Finding Ancestors wherever their trails led with Genealogy Trails History Group

Beltrami County Minnesota 
Genealogy and History


Local People


Ah-ke-wain-zee

- - - Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) February 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Ah-ke-wain-zee is visiting Joseph Omen. He is very much in favor of our Farmers' club and talks of joining. We hope that he will.

- - - Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) January 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Ah-ke-wain-zee, John Day, and a number of other Indians are hauling wood to the school.


Ah shah ish kah we ne nee
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) March 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Agency Items. Ah shah ish ka we ne nee, of Little Creek and uncle of Dan Taylor walked into the agency office March 11th to report his return to the reservation after an absence of some eighteen years in Canada. He had made his home in Canada with a band of Chippewa living near Rat Portage on Lake of the Woods.


John Bailey
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) Saturday, January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

THE CITY. Deputy Sheriff John Bailey is at Turtle River on official business today.


Solomon Blue
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) February 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Solomon Blue made a trip to Red Lake the 10th on hearing that his pension money had arrived.


C. S. Boss
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
TO ENGAGE IN BUSINESS.
C. S. Boss, who for some time past has been engaged as entry clerk at the Minnesota & International depot, has resigned his position and yesterday left for Detroit, Minn., where he will engage in business with his brother, who is a successful contractor and builder at that city, with a large and growing business.


Fred Brinkman
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
THE CITY. Fred Brinkman is making considerable repairs to the Opera Buffet.


Frank Brun
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) March 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Frank Brun installed a telephone in his house the 15th.


Cyril Butler and Hugh Broomfield
Source: The Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) June 6, 1907; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

TWO YOUTHS SHOW PRESENCE OF MIND.
A. C. Butler, Aged 70 Years, Narrowly Escaped Filling a Watery Grave in Lake Irving Tuesday Afternoon - Was in the Water an Hour.

Through the heroism of Cyril Butler and Hugh Broomfield, two little boys aged respectively 11 and 10 years old, A. C. Butler, aged 70 years, was saved from drowning, Tuesday evening, on Lake Irving.

Mr. Butler, who is the father-in-law of Mrs. A. Butler of this city, and who is here on a visit from Mizpah, Minn., took the little butler boy, who is his grandson, and the Broomfield boy and went to the south shore of Lake Irving in a boat to do some fishing. They tied the rope on the end of the boat to a boom post and began fishing, in a spot about twenty rods from the shore, where the water is nat least twenty feet deep.

In some unaccountable manner, the boat was overturned throwing all three of the occupants into the water. Mr. Butler grasped the boom post and the boys took hold of the log that was lying beside the post. The old gentleman was chilled to the marrow b the water, but was greatly encouraged by his two little companions, who beseeched him to have courage and they would certainly be rescued.

The Broomfield boy got on Mr. Butler's shoulders and climbed to the top of the post, from which place he assisted in keeping Mr. Butler's head above the water. The Butler boy baled some of the water from the boat and paddled to the shore. He saw A. A> Carter and another gentleman passing at a distance in a launch and hailed them, but they were too far away to hear him.

The little fellow then ran through the woods and succeeded in heading off the party in the launch. The boy was taken in and the boat was hastened to where Mr. Butler and Hugh Broomfield were battling for their lives in the waves.

Mr. Butler had given up twice, but had been encouraged by Hugh to "hang on," which he did with great difficulty, the boy giving him every assistance possible in keeping afloat.

When Mr. Carter arrived on the scene they found that Mr. Butler was about to succumb to the cold and sink to the bottom of the lake. He had a death grip with his hands on the boom post, and it was with difficulty that his fingers could be unloosened. The old gentleman and his youthful companions were brought to the city and taken care of, and have suffered no ill effects beyond being slightly stiff from their hour's stay in the cold water.


Earl Carson
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) February 2, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
THE CITY.
Earl Carson, who has been in charge of the county treasurer's office and has been succeeded by County Treasurer French, will remain at the office until some of the details of the work which came under his management are adjusted. He is undecided as to what he will do in the future.


M. Cleary
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) Saturday, January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

THE CITY. M. Cleary, the well known Tennstrike saloon man, was transacting business in Bemidji yesterday.


Joe Dempsey
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) February 1, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
THE CITY. Joe Dempsey was appointed cook at the quarantine hospital by the board of county commissioners and assumed his duties this afternoon.


Mabel Douglass
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) January 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Mabel Douglass is the new laundress, Mrs. Beaulieu having resigned.


Mr. Dupris
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) January 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

Mr. Dupris, farmer at Cross Lake District, nearly lost his team in the lake Tuesday morning, when attempting to cross from Ponemah to Redby after freight. The ice is nearly twenty inches thick, but owing to the spreading of the ice, formed a crack a few hundred feet from shore, and when Mr. Dupris drove over it a chunk about thirty feet wide broke off and let his team into the lake. But for the presence of mind of Mr. Breckner and Mr. Dupris and hard work of all present, the team would have been lost. Teams have been hauling freight for several weeks. The weather has been very cold, and owing to the rising temperature ice has bulged up resulting in a break when the team was driven on.


G. W. Elliot
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
THE CITY. G. W. Elliot, the logger and sawmill man from Buena Vista, is in the city on business today.


George Fleming
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
TO TAKE CHARGE OF STORE.
George Fleming, who has been employed at the hardware department of E. H. Winter & Co.'s for some time past, has gone to Mountain Iron, on the range, where he will look over a hardware store, the management of which has been offered to him. He is not yet decided whether he will accept or not. Mr. Fleming is one of the best hardware men in the city and has many Bemidji friends who would regret to see him leave the city.


J. F. George
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) February 4, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
HEARD THE PAINTED FAIRIES.
J. F. George returned yesterday from his trip to Grand Forks where he went Monday to hear the Bostonians sing "The Serenade." Mr. George is fond of opera and he says he had never more thoroughly enjoyed a production than the one he listened to at Grand Forks.


Agnes Gurneau
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) March 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Mrs. Agnes Gurneau is getting quite a reputation as a sheep doctor.


Louis Gurneau
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) February 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

Louis Gurneau hauled in a couple of loads of wood the 10th for an old man on the lake road who had no team.


Gwon-ay-aush-ung
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) January 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Gwon-ay-aush-ung is the only man who did not bring in his children promptly to school the morning of the second of January.


George Highlanding
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) January 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

AGENCY ITEMS.
George Highlanding is on the police force again, being the oldest man on the force now from a point of service and age. George says that he feels like a young man again.


John Johnson
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) April 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
AGENCY NEWS ITEMS.
John Johnson is clearing a strip of land on his place at Little Rock, with the assistance of his neighbors and friends in that locality who recently turned out en masse for the purpose of giving John a little shove. Everybody ought to follow after John and get busy. Quite a number have begun preparations for their spring farm work by ordering machinery and seeds.


Stanley Johnson
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) March 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

Stanley Johnson, the genial agency stenographer has demonstrated his countrymen's national sport, that of traveling on skis. Stanley explains that when he falls down "he's a durn Swede" but when he successfully rides the brink he maintains his countrymen's honor.


Martin Kruger
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) February 2, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
THE CITY.
Martin Kruger, a woodsman, was slugged with a sling shot and robbed of $6 in the rear of a Minnesota avenue saloon last night. A man named McGuire, who followed him out of the place just before the affair occurred was arrested today at Cass Lake and must answer to the charge.


J. Geo. Littledeer
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) February 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
We regret to learn of the expulsion from the Carlisle Indian School of J. Geo. Littledeer of the Red Lake Reservation.


Claude Masten
Source: Duluth News-Tribune (MN) May 6, 1910; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

BOY DENIES OWN FATHER.
Young Runaway From Tenstrike, Minn., Stolidly Declines to Recognize Parent.

WAS PICKED UP AT DULUTH UNION STATION.
Improbable Story of Claude Masten Resulted in Investigation.
Habitual Deserter.

Face to face with his own father in Probation Officer Resche's office yesterday morning a 14-year-old boy calmly denied his parentage and refused to recognize his father until confronted with strong evidence that his "gave" was up and that it was necessary either to go home or to the training school.

The youngster is Claude Masten, who when picked up at the Union station a week ago by a deaconess, said that his name was John Richardson and that he had come to Duluth on the advice of a man with whom he was living at Funkley, Minn., to escape being arrested for stealing coal and to visit an aunt here.

He stuck to his improbable story so persistently that he was turned over to the boy's department of the Young Men's Christian association for care until the persons he named could be communicated with.

Boy's Story False.
As a result of an investigation Colonel Resche found the boy's story false and learned that his father is John Masten of Tenstrike, Minn. The father was persuaded to come to Duluth and yesterday morning was in an adjoining room when the boy was brought before Colonel Resche.

Although the probation officer told young Masten that he could not verify his story in any particular the little fellow still allowed that he had told the truth.

"Well, step into that room a minute, I want to speak with this man alone," said Colonel Resche, indicating the room where sat the boy's father.

Young Masten opened the door and as he saw his father gave a slight start. It was but momentary, however, and he calmly walked in and took a chair without another sign of recognition, watched all the time by the probation officer and the man who had accompanied him from the boy's department.

"Don't you know that man? Isn't he your father?" asked Colonel Resche.

"No, sir. He is not my father."

"Well, don't you know him? Didn't you ever see him before?"

The boy gazed intently at his father for a minute and then replied, "Well, he looks like a man named Masten."

It then took but a few minutes of argument with the boy before he decided that rather than go to the training school he would go home. He will be taken to Tenstrike today.

This is the third time the boy has run away. When he was but five years old he started out on a journey for himself but was caught after he had gone but about five miles. Last year he did the same and again two months ago.

On this last trip he went to Funkley, where a woman who ran a restaurant took pity on him and gave him food and lodging in return for small services. He then got a job with a farmer with whom he stayed until he got together money enough to come to Duluth.


Hans Milbury
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) Saturday, January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

THE CITY.
Hans Milbury, a homesteader from town 131 was transacting business at the court house this morning. He was on his way to Crookston where some of his children are attending school.


Me-zhuck-eence
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) March 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Agency Items. Me-zhuck-eence of Ponemah transacted business at the Agency on March 3rd.


No-din-e-be-nais
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) February 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
No-Din-e-be-nais, one of the Down River Indians, recently bought a horse from Joe W. Lawrence.


Jerry O'Kelliher
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) February 4, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
O'KELLIHER RETIRES.
Jerry O'Kelliher this week retires from the Kelliher Mercantile Co. at Kelliher. Mr. O'Kelliher's interests it is understood have been disposed of to the Crookston Lumber Co. Just what his plans are for the future are not stated. A. H. Harris, formerly of this city will continue as resident manager for the Mercantile Co. at Kelliher.


Joseph Omen
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) March 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Joseph Omen has been getting out telephone poles during the past week.


Earnest Prebble
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) February 3, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

STOLE AWAY TO BE A SOLDIER
Bemidji Boy's Patriotism Exceeds His Scruplus for the Truth. [sic.]

FORGED PARENTS' NAME TO LETTER GIVING CONSENT.
Earnest Prebble Enlists for Cavalry Service But Will Probably Be Sent Back Home.

The longing to be a soldier was too strong in the breast of Earnest Prebble, the seventeen year old son of W. P. Prebble, to be conquered and when he found that his parents would not consent to his joining the army, he deliberately forged their name to a letter of consent given the recruiting sergeant and when the Great Northern train east bound yesterday rolled out of the city with its bunch of recruits Prebble was among the rest.

The lad has long had a hankering for the military life and ever since the recruiting office was opened in this city he has importuned his parents with requests to be allowed to enlist. They steadfastly withheld it as they had another future in sight for Earnest, not as romantic and less inclined to vicissitude than the one he chose for himself.

Finally he presented himself at the recruiting office as a candidate for the consideration of the sergeant. Mr. Witte very promptly informed him, although he stated that he was past the age limit, that it would be necessary for him to secure the written consent of his parents before his application would be considered. In a short time the boy returned with the necessary credentials and was duly accepted as a recruit.

He was enrolled as a cavalry recruit and shopped to St. Louis yesterday noon. Shortly after his departure the news reached his mother. His father is at present in the woods near Solway. She visited the recruiting office, learned the truth and was so overcome that she was taken seriously ill.

The case is an unfortunate one. Sergeant Witte will use every effort to have the boy returned to his home but it is a question whether this can be accomplished or not.


Frank Richards
Source: The Bemidji Daily Pioneer (MN) February 2, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Frank Richards, who has been in charge of the Red Lake Transportation Co.'s store, went to Minneapolis this morning. The company expects to close out its stock and leave Bemidji in about two weeks more.


John Sayers
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) March 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

Agency Items. John Sayers recently delivered 25,000 ft. of sawlogs for the agency sawmill.


Jonathan Taylor
[Source: The Saint Paul Globe (MN) January 4, 1880; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]

A JOLLY POSTMASTER
The Postmaster at Red Lake, Minn., in answer to an official circular from this division of the railway mail service, directing the return of a complete list of all local names, to which mail matter is sometimes addressed, and which are enrolled within his jurisdiction, responds in the following happy strain:

One hundred miles of mud and flood
Just now doth intervene
Between our happy hunting ground
And where the "Keen" are seen.
We have no "locals,"
But the lake doth stretch both far and wide,
And when the wind is on its ear
In comes the rolling tide;
We have no rail,
But then we have the "injins" all the same,
And when the white fish they can't take
They seek for other game.
JONATHAN TAYLOR, Postmaster.


Daniel Tracy
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) Saturday, January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

HOBO DAN HAS 'EM.
Daniel Tracy, committed to the county jail several days ago to serve thirty days for drunkenness has been very ill since his confinement with one of the worst cases of delirium tremens that has ever been developed at the county jail. Tracy neither slept nor ate for four days and night and required constant attention. He is now recovering nicely.


Hazel Olson
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) Saturday, January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

THE CITY. Miss Haze Olson, who has been the Pioneer's efficient stenographer for the past four months has resigned her position. She does not expect to accept employment for the present.


Brita Soland
Source: Duluth News-Tribune (MN) Thursday, August 15, 1907; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

Brita Soland is appointed postmaster at Spaulding, Beltrami county, Minnesota, vice F. Ihde, resigned, and Grace Weston, postmistress at Beaulieu, Mahnomen county, Minnesota, vice Viola Cook, resigned.


Oscar Whitefeather
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) January 15, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

CROSS LAKE ITEMS.
Oscar Whitefeather and his brothers are busily engaged in logging operations. This is the only camp that is going to get out a large scale of logs. There are two other outfits logging, but they are not getting out very many logs.


George Williams
Source: Red Lake News (Red Lake, MN) January 1, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
George Williams celebrated Xmas by working as usual.


C. C. Woodward
Source: Bemidji Daily Pioneer (Bemidji, MN) Saturday, January 30, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

C. C. Woodward this week purchased a fine farm of the Pillsbury estate. It is located at one of the prettiest spots at the head of Lake Bemidji and contains 160 acres.



HOME

Genealogy Trails History Group

Copyright ©Genealogy Trails