TOWNS
CITIES
TOWNSHIPS

Wayne County Michigan


Ecorse Township MI Post Office (1910)(post office is on the right) - Photo Contributed by Paul Petosky
Transcribed by Christine Walters from the History of Detroit and Wayne County and early Michigan: [Vol. 2] Author: Farmer, Silas, 1839-1902.

This township was first created on April 12, 1827, and then included also what is now the township of Taylor. The township now known as Taylor was detached from Ecorse by Act of April, 1847. The first township meeting for Ecorse township was held at the house of Daniel Goodell, on Monday, May 28, 1827. The township was called Ecorse, because of the stream by that name which flows through it. The population of the township in 1850 was 653; in 1860, 2,399; in 1870, 2,211 ; in 1880, 2,648. The valuation of the property in the township in several decades was as follows: 1840, $197,190; 1850, $41,167; 1860, $269,072; 1870, $185,419; 1880, $890,000. The township officers for the several years have been as follows;

1827. Supervisor, James Cicotte; Clerk. Nathaniel Case; Assessors, Daniel Goodell, Nathaniel Clark, James Jacob; Highway Commissioners, Louis Ladue, Jonas Goodell, Simon Rousseau ; Col- lector, Daniel Goodell.

1828. Supervisor, James Cicotte and Daniel Goodell, each part of the year; Clerk, Nathaniel Case; Assessors, Joseph Corbus, Dominick Bondy, Charles Barrow; Highway Commissioners, Jonas Goodell, Alex. Frazer, Joseph Barrow, Jr.; Overseers of the Poor. John B. Muziee, Antoine Oudin; Collector, Joseph Barrow; School Inspectors. Joseph Corbus, Nathaniel Case; Constable, Jonas Goodell.

1829. Supervisor, Daniel Goodell; Clerk. Joseph Barrow and Nathaniel Case, each part of year ; Assessors, Dom. Bondy, Sr., Charles Baum, Joseph Baum; Highway Commissioners, Charles Baum, Alexis Delisle, Louis Leduc; Overseers of the Poor, Antoine Oudin, Alexander Frazer; Collector, John Palmer: School inspectors, Daniel Goodell, Joseph Baum, Samuel Abbott, John Palmer, Nathaniel Case.

1830. Supervisor, Daniel Goodell; Clerk, John Palmer; Assessors, Dom. Bondy, Charles Barrow, D. Goodell; Highway Commissioners, Jonas Goodell, Simon Rousseau, Amable Bondy; Constable, Jonas Goodell; Collectors, Joseph Barrow and Jonas Goodell, each part of year.

1831. Supervisor, Daniel Goodell; Clerk, John Palmer ; Assessors, John Palmer, Charles Barrow, Dom. Bondy; Highway Commissioners, Jonas Goodell, Simon Rousseau, Lewis Cicotte; Collector and Treasurer, Jonas Goodell; Constables, Jonas Goodell, Thomas Knowlton.

1832. Supervisor, Daniel Goodell; Clerk, John Palmer; Assessors, D. Bondy, Chas. Barrow, John Palmer; Highway Commissioners, John Knaggs, Lewis Cicotte, Simon Rousseau; Collector, John Palmer; Treasurer, Jonas Goodell; Constables, Jonas Goodell, Peter Perry, James Palmer.

1833. Supervisor, John Palmer; Clerk. Daniel Goodall; Assessors, Lambert Beaubien, Wm, Burbank, James Sutliff; Highway Commissioners, James Goodell, Simon Rousseau, Peter Coan ; Collector, Jonas Goodell; Constables, Jonas Goodell, Peter Perry; Poor Director. Daniel Goodell; School Inspectors, Daniel Goodell, Lambert Beaubien and John Palmer.

1834. Supervisor, John Palmer; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors, Lambert Beaubien; Wm. Burbank, James Sutliff; Highway Commissioners, Jonas Goodell, Dom. Bondy, Peter Coan ; Trustees, Daniel Goodell, Lambert Beaubien, Giles Eastwood ; School Commissioners, John I aimer, Peter Coan, Paul Rise ; Poor Directors. Daniel Goodell, Giles Eastwood ; Collector, Jonas Goodell; Constables, Jonas Goodell, Peter Perry, James Palmer.

1835. Supervisor, John Palmer; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors, Wm. Burbank, Chas. Barron. Lambert Beaubien; Highway Commissioners, Lewis Cicotte, Peter Perry, Lambert Beaubien ; Poor Directors, Joseph Burreaux, Simon Rousseau ; Collector, Peter Goodell; Constables, Peter Goodell. Peter Ferry, James Palmer ; Treasurer, Dominick Bondy.

1836. Supervisor, Jonas Goodell; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors, John Palmer, Lambert Beaubien, Wm. Burbank; Highway Commissioners, Peter Coan, John Palmer, Abram Griffin; School Commissioners, Daniel Goodell, Augustus Coan, John Kelley; Collector and Constable, Peter Goodell; Poor Directors, Simon Rousseau, Daniel Goodell; Justices of the Peace, Daniel Goodell, John Palmer, Richard Sutliff, Austin D. Robinson.

1837. Supervisor, Jonas Goodell; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors, Dorn. Bondy. Joseph Visger, Murray Shetman; Highway Commissioners, John Palmer, Lewis Cicotte, Martin Pierce; Collector, Peter Goodell; Constables, Peter Goodell, James Palmer, John Jarrett; Poor Directors, Daniel Goodell, John Palmer; School Commissioners, D. C. Kelley: Justice of the Peace, Peter Coan.

1838. Supervisor, Jonas Goodell; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors, John Brass, Wm. Burbank, Edward Campau ; Highway Commissioners, Jonas Goodell, John Palmer, W. N. Steward; Collector, Peter Goodell; Constables, Peter Goodell, H. B. Reves, Chandler Wells; School Inspectors, John Biddle, Jonas Goodell, Wm. Sutliff; Justices of the Peace, M. Wood, Joseph Visger.

1839* Supervisor, John Biddle; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors, Wm McVey. A. Campau, Chas. Strand; School Inspectors, John Biddle. Jonas Goodell, Chas. Steward ; Highway Commissioners, Jonas Goodell, John Palmer, Moses Steward; Treasurer, Jonas Goodell; Justice of the Peace, Daniel Goodell; Collector, Peter Goodell; Constables, Peter Goodell, Chandler Wells, H. B. Reves; Poor Directors, Wm. Burbank. John Blau. 1840. Supervisor, John Biddle; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors, John Palmer. Richard Sutliff, Lewis Cicotte; School Inspectors, John Biddle, Joseph Visger, Charles Steward ; Highway Commissioners, Wm. Burbank, Jonas Goodell, W. N. Steward; Treasurer, Joseph Visger; Collector, Peter Goodell; Constables, Peter Goodell, Chandler Wells, Henry McVey; Justices of the Peace, Daniel Goodell, John Palmer, Joseph Visger; Poor Director, J. Johnson.

1841. Supervisor, John Biddle; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Assessors. John Palmer, Lewis Cicotte, Richard Sutliff; Highway Commissioner, Jonas Goodell, Win. Burbank, N. P. Steward ; Justice of the Peace, Peter Coan; School Inspectors. John Biddle, Charles Steward, Joseph Visger ; Treasurer, Jonas Goodell; Collector. Peter Goodell; Constables, Peter Goodell, Chandler Wells, Jesse Hicks.

1842. Supervisor, John Biddle; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Highway Commissioners, George Brandicott, Wm. Burbank. Edward Campau: Assessors, John Palmer, Jared Sexton; Justices of the Peace, Daniel Goodell, Jared Sexton; Treasurer, Peter Goodell; School Inspectors, John Biddle, Charles Steward; Constables, Peter Goodell, Chandler Wells, Jesse A. Hicks: Overseer of the Poor, Josiah Johnson.

1843. Supervisor, John Diddle; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Highway Commissioners. Charles Steward, Edward Campau. John Palmer: Treasurer, Peter Goodell; Constables, Peter Goodell, Edward Visger, Chandler Wells; School Inspectors, John Biddle. Chas. Steward; Overseer of the Poor, Josiah Johnson.

1844. Supervisor, John Biddle ; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Highway Commissioners, Edward Campau, Lewis Cicotte, Wm. Sutliff; Assessors, Peter Le Blanc, Charles Steward ; Justices of the Peace, Daniel Goodell, Joseph Visger, Hugh Henry; Treasurer, Peter Goodell, Directors of the Poor, Edward Campau, Peter Coan; School Inspector, John Biddle.

1845. Supervisor, John Biddle; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Treasurer, Peter Goodell; Justices of the Peace, Peter Coan, Wm. Burbank; Assessors, Chas. Steward, Archibald Campau; Poor Directors, Peter Perry ; Constables, Peter Goodell, Lewis Cicotte, Chandler Wells.

1846. Supervisor, Joseph Visger; Clerk, Daniel Goodell,; Treasurer, Peter Goodell; School Inspector, Peter Goodell; Assessors, Charles Steward. Wm. H. Case: Highway Commissioners; Lewis Cicotte, Peter Perry. Wm. Sutliff; Justices of the Peace, Joseph Visger, Hiram H Stone; Poor Directors, Dominick Bondy, Peter Perry; Constables, Peter Goodell, Lewis Cicotte, Chandler Wells.

1847. Supervisor. Jonas Goodell; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Treasurer, Peter Goodell; Highway Commissioners, Peter Perry, Archibald Campau, Louis Borassau; Assessors, Wm. Burbank. George Le Blanc; Poor Directors, Peter Perry, Wm. Burbank; Constables, Peter Goodell, Abraham LeBlanc, D. B. Reaume; Justices of the Peace, Daniel Goodell, Joseph Visger, Wm. H. Case, Michael T. Collard.

1848. Supervisor, Lewis Cicotte; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Treasurer, Peter Goodell; School Inspector. Peter Goodell; Highway Commissioner, John Debeaux; Assessors, Joseph Visger, James Bondy; Constables. Peter Goodell, Joseph B. Goodell, David LeBlanc; Poor Directors. Peter Perry, Joseph Visger ; Justice of the Peace, Wm. Burbank.

1849. Supervisor, Lewis Cicotte; Clerk, Daniel Goodell; Treasurer, James A. Visger; Justices of the Peace, L. P. Felt, L. A. Wells; School Inspectors. Joseph Visger, L. P. Felt; Assessors. Joseph Visger, James Bondy: Highway Commissioner, Joseph Cicotte; Poor Directors, Toussant LeBlanc, A. D. Bordino.

1850. Supervisor, Lewis Cicotte; Clerk, L. P. Felt; Treasurer, James A. Visger; School Inspectors, L. B. Wells, Joseph Visger; Justices of the Peace, Lewis Cicotte, Joseph Visger; Highway Commissioner, Archibald Campau; Constables, James Goodell, Joseph Delisle, John Cicotte, Andre Buchia; Poor Directors, James Bondy, Moses Salliotte; Assessors, George LeBlanc, Lewis Burnham. 1851. Supervisor. Lewis Cicotte; Clerk, Laurence P. Felt; Treasurer, James A. Visger; Justice of the Peace, Wm. Witherspoon ; Road Commissioner, James Bondy; Assessors, John Debo, William Delisle ; Constables, John B. Cicotte, Joseph Delisle. Peter King, David LeBlanc; Poor Director, Emanuel Lacroix.

1852. Supervisor, Lewis Cicotte; Clerk, David LeBanc; Treasurer, James A. Visger; Justice of the Peace, Laurence P. Felt; School Inspectors, Wm. Witherspoon, L. P. Felt; Highway Commissioner, Wm. Delisle; Constables, Peter King, Joseph Goodell, Cleophas Goodell, Joseph Vernett; Assessors, John Debo, Francis Labadie ; Poor Director, Emanuel Lacroix.

1853. Supervisor, Louis Cicotte; Clerk, David LeBlanc; Treasurer, James A. Visger; Justices of the Peace, Louis Cicotte, Daniel Goodell; Highway Commissioner, Cleophas Goodell; Constables, Antoine LeBlanc, Joseph Goodell, Joseph Bondy, Peter King: Poor Director, Peter Perry: School Inspector. Daniel Goodell.

1854. Supervisor, Louis Cicotte; Clerk, David LeBlanc; Treasurer, James A. Visger; Justices of the Peace, Joseph Visger, Louis Cicotte; Highway Commissioner, Francis Campau ; Constables, J. B. Cicotte, Peter King. Joseph Goodell, Joseph Delisle; Poor Director, Peter Perry: School Inspector, Wm. Witherspoon; Assessors, Joseph Visger, Edward Cicotte.

1855. Supervisor, Louis Cicotte; Clerk, David Le Blanc ; Treasurer, James A. Visger ; Justices of the Peace, Wm, Witherspoon, Leander Ferguson, Wm. Sickles; School Inspector, Wm. Sickles; Highway Commissioner, Peter Perry; Assessors, Leander Ferguson, Edmund Visger; Poor Director. Edmund Visger; Constables, Cleophas Goodell, John B. Cicotte. George S. Beebe, Antoine LeBlanc.

1856. Supervisor, Edmund Visger ; Clerk, Frederick Ferguson: Treasurer, James A. Visger; Justice of the Peace, Daniel Goodell; School Inspector, Wm. Witherspoon ; Highway Commissioner, Welcome Delisle; Poor Director, Emanuel Lacroix ; Constables, Peter King. Joseph Delisle, Joseph Goodell, Antoine LeBlanc.

1857. Supervisor, Edmund Visger; Clerk, David LeBlanc; Treasurer, Wm. Witherspoon; Justice of the Peace, Orrin Packard; School Inspector, Daniel Goodell; Highway Commissioner, Charles L. Way; Poor Director, H. H. Eby; Constables: John B. Cicotte, Joseph B. Goodell, Joseph Delisle, Leander W. Ferguson.

1858. Supervisor. Edmund Visger; Clerk, John S. Van Alstyne: Treasurer, Wm. Witherspoon ; Justices of the Peace, Leander Ferguson, Daniel Goodell; Highway Commissioners, Charles L. Way, Daniel Goodell; School Inspector, Peter L. Lacy ; Overseer of the Poor, James H. Vaughn ; Assessors, John Grantzinger, Russell F. Johnson ; Constables, Scipio Rcaume, Joseph Goodell, Joseph Delisle, L. W. Ferguson.

1859. Supervisor, Edmund Visger; Clerk, L. P. Felt; Treasurer, Welcome Delisle; Justices of the Peace, John F. W. Hoersch, Wm. Witherspoon; Highway Commissioner, Cleophas Goodell; School Inspector, Wm. Witherspoon; Assessors, John Debo, John Heintzen ; Overseer of the Poor, John Grantzinger, Emanuel Lacroix; Constables, Scipio Reaume, James Callahan, George Heintzen, Joseph Goodell.

1860. Supervisor. Edmund Visger; Clerk. Frederick Ferguson; Treasurer, Welcome Delisle; Justice of the Peace, James A. Visger; Highway Commissioner, James Bondy; School Inspector, John Brophy; Assessors, John Debo, Jas. Heintzen; Directors of the Poor, Patrick Rentz, Edward Cicotte; Constables, James Callahan, Amanzer Syckmond, George Heintzen, Michael Dunn.

1861. Supervisor, James A. Visger; Clerk, Frederick Ferguson; Treasurer, Welcome Delisle; Justice of the Peace, Wm. Witherspoon; Highway Commissioner, James Heintzen; School Inspectors, James Thorpe, Hyacinth F. Riopellc; Assessors, Andrew Budosy, Wm. Thon; Directors of the Poor, Wm. Morris, Emanuel Lacroix ; Constables, Joseph Goodell, Amanzer Syckmond, Michael Forbes, Michael Dunn.

1862. Supervisor, James A. Visger; Clerk, Chas. Partridge; Treasurer, Welcome Delisle; Justices of the Peace, Leander Ferguson, Wm. F. Morris; Highway Commissioner, Daniel Meagher; School Inspector. Wm. O. Vining ; Assessors, Peter Perry, George Marx; Directors of the Poor. Edward Cicotte. Dennis Sullivan; Constables, Joseph Goodell, Michael Dunn, Frederick Singer, Patrick Gallagher.

1863. Supervisor, James A. Visger; Clerk. Chas. Partridge; Treasurer, Welcome Delisle; Justice of the Peace, John F. W. Hoersch; School Inspectors, Hyacinth F. Riopellc, Leander Ferguson; Highway Commissioner, Michael Roulo; Assessors, Peter Perry, George Marks; Directors of the Poor, Emanuel Lacroix, James Callahan; Constables, Francis Perry. Michael Dunn, Joseph Salliotte, John Smith.

1864. Supervisor, James A. Visger; Clerk, Moses B. Widner; Treasurer, Welcome Delisle: Justice of the Peace, Hyacinth F. Riopelle: School Inspector. Matthew H. O'Connor; Highway Commissioner, James Heintzen; Assessors, Chas. Genthe, Touissant Drouillard; Directors of the Poor, Dennis Sullivan. Emanuel Lacroix; Constables. Michael Dunn. John Smith, A. Hourassa, J. Ingalls.

1865. Supervisor, James A. Visger; Clerk, Moses B. Widner; Treasurer, Henry H. Eby; Justices of the Peace, Bartholomew Russell, George Henry; Highway Commissioners, Daniel Meagher, William Otto; Assessors. George Seis, Alexander Riopelle; School Inspectors; Hyacinth F. Riopelle, Leander Ferguson; Overseers of the Poor, Dennis Sullivan, Emanuel Lacroix; Constables, John Smith, Fred. H. Perrigo, James Burt, Michael Dunn.

1866. Supervisor, James A. Visger; Clerk, Moses B. Widner; Treasurer, Alexis M. Salliotte; High- way Commissioner, Wm. Otto; Justice of the Peace, Leander Ferguson; School Inspector, J. Wesley Nelson; Assessors. James Cahill, Christian Schmidt; Directors of the Poor, Emanuel Lacroix, Patrick Beatty; Constables, Joseph Delisle, Augustus Schuffert, Daniel Meagher, Fred. H. Perrigo. 1867. Supervisor, Hyacinth F Riopelle; Clerk, David LeBlanc; Treasurer, Joseph Goodell; Highway Commissioners, John J. Smith, James Bondy, Edmund Visger; Justices of the Peace, Daniel Goodell, John S. Wilson, Moses B, Widner; School Inspectors, Hyacinth F. Riopelle, John Copeland, Sr.; Assessors, Touissant Drouillard, Joseph Ditmar; Directors of the Poor, Michael Roulo, Peter Perry, Sr.; Constables, Joseph Delisle, Frederick F. Perrigo, Antoine Drouillard, Charles Schoenfield.

1868. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Ephraim P. Abbott; Treasurer, Joseph Goodell; Justices of the Peace. Hyacinth F. Riopelle, James A. Visger; Highway Commissioner, Edmund Visger ; School Inspector, Peter B. Delisle ; Assessors, Joseph Ditmar, Alexander Bourassa; Overseer of the Poor, Michael Roulo; Constables, Joseph Delisle, Charles Schoenfeld, John Drouilllard, Geo. Perry.

1869 Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Ephraim P. Abbott; Treasurer, Joseph Goodell; Justice of the Peace, Moses B. Widner; Highway Commissioner, Antoine Labadie; School Inspector, Jasper Robinson ; Assessors, Alexander Bourassa, Laurence Bicker; Overseers of the Poor, Peter Pellon, Michael Roulo; Constables, Joseph Delisle, Michael Roulo, Louis LeBlanc, Francis Riopelle.

1870. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Ephraim P. Abbott; Treasurer, Joseph Goodell; Justice of the Peace, Noah LeBlanc; Highway Commissioner, John J. Smith: School Inspector, Moses B. Widner; Assessors, Laurence Bicker, Michael Campau; Directors of the Poor, Peter Pellon, Michael Roulo; Constables, Joseph Delisle, Francis Riopelle Louis LeBlanc, Michael Roulo.

1871. No records can be found for this year.

1872. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk. Ephraim P. Abbott; Treasurer, Cleophas T.Goodell; Justice of the Peace, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Highway Commissioner. Abraham LeBlanc; Drain Commissioner, Owen McQuade ; School Inspector, Joseph Ditmer; Assessors, Pascal Odette. Rinehart Schafer; Poor Directors, Alexander Bondy, Peter Pellon ; Constables Joseph Delisle, Francis Riopelle, Louis T. Goodell, Michael Dunn.

1873. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Ephraim P. Abbott; Treasurer, Francis X. Riopelle; Justice of the Peace, E. P. Abbott; High- way Commissioner, John J. Smith; Drain Commissioner, Owen McQuade; School Inspector, Joseph Ditmer; Poor Director, Joseph Bondy, Jr.; Constables. Michael Dunn, Joseph Delisle, Claude Solo, Michael Roulo.

1874. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Jasper Robinson ; Treasurer, Francis X. Riopelle ; Justice of the Peace, Joseph Salliotte; Assessor, Desia Bourassa; Highway Commissioner. John Schoenfield; School Inspector. Alexander Rousseau; Poor Director, Claude Solo; Constables, Charles Labadie, George Drouillard.

1875. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer, Michael Roulo; Justice of the Peace, Jasper Robinson; Assessors, Charles Cicotte, John A. Shoemaker; Highway Commissioner. Peter Drouillard ; Drain Commissioner, Laurence Bicker; Superintendent of Schools, Jasper Robinson; School Inspectors, James Heintzen, Joseph Ditmer; Poor Directors Alexander Bondy, Claude Solo; Constables, Oliver Demay, Sebastian Shaffer, Michael Dunn, Francis Goodic.

1876. Supervisor. Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer, Michael Roulo; Superintendent of Schools, Jasper Robinson; School Inspector, James Heintzen ; Justice of the Peace, Ephraim P. Abbott; Highway Commissioner, Peter Drouillard; Drain Commissioner, Laurence Bicker; Assessors, Charles Cicotte John C. Stilzer; Directors of the Poor, Alexander Bondy, William Solo; Constables, Joseph Delisle, Michael Dunn, George Cicotte. Claude Solo.

1877. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk. Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer. Michael Roulo; School Inspector, Joseph Ditmer; Superintendent of Schools. Thomas H. Somers; Commissioner of Highways, John Debo; Justice of the Peace, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Constables. Joseph Delisle, Abraham Brisboise, Lawrence Hiedy, Charles Labadie.

1878. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle ; Clerk, Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer,George Cicotte; Justice of the Peace, Joseph Salliotte; School Inspector, Henry Haltinner; Superintendent of Schools, Thomas H. Somers; Highway Commissioner, John Debo; Drain Commissioner. Owen McQuade, Poor Directors, Peter Pillon, Claude Campau; Constables. Abraham Brisboise, Alexander J. Bourasseau, Charles Labadie, Louis C. Goodell

1879. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Alexis M. Salliotte; Treasurer, George Cicotte; Justice of the Peace, Jasper Robinson; Superintendent of Schools, Thomas H, Somers; School Inspector, Joseph Salliotte; Highway Commissioner, Matthias Raupp; Directors of the Poor; Peter Pillon, Claude Campau ; Constables, Abraham Brisboise, Joseph Delisle, Alexander J. Bourasseau, Charles Labadie.

1880. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Alexis M. Salliotte; Treasurer, George Perry; Superintendent of Schools, Thomas H. Somers; School Inspector, Andrea Dittmar; Justices of the Peace. Ephraim P. Abbott, Frederick Krenger; Highway Commissioner, Mathias Raupp. Jr; Poor Directors, Pascal Odette. Claude Solo; Constables, Alexander J. Bourasseau, Charles Labadie, Joseph Delisle, Abraham Brisboise.

1881. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Cleophas T. Goodell; Treasurer, George Perry; Superintendent of Schools, James C. Riopelle; School Inspector, Eli Odette; Justice of the Peace, Hyacinth F Riopelle; Highway Commissioner, Francis LeBlanc; Poor Directors, Pascal Odette, Claude Solo; Constables. Hyacinth Burke. Harmon Schoenfield. Charles Labadie. Edwin Longton.

1882. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Cleophas T. Goodell; Treasurer, John Leavitt: School Inspectors, James C. Riopelle, Ambrose Cicotte; Justice of the Peace, Thomas H. Somers; Highway Commissioner, Francis LeBlanc: Poor Directors, Alexander Bondy, Alexander B. Bondy; Constables, Charles Labadie, Harmon Schoenfield. Hyacinth Burke, Alexander J. Bourasseau.

1883. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer, John Leavitt; School Inspector. James C Riopelle; Highway Commissioner, Francis Cicotte; Justice of the Peace, Henry Haltinner; Poor Directors, Alexander Bondy, Oliver Demay; Constables. Harmon Schoenfield, Charles Labadie, Joseph Delisle, Charles L. Bourasseau.

1884. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer, Gustave A. Raupp: School Inspector. Louis Odain ; Highway Commissioner, Francis Cicotte : Justice of the Peace, Ephraim P. Abbott; Drain Commissioner, Louis Bourasseau; Constables, Alexander J. Bourasseau, Harmon Schoenfield, Chas. A. Labadie, Peter Burger. 1885. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer, Henry F. Ferguson; School Inspector, Edmund T. Drouillard : Highway Commissioner, Michael Steffes: Justice of the Peace, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Constables, George Allen, Alexander J. Bourasseau, Harmon Schoenfield, Peter Burger.

1886. Supervisor, Hyacinth F. Riopelle; Clerk, Noah LeBlanc; Treasurer, Henry F. Ferguson; School Inspector, Robert Osborne; Highway Commissioner, Michael Steffes; Drain Commissioner, Joseph Cicotte, Sr.; Justice of the Peace, Thomas H. Somers; Constables, Charles Demay, Win. Solo. Harmon Schoenfield, Peter Burger.

1887. Supervisor, Gustave A Raupp; Clerk, William A. Ferguson; Treasurer, Edmund LeBlanc; School Inspector, Francis Cicotte; Justice of the Peace, Ari E. Woodruff; Constables, Wm. Solo, Harmon Schoenfield, James F. Riopelle, Chas. Dema

1888. Supervisor, Gustave A. Raupp; Clerk, Wm A. Ferguson; Treasurer, Charles L. Bourasseau; Highway Commissioner, George LeBlanc; Justice of the Peace, John Haltinner; School Inspector, Peter McQuaid; Drain Commissioner, Alexander Labadie: Constables, Alfred A. Salliotte, John A. Frasier. George B. lorongo, Samuel Drouillard.

1889. Supervisor. G. A. Raupp ; Clerk, Wm. A. Ferguson; Treasurer, C. L. Bourasseau ; Highway Commissioner. Geo. LeBlanc; Justice of the Peace. H. F. Riopelle; School-Inspector, Chas. Foley; Drain Commissioner, John Quandt; Constables. F. Kamin, Wm. Solo, A. A. Salliotte. W. Roulo.

1890. Supervisor, T. Saunders; Clerk, J. Leavitt, Jr.; Treasurer, A. C. Bouchard; Justice of the Peace, C. N. Riopelle; School Inspector, P. McQuaid; Highway Commissioner. Alex. Reaume; Drain Commissioner, Peter Burger; Board of Review, M. Dunn, A. Labadie; Constables, Wm. Perry, Wm. Smith, W. C. Delisle, W. Solo.

Schools.

The condition of the schools in the township in the year ending September 3, 1888. was as follows : There were ten school districts, with an enrollment of 1,100 pupils, and an average daily attendance of 653. The township contained one brick house, costing $3,900, and seating 188, and nine frame houses, costing $6,861, and seating 619. Six male and nine female teachers were employed. There were libraries in each district, the total number of volumes being 1,260.

Cemeteries. A Catholic cemetery was opened about 1836. on the St. Combe line road, a little northwest of Ecorse, and just west of the brick school-house. This was discontinued in 1876, on the opening of a new one about a quarter of a mile west. In 1860 a Catholic cemetery was opened on Section 29, bounded on the north by the north line road, and on the other three sides by the James T. Hurst property. Oakwood cemetery on the estate of John P. Clark, just north of the north city limits, was incorporated August 13, 1869, by John P. and E. W. Clark. On August 24, 1878, by consent of the Circuit Court of Wayne County, the Board of Health sold the old “Potter's field," and purchased a piece of land on fractional Section 20, part of the estate of John Cobden, to be used as a burial ground for the poor of Ecorse.

Streams and Islands.

The banks of the Ecorse, on both sides, are low and marshy, and the stream almost unapproachable except by a boat from the Detroit river. In a few places the banks have been raised, in order to give a foundation for the bridges across the channel. A little distance below Wyandotte there is a lagoon which is variously designated as Monguagon, or Stone Quarry Creek. The last name was undoubtedly given because of its proximity to the limestone quarries from which Detroit was supplied in the very earliest years of the settlement. The creek opens into the Detroit, nearly opposite Sibley’s quarries, and extends up northwesterly through the farm of George Payne; across the creek, on the farm named, in recent years there was the remains of a corduroy bridge, said to have been constructed by Hull's army in 1812. while on the way from Dayton to Detroit. Another small creek, within the limits of the present city of Wyandotte, could at one time be easily traced. It is now entirely obliterated. It was on the route of this creek, or in its immediate vicinity, that Lieutenant-Colonel Miller was attacked by the British and Indians on August 9, 1812. The creek extended up from the Detroit, across Biddle Avenue, and thence northwesterly through the city. Its outlet was through Chestnut street. The office of Dr. E. P. Christian, and the Presbyterian church, arc located on its route, The islands in the Detroit river, named Grassy. Mud and Mama-Juda Shoal, are assessed as belonging to this township.

Ecorse, FORMERLY GRANDPORT.

The site of this village was once occupied by the Indians, and as late as 1813 the smoke of their wigwams marked the site of their encampment. Soon after this date several white families settled here, but the plat of the village was not recorded until 1836. It was laid out by Simon Rousseau, A. Labadie, L. Bourassa and P. LeBlanc, and named Grandport. It is on the line of the Canada Southern branch of the M. C. R. R., and also on the L. S. & M. S. R. R. One of the principal industries of Ecorse is the saw-mill and lumber yard of Salliotte & Raupp, whose plant covers about fifteen acres of land on the Detroit river at the mouth of the Ecorse. It was established by John Copland in 1855, and in 1876 came into the hands of the present owners. In 1878 the entire works were destroyed by fire, but were at once rebuilt, and the buildings, consisting of a saw-mill, planing-mill, dry kilns, and all necessary adjuncts to a first class mill, cover about 16,000 square feet of floor space, giving employment to an average of sixty men on the day run and forty at night. In connection with the mill are two kilns, by which the mill-slabs are converted into charcoal, which finds a ready sale in Wyandotte. In 1886 a grist mill was opened by Jos. Salliotte, and on December 29, 1887, the Ecorse Comet Band opened their hall. It seats about 400, and is used as a town hall and for public entertainments.

The Roman Catholic church of St Francis Xavier was established about 1845 by Rev. Charles L. DePreiter, and under his direction a frame church was erected. He had charge of the congregation until 1871, when he was succeeded by Rev. L. Barunoux. On February 14. 1882. Rev John F. Van Gennip came and under his pastorate the old church was moved away, and on July 23, 1882, the cornerstone of the present church was laid by Right Rev. Caspar H. Borgess. It was completed and dedicated August 5. 1883. It cost $7,coo. and will seat 300. The parsonage cost about $3,500. At the time Rev. Van Gennip took charge of the congregation there were no families; in 1888 there were 150 families, numbering 800 persons.

WYANDOTTE.

Its Beginnings and Business Establishments.

The city of Wyandotte is located about midway between lakes St. Clair and Erie, on the west bank of the Detroit river, and on the line of the Canada Southern branch of the M. C. R. R. and also on the line of the L. S. & M. S. R. R The relatively high banks of the river at this point afforded a favorable camping place for the Indians, and it was selected by the Wyandottes at a very early date as the site of the village of Mongaugon, and as late as 1820 to 1840 there were large numbers of Indians still in the vicinity. One of their burial grounds was just below where the rolling mills are now located, and another was about a mile south of the old Biddle mansion, which in later years was occupied by Thomas Watkins. In the last named burial ground the old chief Walk-in-the- Water was buried. His remains are said to have been subsequently exhumed and taken east by some one interested in antiquarian research.

The various tribes conveyed their title to the and along the Detroit by several treaties concluded between the years 1784 and 1808. In 1818 the first public sale of United States lands in Michigan took place, and some of the land now occupied by the city of Wyandotte is said to have been sold at $40 per acre. It is a curious illustration of the change in values, that Major John Biddle sold the same lands in 1854, 2,200 acres, to the Eureka Iron Company, for $20 per acre.

The Eureka Iron Company was organized on October 15, 1853, and consisted of E. B. Ward, resident; T. W. Lockwood, treasurer; George S. Thurber, secretary; and the following stockholders: Eber B. Ward, Harmon DeGraff, Silas N. Cendrick, U. Tracy Howe, Silas M. Holmes, Philip Thurber, Elijah Wilson, Thomas W. Lockwood, Francis Choate and Sylvester Lamed. The capital stock of the company at the beginning was §500,000. in shares of twenty-live dollars each, of which $117,500 was paid in. The profits increased so rapidly that the amount of surplus, over and above the dividends paid to the subscribers, was sufficient, in 1873, to pay up the entire capital stock. The site selected for the works was deemed specially favorable for the proposed enterprise, because of the splendid river frontage, with its facilities for receiving ores by water from northern Michigan.

The land was also covered with a dense forest, which could be utilized in the production of charcoal, while the nearness of the neighboring limestone quarries would enable the company to cheaply obtain the needed for the ores and metal. The next year after being organized the company erected a blast furnace and bar mill, with a full complement of buildings, among which was a large boarding house for the accommodation of their workmen, which may be said to be the starling point in the real history of Wyandotte.

The Wyandotte Rolling Mill Company was organized in 1855, with E. B. Ward as president, for the manufacture of all kinds of merchant’s bar iron, and for a time was very successful, but after the death of Mr. Ward there was great uncertainty as to the future of these corporations, in which he was so extensively interested, and the works were controlled by numerous parties, enduring many vicissitudes. In the fall of 1877 the Rolling Mill Company failed, and the Eureka Iron Company bought up the mortgage bonds, and by foreclosure absorbed the rolling mill and carried on the entire business until December 19, 1883 when the present corporation. the Eureka Iron and Steel Company, was formed. The offices are at Detroit. The officers arc: William K. Muir, president and general manager; Sidney D. Miller, secretary; George Hendrie. treasurer; J. S. VanAlstyne, agent, and T. D. Evans, superintendent. They make charcoal pig iron, from Lake Superior ores, for foundry, car wheel and malleable use, also boiler plate, tank iron, and the usual variety of common and refined bar iron. The plant consists of two blast furnaces, a rolling mill for merchant bar iron, having three trains of sixteen, ten and eight-inch rollers, a plate mill, with puddling furnaces, and everything necessary for the conducting of their business, giving employment to from four hundred to five hundred men. and occupying nearly 400,000 square feet of land, in the heart of the city. The first successful experiments in the manufacture of Bessemer steel in the United States were made at these furnaces, under the direction of Captain Ward, and to Wyandotte belongs the honor of having produced the first Bessemer steel made in America.

The probability that iron vessels would take the place of those constructed of wood, was often suggested by E. B. Ward, and the present extensive ship-yard owes its beginnings to his enterprise and foresight. He became acquainted with Messrs. F. E, and F. A. Kirby in 1872, and was so favorably impressed with their abilities that he provided the facilities and gave them an order to construct an iron rug, which was to be the largest and best possible to build. The order was given in the spring, and in August of the same year, 1872, they completed the steam tug " E. B. Ward.” The same year they built the “Queen of the Lakes,” the “ Myrtle,” and the " Sport,” and other vessels in rapid succession.

After the death of Mr. Ward, the Detroit Dry Dock Company purchased the plant, and a new company was organized to carry on the business of ship-building, and both of the Messrs. Kirby became large stockholders. Under their supervision the work of building iron passenger steamers was successfully entered upon, and those magnificent floating palaces now operated by the Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Company afford the best of evidence of the capacity of the yards, and of the skill and ability of those who designed and constructed them. The principal office of the corporation is at Detroit, and is alluded to elsewhere in this work Three hundred men are employed in the establishment, and the monthly pay roll is over $10,000. The machinery employed, though massive, is very simple, including principally rolls and forges for shaping the plates and frames, and fully equipped carpenter shops. Sixty per cent, of the cost of an iron boat is in days' work at the shipyard.

In addition to the other enterprises at Wyandotte established by Mr. Ward, there was the Silver Smelting and Refining Company. The works were built in 1871, under the supervision of Thomas McFarlane, who discovered the Silver Islet mine some years before. The corporation, with Mr. Ward as president, began operations in 1872, taking the silver ore as brought by boats from the mines on the north shore of Lake Superior, and treating it, sending the silver and gold bullion to the government to be stamped, and afterwards selling it in New York. The lead was sold mostly to the Detroit Lead Works, and the nickle, saved in the nickle net, was concentrated and sent to England. While at their zenith, the works kept from seventy-five to one hundred men employed, but. flushed with prosperity, and indications showing the bottom of the Silver Islet mine to be Nearly reached, they attempted to refine Western ore, but the venture proved unprofitable, and the business was abandoned. Mr. McFarlane was superintendent for two years, being followed by Wm. Curtis the same length of time, and H. C. Hahn for one year, at the close of which time Mr. McFarlane again became superintendent, and held the position until the fall of 1878, when the property fell into the hands of New York capitalists, who, with Sidney D. Miller, of Detroit, caused the property to be disposed of. The buildings and land were sold to the Star Mineral Company, composed of John Clee and E. C. Sewall, who for a time manufactured barytes, both crude and refined, the ore being imported from Germany. Among the notable business enterprises of Wyandotte is the Long Wool Rug and Duster factory of J. H Bishop, there being but one other establishment of the kind in the United States. Mr. Bishop experimented for a series of years before he was able to overcome the obstacles in the way of producing satisfactory rugs, but at last achieved complete success, and he now not only makes great numbers of wool rugs, but also imports thousands of Chinese goat skins, which he transforms into elegant mats, robes and rugs, employing about fifty persons.

The extensive steam planing mill, and sash, door and blind factory of James T. Hurst, the stave and hoop factory of Shelly & Company, the Burrell & Whitman hoop heading factory, and the Detroit Cooperage Company's factory, are also here located. The Wyandotte Savings Bank was organized November 20, 1871, with a capital of 850,000. The original and present officers arc John S. Van Alstyne, president, and W. Van Miller, cashier. The population of the city in 1870 was 2,731, and the valuation of real and personal property $186,135. in 1880 the population was 3,631, and the valuation of real and personal property $792,464.

The City Corporation.

The City of Wyandotte was created by Act of March 5, 1867. the charter being subsequently amended by various acts dated March 2, 1869. April 4, 1873. April 27, 1875, May 10, 1877. March 13, 1883, and May 4, 1885. The bounds of the city arc the same as at first defined, and include all of the lands east of the west line of the lands of the Detroit, Monroe & Toledo Railroad to the Detroit River, and between the south line of Sections 20 and 21, of Town 3. Range 11 East, and a center line running east and west through the center of Sections 31 and 32. Under the original act the city was divided into three wards, as follows: The First Ward, including all north of Oak Street; the Second Ward, all between Oak Street and Eureka Avenue; and the Third Ward, all south of Eureka Avenue. In the original act the city was required to publish yearly, for two weeks, in some weekly paper issued in Detroit, a detailed statement of its yearly receipts and expenditures.

The elective officers provided for in the original act were a Mayor, a Recorder, a Treasurer, who was also to serve as Collector, a Marshal, two School Inspectors, two Directors of the Poor, three Justices of the Peace, and two Aldermen and a Constable for each Ward. The Council were to appoint a City Attorney, a Street Commissioner, and a Chief Engineer of the Eire Department The Mayor, Treasurer, Marshal and one School Inspector, and one Director of the Poor were to be elected yearly, the Recorder every other year, and the Justices for terms of one, two and three years. Under Act of 1869, provision was made for electing an Assessor. Act of 1873 provided for the election of a Police Justice, and Act of 1877 provided for the election of a Street Commissioner, and for four Justices of the Peace, instead of three, as before.

The annual election is held on the first Monday in April. The first election was held on the first Monday of April, 1867, and the polls for the First Ward were at the District School House; for the Second Ward, at Farnsworth Hall; and for the Third Ward, at the house of Joseph Gartner. The first meeting of the Common Council was held on April 8th, 1867.

The city officers for the several years have been, as follows:

1867. Mayor, John S. Van Alstyne; Recorder, Peter Lacy; Aldermen. E. P. Christian, R. C. Conwell, R. W. Leighton, Dennis Sullivan. H. N. Ocobock, Fred. Kreiger; City Attorney. Robert V. Briggs; Street Commissioner. H. W. Pardo.

1868. Mayor, Charles Partridge; Treasurer, Frank Bohl; Marshal, John Smith; Justice of the Peace, James Kelley: School Inspector, Robert V. Briggs; Overseers of the Poor. John McPeak; Aldermen, Joseph Massett, Peter Casper, John Bittorf; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, Dennis Sullivan, Henry Kaul.

1869. Mayor, Charles Partridge; Recorder, Peter Lacy; Treasurer, John F. W. Thon; Marshal, John Smith ; Assessor, George Marx; Justice of the Peace, Robert V. Briggs; School Inspector, Wm. Leighton; Aldermen, Isaac Strong, Thomas Delaney, James Cahill; Constables, Augustus Schuffert John Leockner, Robert Huston.

1870. Mayor, E P. Christian; Treasurer, John F. W. Thon; Assessor, John A. Morgan ; Marshal, A. McTaggard ; School Inspector, John S. Van Alstyne; Poor Master, George Thon ; Justice of the Peace, John Robinson; Aldermen, Charles Jacobs, George Zeis, Charles Wilks; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, Claus Speck; Supervisors, John Morgan, Isaac Strong.

1871. Mayor, Thomas Jewel; Recorder, Francis Murphy; Treasurer, John F. W. Hoersch ; Justice of the Peace, Moses B. Widner; Assessor, Leander Ferguson; School Inspector. A. Whiting; Marshal, P. Welch; Overseer of the Poor, Christ. Grimm; Aldermen, Alfred Plumb, Patrick Keavney, James Cahill; Constables, Augustus Schuffert John Leockner, H. W. Pardoe; Supervisors, Leander Ferguson, Charles Wilks.

1872. Mayor, Thomas Jewel; Treasurer, John F. W. Hoersch; Assessor, George Marx; Justice of the Peace, Leander Ferguson; School Inspector, Francis Murphy; Marshal, P. Walch; Overseer of the Poor, P. Keavney; Aldermen. H. H. Eby. Mark Rush. Peter Coaster; Constables, A. Schuffert. John Leockner, E. Whalen; Supervisors, George Marx, Louis Stilzer.

1873. Mayor, Horacc N. Ocobock; Recorder, Alfred Plumb; Treasurer, John S. Bennett; Assessor, George Marx; Police Justice, S. A. Gonman; Justice of the Peace, J. I noise; Marshal, H. Bullard; Director of the Poor, Wm. Bolton; School Inspector. J. A. Morgan ; Aldermen. F. Steiler, M. Gauley, S. D. Hinds; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, John Leockner, C. H. Tompkins; Supervisors, George Marx, H. H. Eby.

1874- Mayor, Theophilus J. Langlois; Treasurer, John S. Bennett; Assessor, George Marx; Justice of the Peace. Moses B. Widner; Police. Justice, Richard Jones; Marshal, John Smith; School Inspectors, Wm. Bolton, Frederick Raubolt; Director of the Poor, John George Thon; Aldermen, James Keusch, Patrick Fury. Oscar Sanborn; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, John Leockner, H. W. Pardo; Supervisors, George Marx, James Keusch.

1875. Mayor, Charles Partridge; Recorder, Alfred Plumb; Treasurer, William Armstrong; Assessor, George Marx; Police Justice, Oliver Colburn ; Marshal, Patrick Welch; Justice of the Peace. Richard Jones ; School Inspector. George W. Tilford; Director of the Poor, John Me Peek; Aldermen, Joseph Girardin, Michael Gauley, Jacob Shepherd; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, John Lcockner, Daniel Block; Supervisors, George Marx, Oscar Sanborn. On May 29, Mayor Partridge resigned, and John Bittorf was elected to fill the vacancy.

1876. Mayor, John Bittorf; Treasurer, Christian Grimm; Assessor, Francis Murphy; Police Justice, Anthony Loskey; Marshal, Augustus Schweirs; Justice of the Peace, Leander Ferguson; School Inspector, A. Whiting; Director of the Poor, John McPeak; Aldermen, Theodore Magges, Patrick Fury, Oscar Sanborn; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, John Leockner, Fred. Kinsella; Supervisors, Francis Murphy, Joseph Girardin.

1877. Mayor, James S. Campbell; Recorder, Jeremiah Drennan; Treasurer, Christian Grimm; Assessor, George Marx; Police Justice, Francis Murphy; Street Commissioner, Frederick Raubolt; Justice of the Peace, Oliver D. Hibbard; School Inspector, John P. Debo; Director of the Poor, Frank Stieler; Aldermen, Charles J. Northrup, Martin Jordan, Peter Coaster; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, John Leockner. Patrick Walsh; Supervisors, George Marx, Patrick Fury.

1878. Mayor, John Bittorf; Treasurer, R. C. Conwell: Assessor, R. W. Leighton; Street Commissioner. John Franklin; Police Justice, George W. Telford; Justice of the Peace, John J. Tillman; Director of the Poor, Frank Steiler; School Inspectors. Christian Speck, Hezekiah Milkins; Aldermen, John E. Mellis, Richard Mason, Reinold Thon, August Asmus; Constables, August Schuffert. Hiram Millspaugh, H W. Pardo; Supervisors, R. W. Leighton, John J. Thon.

1879. Mayor, James Keusch ; Recorder. Jeremiah Drennan ; Treasurer, Joseph Gartner; Assessor. R. W. Leighton; Justice of the Peace. Richard Jones; Police Justice, Moses B. Widner; Street Commissioner, Charles Sachs; Director of the Poor. Wm Watson; School Inspector, Henry Eichmati; Aldermen, H. H. Eby, John Robinson, John P. Debo. A. W. Milkins; Constables, Augustus Schuffert, James Collins, Charles F. F. Behme; Supervisors, R. W. Leighton, John P. Debo.

1880 Mayor, James Keusch; Treasurer, Frank Drohl; Assessor, Robert W. Leighton; Justice of the Peace. James S. Campbell; Street Commissioner, August Lehman; Director of the Poor, John G. Thon; School Inspector, T. J. Langlois; Aldermen, Richard Mason, John Beattie, S. D. Hinds; Constables, Augustus Schuffert. John Lcockner, Charles Behm; Supervisors, Robert W. Leighton, Richard Mason.

1881. Mayor, Michael Gauley, Sr.; Recorder, Almond L. DePoutee; Treasurer. Frank Brohl; Assessor, Robert W. Leighton; Street Commissioner, Frederick Raubolt; Justice of the Peace, Francis Murphy; School Inspector, Henry E. Thon ; Director of the Poor, James Calahan, Sr.; Aldermen, John Robinson, Conrad Caspers, Albert Raubold ; Constables, Christian Marquette, Dennis Sullivan, Moses H. Clements; Supervisors, Robert W. Leighton, Richard Mason.

1882. Mayor, Thomas D. Evans; Treasurer, Frank Brohl; Assessor, Jeremiah Drennan; Street Commissioner, John Coop; Justice of the Peace, Sylvester Pray; School Inspector, Samuel T. Hendricks; Poor Master, Henry Rentz; Aldermen, Richard Mason, Thomas Raynard, Sylvester D. Hinds; Constables, Christian Marquette, Edwin H. Bessey, Patrick Welsh; Supervisors, Jeremiah Drennan, Sylvester D. Hinds.

1883. Mayor, Thomas D. Evans; Recorder, Almond L. DePoutee; Treasurer, Frank Brohl; Assessor, Jeremiah Drennan; Police- Justice, Charles G. Chittenden; Street Commissioner, John Coop; Justice of the Peace, John J. Tillman; School Inspector, James Shannon; Director of the Poor, John George Thon; Aldermen, Samuel J. Lawrence, Wm. H. Lacy, John C. Jackson; Constables, Christ. Thon, Jr., Dennis Sullivan, Samuel Lyon; Supervisors, Jeremiah Drennan. Samuel J. Lawrence.

1884. Mayor, Thomas D. Evans; Treasurer. Frank Brohl; Assessor, Charles Schuffert; Police Justice, Oliver D. Hubbard; Street Commissioner, Peter LaSalle; Justice of the Peace, Martin A. Cone; School Inspector, Charles G. Chittenden; Director of the Poor, John Riley; Aldermen, George Stormount, Conrad Caspers. Edward Purcells; Constables, Christ. Thon. Jr.. Dennis Sullivan, Charles Shamburg; Supervisors, Charles Schuffert, Samuel J. Lawrence

1885. Mayor, Joseph H. Bishop; Recorder, D. W. Roberts; Treasurer, Joseph Girardin; Assessor, Charles Schuffert; Police Justice, John J. Tillman; Street Commissioner, Frederick Theide; Justice of the Peace, Charles G. Chittenden; School Inspector. Aaron Strong; Director of the Poor, John George Thon; Aldermen, Samuel J. Lawrence, John Teeling. Thomas W. Bristow; Constables, Christ. Thon. Jr., John Leockner, John M. Green; Supervisors, R. W. Leighton, Dennis Sullivan, James Cahill.

1886. Mayor, Joseph H. Bishop; Clerk, Charles H. Genthe, Jr., Treasurer, Joseph Girardin; Marshal, John Allen; Street Commissioner, Frederick Theide; School Inspectors, C. W. Thomas for one year, William Gartner, for two years, Wm. Bolton, for three years; Aldermen: For one year at large, J. S. Trites, for two years at large, C. Schuffert, First Ward, George Stormont, Second Ward. Jas. McCloy, Second Ward to fill vacancy, C. Bigler, Third Ward, R. Tims; Constables, First Ward, Christ. Thon, Jr., Second Ward, H. W. Pardo, Jr., Third Ward, John Leockner; Supervisors. First Ward, Robert W. Leighton, Second Ward, Dennis Sullivan, Third Ward, James Cahill.

1887. Mayor, F. A. Kirby; Clerk, Charles H. Genthe, Jr„ Treasurer, Joseph Girardin ; Marshal, Christian Thon ; Street Commissioner. John Bonehill; School Inspector, Charles W. Thomas; Jusice of the Peace, John Leockner; Aldermen : At large, John S. Trites, First Ward, Wm. H. Lacy, Second Ward, Conrad Bigler, Third Ward, Louis P. Miller; Constables, Martin Olius, John S. Brophas, John Perdo; Supervisors, Robert W. Leighton, Dennis Sullivan, John H. Smith. 1888. Mayor, T. J. Langlois; Clerk, Charles H. Genthe, Jr.; Treasurer. Wm. H. Denman; Marshal, Frank Wolcott; Street Commissioner, William Watson; School Inspector, Wm. Gartner; Justice of the Peace, Francis Murphy ; Aldermen : At large, John Ginzel, First Ward, Frank Marx, Second Ward, James McCloy, Third Ward. H. F. Walter; Constables, George Beebe. J. B. DeLisle, Wm. Stefkey; City Attorney, George W. Coomer; City Physician, E. P, Christian; School Inspector, Michael Gauley; Chief Engineer. Gustave Daumier; Assistant Engineer, Charles Millspaugh; Engineer, Edward Timm; Pound Master. N. Tewksbury ; Supervisors, Richard Mason, Dennis Sullivan, John H. Smith.

1889. Mayor, Wm. Campbell; Marshal, Christian Thon; Clerk, J. S. McGlaughlin; Treasurer, Wm. H. Denman; Street Commissioner, Wm. Watson; School Inspector. Joseph Girardin; Jusice of the Peace, A. S. Hunter; Aldermen: At large, R. C. Conwell, First Ward, Wm. Gartner, Second Ward, C. Bigler, Third Ward. George Crassweller; Supervisors, First Ward, R. Mason, Second Ward, D. Sullivan, Third Ward, C. G. Chittenden; Constables, First Ward, J. Weivich, Second Ward. J. B. DeLisle, Third Ward, Wm. Donaldson.

1890 Mayor, Wm. Campbell; City Clerk, J S. McGlaughlin, Jr.; Marshal. Daniel Campau; Treasurer, Charles Wambier; Street Commissioner, Christopher Dolan; Justices of the Peace. Ed. Beathe, Francis Murphy: School Inspectors, Wm. Lawrence, T. T. Busha; Aldermen: At large, Frank Walcott, R. C. Conwell, First Ward, full term, Frank Marx, First Ward, to fill vacancy. Col. Busha, Second Ward, Jeremiah Drennan, Conrad Bigler, Third Ward, Rudolph H. F. Walter, George Crassweller; Constables, Wm. Olms, J. B. DeLisle, Wm. Donaldson; Supervisors, Wm. Bolton, Dennis Sullivan, Chas. G. Chittenden.

The City Hall.

In October, 1870 a petition was presented relative to building a jail, and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means, on whose report an election was held, and a majority of 174 obtained by those opposed to the purchase of the site for a city building. The question then rested until June, 1880, when another petition was presented, asking the Council to make the necessary appropriations to direct a lockup, city hall and engine house. The Committee on Ways and Means reported favorably, and the Mayor was requested to call a meeting of the citizens to vote on an appropriation of 88,000 that purpose. An election was held on August 8, 1880, and by a majority of 62 the city voted 0 issue bonds to the amount of $7,000 for the purpose indicated. A site for the building was purchased of Wm. Farnsworth, at a cost of $1,000. and in October, 1880, the city entered into a contact with Edward Garrett to erect the building for $6,915. Everything seemed to move smoothly on until the refusal of Recorder Drennan to sign the bonds. On steps being taken to compel him to comply with the vote of the people and action of the Council, the bonds were issued and placed in the hands of the Treasurer for disposal. The following citizens each purchased $1,000 in bonds: Edward Chandler, John Robinson. Joseph Girardin, and E. P. Christian. Bonds for $1,500 were sold to Antoine Labadie and Nelson Dupey. On March 25, 1882, the building committee reported the city hall completed. It consists of a two-story brick building with mansard roof and tower, ornamented with cut stone trimmings. It has a frontage on Biddle Avenue of sixty-seven feet, with sixty-two feet on Elm Street. The first room on the main floor is twenty-seven by fifty-one feet, and is used for an engine house Back of this, there is a wide hall opening off from Biddle Avenue, with stairs leading to the second story. To the left of the hall is the city jail, containing eight cells, four on the lower and four on the upper floor. Over the engine room is the public library and reading-room, the same size as the lower floor, and over the jail part is the Council chamber and court room, twenty-six by eighteen feet, with two other rooms which can be used as jury rooms.

Sewerage.

The first suggestion in the way of a sewer was contained in a petition from John H. Jones and Wesley Sheldon, who asked leave to fix up the drain running through their lots. Their petition was presented by Alderman Christian on April 16, 1867, and from time to time since then the Street Commissioner. acting under instructions, has put in box drains, and more recently crocks of from eight to twenty-two inches in diameter. These, with surface drains and ditches sloping toward the river, have effectually sewered the city. As no separate account of this department of improvements has been kept, it is impossible to give the exact amount of piping or cost of sewerage, but there is about three miles of sewer pipe, and the cost has been about $10,000.

Fire Department.

In the beginnings of Wyandotte, its location on the river and the agility of the "bucket brigade” formed the only protection against fire. In January 1868, a petition was received by the Council relative to a fire department, which was referred to S. L. Hotter, Abraham Whiting and J. S. Trites, with instructions to ascertain the cost of and terms of payment for a fire engine. This movement resulted in the purchase, in October, 1870, of twelve Babcock fire extinguishers, at a cost of $630, which were distributed in various parts of the city, and an ordinance passed relative to their custody and use. In January, 1871, Wm. Armstrong and others petitioned to be organized as a fire company. The petition was granted, and the officers of the fire department appointed to organize the company. In November, 1875, an election was ordered to be held on November 4. for the purpose of voting a tax to purchase a fire engine, the result of which was one hundred and forty-six votes for and thirteen against the purchase. Accordingly the bonds of the city were issued for $6,000, payable in four, five and six years, for the purchase of a steam fire engine. A contract was made with L. Button & Sons, and the following January the engine was received and named the "City of Wyandotte." John Merreth was appointed engineer in charge, and G. W, Telford chief engineer. In November, 1885 an ordinance was passed to provide for organizing a fire department under the State law. and repealing all former ordinances in regard to the extinguishment of fires. In January, 1886, in accordance with this action, a number of persons met and organized a new fire company, to be known as Wyandotte Steam Fire Company, No. 1.” The company list was accepted by the Council on February 3, 1886, and was composed as follows: James McCloy, president; Joseph Marx, vice-president: Nelson Dupey, recording secretary; Wm. Marx, treasurer; J. J. Hoersch, financial secretary; C. Bigler, foreman; Gust. Baumler, chief engineer; Charles Millspaugh, assistant chief engineer; Ed. Finn, engineer; Wm. Watson, assistant engineer; Joseph Darby, Wm. McCloy, John Welch, John Brant, Wesley Wright and Fred. Raubolt.

The subject of providing water works received much attention, and it was finally decided to bond the city for $50,000 to provide for the erection of suitable works, and the work was begun in the fall of 1889.

Public Schools and Public Library.

Wyandotte is one of the few cities in which a graduate from the high school is prepared for college without further examination. Before the city was incorporated it was in District No. 1, of Ecorse Township, and its public school was held in the old brown house lately sold to Mr. Bishop and converted into an opera house. Soon after the city charter was procured, steps were taken to build a large brick school-house in the Second Ward, and it was speedily erected. It was completed in 1868 at a cost of $23,000, is three stories high, and contains five rooms with scats for 340 pupils. In 1889 it had an enrollment of 264 pupils, with an average daily attendance of 198, for whose instruction, including the Superintendent, there was employed six teachers at a yearly expense of $2,870. This school is known as the Central Union or High School, and was opened the first Monday in September, 1869, as a graded high school with four departments. There are now five teachers. The Superintendents since the opening have been as follows: September, 1869 to June, 1871, Daniel H. Thomas; September, 1871, to June, 1875, Jerome H. Bishop j September, 1875, to June, 1876, J. H. Burke; September, 1876, to June, 1877, O. J. Roberts; September, 1877, to June, 1881, Miss Belle Widner; September, 1881, to June, 1886, C. O. Hoyt; September, 1886, to June, 1888, M. O. Graves; September, 1888, to--, L. M. Kellogg. In 1872 the city, at a cost of $8,000, erected a two story brick building in the Third Ward, containing four rooms, with a seating capacity of 200. employing two teachers, whose combined salary is $650 The enrollment in this is 101, with an average attendance of seventy-six. In 1886 the First Ward was supplied with a one story brick building containing two rooms and seats for eighty pupils, for which the city paid $8,000. The enrollment in this building is 118, with an average attendance of eighty-nine. It has two teachers who are paid the same salary as the teachers in the Third Ward School. The entire course from the Primary School through the Central Union or High School covers twelve years, or four years in each department. In addition to the public schools there arc several parochial schools which are mentioned in connection with the churches which control them. Connected with the public schools and under the control of the Board of Education is a public library of nearly 2,000 volumes. This is the outgrowth of the old school library which was only open from two to four P. m., each Saturday. In the summer of 1887. J. H. Bishop, then Mayor of the city, and President of the Board of Education, in behalf of the latter asked for and was granted by the Council an unoccupied room in the city hall for the purpose of establishing a library and reading room, he agreeing to donate an amount equal to that raised by the Board to put the library in such shape as would make it a credit to the city. Connected with the library is a reading room containing leading papers and magazines. The library was opened in September, 1887, and the published report of the Librarian, Mrs. Nellie K. Briggs, shows an average daily attendance of sixty in the reading room, and a monthly average of 800 books drawn. It is open daily from 2 to 6, and from 7 to 9:30 p. m. St. Patrick's, formerly St Charles's, Catholic Church.

The influx of workmen into Wyandotte in 1854, many of them being Roman Catholics, caused the Rev. Charles DePreiter, then in charge of the parrish at Ecorse, to establish a mission at Wyandotte, and in a short time he removed there and organized St. Charles’s church, of which he had charge until 1873. He was succeeded by the following priests: Rev. W. DeBeaver, 1872-1876; Rev. H. W. Grimme, 1876-1878; Rev. Hebstrett for one year, and F. J. Broegger, 1880-1883; Rev. T. Roeper, 1883-1886; Rev. George Langel, 1886-

The first church was built about 1854, and was a plain frame edifice now used for the parochial school. The closing of the mills rendered it impossible to sustain two churches, and this church and St. Joseph’s were temporarily merged under the charge of one priest until 1874. when Rev. W. DeBeaver, of Ypsilanti, took up the work, and at this date the present St. Patrick’s church began. Five lots were donated by Captain Ward, and the foundations of a new church laid, and after several years’ laborious work on the part of the congregation the church was dedicated in 1884 by Bishop Borgess, of Detroit. The building, by far the largest in the city, is of brick, cost $22,000, and seats about 700. The parish numbers some 200 families, and they have a parochial school of about 200 scholars, in charge of five Sisters of Charity. St. Joseph's Catholic Church.

This was organized in the spring of 1870, the Germans separating from the parent church and purchasing two lots at a cost of $700 and erected a church at a cost of about $8000. They organized with sonic seventy families, and now have 100. It has been in charge of the following priests: Rev. Undereiner, Rev. Trottenberger, Rev. Joseph Reis, Rev. H. W. Grimme, from 1876-1879; Rev. Hebstrett, 1879; Rev. F. J. Broeggcr, 1880-1883; Rev. Roeper, 1883-1886; Rev. Geo. Langel, 1886-1888; Rev. Charles Settele, January 27, 1888, to --.

First Presbyterian Church.

This society was organized September 9, 1856. Services were held at intervals in the old brown school-house by Rev. James Nall and others until April 17, 1860, when the society practically ceased, On December 26, 1866, Rev. Dr. Duffield. of Detroit, reorganized the church with eleven members received by letter, and four by profession of faith. A lot was donated by the Eureka Iron Company, and a church building seating 325 persons and costing $4,000 was dedicated October 16, 1867. From this date the church had the following pastors; Rev. O. D. Hibbard, from October 1867 to October, 1868; Rev. Sylvanus Warren, November 1868, to October, 1869; Rev. O. D. Hibbard, October, 1869, to May, 1870; Rev. A.W. Sanford, May, 1870, to May, 1873; Rev* W. K. Ingersoll, from June, 1873,10 June, 1877; Rev. I. N. Sprague from November, 1877, to April. 1883; Rev. Thomas Middlemiss, from January 1, 1884 to January 1, 1889. The church property is valued at $7,000, including a parsonage costing $1,400. From a membership of seven in 1856, they had 23 in 1860; 64 in 1870; 85 in 1880, and 95 in 1888.

Methodist Episcopal Church.

During the years 1855 part of the old brown school-house was built, and for two years was used as a place of worship, the Methodists and Presbyterians holding morning and evening services alternately, and the Episcopalians an afternoon service, the Methodist Episcopal ministers from Trenton taking charge of the services of their church. The Methodist society were the first to erect a house of worship. It was dedicated in 1860, and cost about $2,500, seating about 230. The following pastors have been in charge : Rev. John Levington, 1861 ; Rev. George Wilson, 1862: Rev. 0. J. Perrin, 1863: Rev. W. Mahon, 1864; Rev. John S. Joslin, 1865- 1866; Rev. J. M. Arnold. 1867-1868; Rev. W. J. Campbell. 1869-1871: Rev. H. O. Parker, 1872- 1873; Rev. W. J. Campbell, 1873; Rev. F. E, York, 1874; Rev. Daniel C. Jacokes. 1875: Rev E. Harry. 1876-1877 ; Rev. G. W. Owen, 1878-1879; Rev. B. F Pritchard, 1880-1881; Rev. C. W. Turill, 1882; Rev. S. P. Warner, 1883-1884; Rev. James Rose, 1885 ; Rev. S. E. Warren, 1886 ; Rev. J. Stanfield, 1887 to-.

In 1870 the church bad 99 members and 23 probationers ; in 1880,80 members and in 1888, 70 members and 10 probationers. The church property is worth about $6,000.

Protestant Episcopal Churches.

St. Stephen’s Church was organized October 16, 1860, Dr. E. P. Christian and John Bennett being the first wardens, and Dr. Christian has held the office of Senior Warden ever since, with the exception of one year. For some time services were held in the Methodist Church on Sunday afternoons. Fin- ally a lot was donated by the Eureka Iron Company, and in 1867 a church was built. The Rev. M. II. Ward, the first rector, was followed in 1866 by Rev. Josiah Phelps, who served two years, and was followed in 1868 by Rev. H. Banwell. who remained three years, and was succeeded by the Rev. Levi Courson, who was succeeded in 1875 by the Rev. George W. Bloodgood. Rev. Wm. Charles was called in October, 1887. The church building cost $3.500 and scats about 200. The present membership is 40, and the annual cost of sustaining the church is about $700. The church property is valued at $2,700. In connection with his charge in Wyandotte, the Rev. Mr. Charles also served St. Thomas’ Church at Trenton, St. John’s at Grosse Isle, and St. James’ at East Grosse Isle. Evangelical Lutheran Trinity Church.

This society was organized July 13, 1861. purchased a lot for $700. and the following summer erected a house of worship. Services meanwhile were held in private houses by the Rev. J. A. Huegli of Detroit. The pulpit was supplied by Rev. J. G. Walthew from August 30, 1863. to November 26, 1867; Rev. M. Halboth from August, 1868 to October 16, 1871 ; Rev. G. Markworth from November 19. 1871 to April, 1887; and by Rev. J. J. Bernthal since August. 1887.

Under the pastorate of Mr. Bernthal the old church became too small to accommodate the members, and a new brick church, costing exclusive of furniture $11,000, was built. It was dedicated September 23. 1888, and scats 800. In connection with the church is a parochial school with about [60 pupils. From 1863-1867 the school was in charge of the minister as teacher; after that date a regular teacher was obtained, and since 1878 two have been employed.

The old church building is used as a school- house, as is also a building adjoining the church. The present value of the property, including the school buildings, is $18,500. The membership since the organization of the society has increased from 30 voting members in 1861 to 84 in 1870; 160 in 1880, and 181 in January, 1889. There are about 1.100 persons connected with the Church.

German Evangelical St. John's Church.

In 1870 some 25 members went out from the Evangelical Lutheran Church and under the pastorate of Rev. Frederick Zimmerman formed this church, which was organized May 14, 1870. A lot was presented by the Eureka Iron Company, and a church erected costing $7,000, and seating 400

It was dedicated in June. 1872. Mr. Zimmerman was succeeded on August 17. 1875 by Rev. P. Vontobel followed in June, 1877, by Rev. Theo. Munzert; in July, 1879. by Rev. J. G. Fetzer; in April, 1885, by Rev. Julius Schuman; on March 10. 1887, by Rev. F. Smidt. In 1880 the parish numbered 75 families, and now includes 130 families, representing about 800 persons. In connection with the church there is a parochial school in charge of the pastor, and having about 100 pupils. The value of the church property, including the pastor's residence and the school-house, is about $9,000.

Societies.

Wyandotte Lodge, No. 170, F. & A. M., was organized January 30, 1865.

E. B. Ward Lodge, No. 172, I. O. O. F., was granted a charter on November 18, 1871.

Wyandotte Council, No. 321. Royal Arcanum, was instituted May 2, 1879.

Turner Lodge, No. 563, Knights of Honor, was instituted March 14, 1877.

Wyandotte Branch, No. 36, C. M. B. A., was organized July 25, 1886.

Division No. 3, A. O. H., of Wayne County, came into existence October 23, 1882.

Iron City Lodge, No. 73. A. O. U. W., was instituted May 4. 1880.

Eureka Assembly, No. 6056, Knights of Labor, held its first meeting March 14, 1886.

Eureka Conclave, No. 41, Royal Adelphia, was instituted May 16. 1887.

The Arbeiter Verein was organized November 10, 1872.

The Wyandotte Courier.

This paper was independent in politics, and de- voted to the interests of the county, literature, agriculture, etc. It was first issued on June 5, 1867, and was the first newspaper ever published in the Iron City The office was in the second story of the Farnsworth Block, where the city ball is now located. J. Lee & Company were the publishers.

It was issued Thursdays, at $2 a year. The office was destroyed by fire in July, 1867, with a loss of $3,100. The paper was started up again on a small scale, but the great strike of the rolling mill men that year compelled its suspension.

BIOGRAPHICAL

BISHOP, Jerome Holland
BISHOP, Mathew H.
CLARK, George
EVANS, Thomas D.
HURST, James T.
KIRBY, F.A.
LAMBERT, Walter C.
LANGLOIS, Theophilus
RIOPELLE, Hyacinthe F.
SALLIOTTE, Alex M.