NANKIN TOWNSHIP

Wayne County Michigan

Source: History of Detroit and Michigan, Silas Farmer 1890 - Part XIII Biographical Pg. 1330-1340



This township created an October 20, 1829, out of part of what had been the Township of Bucklin, consists of Town 2, North of Range 9 East. As it was created out of Bucklin, and as that township no longer exists, it seems proper to give here the names of the officers of that township, especially as the most of them remained in the new Township of Nankin. The township officers of Bucklin were as follows:

1827. Supervisor. Marcus Swift; Clerk, Joseph Hickox; Assessors, Joseph Hanchett, Wm. McCarty, Henry Wells, L. G. Hanson. A. Fox ; Collector, Aaron Thomas; Overseers of the Poor, Joseph Kingsley, John F. Reupley; Commissioners of Highways, George M, Johnston, Elisha Warren, Harvey Tuttle; Constables, Aaron Thomas. James Abbott, Joseph Young; Fence Viewers, James Bucklin Joel Thomas, Joshua Chamberlin Joseph Fowler, James Dune. Wm. Hickox. Jr., Wm. Osborn.

1828. Supervisor, Marcus Swift; Clerk, Joseph Hickox; Assessors, Henry Wells. Thomas Harper, Joel Thomas; Collector, A. Thomas; Highway Commissioners, John J. Andrews Wm. Osborne. J. Thomas; Overseers of the Poor, John J Reupley, Jos. Kingsley; Constables, Jas. Bucklin, Jas Abbott.

1829. Supervisor, Marcus Swift; Clerk, James F. Chubb; Assessors, Thomas Harper, Henry Wells, Joel Thomas; Collector, James Bucklin; Overseers of the Poor, Jos. Kingsley, J. F. Rupeley; Highway Commissioners, Thomas Harper, Wm. Osband, Wm. Fraser; Constables, J. Abbott, J. Bucklin, A. Thomas; School Inspectors, James F. Chubb, T. Harper, P. Cater, B, F. Fox, M. Harrison.

The first township meeting of Nankin was held at the house of Henry Wells on the first Monday of April, 1830. The name was borrowed from the empire of China, and some interesting facts on this and other points will be found in Chapter XXII. The township officers have been as follows. The name of the Supervisor only can be found for the years 1830 and 1831, in which years Marcus Swift was serving:

1832. Supervisor, Marcus Swift; Clerk, G. D. Chubb; Collector. Adolphus Brigham; Assessors, James Dunn. Dexter Briggs, Leonard Harrison; Overseer of the Poor, Marcus Swift; Commissioners of Highways. J Kingsley Timon Downer, Norman Putnam; Constables, Reuben Starks, Adolphus Brigham, Z. H. Hastings.

1833 Supervisor, G D. Chubb; Clerk, Latnon A Fowler; Assessors, A. Brigham, N. Eld ridge, V. Wightman; Collector, A Brigham; Treasurer, J. Kingsley; Poormaster, M. Frazier; Highway Commissioners. S. Barker, W. Norris. M Everett; School Commissioners, J. Dunn, H. Wells. A Perrin ; Constables, R Starks. A. Brigham. 1834. Supervisor, Adolphus Brigham; Clerk, Silas Joslin; Assessors, J. Gunning. H. Durfee, J. Haynes; Highway Commissioners, J. Briggs, Wm. Hawley, T. Dickerson; Poormasters. J. Patterson, J. Lewis; Collector, N. Tallmadge ; Constables, R. Starks, N. Tallmadge, Wm. Curtis.

1835- Supervisor, Ammon Brown (he also appears to have been present as Justice of the Peace); Clerk, Leonard G. Harrison; Assessors, S. Barker, R. Campbell, J. I). Corey ; Highway Commissioners, V Wightman, S. H. Hazard, D. L. Van Aukin; Collector, N. Putnam; Poormasters, W. Norris, O. Dickinson ; School Commissioners. J. Mason. C. Newell, V. Wightman; Constables, N. Putnam, J. Rhead, N. Blanchard; School Inspectors, A. Brown, O. Dickinson, T. Munger, J. Street, D. L. Van Auken.

1836. Supervisor, Ammon Brown; Clerk, Josiah Mason; Assessors, V. Wightman,T. Street, S. H. Hazard; Highway Commissioners, Wm. Osbond, D. L. Van Aukin, V. Wightman ; Poormasters, T. Dickinson, S. Torbert; Collector. N. Putman; School Commissioner. J. Mason, C. Newell, L. G. Harrison; School Inspectors, D. H. Hume, W. Edmonds, M. Swift, A. Brown, T. D. Corey; Constables. J. Rhead, N. Putman; Justices of the Peace, A. Brown, E, Deaby, W. Edmonds, M. Swift.

1837. Supervisor, Ammon Brown; Clerk, Josiah Mason; Assessors, W. Norris, E. Straight, D. L Van Aukin; Collector, J. M. Wightman; Poormasters, S. Torbert, E. Straight; Highway Commissioners, W. White, M. Swift, W. Edmonds; School Inspectors, J. M. Hume. W. White, D. L. Van Aukin; Justice of the Peace, V. Wightman; Constables, J M. Wightman, T. Munger, S H. Collins, S P. Cady.

1838 Supervisor, Glode D. Chubb; Clerk, Harry Lewis; Assessors. S. H. Aldrich, B. C. Bunnell, T. Munger; Collector, S. S. Torbert; Poor Masters, T. Dickerson, James Pattison; Highway Commissioners, Wm. Osband, Geo. C. Nash, James Pattison; School Inspectors, Z. Knight, J. M. Hume, T. Munger; Justices of the Peace. A. S. Stevens, S. H. Aldrick; Constables, S. S. Torbert, S. P. Cady, N. Blanchard, W. L. Barker.

1839. Supervisor, Morrison Swift; Clerk, Barnabas C. Bunnell; Treasurer, J. Mason; Justice of the Peace, J. Ganong; Assessors, V. Wightman, J. I). Corey, A. P. Clark; School Inspectors, A. Brown, W. Edmonds, O. P. Dresser; Highway Commissioners, D. L Van Auken, J. Clark, W. Norris; Poor Masters, T. Dickerson, J. Gutiong; Collector, W. L. Barker; Constables, A. Beeman, J. M. Wightman. W. L. Barker, I. Wright.

1840. Supervisor, Volney Wightman; Clerk, Samuel P. Cady; Treasurer. J. Mason; Justice of the Peace, A. Brown; Assessors, A. P. Clark, J. D. Corey, W. Hawley; Collector, A. Beeman; School Inspectors, W. Edmonds, O. P. Dresser, A. Brown; Poor Directors, T. Dickerson J. Ganong; Highway Commissioners, W Norris D. L. Van Aukin, J. Powell; Constables, A Beeman N. Blanchard.

1841. Supervisor, Samuel P. Cady ; Clerk, Josiah Mason; Treasurer, P. Mason ; Justice of the Peace, A. L. Stevens; Assessors, J Dawson, J. D. Corey, V. Wightman; Collector, W. Edmonds; School Inspector, A Brown, O. P. Dresser, D. L. Van Aukin; Poor Directors J. Speers, P. Mason ; Highway Commissioners, G. Cooper, V. W. Blodgett. A. P. Clark ; Constables, W. Edmonds, A. Fitzgerald, N. Blanchard J. Phillips.

1842. Supervisor, Morrison Swift; Clerk. Samuel P. Cady; Treasurer, V. Wightman; Justice of the Peace, E. Harvey; Assessors, A. P. Clark, G. Cooper; School Inspectors, J D. Corey, O. P. Dresser, A. Brown; Poor Directors, M. Swift, J. Rhead ; Highway Commissioners, V. Wightman, J. Dawson, G. Cooper; Constables. A. Beeman, A. Brink.

1843. Supervisor, Ammon Brown; Clerk. Barnabas C. Bunnell; Treasurer, S. P Cady; Justice of the Peace, O P. Dresser; School Inspector, for two years, A. Brown, for one year, O. P. Dresser; Highway Commissioners,G. Cooper, A P. Clark, J. Rhead ; Poor Directors, M. Swift, P. Mason ; Assessors, W. Edmonds, J. D. Corey ; Constables A. Beeman, A. Brink, S. D. Curtiss, A. Fitzgerald. 1844. Supervisor, Volney Wightman; Clerk. Barnabas C. Bunnell; Treasurer, W. Edmonds; Justice of the Peace, S. W. Aldrich ; Assessors, J. D. Corey. J. Dawson; Highway Commissioners, A. Patchen, E. Warner, E. T. Glass; School Inspector, O. P. Dresser; Poor Directors, P. Mason, W. Ganong; Constables, W. R. Curtiss, A. Brink, A. Pate. J. Phillips.

1845. Supervisor, Volney Wightman; Clerk, Barnabas C. Bunnell; Treasurer, W. Edmonds; Justice of the Peace, A. Patch in; Highway Commissioners, E. T. Glass, E. Warner, D. L. VanAuken; Poor Directors, P. Mason, W. Ganong; School Inspector, R. Brown; Constables, W. R. Curtiss, J. Rhead, C. F. Wilkerson, Geo Morea.

1846. Supervisor, Volney Wightman; Clerk, Barnabas C. Bunnell; Treasurer, W. Edmonds; Justice of the peace, E. Hawley, Jr.; Assessors, J. Dawson, A. Patchin; Highway Commissioners, J. M. Palmer. N. Blanchard, J Stanton; School Inspector, A. Brown; Poor Directors, P. Mason, M. Warner; Constables. W. Edmonds, J. Stanton.

1847. Supervisor, Ammon Brown; Clerk, David Walker; Treasurer, S. P. Cady; Justices of the Peace, E. T. Class, D. Straight; School Inspector, W. G Porter; Poor Directors, G. Cooper, W. Edmonds ; Assessors, V. Wightman, S. T. Curtiss; Highway Commissioner, for three years, J. Lathers, for two years, H. Fink, for one year, M. Sweegles; Constables, J. Stanton, W. R. Curtiss, A. Rhead, W. Edmonds.

1848. Supervisor, Ammon Brown; Clerk, Barnabas C. Bunnell; Treasurer, E. Warner; Justice of the Peace, A. L. Stevens; School Inspector, W. Brown; Poor Directors, M. Warner, D. L. Van Aukin ; Highway Commissioner, M. Sweegles; Con- stables, U. H. Blodgett, W. R. Curtiss, L. Doolittle, A. Brink.

1849. Supervisor, Ammon Brown; Clerk, Charles H. Cady; Treasurer, E. Warner; Justice of the Peace, B C. Bunnell; School Inspector, E. Hawley, Jr.; Highway Commissioner, J. D. Corey; Assessors, J. Dawson, J. D. Corey; Poor Directors, S. P. Cady, A. Stewart; Constables, J. Dawson, W. R Curtiss. J. L. Lock, A. Pate.

1850. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Charles H. Cady ; Treasurer, James Q. Carver; Justice of the Peace, E. Hawley,. Jr.; School Inspector, A. Brown; Highway Commissioner, E. Warner; Assessors, J. Dawson, V. Wightman; Poor Directors, S. P. Cady, J. Phillips; Constables, A. Pate, W. R. Curtiss, B. Lewis, U. H. Blodgett. 1851. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, John J. Wright; Treasurer, S. G. Hammond; Justices of the Peace, M. Sweegles E. Warner; School Inspector, E. Hawley, Jr.; Highway Commissioner, J. Ganong; Poor Directors, J. Dawson, A. Patchin; Constables. T. J. Dean, T. B. Downer, E. Terry, J. Stanton.

1852. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, John J. Wright; Treasurer, S. G. Hammond; Justices of the Peace, A. L. Stevens, D. G. Brown, A. Patchin; School Inspector, A. Brown; Highway Commissioner, J. D. Corey: Poor Directors, P. Doolittle, A. Brown; Constables, S. G. Hammond, P. Van Allen, T. J. Dean, A. Pate.

1853. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Charles H. Cady; Treasurer, E. O. Bennett; Justices of the Peace, A. Patchin. W. Edmonds; School Inspector, T. J. Dean ; Highway Commissioners, J. Rhead, J. Dawson; Poor Masters. G. Morea, D. Harrison ; Constables, T. B. Downer, B. Lewis, T. J. Dean. A. Pate.

1854. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Chas H. Cady: Treasurer, D. S. Brown; Justice of the Peace, Willard Edmonds; Highway Commissioner, D. Harrison; School Inspector, A. Brown; Poor Directors, G. Morea, J. Rhead ; Constables; G. D. Rogers, T. B. Downer, B. Goff, T. J. Dean.

1855. Supervisor, David Walker; Clerk, Harry Lewis; Treasurer, E. O. Bennett; Justice of the Peace. S. W. Walker; Assessors, L. Felton, V. Wightman; Highway Commissioners, G. Cooper C. Randall; Poor Directors, H. Fisk, E. T Glass; Constables, G. Wm. Walker. C. Wilber, R. J. Rhead, B. F. Goff.

1856. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Harry Lewis; Treasurer, E. O. Bennett; Justice of the Peace, A. L. Stevens ; Highway Commissioner, E. Warner; School Inspector, T. J. Dean; Directors of the Poor, G. Morea, J. Rhead; Constables, E. Glass, T. Downer, R. D. Rhead, G. W. Cooper.

1857. Supervisor, David Walker; Clerk, Ammon Brown; Treasurer. H. Allyn; Justice of the Peace, A. Patchin ; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; High- way Commissioner, B. Lewis, J Rhead; Constables, A. Beeman, H. L. Grover. E. Glass, R. D. Rhead.

1858. Supervisor, David Wralker; Clerk, Ammon Brown; Treasurer, H. Allyn; Justices of. the Peace, W. Edmonds, L. A. Van Aukin; School Inspector, R. J. Brown; Poor Directors, E. P. Lewis, D. F. Norton; Highway Commissioner, J. Curry; Constables, H. L. Grover, A. Beeman, R. D. Rhead, W. R. Corlett.

1859. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Ammon Brown; Treasurer, H. Allyn; Justice of the Peace, S. W. Walker; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; Highway Commissioner, E. Warner; Overseers of the Poor, E. P. Lewis, G. Morea; Constables, W. R. Corlett, T. Ackley, R. D. Rhead, J. Reeves.

1860. Supervisor, David Walker; Clerk, Ammon Brown; Treasurer, H. Allyn; Justice of the Peace, J. A. Peck; School Inspector, R. J. Brown ; Highway Commissioner, D. S. Hicks; Poor Directors, G. Morea, J. H. Curtiss; Constables. G. W. Cooper, T. Ackley, R. D. Rhead, D. R. S. Underwood.

1861. Supervisor, Daniel Straight; Clerk. Orange Butler; Treasurer. H. Allyn; Justice of the Peace, D. G. Brown ; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; Highway Commissioner, J. Lathers; Poor Directors, G. Morea, R. D. Rhead; Constables, J. Harrison, O. Trowbridge, G. Cooper. R. D. Rhead.

1862. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Truxton Haywood ; Treasurer, Orange Butler; Justice of the Peace, S. A. Cady ; Highway Commissioner, J. Rhead ; School Inspector, H. Strickland; Poor Directors, G. Morea, R. D. Rhead; Constables J. Harrison, O. Trowbridge. R. Lansing. R. D. Rhead.

1863. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Truxton Haywood; Treasurer, T. J. Ackley; Justice of the Peace, W Edmonds; School Inspector, S. A. Cady, A. Sherwood ; Highway Commissioner, W. Walker; Poor Directors, G. Morea, J. Rhead ; Constables, R. D. Rhead, O. Trowbridge, E. Corley. J. Hamson.

1864. Supervisor, David Walker; Clerk, Jacob D. Bunting; Treasurer, J. D. Locke; Justice of the Peace, H. Randall; Highway Commissioner, W. D. Dean ; School Inspector, Albert Sherwood; Poor Directors, L. E. Doolittle, R. D. Rhead; Constables, A. Bell, E. E. Glass, E. Cooley, R. D. Rhead.

1865. Supervisor, John J. Palmer; Clerk, David Walker; Treasurer, Thomas Ackly; Justice of the Peace, Ammon Brown; School Inspectors, S. A. Cady, R. Montgomery; Poor Directors, G. Morea, R. D. Rhead; Highway Commissioner, Glode D. Chubb; Constables. W. R. Curtiss, S. Joslin, E. Cooley, D. B. Newkirk.

1866. Supervisor, John J. Palmer ; Clerk, Jeremiah O'Connor; Treasurer, G. Stellwagen ; Justice of the Peace, G. W. Swift; School Inspector, T. Lather; Highway Commissioner, S. Joslin; Poor Directors, G. Morea, J. Sauslager; Constables, E. Cooley, W. R. Curtiss, J. M. Chambey, A. P. Rhodey.

1867. Supervisor, John J. Palmer; Clerk, William M. Hastings; Treasurer, J. L. Decker; Justices of the Peace, W\ Edmonds, W. D. Dean; School Inspector, A. Knickerbocker, Highway Commissioner, W. A. Van Aukin; Poor Directors, G. Morea. J. Sauslager; Constables, W. R. Curtiss, C. Bayliss, W. Pate, J. M. Chambers.

1868. Supervisor, George Stellwagen; Clerk, William M. Hastings; Treasurer, J. L. Decker; Justice of the Peace, L. A. VanAuken ; Highway Commissioner, A. Fitzgerald; School Inspector, S A. Cady; Poor Directors, G. Morea, D. G. Brown; Constables, Wm. Snyder, W. Cooper, J. Albaugh, F. Marker.

1869. Supervisor, George Stellwagen; Clerk, John Robson; Treasurer, J. L. Decker; Justice of the Peace, S. W. Walker; Highway Commissioner. M. Harrison ; School Inspector, C. H. Cady; Poor Directors, G. Morea, B. Marshall; Constables, L. Millspaugh. R. D. Rhead, C. G. Brown. F. F. Marker.

1870. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, John Robson; Treasurer, J. Rhead; Justice of the Peace. S. A. Cady; School Inspectors, C. H. Cady, S. A. Cady; Highway Commissioner, W. Cooper; Poor Directors, G. Morea, R. D. Rhead, Constables, L. Millspaugh, F. D. Rhead. F. F. Marker, W. Cooper.

1871. Supervisor, Willard Edmonds; Clerk, Lawrence Millspaugh; Treasurer, C. Brace ; Justice of the Peace, E. O. Bennett; Highway Commissioner, D. G. Brown; Drain Commissioner, A. Butler; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; Poor Directors, G. Morea, O. Butler; Constables, F. F. Markel, W. R. Curtiss. C. G. Brown, J. J. Stringer.

1872. Supervisor, Samuel A. Cady; Clerk, Samuel W. Walker; Treasurer, L. Millspaugh; Justice of the Peace, W. H. Heywood; School Inspector, Chas. H. Cady; Highway Commissioner, D. Cady; Drain Commissioner, Allen Butler ; Poor Directors, G. Morea, O. Butler; Constables, H. Barker, W. Cooper, W. Curtiss, C. Bayliss.

1873. Supervisor, George Stellwagen; Clerk, George W. Bedell; Treasurer, L. Millspaugh; Justice of the Peace, J. B. Wallace; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; Highway Commissioners, W. Copper; Drain Commissioner, A. Butler; Poor Directors, G. Morea, D. G. Brown ; Constables, J. M. Chambers, W. R. Curtiss, W. Cooper. B. J, Rhead.

1874. Supervisor, George H. Stellwagen and Joseph B. Wallace each part of a year; Clerk, Hiram N. Collins; Treasurer, S. Joy; Justice of the Peace, W. D. Dean ; Highway Commissioner, D. G.' Brown; School Inspectors, C. H. Cady; Drain Commissioner, W. Bell; Constables, J. M. Chambers, G. McCumber, F. F. Marker, B. J. Rhead.

1875. Supervisor, Joseph B. Wallace; Clerk, Hiram N. Collins; Treasurer, Samuel Joy and D. G. Brown, each part of a year; Justices of the Peace, B. Hodgkins, G. W. Walker; Superintendent of Schools, John Gillespie and S. A. Cady, each part of a year; School Inspector, C. H. Cady; Highway Commissioner, D. Cady; Drain Commissioner, L. Hix; Constables, J. A. Chambers, F. F. Marker, G. McComber, Reeman.

1876. Supervisor, Joseph B. Wallace; Clerk, Hiram N. Collins; Treasurer, C. H. Cady; Justices of the Peace, D. Hull, G. McGuire; Highway Commissioner, W. Bell; Superintendent of Schools, E. O Bennett, Jr.; School Inspector. L. R. Munson ; Constables, G. McComber, F. F. Marker, B. J. Rhead, T. H. Pate.

1877. Supervisor, Joseph B. Wallace; Clerk, Hiram N. Collins; Treasurer, John Robson; Justice of the Peace, C. H. Cady; Highway Commissioner, M. Bills; Supt. Schools, C. Cady ; School Inspector, L. R. Munson; Drain Commissioner, C. Ganong; Constables, A. Barnes, B. J. Rhead, G. McCumber, J. Fitzgibbons.

1878. Supervisor, Oscar S. Straight; Clerk, Hiram N. Collins; Treasurer, Jacob Stellwagen; Justice of the Peace, W. D. Dean; Supt. Schools, C. Cady; School Inspector, W. W. Duffield; Highway Commissioner, #M. Bills; Drain Commissioner, A. Beeman ; Constables, E W. Pate. George McCumber, J. Shook. A. Barnes.

1879. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, Hiram N. Collins; Treasurer, J. M. Vennoy; Justice of the Peace, S. W. Walker; Supt. Schools, W. H. Heywood; School Inspector, W. W. Duffield; Highway Commissioner, J. B. Wallace; Drain Commissioner, H. E. Heywood; Constables, A. Barnes, I. S. Hall, G. McCumber, F. E. Coleman.

1880. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, Theodore E Deming; Treasurer, C. Brace; Justice of the Peace, D. Hall; Highway Commissioner, C. Ganong; Drain Commissioner, A. Beeman; Supt. Schools, D. Zimmerman; School Inspector, W. W. Duffield; Constable, T. Tyley, H. Fisher, W. Cooper, C. Frank.

1881. Supervisor, William H. Heywood; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, C. Brace; Justice of the Peace, C. H. Cady; Highway Commissioner, P. Reed; Supt. Schools, D. Zimmerman; School Inspector, T. Raymo; Constables, E. W. Pate. T. Tyley, J. Nichols, F. E. Coleman.

1882. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, Hiram N. Collins ; Justices of the Peace, R. O. Rhead, S. D. Curtiss ; Highway Commissioner, M. Harrison; Drain Commissioner, H. E. Heywood ; School Inspectors, E. N. Lathers, E. S. James; Constables, D. Mead, W. Robinson, W. Blain, A. Howe.

1883. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady ; Clerk, John Fitzgibbons; Treasurer, H. N. Collins ; Justice of the Peace, W. A. Pettingill; Highway Commissioner, W. Cooper; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; Constables, C. M. Crane, A. Robinson, W. A. Robinson, G. W. Walker.

1884. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, John Murphy. Jr.; Treasurer, C. Merriman; Justices of the Peace, O. Van Alstyne, C. G Brown; Highway Commissioner. W. Cooper; School Inspector, W. Lathers; Drain Commissioner, J. M. Tuttle; Constables, J E. Lathers, H. Fisher, W. A. Robinson; W. Reynolds.

1885. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, James Murphy, Jr.; Treasurer, C. Merriman; Justices of the Peace, T. E. Deming G. Chilson; Highway Commissioner, J. Shook ; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; Constables, W. Reynolds, W. Hix, J. W. Rhead. B. Rathburn.

1886. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, Harry C. Robinson; Treasurer, E. F. Stevens; Justice of the Peace, R. M. Gardner; Highway Commissioner, Chas. H. Sweegles; Drain Commissioner, M Bills; School Inspector, J. F. Cullum; Constables, H. Fisher, VV. Sherman, B. Rathburn, B. Cortritz

1887. Supervisor, Charles H.Cady; Clerk,Giles H. Collins: Treasurer, H. Loss; Justice of the Peace, John F. Cullen; Highway Commissioner, C. H Sweegles; School Inspector, E. W. Brown; Constables, W. Cooper, J. C. Smith, J. W. Rhead. W. Dunn.

1888. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, William A. Marker and Giles H. Collins, each part of year; Treasurer, H. Loss; Justice of the Peace, James Gillespie; Highway Commissioner, W. A. Robinson; Drain Commissioner, W. Copper; School Inspector, S. A. Cady; Constables, O. N. Baker, W. Reynolds, A. Treois J. W. Rhead.

1889. Supervisor, Charles H. Cady; Clerk, Fayette Harris; Treasurer, G. L. Nash; Justice of the Peace T. E. Deming; Highway Commissioner, W. A. Robinson; School Inspector, G. H. Brown; Constables J. T. Brown, O. N. Baker, S. Sims, J. G. Fisher.

1890. Supervisor, C. H. Cady; Clerk, G H. Collins; Treasurer. G. L. Nash; Justice of the Peace, S. A. Cady; Highway Commissioner, W. A. Robinson; School Inspectors, C. Cady, J. F. Cullen; Board of Review, J. J. Stellwagen, J. R Noble; Drain Commissioner, H. E. Heywood; Constables, J. W. Rhead, J Ryan, F. Remian, J. C. Smith. Schools.

The condition of the schools, as shown by the Inspectors’ reports for the year ending September 3, 1888 is as follows: There were seven whole and three fractional districts, enrolling 790 pupils, with an average daily attendance of 470. Four brick houses, costing $20,500, and seating 508, and six frame houses, costing $3,000, and seating 282. Four male teachers and fourteen female teachers were employed. In six of the districts there were libraries containing a total of 1,587 volumes.

The population of the township in 1850 was 1,617; in 1860; 2,168; in 1870, 2,956; and in 1880. 3,231. The valuation of the property in 1840 was $126,904; in 1850. $73,518; in 1860, $286,814; in 1870, $340,120; and in 1880, $1,077,750. The apparent decrease in values between the years 1840 and 1850 is evidently owing to the low valuations affixed in order to escape as much as possible of the county and State taxes.

Streams and Names.
The principal stream in the township is a branch of the River Rouge, which runs nearly east and west through the lower portion of the town. A stream of the extreme north of the township was formerly well known as Tonquish Creek, and was named after the old Pottawattomie Indian chief. A plain or prairie in the adjoining township on the east was designated as Tonquish Plain, and under the treaty of November 17, 1807, two sections of land where his village was located near the river, were reserved for the Indians. Interesting details of the troubles of the early settlers with Tonquish and his band are given by Melvin D. Osband in Volume 3 of the Pioneer Collections of Michigan, and the following account is collected from that and other sources: Among the early settlers in 1812, commencing at the swing bridge on the Rouge and working west towards Wallaceville, were Joseph Brown, of what was afterwards known as the Salisbury farm and also as the Weaver farm, Thomas Anderson, and in the rotation named Wm. McCarthy, Francis Choon, Francis Laren, Widow Coutte, John Sargent.- Stacy, John Thomas, Aaron Thomas, Alanson Thomas, Capt. Macomb, Joel Thomas; then came the Harrison tract, Francis Dumay,-Hanchett, Jerry Dean, Hiram Fahns, Chappel farm, William Bucklin, John Cramer, Chauncy Brown, John W. Tompkins, W. Gridley, F. Eldridge, Thomas Johns, David Bucklin,- Tuttle, Joseph Hickox and James Abbott.

After the peace of 1815 the Pottawattomic Indians were disaffected and troublesome, and frequently committed little depredations on the settlers along the River Rouge, west of Detroit. They manifested no desire to engage in open hostilities, but were indifferent to the rights of the whites. Tonquish, their chief, was a leader in these acts of lawlessness, arrogant and imperious Followed by his band, he would enter the houses of the settlers, and demand and obtain various articles. Upon one occasion he called at the house of Alanson Thomas, who lived on the brow of a hill on the north side of the River Rouge, about two miles below' the village of Dearborn. Mr. Thomas was fixing up Some shelves for his wife’s convenience, when he heard a voice behind him, and turning around, he saw Chief Tonquish, who ordered Mr. Thomas's wife to hand him something which he coveted. Upon Mr. Thomas demanding, “ What are you doing here,” the chief sprang at him, but he met the brawny fist of Thomas, and was landed senseless on the other side of the room. Mr. Thomas then administered several kicks to the fallen brave, and finally threw him out of the back door. Then looking up he saw several of the band standing near by, who had evidently witnessed the discomfiture of their chief. One of them, a young son of Tonquish, scowled, shook his head and said, "Bime-by you be dead.” “Well, dead or alive,” said Thomas, “I’ll venture to give you a Hogging,” and picking up a green withe that had been used to fix his fence, he chastised the Indian severely. He jumped up and down and yelled, and gave the war whoop in vain, as none of his companions came to his rescue. Mr. Thomas anticipated trouble as a result of the encounter, but the Indians after that were afraid of and avoided him. Subsequently Chief Tonquish called at the cabin of Thomas Johns and demanded of Mrs. Johns that she supply them with food. The best that she could do did not please them, and throwing the victuals in her face, they went on. Some two miles west near John Sargent’s place, they met Simon Shover with a basket of bread which he was carrying to some men who were cutting timber for a dock. The Indians attempted to take the bread, and Shover resisted and called for help, which speedily came from the lumbermen. During the melee a dog bit one of the Indians in the leg. The Indians demanded that the dog be killed, but young Sargent refused and started to put the dog in the cellar. As he turned towards the house, the son of Tonquish shot him in the back, and he died from the wound soon afterwards. 1 he settlers were at once called together and started in pursuit of the Indians. Among them were John Sargent, Aaron and Joel Thomas, Capt. Macomb, William Bucklin, Amos Gordon, Tell Nichols, Simon Shover, Francis Ruff, Francis Dumay and David Bucklin. Each was armed with a good rifle and well supplied with ammunition. Being determined to avenge the death of their pioneer neighbor, they went through the woods to the Tonquish Plains, where they overtook the Indians the following morning on what is known as Section 7 in Nankin. At that point the Indians turned to the left, crossed the stream known as Tonquish Creek, and passed out of sight over the opposite bank. The settlers moved rapidly forward, but on reaching the locality no Indian could be seen. They, however, hastily pushed on, and the Indians soon arose from where they had hid and fired, but fortunately no person was seriously hurt. The settlers then rushed on them before they had time to reload and captured all but Tonquish‘s son Major Macomb, who led the party aimed his gun at him to shoot him, but Tonquish stopped him and said he would call him back, but instead of doing so, he told him in Indian language to run, and when he had reached a point that he thought beyond the range of Macomb's gun, the old chief turned and said : “ He no come back, shoot him.” The major shot, and he fell The chief, who had been disarmed except his knife, then sprang at Macomb, but James Bucklin, and one account says Amos Gardner, prevented his reaching Macomb, who soon had his gun reloaded. When the chief saw that the gun was nearly loaded he ran, but before he had ran many steps, the major shot him in the back. He fell mortally wounded, died the same day, and was buried by the Indians 1 his skirmish took place on Section 6 in the township of Nankin. The sanguinary affair practically put an end to Indian forays in this vicinity, but both Macomb and Shover, who were inveterate Indian haters, had to plow and work, with rifle ready for instant use in their defense. Macomb finally left the country. His favorite way of saying he had shot an Indian was, " Well, I’ve got another blanket with a buttonhole in it.” About 1838, some boys opened the grave of Tonquish and took from it the remains of the chief’s gun, and some personal ornaments.

Churches.
Among the first Methodist Episcopal preachers in this section of the country, if not the very first, was Rev. Marcus Swift, who came to Michigan in 1825. It was his custom to preach wherever a few people could be gathered together. Very soon afterwards Rev. Messrs. Elliott, Sayres, Brockway, Triggs, Jones, Herr and Collins came. In 1835 a church was organized. H. S. Kilburn was the first class leader, and William Gilbert the second. The first quarterly meeting was held in 1835. 1 he first church building was erected in 1862, during the second year of Rev. B. H. Hedger’s pastorate. It was dedicated on January 16, 1863, and cost about $3,700. The names of the several pastors are as follows: 1834, John Sayres; 1835-1836, W. H. Brockway and C. Babcock ; 1836-1837, Arthur B. Elliott; 1837-1838, W. H. Brockway and C. Babcock; 1838-1839, C. Babcock and J. Blanchard; 1839-1840, Robert Triggs and W. H. Collins; 1840-1841, Adam Minnis and - Bradford; 1841-1842, A. Fleming, - Dubois and - Bruce; 1842-1843, - Dubois and-Bruce; 1843-1844, Henry Penfield and Gideon Shurtleff; 1844-1845, John Gray; 1845-1846, J. Blanchard, W. H. Haze; 1846-1847,Daniel Bush, W.Benson ; 1848-1849, Daniel Bush, Frederick Glass, 1849- 1850, J. C. Abbott, B. F. Pritchard; 1850-1851, W. Mothersill, Robert Bird; 1851-1852, Isaac F. Collins, VV. Fox; 1852-1853, Samuel Bessy, J. C. Wortly; 1853-1855, E. Steele, C. Seaman; 1855- 1856, C. Mosher, H. Culby; 1856-1857, J. W. Keltogg, J. Dwella; 1857-1858, J. W. Kellogg, A. J. Bigelow; 1858-1859, W. C. Way; 1859-1860, W. C. Way ; 1860-1861, George Smith ; 1861-1862, B. H. Hedger, C. Church; 1862-1863, B. H. Hedger; 1863-1865. J. W. Kellogg; 1865-1866, T. G Potter; 1868-1871, J. A. Mcllwain; 1871— 1872, E. E. Pearman; 1872-1874, J. S. Joslin ; 1874- 1876, L. C. York; 1876-1877. W. J. Campbell; 1877-1879, H. O. Parker, 1879-1881, T. H. Baskerville; 1881-1884, J. H. Kilpatrick; 1884-1886. J. C. Wortly; 1886-1889, J. A. Mcllwain.

The first meeting of those favoring the organization of a Congregational Church was held in the school-house on August 20, 1848. A lot was purchased, and the First Congregational Society of Wayne was organized on October 7, 1848. It was proposed to raise money to erect a church to be used jointly by the Congregationalists and Methodists. This plan was carried into effect, and the building was completed and dedicated in January, 1850. It seated 350. The following persons served as pastors : Rev. John S. Kidder, August, 1848, to July, 1851 ; Rev. James Nall, July, 1851, to February, 1855; Rev. Orrin C. Thompson, February, 1855, to September, 1856; Rev. Norman Tucker, September, 1856, to February, 1859; Rev. O. C. Thompson, 1860-1861 ; Rev. John D. Pierce, from 1861-1863. While the church was without a regular pastor. Elders Swift and Van Norman filled the pulpit from 1864 to 1867 ; Rev. Charles Cutler, from February, 1867, to May, 1869; Rev. O. C. Thompson, from January. 1870, to October, 1871, Rev. Obadiah Hobbs, April, 1872, to January, 1873; Rev. Jonas Estabrook, February, 1873, to October, 1878; Rev. Augustus G. Upton, October, 1878, to August, 1880; Rev. David C. McNair, from September, 1880. to April, 1883 ; Rev. George C. Empson, from October, 1883, to December. 1887; Rev. Willis S. Colton, from June 3, 1888. Starting with nine members in 1848, there were 15 in 1850; 27 in 1860; 40 in 1870; 252 in 1880; and 152 in 1889. The church property is valued at $2,500.

St. Mary's Catholic Church has always been a mission of the church at Dearborn. The services were conducted by a priest from that place, services being held for many years in private houses. In the fall of 1864, services were first held in their new and unfinished church building, and then, until February, 1865. in O’Connor Hall. The church being then completed, it was blessed, and services have been held since on one Sunday and one Wednesday in each month, and occasionally on festival days. The church building is of brick, cost about $3,000 and seats 200. When the church was built there were about forty-five families and since then it has only held its own.

A Baptist Church was organized in Nankin as early as 1835, but the society ceased many years ago. The present organization, which dates from 1868, for a long time held its services in a schoolhouse known as the Somerville School, located on Section 3 in the town of Romulus. They have no church building, and have had but two pastors, Rev. George McGregor, who served four years, and Rev. T. Shaftoe, who was serving in 1888, at which time the society had twenty-eight members.

In 1864 General Van Aiken built a church on the northwest quarter of Section 1, which is free to all denominations desiring to use it. He also platted a cemetery at the same time, but it was long since abandoned. In 1859 S. G. Heyward built a free church on his farm on the northwest quarter of Section 7, and platted a cemetery, which has also been abandoned. The " Old Cemetery ” on the southeast quarter of Section 28, at the northerly limits of the village of Wayne was opened about 1835. The lots are owned by the old families and descendants of the first settlers. The Gunong Cemetery was first used about 1840, and is on the Gunong farm on the northeast quarter of Section 35. St. Mary's Cemetery, on the southeast quarter of Section 28, is used in connection with the Roman Catholic parish of the same name, and dates its consecration with the building of their church. Glenwood Cemetery, on the eastern half of Section 28, was opened in 1872 by a private corporation.

WAYNE.
The first settler here was George M. Johnson, who located in 1824 and opened a log tavern, where Hosie & Stellwagen’s store is now located. The tavern was sold to a Mr. Simmons in 1826, who kept it for about three years. While under the influence of liquor he killed his wife, for which offense he was hanged on September 24,1830. The first saw-mill in Nankin was built in 1834 by Ezra Derby on the east side of the old territorial road where it crosses the lower Rouge. The first frame house was built by Mr. Derby in 1834, a few rods east of the present Varney House, on the Chicago Road, and he also built the first store, which was located on the corner opposite the hotel. In 1832 he built a black- smith shop on the public square about where the town hall now stands. A private school was kept in the building in 1833 by Cornelia Hawley, a sister of Judge Elijah Hawley. In 1834 Ezra Derby recorded the first plat of Wayne At that time it was called Derby's Corners. A part of the present village was laid out in 1835 under the name of Nankin, and for many years the postoffice here was known as South Nankin. It is on the line of the M. C. and F. & P. M., railroads. In 1836 a plat was recorded of a portion of the present village under the name of Wayne, and in 1839 there was a saw-mill, tavern, two stores and half a score of families. The village Was incorporated by Act of April 2, 1869, and the corporation was to include the southeast quarter of Section 29, the southwest quarter of Section 28 the northwest quarter of Section 33, and the northeast quarter of Section 32 of the Town of Nankin. The Act provided that the first election should be held at the Union Hotel, on the second Monday in April, and on the third Monday yearly thereafter. It also provided for the election of a president, recorder, treasurer, and five trustees. The first election was held on April 12, 1869. Hiram N. Collins and Charles T. Barnard, inspectors, and Wm. M. Hastings, clerk, were duly sworn by Ammon Brown, and the following officers were elected:

President, William R. Corlett; Recorder, Wm. M. Hastings; Treasurer, Ammon Brown; Trustees, Jacob D. Bunting, Frederick Marker, Sr., Thomas Morrison, Israel Bell, John J. Palmer. The council was duly organized and the first meeting held April 20, 1869, at which time Stephen T. Curtiss was appointed marshal, and Andrew L. Chase, street commissioner. The subsequent officers have been:

1870. President, David Walker and Amnion Brown, each part of a year; Clerk James R. Hosie; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, A: C. Pitcher, Wm. Booth, Henry N. Wilford, John S. Egeler, Ammon Brown.

1871. President, Thomas Morrison ; Recorder, George W. Bedell; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, O. C. Abell, L. T. Blount, I. Bell. Wrm. A. Pettingill, 0. E. Warner.

1872. William C. Steers; Recorder, Theodore E. Deming ; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn ; Trustees, J. F. Hammon, L. E. Doolittle, S. D. Smith, W. W. Bailey. J. R. Brace.

1873. President. Oliver C. Abell; Reeorder, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn ; Trustees, L. E. Doolittle, J. F. Hammon, L. T. Blount, E. Derby, I. Stevenson.

1874. President, Charles H. Cady; Recorder, Curtis Brace; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trusts, W. A. Pettingill, J. F. Hammon, W. Blain, A. L. Chase, H. Loss.

1875- President, O. C. Abell; Recorder, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, Henry S. Kilburn; Trustees, W. C. Steers, I. Bell. F. H. Hubbard, H. L. Bedell, with L. E. Doolittle, and Thomas Morrison, each part of a year.

1876. President, William R. Corlett; Recorder George McGuire; Treasurer. John S Egeler; Trustees J. O'Connor, W. Pettingill, C. H. Cady, S. W. Walker, J. R. Hosie.

1877. President, William R. Corlett; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, John S. Egeler; Street Commissioner, Hiram N. Collins; Assessor, George McGuire; Trustees two years, Jeremiah O’Connor, Wm. A. Pettingill, O. J. Turk ; Trustees one year Charles H. Cady, John F. Hammon, James R. Hosie; Constables, Wm. Blain, T. E. Deming.

1878. President, William R. Corlett; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Treasurer, John S. Egeler; Trustees, James R. Hosie, Chas. H. Cady, L. E. Doolittle; Street Commissioner, Hiram N. Collins; Assessor, George McGuire; Constable, Wm. Blain. 1879. President, William R. Corlett; Clerk, Theodore E. Deming; Trustees, John C. Stellwagen, Samuel W. Walker, Jr.. David Zimmerman; Treasurer, H. Loss;Assessor, T. Morrison; Street Commissioner, H. N. Collins; Constable, Wm. Blain.

1880. President, Bradshaw Hodgkinson; Clerk, Ira M. Jennings; Trustees, James R. Hosie, Chas. H. Cady, James H. Rodgers; Treasurer, Chas. Kynoch; Assessor. Thomas Morrison; Street Commissioner, H. N. Collins; Constable, Edgar W. Pate.

1881. President, Bradshaw Hodgkinson; Clerk, Ira M. Jennings; Trustees, T. E. Deming, L. E. Doolittle, Geo. D. Parr, C. Brace, A. W. Meldrum; Treasurer, H. Loss; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Assessor, David Zimmerman; Constable, Wm. Blain.

1882. President, William C. Steers; Clerk, Henry W. Barnard; Trustees, James H. Rogers, Wm. A. Pettingill, John S. Egeler; Treasurer, H. Loss; Assessor, Thomas Morrison; Street Commissioner, L. H. Pitcher; Constable, Wm. Blain.

1883. President, Bradshaw Hodgkinson; Clerk, Edwin F. Steers; Trustees, T. E. Deming H. N. Collins, S. G. Hammon; Treasurer, Geo. H. Stellwagen; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Assessor, Thomas Morrison; Constable, E. Wilbur Pate.

1884. President, James R. Hosie; Clerk, Joseph S. Brown and F. C. Wheeler. each part of a year; Trustees, B. Newkirk, Wm. Artley, M. Schmidt; Treasurer, Geo. H. Stellwagen; Assessor, Thomas Morrison; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Constable, Geo. A. Guest.

1885. President, Frank H. Knickerbocker; Clerk, William A. Marker; Trustees, John S. Egeler, Geo. M. Bennett, Chas D. Bunting; Treasurer, H. Loss; Assessor, John Murphy Jr; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Constable, Henry Fisher.

1886. President, James R. Hosie; Clerk, William A. Marker and E. M Murphy each part of year ; Trustees, Edwin F. Steers, James R. Noble, Hiram Hawley. John Murphy, Jr.; Treasurer, H. Loss;; Assessor, Giles H. Collins; Street Commissioner, James H. Pitcher; Constable, John J. Downer.

1887. President, James R. Hosie; Clerk, William A. Marker; Trustees,T. E. Deming; C. W. Chambers, S. D Smith; Treasurer, Jacob D. Bunting; Assessor, Giles H. Collins; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Constable, John J. Downer.

1888. President, David Zimmerman; Clerk, William A. Marker and G. H. Collins, each part of a year; Trustees, James R. Hosie, Wm. A. Chamberlin, John Harrison; Treasurer, J. D. Bunting; Assessor, Giles H. Collins; Street Commissioner, Phillip Spann ; Constable, J. C. Smith.

1889. President, Theodore E. Deming; Clerk, Giles H. Collins; Trustees, Geo. H. Stellwagen, James M. Crouch, James R. Noble; Treasurer, John C. Stellwagen; Assessor, Wm. R. Corlett; Street Commissioner, Francis H. Pitcher; Constable, Joseph C. Smith.

1889. President, Theodore E. Deming; Clerk, Giles H. Collins; Trustees, Geo. H. Stellwagen, James M. Crouch, James R. Noble; Treasurer, John C. Stellwagen; Assessor, Wm. R. Corlett; Street Commissioner, Francis II. Pitcher; Constable, Joseph C. Smith.

1890. President, William R. Corlett: Trustees, Theodore E. Deming, William Hoops James R. Noble, Geo. H. Stellwagen, Michael Schmidt, Almond C. Parsons; Giles H. Collins; Assessor, Daniel M. Chambers; Street Commissioner, Daniel Ackley; Constable. Joseph C. Smith.

Appointments by council: President pro tem., James R. Noble; Marshal Joseph C. Smith ; Health Officer, Herbert E. Foster; Village Attorney, John F. Cullen; Chief Engineer Fire Department, Fayette Harris.

The first village lock-up was completed and occupied on July 29, 1869. On January 31, 1876, fifteen street lamps were put up at a cost of $141.20, and at intervals since they have been lighted. The village hall, located in the public square, is a two story frame building. A portion of the lower store is used as a jail, and part for the township meetings. The upper part was not finished off until August, 1880, it is used as a council room. The building was first occupied on November 14. 1878, and cost $1,400. In July, 1879, a special police force was organized, consisting of the village marshal and three policemen, L. E. Doolittle, E. Wilber Pate, and D. L. Adams, who were to act under instructions from the village attorney. In July, 1881, two Babcock fire extinguishers were purchased at a cost of $96. An effort was subsequently made to obtain a vote in favor of borrowing $2,500 to procure fire apparatus, but it was unsuccessful. ?On the morning of September 12, 1888, the O’Connor Block was destroyed by fire with a loss of $25,000. and during the winter of 1888-9 fires became so frequent that on January 18, 1889, the council offered a reward of $500, for the arrest and conviction of the incendiary.

The Union School building is a three story brick building, with seats for 300 pupils. It was erected in 1870 and 1871, cost $19,000 and was opened in the fall of 1871 by Prof. Boyd.

The population of Wayne in 1870 was 833, and in 1880, 919. The assessed valuation of the property in the village is $260,000; in the township, $1,100,000.

The Wayne County Review, an eight page, five column paper, is published every Friday at $r per year, by E. F. Steers. Its beginnings were as follows. In the fall of 1876 two boys,brothers, named E. F. and E. E. Steers, set up as amateur job printers, their outfit consisting of 6 1/2 x 10 1/2 hand inking novelty press, for which they paid $10. With this and $18 worth of type they began. The following spring Mr. E E. Steers went to California, and the job office was sold to their uncle, J. H. Steers, who in the fall of 1877 started the Weekly Review as a four column quarto without a subscriber or advertisement, and with little or no experience. The paper was printed on a 13x19 half medium Universal press. The venture proved a success, and on April 12, 1878, the paper was enlarged to a five, and July 5 to a seven column quarto. On December 6, the name was changed to the Wayne County Review’, with an office in both Plymouth and Wayne, the former in charge of O. S. Howard as editor. In July, 1887, it was purchased by the present proprietor, E. F. Steers. Wayne Masonic Lodge, No. 112, secured a dispensation on January 14. 1858. and held its first regular meeting on July 19, following

A Universalist Society was organized about 1858 by the Rev. Andrew' J. Stebbins, and the first sermon was preached by the Rev. Dr. Snead. A church was built and dedicated in 1863, and was under the charge of Rev. Chauncey Knickerbocker, until his de^th in 1884. Since then only occasional services have been held.

St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, U. A. C, was organized by the Rev. George Deckinger in the fall of 1876. For a time the meetings were held in Steer’s Hall. A lot was afterwards purchased for $100, and a church erected, which was dedicated on August 12, 1877. It cost $1,350. The pastors have been: Rev. George Deckinger, from September, 1876 to April, 1878; Rev. George Tierck, from May, 1878, to May, 1880; Rev. George Deckinger until September, 1880: Rev. J J. Bichsenstin, from January, r 88 r, to October, 1883; Rev. Robert Weise, from May. 1885, to May, 1886; Rev. Wm. Renz. from May, 1886, to May, 1888; Rev. John Baumann, from July, 1888. From October, 1883, to May, 1885, the church was with- out a pastor, occasional services being held by neighboring ministers. They had twenty-five members when the church was organized/and now have thirty.

Wayne has several advantages as a manufacturing center. The Michigan Central and the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroads intersect at Wayne Junction less than a mile west of the village. A Citizen’s Improvement Committee of ten was organized in 1887 for the purpose of holding out inducements to manufacturing establishments to locate in Wayne, and on December 5, 1887, at a special election, there was a unanimous vote to bond the city to purchase three acres of land as a site for public buildings. The land was purchased and at a special meeting of the Council on January 7, 1888, it was sold to the Prouty & Glass Manufacturing Company, of Detroit for $8,000. Their establishment, which manufactures carriages and sleighs, was started in Detroit in 1881, and moved to Wayne in November, 1887. They give employment to an average of fifty men with a pay roll of $500; the annual output being estimated at $80,000. They make an average of 100 carriages monthly, and about 125 cutters, besides white work in the rough.

The elevator of Hosie & Stellwagen, located on the Michigan Central track near the north end of the village, was put in operation in 1880, and has a storage capacity of ten thousand bushels. They have handled an average of twenty-five thousand bushels each of wheat and oats annually, and one year reached seventy-five thousand bushels.

COUNTY HOUSE STATION.
This station on the Michigan Central Railroad, as its name indicates, is for the convenience of the county establishment known as the Poor House and Insane Asylum. The history of these institutions up to 1886 is given in Chapter LXVII. In the latter year a building designed for use as a chapel, offices, and store room was erected at a cost of 823,000, and other buildings, such as gas and boiler houses, at a cost of $12,000 additional. In 1888 further additions were made to the main building at a cost of $60,000, and the establishment as now one of the largest and most complete in the country.

INKSTER, FORMERLY MOULIN ROUGE.
This place, laid out in 1839 is on the northeast quarter of Section 25. and is named after Robert Inkster, one of the early settlers. The post-office was formerly called Moulin Rouge (Red Mills). It is on the Michigan Central Railroad.

The Methodist Episcopal Church at this place formed part of the Huron Mission in 1832, and has always been attached to either Wayne or Dearborn. The church building was erected in 1860 It will seat 250, and is worth about $2,000.

The East Nankin Presbyterian Church, located about two miles west of Inkster, was organized in August, 1840. Their church building was first used on October 1, 1846. It will seat 140, and is worth about $300. They had 17 members in 1840; 26 in 1850; 36 in 1860; 55 in 1870; 44 in 1880; and 52 in 1889. The first pastor, Rev. Joshua A. Clayton. served from 1840 to 1845. when the church building was erected. The society left the old school Presbyterian body, and organized as an associate Presbyterian Society subordinate to the Associate Presbytery of Richland, Ohio. Joseph McClintock then served for two years, and was followed by stated supplies at short intervals, no less then forty different ministers of the Associate and United Presbyterian Churches serving until September, 1872, when the church left the United Presbyterian Synod and joined the Detroit Presbytery.

PERRINVILLE.
This is one of the oldest villages in the county and is named after Abraham Perrin, who bought land here in 1829 The Methodist Episcopal Church at this place was organized in 1864, and is attached to Wayne. They worship in the Union Church building erected in 1845 seat 200 and is worth about $1,000. pike's peak.

This locality, about the middle of the extreme north part of the township, is said to have received its name from the fact that a man named Sheperd, from Pike’s Peak, erected a mill here. It contains a general store, blacksmith shop and water grist mill, the latter built in 1848 by Samuel Hardenberg, and since owned by I. M. Lewis.

SCHWARTZBURGH.
This locality is one mile west of Pike’s Peak, and is named after John E. Schwartz, who filled various State Offices, and was a prominent character in early territorial days

BIOGRAPHICAL

EBENEZER O. BENNETT, M. D
Was born January 16, 1838, at Maumee, Ohio, and is the son of Ebenezer O., and Laura (Scott) Bennett. His father, who was of English descent was born on June 13, 1806. His mother, who was a second cousin of the late General Winfield Scott, and of Scottish ancestry, was bom February 10, 1810. Both of his parents were born and reared at Ridgefield, Connecticut, from which place they moved to Ohio in the fall of 1837. and to the township of Nankin, in Wayne County, Michigan, in 1840, settling on a farm adjoining what is known as the Nankin Mills. Their family consisted of five sons and one daughter, of which Ebenezer 0. Bennett, Jr., is the third. As they were pioneers in their section of the country they suffered the hardships usual to such a life, yet they managed to give their children a good education, one graduating from the State Normal School and two from the University of Michigan. The father died on June 17, 1883, and the mother on December 26. 1888. Both of them were highly respected and widely known throughout Wayne County.

The boyhood days of Ebenezer O. Bennett, Jr, were spent on the farm in Nankin, and in 1855 he entered the Union School at Ypsilanti, where he remained for three years receiving a good academic education. On leaving school he engaged in teaching until the Civil War broke out He with others, listened to the call for men, and on October 23, 1863, he enlisted at Detroit in Company M, of Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, and was at once sent to the scene of action. He was engaged with his regiment in the battle of Lookout Mountain, and in 1864 was placed on detached service until the close of the War, and on May 8, 1865, was mustered out of service. On his return home, he again engaged in teaching until 1875, when he entered the medical department of the University of Michigan, and on graduating in 1878 was appointed by the regents house surgeon of University hospital. He held this position for one year, and then resigned to become Medical Superintendent of the Wayne County Asylum, which position he still holds. Since Dr. Bennett has become Superintendent of the Asylum he has introduced some radical changes in the management of the institution and in the care and treatment of the insane. He has profited by the field offered for observation anti investigation into mental diseases, and to-day is an acknowledged expert on insanity. Though advancing many new ideas on this subject, his views have been vindicated by the successful manner in which he has treated many desperate cases, while the affection and esteem with which he is regarded by those under his charge, and the model condition of the Asylum testify both to the good qualities of his heart and to his executive ability and foresight. Though a Republican in principle. Dr. Bennett has been too deeply engrossed with the cares of the large institution under his control to give much attention to polities. He is a member of the Congregational Church, and belongs to the State Medical Society, to the American Medical Society, and was a member of the Ninth International Medical Congress held at Washington in 1887.

Physically he is a man of prepossessing and scholarly appearance. Quiet and unostentatious in his ways, he nevertheless possesses great energy of character and strong reserve power. Slow in forming his judgments, he nevertheless acts promptly on them when once formed. Of a friendly, hospitable nature, he quickly makes friend And long retains them His career is a good illustration of what industry, determination, correct habits and upright conduct do to create success. He is eminently a self-made man, starting out with nothing but the talents which nature,bad conferred on him. he steadily persisted, overcoming obstacles, and slowly rising, until today he holds one" of the most responsible medical positions in the State.
On October 28, 1863. he married Janetta D. Felton. They have bne son Joseph E. Bennett, and one daughter Mary A. Bennett. His son is also a member of the medical profession, having graduated from the medical department of the University of Michigan, in June, 1890.

Silas Farmer History of Detroit 1890