IngersollTownship
Midland County Michigan


Ingersoll Township lies in the south- eastern corner of Midland County. It is numbered 13 north and 1 east, and is bounded on the north by Midland Township, on the east and south by Saginaw County and on the west by Mt. Haley Township. The northeastern part of this township is crossed by the Tittabawassee River, which flows south, then cast into Saginaw County. Ingersoll is reckoned as one of the best agricultural townships in the county, the east half being an especially fine farming district. Ingersoll contains, no towns; it being so short a distance from Midland City, that point is made its chief market. Smith's Crossing, on the boundary line between the two townships as well as between Midland, Saginaw and Bay Counties, is a stopping place for all passenger trains, making it convenient for the farmers going to and from Midland City.

At one time Pay-mos-e-gay, the chief of the Blackbird Indians, made his headquarters on the banks of the Tittabawassee, opposite the farm of John Whitman. The Indians lived there for at least 30 years in undisturbed peace. The bottoms along this river afforded them abundant pasturage for their ponies and abounded with game of all kinds. These lands were accounted their choicest hunting-grounds, and hundreds of deer, bear and smaller game have been captured in its precincts.

John Whitman was the first settler in the township. He located here in 1844, arid his daughter, Jane Whitman, now Mrs. Jos. Barton, of Homer Township, was the first white child born in Ingersoll Township. This event occurred in 1844. John Annabel settled here in 1867. Among other comers were Geo. Davis, Eli Bailey, L. P. Bailey and Joseph Lane.

The township was organized Oct. 1, 1855. The first election was held at the house of David Crampton, Oct. 20, 1855. Charles S. Blodgett. Martin P. Crampton and Esial Chamberlin were the inspectots. The history of the lumber interest in Ingersoll is but a repetition of that of the other townships in Midland County. Hundreds of acres of dead pine still cover the ground in some localities, which will in due time be manufactured into fencing and building material.

The Supervisors of this township have all been good and intelligent men, and many of them have served a number of terms. Their names and terms served are annexed:

SUPERVISORS.

Martin V. Crampton.......1855
Wm. A. Copeland..........1856
S. D. Gaskill...............1857
Charles S. Blodgett.......1858
S. D. Gaskill...............1859-60
Augustus Crownover.......1861
S. D. Gaskill...............1862-4
Wm. P. Petteplace........1865-71
S. D. Gaskill...............1872
Wm. Atchison..............1873
S. D. Gaskill...............1874-5
Wm P. Petteplace.........1876
C. J. Winslow..............1877
A. R. McMillan.............1878-9
Joseph J. Winslow.........1880
A. R. McMillan.............1881
Joseph J. Winslow.........1882
Stoel E. Dean..............1883
A. R. McMillan ............1884



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