Wayne County Michigan
Genealogy and History

WAYNE, MICHIGAN

 


Wayne, MI - Main Street looking east (1920s) - contributed by Paul Petosky

The first settler here was George M. Johnson, who located in 1824 and opened a log tavern, where Hosie & Stellwagen's store is now located. The tavern was sold to a Mr. Simmons in 1826, who kept it for about three years. While under the influence of liquor he killed his wife, for which offense he was hanged on September 24, 1830. The first saw-mill in Nankin was built in 1834 by Ezra Derby on the east side of the old territorial road where it crosses the lower Rouge. The first frame house was built by Mr. Derby in 1834, a few rods east of the present Varney House, on the Chicago Road, and he also built the first store, which was located on the corner opposite the hotel. In 1832 he built a blacksmith shop on the public square about where the town hall now stands. A private school was kept in the buildfing in 1833 by Cornelia Hawley, a sister of Judge Elijah Hawley. In 1834 Ezra Derby recorded the first plat of Wayne. At that time it was called Derby's Corners. A part of the present village was laid ojut in 1835 under the name of Nankin, and for may years the postoffice here was known as South Nankin. It is on the line of the M. C. and F. & P. M., railroads. In 1836 a plat was recorded of a portion of the present village under the name of Wayne, and in 1839, there was a saw-mill, tavern, two stores and half a score of families. The village was incorporated by Act of April 2, 1869, and the corporation was to include the southeast quarter of Section 29, the southwest quarter of Section 28, the northwest quarter of Section 33, and the northeast quarter of Section 32 of the Town of Nankin. The Act provided that the first election should be held at the Union Hotel, on the second Monday in April, and on the third Monday yearly thereafter. It also provided for the election of a president, recorder, treasurer, and five trustees. The first election was held on April 12, 1869.

Hiram N. Collins and Charles T. Barnard, inspectors, and Wm. M. Hastings, clerk, were duty sworn by Ammon Brown, and the following officers were elected:

President, William R. Corlett; Recorder, Wm. M. Hastings; Treasurer, Ammon Brown; Trustees, Jacob D. Bunting, Frederick Marker, Sr., Thomas Morrison, Israel Bell, John J. Palmer.

The council was duly organized and the first meeting held April 20, 1869, at which time Stephen T. Curtiss was appointed marshal, and Andrew L. Chase, street commissioner. The subsequent officers have been:

1870 - President, David Walker and Ammon Brown, each part of a year; Clerk, James R. Hosie; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, A. C. Pitcher, Wm., Booth, Henry N. Wilford, John S. Wegler, Ammon Brown.

1871 - President, Thomas Morrison; Recorder, George W. Bedell; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, O. C. Abell, L. T. Blount, I. Bell, Wm. A. Pettingill, O. E. Warner.

1872 - President, William C. Steers; Recorder, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, J. F. Hammon, L. E. Doolittle, S. D. Smith, W.W. Bailey, J. R. Brace.

1873 - President, Oliver C. Abell; Recorder, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, L. E. Doolittle, J. F. Hammon, L. T. Blount, E. Derby, I. Stevenson.

1874 -  President, Charles H. Cady; Recorder, Curtis Brace; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, W. A. Pettigill, J. F. Hammon, W. Blain, A. L. Chase, H. Loss.

1875 - President, O. C. Abell; Recorder, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, W. C. Steers, I. Bell, F. H. Hubbard, H. L. Bedell, with L. E. Doolittle, and Thomas Morrison, each part of a year.

1876 - President, William R. Corlett; Recorder, George McGuire; Treasurer, John S. Egeler; Trustees, J. O'Connor, W. Pettigill, C. H. Cady, S. W. Walker, J. R. Hosie.

1877 - President, William R. Corlett; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, John S. Egeler; Street Commissioner, Hiram N. Collins; Assessor, George McGuire; Trustees two years, Jeremiah O'Connor, Wm. A. Pettigill, O. J. Turk; Trustees One year, Charles H. Cady, John F. Hammon, James R. Hosie; Constables, Wm. Blain, T. E. Deming.

1878 -  President, William R. Corlett; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, John S. Egeler; Trustees, James R. Hosie, Chas H. Cady, L. E. Doolittle; Street Commissioner, Hiram N. Collins; Assessor, George McGuire; Constable, Wm. Blain.

1879 -  President, William R. Corlett; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Trustees, John C. Stellwagen, Samuel W. Walker, Jr., David Zimmerman; Treasurer, Henry Loss; Assessor, T. Morrison; Street Commissioner, H. N. Collins; Constable, Wm. Blain.

1880 - President, Bradshaw Hodgkinson; Clerk, Ira M. Jennings; Trustees, James R. Hosie, Chas. H. Cady, James H. Rodgers; Treasurer, Chas. Kynoch; Assessor, Thomas Morrison; Street Commissioner, H. N. Collins; Constable, Edgar W. Pate.

1881 - President, Bradshow Hodgkinson; Clerk, Ira M. Jennings; Trustees, T. E. Deming, L. E. Doolittle, Geo. D.Parr, C. Brace, A. W. Meldrum; Treasurer, Henry Loss; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Assessor, David Zimmerman; Constable, Wm. Blain.

1882 - President, William C. Steers; Clerk, Henry W. Barnard; Trustees, James H. Rogers, Wm. A Pettigill, John S. Egeler; Treasurer, Henry Loss; Assessor, Thomas Morrison; Street Commissioner, L. H. Pitcher; Constable, Wm. Blain.

1883 - President, Bradshow Hodgkinson; Clerk, Edwin F. steers; Trustees, T. E. Demming, H. N. Collins, S. G. Hammon; Treasurer, Geo. H. Stellwagen; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Assessor, Thomas Morrison; Constable, E. Wilbur Pate.

1884 - President, James R. Hosie; Clerk, Joseph S. Brown and F. C. Wheeler, each part of a year; Trustees, B. Newkirk, Wm. Artley, M. Schmidt; Treasurer, Geo. H. Stellwagen; Assessor, Thomas Morrison; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Constable, Geo. A. Guest

1885 - President, Frank H. Knickerbocker; Clerk, William A. Marker; Trustees, John S. Egeler, Geo. M. Bennett, Chas D. Bunting; Treaurer, Henry Loss; Assessor, John Murphy Jr.; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Constable, Henry Fisher.

1886 - President, James R. Hosie, Clerk, William A. Marker and E. M. Murphy each part of year; Trustees, Edwin F. Steers, James R. Noble, Hiram Hawley, John Murphy Jr.; Treasurer, Henry Loss; Assessor, Giles H. Collins, Street Commissioner, James H. Pitcher, Constable, John J. Downer

1887 -  President, James R. Hosie, Clerk, William A. Marker; Trustees, T. E. Demingm, C. W. Chanmgers, S. D. Smith; Treasurer, Jacob D. Bunting;  Assessor, Giles H. Collins, Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher, Constable, John J. Downer 

1888 - President, David Zimmerman; Clerk, William A. Marker and G. H. Collins, each part of a year; Trustees, James R. Hosie, Wm. A. Chamberlin, John Harrison; Treasurer, J. D. Bunting; Assessor, Giles H. Collins; Street Commissioner, Phillip Spann; Constable, J. C. Smith

1889 - President, Theodore E. Deming; Clerk, Giles H. Collins; Trustees, Geo. H. Stellwagen, James M. Crouch, James R. Noble; Treasurer, John C. Stellwagen, Assessor, Wm. R. Corlett; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Constable, Joseph C. Smith.

1890 - President, William R. Corlett; Trustees, Theodore E. Deming, William Hoops, James R. Noble, Geo. H. Stellwagen, Michael Schmidt, Almond C. Parsons; Giles H. Collins; Assessor, Daniel M. chambers; Street Commissioner, Daniel Ackley; Constable, Joseph C. Smith.

Appointments by council: President pro tem., James R. Noble; Marshal Joseph C. Smith; Health Officer, Herbert E. Foster; Village Attorney, John F. Cullen; Chief Engineer Fire Department, Fayette Harris.

The first village lock-up was completed and occupied on July 29, 1869. On January 31, 1876, fifteen street lamps were put up at a cost of $141.20, and at intervals since they have been lighted. The village hall, located in the public square, is a two story frame building. A portion of the lower store is used as a jail, and part for the township meetings. The upper part was not finished off until August, 1880, it is used as a council room. The building was first occupied on November 14, 1878, and cost $1,400. In July, 1879, a special police force was organized, consisting of the village marshal and three policemen, L. E. Doolittle, E. Wilber Pate, and D. L. Adams, who were to act under instructions from the village attorney. In July, 1881, two Babcock fire extinguishers were purchased at a cost of $96. An effort was subsequently made to obtain a vote in favor of borrowing $2,500 to procure fire apparatus, but it was unsuccessful. On the morning of September 12, 1888, the O'Connor Block was destroyed by fire with a loss of $25,000, and during the winter of 1888-9 fires became so frequent that on January 18, 1889, the council offered a reward of $500, for the arrest and conviction of the incendiary.

The Union School building is a three story brick building, with seats for 300 pupils. It was erected in 1870 and 1871, cost $19,000 and was opened in the fall of 1871 by Prof. Boyd.


Wayne, MI (Depot - 1909) - contributed by Paul Petosky

Wayne has several advantages as a manufacturing center. The Michigan central and the Flit & Pere Marquette Railroads intersect at Wayne Junction less than a mile west of the village. A Citizen's Improvement Committee of ten was organized in 1887 for the purpose of holding out inducements to manufacturing establishments to locate in Wayne, and on December 5, 1887, at a special election, there was a unanimous vote to bond the city to purchase three acres of land as a site for public buildings. The land was purchased at a special meeting of the Council on January 7, 1888,  it was sold to the Prouty & Glass Manufacturing Company, of Detroit for $8,000. Their  establishment, which manufactures carriages and sleighs, was started in Detroit in 1881, and moved to Wayne in November, 1887. They give employment to an average of fifty men with a pay roll of $500; the annual output being estimated at $80,000. They make an average of 100 carriages monthly, and about 125 cutters, besides white work in the rough.

The elevator of Hosie & Stellwagen, located on the Michigan Central track near the north end of the village, was put in operation in 1880, and has a storage capacity of ten thousand bushels. They have handled an average of twenty-five thousand bushels each of wheat and oats annually, and one year reached seventy-five thousand bushels.

Source: History of Detroit and Michigan, Silas Farmer, 1890

 

 




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