills during the season. I have neglected to say there is also one saw-mill in operation, owned by D. Goodrich, of Flint. It turns out thirty-five thousand feet of lumber per day. The pine limber hereabouts is exceedingly tine, and is owned by Messrs. Stephens, Mellen and Tacles, and parties in Detroit. H. H. Smith, the builder of the Detroit A Bay City Railroad, is. I believe, also largely interested in pine land in this vicinity, in consideration of its expectation of a railroad, and from the fact that it is located in a lumber region inexhaustible for half a century to come, I am inclined to believe that the future of Fish Lake is of the most flattering."

Fish Lake is now a village without inhabitants. Its dwelling houses. Hulls, stores, shops and hotel, are tenant less and dismantled, and the active business life of the village is but a memory of the past.

FIVE LAKES

The village of Five Lakes taking its name from the lakes in its immediate vicinity, is in the northeast part of the town of Mayfield. Its origin was much like that of Fish Lake, the railroad which terminates here being extended from Fish Lake through the business necessities and enterprise of the owners of pine lands in the vicinity. Messrs. Piper A Thompson built the first mill here, followed by Sage, Ferry and Lee, and A. B. Royce. The lumber business is now almost a thing of the past. Charles Chapman has a shingle-mill, and McLaughlin a small portable mill, for the manufacture of ties and hardwood lumber. The country being now denuded of its pine, the cultivation of the soil is attracting attention, upon which this place will in the future depend for its prosperity. Many years prior to the lumber enterprises of the place, a post- office was established, with Mr. Stone as postmaster, who also kept a hotel.

THE FIRE OF 1881.

The township of Mayfield was one that suffered from the great fire of September, 1881. A list of losses was made at the time as follows: L. E. Waterbury, one mile of fence; William Peter, damage to pine timber probably $500 or more; no insurance. Henry Stephens, thirty tons hay, new barn, fences, $100. Insurance not ascertained. Alex. Smith, fences, $100. No insurance. Mr Roberts, barn and contents, #150. No insurance. Dr. Harrison, barn and contents, $75. No insurance. Alex. Johnston, of Lapeer, logging shanties, sleighs, &, $200. No insurance. C. F. Stroup, fences; Richard Bliss. fences; Mrs. William Bliss, fences: Dell Brown, fences and timber; P. Ivory, fences, com iu shook and timber; John Danforth, fences and timber; John Lynch, fences and timber; William Roberts, fences and timber; Robert King, timber; J. D. Millis & son, fences, lumber, one mile plank road. No insurance.

BIOGRAPHICAL

C. F. Stroup is a native of Germany, and was born in Wirteinberg in 1814. He emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1818, and settled in Lewis County, N. Y. where he remained till 1838, when he went to Oxford County, Ontario, making that his home until 1851, when he came to Michigan and settled in Berlin, St. Clair County, where he remained one year previous to his coming to this county. After living in several different places in the county, he finally in 1878 purchased l60 acres of land on section 9, in the township of Mayfield, upon which he has since resided. He was married in 1843 to Miss Alzina Hutt, who was a native of the State of New York. They have nine children,--two sons, and seven daughters. Mr. Stroup has been a farmer from his youth up, and in addition to his home farm, owns 160 acres on section 9, and 40 acres on section 16.

Christopher Farnsworth is a native of Worcester County, Mass., where he was born in 1814. He came to Michigan in 1847 with his father's family, and settled on a farm on section 28, township of Mayfield, Lapeer County, where he sill resides. They were the fourth family of actual settlers in the township. As a township official, he has held (he office of highway commissioner, and has also been a notary public. He was married in 1847 to Miss Melissa P. Glidden, a native of Vermont, and has a family of four children, of whom three are married and settled in the township, and a younger son still remains at home.

Daniel Evans was born in what was then Montgomery county N.Y. in 1827 and came to Michigan with his parents in 1840. They first located in the town of Lapeer. Mr. Evans lived at home with parents until twenty-one years of age, and in 1850 purchased and moved on the farm he still occupies, on section 33, in the township of Mayfield which contains eighty acres. He has held the office of treasurer for his township two years. Was married in 1853 to Miss Mary O. Wade, of Oakland County, Mich. Of four children born to them, but one is now living, a daughter, who is now Mrs. C. H. Van Wagoner, of Caro, Tuscola County, Michigan.

Isaac Evans, deceased, was born in the State of Sew York in 1809. He was married in 1826 to Miss Kate Van Dyke, of the same place. Their surviving children are Daniel Evans, of the township of Mayfield, and Mrs. J. L. Vosburg of Lapeer City.

Almon Misener was born near Hamilton, Ontario, in 1848, and when a mere lad came to Michigan with his parents, and settled in the township of Attica, Lapeer Comity. On leaving home Mr. Misener engaged in farming for a time in Oakland County, but in 1870 purchased the farm upon which he still resides, which is situated on section 35, in the township of Mayfield. He was married in 1870 to Miss Rosetta Weston, who died in 1877 leaving one son.

John B. Evans was born in the town of Mayfield, Montgomery County, N. Y., in 1813, and came to Michigan in 1885, reaching Lapeer County on the day the convention met in Detroit to form the State Constitution, which was a year prior to its being admitted. About the year 1855 he was appointed by act of the legislature to organize the township, which he did, giving it the name of Mayfield. He was supervisor of Lapeer when it included ten of the present townships of the county, and has been supervisor and treasurer of the township of Mayfield for many years, in fact has generally held some office in the township sine-; its formation. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for several years, helping to build the first grist-mill in Lapeer City, and afterward worked some time on the State survey, and became what is termed a "land looker," helping to enter nearly all the land in the northern part of the county. About the year 1838 he took up from the government 1211 acres of land on section 34 in the township of Mayfield, and upon which he still resides. He has dealt largely in lands for years, and has owned thousands of acres in his locality. He was married in 1840 to Miss Sarah Willey, of Marathon, which was the first wedding celebrated in that township. They have six children—one son and five daughters. Mr. Evans was actively engaged in recruiting during the lute war, and was appointed by Gov. Blair as recruiting agent for colored troops in the Southern States.

Horace D. Rood was born in Barre, Washington County, Vt., in 1819, and in 1836 came to Lapeer County, Mich., and settled upon eighty acres of land in the township of Mayfield, previously taken up from the government by his father, Aaron Rood. Subsequently he and his brother purchased additional lands in partnership, which included his present farm of 240 acres on sections 38 and 34, and which came to him soon after, when a division was made, and which he has since made his home, adding many improvements in the way of fine buildings and otherwise. Mr. Rood served in 1871 in the State legislature, and has served the township of Mayfield as Supervisor and commissioner of highways, and the county of Lapeer as superintendent of poor, holding the latter office about twenty years. He was married in 1848 to Miss Mary J. Murlin, of Pontiac, Mich. They have four children, one sou and three daughters.

Edward Howard was born in Chemung County, N. Y., and came to Lapeer County, Mich., in 1871. He at first lived two years in Lapeer City, following which he worked a farm in the township of Lapeer two years, and then in 1875 purchased a farm in the township of Mayfield, which he sold in 1878, and bought his present home of eighty acres on section 22. In 1861 he enlisted in the Watkins Dragoons, Col. Gil more commanding, and served with them nine months. He then re-enlisted in the Eighteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry and served three years. He was married in 1871 to Miss Sarah J. Brock, of Erie County, N. Y.

Harmon Owen was born in Columbia County, N. Y., in 1814, He came to Michigan in 1852 and settled on the farm where he now resides in the township of Mayfield, Lapeer County, and first purchased eighty acres of land, which he has increased to 187 acres, lying partly in the townships of Mayfield and Lapeer. He has been treasurer of the township two years. Was married in 1887 to Miss Betsey M. Silvernail, who was also of Columbia County, N. Y., and has had eight children—five sons and three daughters. His third son, Perry Owen, enlisted in the First Michigan Cavalry in February, 1864, and was shot dead at the battle of Cedar Creek, October 10th, of the same year. Mr. Owen has always been a farmer by occupation.

Clarence L. Sheldon was born in Macomb County, Mich., in 1850, his parents being among the earliest settlers of that county. He commenced life for himself when but a mere lad, and has worked up from place to place until now he occupies the position of head-foreman and manager of the extensive lumber yards and mills of Henry Stephens.

A. L. Stephens, business manager for his father (Henry Stephens, of Detroit, Mich.) in his vast mill and lumbering interests in the State will be noted iu an account of his business elsewhere in the work.

Charles W. Perkins was born in Middlesex County, Ont., in 1833, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1845. They settled on what is now the county poor farm, in Lapeer County, and at the age of eighteen he commenced teaching school. In 1858 he took up forty acres of land from the government, on section 33, in the township of North Branch, which he afterward exchanged for village property in Almont, but which he subsequently disposed of and invested in other lands, and from this small beginning grew to be an extensive land speculator in this and adjoining counties, owning at one time over four thousand acres. He owned and resided upon 120 acres of land in the township of Imlay one year and was a resident of Lapeer City ten years. In 1880 he purchased eighty acres on section 21, in the township of Mayfield, where he has since resided. He still owns 260 acres of land in Tuscola County, and interests in other tracts there. He was married in 1859 to Miss Julia A. Rogers, of Imlay. They have nine children, three sons and six daughters. Two sons and one daughter are living in Lincoln, Neb. His father and four brothers saw service in the late war.

D. P. Day was born in Genesee County, Mich., in 1813, and soon after becoming of age he engaged in selling safes as a traveling agent, which he continued two years. He then lived in Clio, Mich., one year, and subsequently in various places throughout the State, being principally engaged in hotel and livery business. In 1877 he purchased a farm in the township of Genesee, Genesee County, which he lived upon until 1881, when he exchanged it for his present hotel stand at Five Lakes, Lapeer County, where he may be found ready at all times to care for the traveling public. He is also engaged in the in manufacture and sale of wire screen milk safes which are being distributed throughout the State. He was married in 1866 to Miss Sarah E. Lash, of the State of New York. They have six children, three sons and three daughters. His father, Sylvester Day, was one of the first settlers in the township of Grand Blanc, Genesee County, Mich.

Dennis Cahill, postmaster and proprietor of general store at Five Lakes was born in Port Byron, Cayuga County, N. Y., in 1854, and came to Michigan in 1871. He first located in Flint, where he remained three years, and afterward spent two years in the employ of Mr. Stephens in his planing-mill. In 1878 he opened a general store at his present place of business, which he has since conducted.

Stephen Carpenter was born in Compton, Lower Canada, in 1829, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1830. They settled on a farm in Oakland County, which they sold in 1840, and then came to the township of Mayfield, Lapeer County, and settled on the farm now owned by G. W. Carpenter. In 1855, he (Stephen Carpenter) purchased 240 acres of land on section 17, in the township of Mayfield, upon which he resided from 1858 to 1863, when he sold out and returned to the homestead for a year. He then purchased his present farm, which he resides upon, and to which he has added until it now contains 145 acres. He also owns on section 7 forty acres of timber land, besides 160 acres in the township of Rich, on sections 24 and 25. He was married in January, 1854, to Miss Eliza A. Richards, of New York, They have three children, one son and two daughters.

G. W. Carpenter, the present (1888) supervisor of the township of Mayfield, was born in the township in 1849. His father, 0. T. Carpenter, came to Michigan in 1880 from Lower Canada, and settled on section 20, in 1840, where Mr. Carpenter now resides. He is now serving his seventh term as supervisor, has been treasurer two terms and township clerk two terms, having been elected to the latter office the year he became of age. He was married in 1870 to Miss Melissa Sawtell, of Mayfield. They have one child, a son. Mrs. O. T. Carpenter, mother of G. W. and Stephen Carpenter, was born in Vermont in 1828, and with her two sous are the only surviving members of the family. Her maiden name was McLeod.

Henry Lee was born in the township of Metamora, Lapeer County, Michigan, where his father, Jesse Lee, settled in 1831, coming there direct from Cattaraugus County, New York. After becoming of age he remained three years on the homestead, and then after spending one year in the west, he purchased a farm in Oakland County, Michigan where he resided two years. He then sold his farm and purchased his present place, in 1867. First bought 100 acres on section 18, in the township of Mayfield, to which he afterward added 180 acres. He has been supervisor of the township seven years and county treasurer four years. He was married in 1862 to Miss Mittie W. Thomas of Mayfield. They have four children, two sons and two daughters.

Warren W. Goodale was born in Tioga County, N. Y., in 1816, and came to Michigan with his parents in 1820. They settled first in Wayne County, but in 1885 came to Lapeer County, and settled on section 29, in the township of Mayfield. His father, took up 240 acres of government land, a portion of which he (Warren W. Goodale) has since resided upon, taking care of his parents until their death. It is perhaps unnecessary to state that they were among the pioneers of this section, and that they came at a time when bear, wolves and wild game abounded. Lapeer City then contained but one frame building. Mr. Goodale has been married three times, first to Miss Elizabeth White, in 1840, and who died in 1860, second to Miss B. C. Perkins, whose death occurred in 1864, and third, to his present wife, Miss Sally Inman, of Macomb County, Mich., whose parents came from the State of New York, and were among the first settlers of that county.

William Callis was born in Keyworth, Leicestershire, England, iu 1832, and came to the United States in 1854. He first located in Schoharie County, N. Y., but soon thereafter came to Michigan, and alter spending a short, time in Groveland and Flint, he in 1855, came to his present location on section 30, in the township of Mayfield, Lapeer Comity. He first purchased forty acres of land, but now owns 175 acres. Has served his township in the capacity of justice of the peace one term. He was married in 1855 to Miss Ellen White, of the same county in which he was born in England. They have two sons and one daughter. Mr. Callis has engaged in the manufacture of bricks as well as in farming since his residence in the county.

E. Allen Goodale, deceased, was born in Tioga County, N. Y., in 1813, and settled in Lapeer County, about 1839, on section 29, township of Mayfield, on land located by his father, and resided there until his death, which occurred in 1879. His widow was formerly Miss Mary Marker, of the State of New York, whom with two sons and one daughter still survive him. O. W. Goodale, son of E. A. Goodale, was born in the State of New York, in 1847, and came with his parents to Michigan, where they settled as above described, and where he has since lived on the land located by his grandfather.

C. V. (Crawford) Austin was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1830, and came to Michigan in 1839. He located first iu Washington, Macomb County, where he followed the trade of a cooper, and in 1878 removed to Marquette, Mich., where he resided until 1880, when he came to Lapeer County, and took charge of the county poor farm. In 1862 he enlisted in Company H. Twenty-second Michigan Infantry, as sergeant, and served to the close of the war. He was married in l861 to Miss Sarah M. McGregor, of Macomb County, Mich. They have one son.

B. C. Hough, who resides on section 29, was born in the township of Almont, Lapeer County, Mich., in 1840, and is a son of Walter K. Hough, who was one of the first settlers there. He is one of a family of twelve children, nearly all of whom are residents of the county. Mr. Hough is the present treasurer of the township and has also been drain commissioner. He was married in 1862 to Miss Maryette Maynard, daughter of William Maynard, formerly of the township of Dryden. Mr. Hough owns a farm of sixty-five acres on the section above named.

William Maynard was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1805, and in 1824 went with his parents to Oxford County, Ontario, where he remained until 1815, when he came to Michigan and settled in the township of Dryden, Lapeer County. He purchased eighty acres of land within one and a half miles of the village of Dryden, building a gristmill thereon, which he ran for eighteen years. He then removed to Romeo, Macomb County, Mich., where he engaged in a general mercantile business. In 1882 he came to the township of Mayfield, and took up his resilience with Mr. Hough on section 29, where he has since resided. He was married in l831 to Miss Maria Brophy (headstone says Brady), of Ontario, Canada. They have one son and two daughters.

Alonzo Conant was born in the town of Pennington, Monroe County, N. Y., in 1814, where he resided, and in the adjoining county of Wayne until 1854, when be came to Michigan and settled in the township of Hadley, Lapeer County. After renting a farm for three years, he purchased a piece of land upon which he resided until he moved to section 19, his present home. He was married to Miss Almina J. Warren, of Wayne County, New York, formerly of Saratoga County, New York. They have three sous and two daughters.

Joseph W. Slater was born in Saratoga County, New York, in 1825 where he lived until he came to Michigan in 1854 with the exception of two years he spent in California, Soon after his arrival in the State he fettled on section 20 in the township of Mayfield, Lapeer County, upon twenty acres of new land which he has increased by subsequent purchase to ninety-five acres. He enlisted in April, 1865, but on account of the war closing, served but six months. Mr. Slater has held the offices of highway commissioner, and drain commissioner. He was married in 1845, to Miss Mary A. Fodder, of Saratoga County, New York, and who died in July, 1877. He was married a second time to Miss Sarah M. Berringer, of Arcadia, Lapeer County.

Samuel Arms was born in Rutland County, Vermont, in 1820. He came to Michigan in 1843, and soon thereafter settled on section 19 in the township of Mayfield, and has added to his original purchase until he now owns 188 acres, sixty-one acres of which is across the township line in Oregon. He is serving his third year as justice of the peace. Mr. Arms was married in 1847, to Miss Julia A. Lathrop, a native of Oakland County, Michigan. They have four sons, of whom one is in Colorado, one still at home, and two living in the immediate neighborhood.