Hennepin County, Minnesota

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Biographies "B"


Babcock
Source: Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Mr. Babcock was born in Otsego County, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1831, and came to Minnesota Territory Sept. 28, 1855. The following spring he was ordained a minister of the gospel in the Baptist church, and in April brought his wife to Minnesota and began pioneer work, preaching from house to house, in pre-emption shanties, and doing hand-to-hand work, largely in Winona and adjoining counties. Later on, when churches were organized, he did pastoral work, part of the time being under appointment as a missionary of the Home Mission Society of New York, but was mostly dependent upon his own resources in the local fields. Health failing, he resigned the regular pastorate, but continued to preach part of the time in destitute fields and do outside work. Now, in his seventieth year, he preaches occasionally.
Mrs. Babcock, born in Otsego County, N.Y., Sept. 16, 1833, taught one of the first public schools of Wilson, Winona County, in 1856. Although many of her pupils have passed over to the other side, she still lives to enjoy the fruit of much hard - wrought pioneer work.
Mr. and Mrs. Babcock now reside in Minneapolis, and take pleasure in contemplating the marvelous development of their adopted Minnesota.


Charles Babcock
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BABCOCK Charles H, Wayzata. Office gen offices Great Northern Ry St Paul. Railroad official. Born Sept 21, 1862 in Minneapolis, son of Lucius A and Ellen M (Sully) Babcock. Married Florence L Holdridge Sept 25, 1889. Attended common and high schools in Minneapolis; worked on farms in vacations. Studied law in the office of Judge Isaac Atwater of Minneapolis; admitted to practice 1885; practiced law alone in Minneapolis 1885-93; member of Babcock & Garrigues law firm 1893; land comnr Great Northern Ry 1893 to date.


E. C. Babb
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) Submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Captain E. C. Babb was born in the village of Saccarappa, near the city of Portland, Maine, on February 1, 1834. His ancestors are descendants of old New England families, his mother, Mary Winslow, tracing her descent from Governor Winslow, of Massachusetts. Captain Babb received a good common school education in his native town, and, after teaching school for a while, learned the trade of a marble cutter. From the age of twenty-one to twenty-eight he was engaged in lumbering in northern Vermont and New Hampshire. It was while he was in this business that the war broke out, and he enlisted in the Ninth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer infantry. He participated in the battles of Bull Run (two), South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. In the latter he displayed such gallantry that he was promoted over six first-sergeants to the rank of second lieutenant. After Fredericksburg Captain Babb's regiment was sent west, and participated in the siege of Vicksburg. Later his regiment was detailed for service in Kentucky, and in 1863 and 1864 Lieutenant Babb served as staff officer during the campaign in East Tennessee. Here he received his commission as first-lieutenant. The following spring found him at Annapolis with his regiment where preparations were making for the final campaign under General Grant. He was in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, and all the battles about Petersburg until the final surrender. He was commissioned captain in January, 1865. On June 10, of the same year, he was mustered out of service at Concord, New Hampshire. Captain Babb came to Minneapolis in 1868. After a few years in the lumber business he became president of the Cedar Lake Ice Company, an office which he still holds. He has been a distinguished member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and has held the position of Commander of the Minnesota department. He is an esteemed member of the Loyal Legion, and is also a Mason and a Knights Templar. He became a Knights Templar in 1868, and is a member of the Zion Commandary, No. 4, of Minneapolis. In 1885 and 1886 Captain Babb represented the Eighth ward in the city council. In 1888 he was elected mayor. During his term of service as mayor occurred the great street railway strike, which called for the exercise of the soldierly qualities which the war had developed in the city's executive. Captain Babb was married on August 15, 1862, to Levee L. Chandler at Berlin Falls, New Hampshire.


Edward Backus
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BACKUS Edward W, Minneapolis. Res 75 Oak Grove st, office 602 Andrus bldg. Lumberman, manufacturer and merchant. Born Dec 1, 1860 at Jamestown N Y. Attended public schools at Red Wing and Featherstone Minn; U of M 1878-82. Entered employ of Lee & McCulloch lumbermen Minneapolis 1882; obtained working interest in the business 1883; member Lee & Backus successors to Lee & McCulloch 1884-86; E W Backus Lumber Co 1886-1894; E W Backus Lumber Co 1894-1900; Backus-Brooks Co 1900 to date. Pres Backus-Brooks Co; Koochiching Co lands; First Nat Bank of International Falls Minn; Rainy River Improvement Co; Columbia Gold Mining Co; Keewatin Lumber Co; dir Rainy River Lumber Co; Northwestern Nat Bank Minneapolis; Minn & International Ry Co and other similar organizations. Member Minneapolis, Minikahda and Lafayette clubs Minneapolis. Was a Roosevelt presidential elector in 1904.


George Backus
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BACKUS George Joseph, Minneapolis. Res 610 13th av S, office 226 Lumber Exchange. Lumber and cooperage stock. Born Feb 23, 1858 at Jamestown N Y, son of Abel and Anna (Anderson) Backus. Married Feb 14, 1894 to Catherine R Fallis. Attended public schools at Red Wing and Featherstone Minn; graduated from U of M, B S 1882. With Gull River Lumber Co 1883-84; with Lee & Backus lumber 1884-86; in fuel business 1887-89; in charge of sales dept E W Backus Lumber Co 1890-96; wholesale lumber trade 1897-1904; organized Backus-Judd Lumber & Cooperage Co also Dumas-Backus Lumber Co 1904; pres of former; sec and treas of latter. Member Commercial Club Minneapolis.


Ernest Bacon
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BACON Ernest, Minneapolis. Res 700 15th av S E, office 306 Globe bldg. Lands, loans and banking. Born Aug 13, 1851 in Princeton Ill, son of Amos N and Julia A (Harris) Bacon. Married March 12, 1879 to Julia S Kellogg. Educated in public and high schools Princeton Ill and Univ of Ill. Taught school Belleville and Princeton Ill 1875-77; farming 1877-83; moved to Burt Ia 1883; engaged in banking and loans; moved to Mankato Minn 1898; to Minneapolis 1903; v pres A D Clark & Co St Paul to 1903; member Bacon-Filkins Land Co; pres First Nat Bank New Salem N D.


Walter Louis Badger
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Walter Louis Badger is a native of Wisconsin. He was born at Fond du Lac, May 27, 1868, the son of George A. Badger, for years a successful merchant in that city, and Harriet E. Hastings (Badger.) Both parents came from good New England stock, and were natives of Massachusetts. Walter Louis attended the public schools until he was fourteen, when, ambitious to earn money to get into business, he left school. In the meantime his parents had moved, in 1878, to Minneapolis, and when Walter began to look for opportunity of earn money, one of the first things which presented itself was employment in the office at the Fair Grounds, when the fair was known as "Bill King's Show." He began his business career in the real estate office of J. Goldsbury, and continued there until going into business for himself in 1886, in the same line of trade. In 1890 he became a special partner of the firm of Corser & Co., and remained with that firm three years. He then withdrew and resumed the business alone in the New York Life Building, where he built up a good business and has charge of a number of large estates, including the real estate business of the Northern Trust Company, and some other prominent corporations. Mr. Badger is a Republican, although he has never taken a very active part in party matters. His principal interest in politics relates to municipal affairs, and he is an active promoter of municipal reform. He is a member of the Commercial Club of Minneapolis, the Royal Arcanum, a director of the Board of Trade, and also of the Northern Trust Company. He is an active member of Plymouth Church, and has been for a number of years treasurer of the Sunday school. He was married in 1890 to Miss Anna Dawson, of Keokuk, Iowa. They have two Children, Lester Roberts and Norman Dawson, aged four and two years, respectively.


Charles Bailey
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BAILEY Charles M, Minneapolis. Res 701 7th st S E, office 807 Pillsbury bldg. Dentist. Born Dec 6, 1843 at Portland Me, son of Lebbenns and Marrietta M (Clapp) Bailey. Married 1876 to Laura Longfellow of Machias Me. Attended the public schools in Portland Me until 1856 when entered law office of Deblois & Jackson as boy of all work. Studied dentistry in office of Dr G A Grant Calais Me 1862-65; associated in practice with Dr Amos Wilder of Calais 1865-67; practiced alone at Machias Me 1867-74; in fall of 1879 entered Harvard Dental School and was graduated in June 1874 to date. Filled chair of Dental Materia Medica Minn Hospital College 1886-88; chair of Prosthetic Dentistry and Orthodontria dental dept U of M 1888-95; professor Dental Materia Medica 1888-89; since 1895 in active practice.


Howard Bailey
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BAILEY Howard Dale, Minneapolis. Res 722 East 17th st, office 615 Andrus bldg. Lawyer. Born May 5, 1876 at Menominee Wis, son of Willis and Rubena (Weston) Bailey. Married Sept 30, 1903 to Florence L Burleson of S Shaftsbury Vt. Graduated from Menominee Wis High School and Stout Manual Training School 1894. Read law at River Falls and Hudson Wis 1895-98; admitted to bar 1898; practiced law at Superior Wis in association with Solon L Perrin 1898-1905; in Minneapolis 1905 to date. Member Co H 3d Inf W N G 1893-95. Member of Masonic fraternity and Royal League.


Joseph Barclay
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARCLAY Joseph J, Minneapolis. Res 1783 Humboldt av S, office 246-250 3d as S. Automobiles. Born Nov 21, 1859 in Prince George county Md, son of Thomas J and Elizabeth D (Jackson) Barclay. Married Sept 24, 1884 to Alice Willard. Educated in public and private schools of Washington D C. Shoe clerk in Washington 1875-81; bank clerk N D 1882-85; real estate N D 1885-92; added machinery to this line 1892-1902; automobile business under firm name of Barclay Auto Co 1902 to date. Pres Minot (N D) Light and Telephone Co.


Winfield Bardwell
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARDWELL Winfield W, Minneapolis. Res 3625 Pleasant av, office 310 Minn Loan & Trust bldg. Lawyer. Born July 18, 1867 in Excelsior, Hennepin county Minn, son of William E and Arminta (Hamblet) Bardwell. Graduated from the Excelsior schools and academy and U of M degrees of LL B and L M. Began the practice of law immediately after his graduation and has been continuously engaged ever since. Previous to graduation was stenographer and clerk in law office for 4 years. Is sec and dir of the Prince Construction Co. Member of the Minn State Legislature 1903-1905; chairman of Hennepin Delegation 1905. Member of Commercial Club, Masonic fraternity, Royal Arcanum and Minneapolis Whist Club.


Isaac Albert Barnes
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) Submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Isaac Albert Barnes is a native of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and traces his ancestry back to the early settlement of the country. His father, Isaac Barnes, Jr., and his mother, Emily Weston (Barnes), were both born at Plymouth, Massachusetts, and moved to New Bedford about 1850. The family line is easily traced back to John Barnes, who settled in Plymouth in 1632, twelve years after the town was founded. Isaac Barnes, great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Isaac Albert Barnes was born in New Bedford, September 7, 1852. His family were people of moderate circumstances, and although eager to obtain an education he was denied the advantages of college training. He attended the public schools and a private school at New Bedford, and gained experience and self-reliance, as many other successful men have, as a little street merchant selling newspapers and apples. But he had determined to be a lawyer, and finally succeeded in entering the Albany law school, where he graduated in 1877. He also read law in the office of Barney & Knowlton, of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and was admitted to the bar of that state from their office. This firm was among the leading members of the Eastern bar, Mr. Barney having been for a number of years associated with Ben Butler, while Mr. Knowlton is now attorney general of Massachusetts. Mr. Barnes also practiced law in Boston for a time, and March 10, 1882, came to Minneapolis in search of a wider and more promising field for a young attorney. He was induced to select Minneapolis as his home through a previous family acquaintance with the late Judge John M. Berry. Since his arrival here he has been engaged in the practice of law, and has also made considerable investment in real estate. He was interested in platting and selling Barnes's addition to the city of Minneapolis. Barnes' re-arrangement of Wright's addition, Barnes' subdivision in Layman's addition, Coplin's re-arrangement and Cole and Weeks' re-arrangement. Mr. Barnes is a Republican, and while he has never held any public office, has always taken an active interest in public affairs. He is a member of the Congregational Club of Minnesota; was twice a member of the executive committee. He is a member of the Commercial Club of Minneapolis and of Plymouth Congregational church. September 7, 1886, he was married to Lizzie L. Wilson, daughter of Hon. Hudson Wilson, of Faribault, Minn. They have three children living, Harriet W., Katherine and Sarah Elizabeth. Mr. Barnes has a pleasant home on Stevens avenue, and he and Mrs. Barnes enjoy the society and friendship of a large circle of cultivated people.

Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARNES Isaac Albert, Minneapolis. Res 1414 Stevens av, office 816 N Y Life bldg. Lawyer. Born Sept 7, 1852 in New Bedford Mass, son of Isaac and Emily (Weston) Barnes. Married Sept 7, 1886 to Lizzie L Wilson. Educated in public schools and private school New Bedford; graduated Albany Law School 1877. Admitted to bar and practiced in New Bedford; moved to Boston and then to Minneapolis in 1882 where he has been engaged in practice since; also invested in real estate and platted a number of additions. Member Commercial Club.


Joseph Barnes
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARNES Joseph U, Minneapolis. Res 2312 Blaisdell av, office 100 Oneida bldg. Banker. Born March 8, 1858 near Geneseo Ill, son of William L and Betsey B (Miller) Barnes. Educated in dist schools with the exception of 3 months in Geneseo Ill High School and 6 months in Davenport Ia Commercial College. Reared on a farm; worked summers attending school in winter; when twenty years old entered country bank at Stuart Ia; in Minneapolis banks 1879-85; private bank at Alexandria Minn 1885; incorporated as a state bank 1886; pres Minn Title, Insurance & Trust Co Minneapolis 1888 to date; principal organizer and stock holder in First National Bank at Elbow Lake Minn; v pres Douglas County Bank Alexandria Minn. Member Minneapolis Real Estate Board. Commercial Club and Masonic fraternity, Minnesota Bankers Assn and Citizen Staff G A R.


Nathan Barnes
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARNES Nathan Miller, Minneapolis. Res Virginia Apartments, office Oneida bldg. Banker. Born in 1866 in Henry county Ill, son of William L and Betsy Baker (Miller) Barnes. Married 1906 to Ella May Spencer. Educated in schools of Geneseo Ill and Knox College Galesburg Ill. Engaged with Douglas County Bank Alexandria, and Minnesota Title, Insurance & Trust Co Minneapolis 1888-95; member of firm of Barnes Bros investment bankers established 1895; dir Minnesota Title & Trust Co Minneapolis; First National Bank Elbow Lake Minn; v pres First National Bank Cold Springs Minn. Member of Commercial and Automobile Clubs.


Fred Barney
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARNEY Fred E, Minneapolis. Res 915 4th st S E, office 207 Central av. Real estate loans and fire insurance. Born Oct 10, 1859 in Swanton Vt, son of Valentine G and Maria (Hadwen) Barney. Married Sept 17, 1885 to Mary Case. Educated in the public schools at Swanton Vt, Minneapolis and Charles City Ia. Engaged as clerk in loan and abstract office Charles City Ia 1878-81. Removed to Minneapolis 1881; was engaged with Commercial Bank for six years and resigned as assistant cashier; organized the present firm of Fred E Barney real estate loans and fire insurance 1888; pres of the East Side State Bank organized 1906; sec Merriman Barrows Co; dir St Anthony Insurance Co; county comnr 1901-1904; chairman of board of same 1903-1904; member of Minneapolis Commercial Club; dir and member of its Public Affairs Committee; St Anthony Commercial Club; dir Minneapolis Whist Club.


Roland Barry
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARRY Roland L, St Paul. Res 1076 Laurel av, office 8th and Cedar sts. Telephone mngr. Born May 5, 1877 in Bangor Me, son of William P and Henrietta M (Dorman) Barry. Married June 1902 to Gertrude C Colter. Educated in the elementary and high schools of Minneapolis. Was in employ of Soo R R 4 years; chief clk N W Telephone Co 4 years; mngr Twin City (now Tri-State) Telephone Co 1901 to date. Member Commercial Club; Business League St Paul; American Institute Electrical Engineers New York.


Ferdinand Bartelme
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTELME Ferdinand M, Minneapolis. Res Swinford Flats, office 819 Security Bank bldg. Lumber. Born Feb 2, 1882 in Chicago, son of Ferdinand E and Emma C (Tiedemann) Bartelme. Educated in the public schools and Lewis Inst Chicago. Employed in lumber business Marshfield Wis 1900-1901; same in Chicago 1901-1902; with Frederick Upham & Co Chicago 1902-1906; in lumber business for self Minneapolis 1906 to date.


Charles John Bartleson
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTLESON Charles J, Minneapolis. Res 1200 Chestnut av, office 425 New York Life bldg. Lawyer. Born April 3, 1844 in Macomb Ill, son of Charles Mahelm and Mary Ann (Airey) Bartleson. Married May 9, 1871 to Harriet Newel Wright. Educated in public schools of Macomb Ill and the McDonough College until 1861. Enlisted in the 2nd Ill Vol Cavalry Aug 2, 1861; discharged Aug 11, 1864; then studied law in the office of Hon John S Thompson Aledo Ill; was admitted to the bar by supreme court of Ill Feb 22, 1867; moved to Minneapolis in May 1872 and has practiced law there since that time. Member of the Minneapolis Academy of Natural Science; Minnesota State Bar Assn and Minneapolis Club.

Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Charles J. Bartleson was born April 3, 1844, at Macomb, Illinois, the son of Charles Mahelm Bartleson, of German descent, and Mary Ann Airey (Bartleson) of an old English Quaker family, whom Charles Mahelm married at Liverpool. Charles M. spent many years in successful navigation as the commander of a packet ship. Mrs. Bartleson sailed with her husband for several years, their home meanwhile being established at Philadelphia. In 1837 Captain Bartleson determined to quit the sea, and removed to the far West, settling at Macomb, Illinois. Here Charles J. Bartleson was educated in the public schools and in the old McDonough College, then an institution of some note. In 1861 he enlisted in the Second Illinois Cavalry and served with the Western army in Grant's campaigns up to the siege and surrender of Vicksburg, when he went with his command to the Department of the Gulf and served with General Banks in his Red River campaign. Mr. Bartleson was slightly wounded at Vermillion Bayou, Louisiana, but boasts that his three years of rough riding in the army was the making of him physically. At the close of the war Mr. Bartleson began the study of law in the office of John S. Thompson, at Aledo, Illinois. He was admitted to the bar in April, 1867. He then practiced his profession in that city for five years in connection with his preceptor, Judge Thompson, at which time he removed to Minneapolis, and has since been engaged in the practice of law at this point. While not desiring to be regarded as a specialist, he has been chiefly interested in the law and litigation pertaining to real estate, in which he is considered well equipped, especially with reference to the decisions of our own courts bearing upon that branch of the law. Mr. Bartleson is not a promoter of litigation. On the other hand he takes more pride in so advising his clients in the conduct of their business as to avoid unnecessary controversy than in litigation of causes, and consequently is commonly on the defensive and less frequently in court. In politics Mr. Bartleson is a Democrat. He has, however, never held a political office and has no aspirations in that direction. He is a member of the Minneapolis Club, the Commercial Club, the Minnetonka Yacht Club and the G. A. R. He was married May 9, 1871, to Harriet Newell Wright and has three daughters and one son, Mabel, Blanche, Maud and Charles Albert.


Merrill Bartlett
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTLETT Merrill, Minneapolis. Res 2503 Hennepin av, office 916 Guaranty bldg. Born June 20, 1868 in Galesburg Ill, son of Rubard Mody and Martha Jane (Merrill) Bartlett. Married June 7, 1890 to Emelie F Thomson. Educated in public and high schools of Minn, Aurora and Chicago Ill. First engaged in employ of Minneapolis Mill Co as bkpr, clk, chief clk, etc, until 1902 when he resigned to engage as private sec to Clinton Morrison; now in general real estate business. Pres Roosevelt Club; member Commercial and Minnetonka Boat Clubs; and Real Estate Board.


Wallace Bartlett
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTLETT Wallace R, Minneapolis. Res 3248 Bryant av S, office 500 Sykes blk. Real estate. Born July 10, 1828 in Green O, son of David R and Emeline (Brace) Bartlett. Married May 1, 1848 to Sarah F Towne. Educated in dist schools; graduated from Austinburg (O) Seminary 1847. Taught school until 1855; moved to Vassar Mich and established the Tuscola County Pioneer 1857; member of Michigan legislature 1856-57; enrolling clk Mich State Senate 1859; and also engaged in gen store business continuously until 1865; moved to Omaha Neb and engaged in land business 1865-82; member Nebraska Legislature 1862-73; moved to Minneapolis 1882 and has engaged in real estate business to date.


William Bartlett
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTLETT William W, Minneapolis. Office 500 Sykes bldg. Lawyer. Born Sept 22, 1860 in Vassar Mich, son of Wallace R and Sarah F (Towne) Bartlett. Twice married: 1881 to Rosalind Wiese, 1895 to Nellie Willis. Received his education in public schools at Vassar Mich and Omaha Neb. Left school in 1876 to take position as clerk in U S Int Rev office; learned the printer's trade; became reporter, editor, publisher and contributor; commenced to study law in 1878; was admitted to practice at Omaha Neb 1880; moved to Minneapolis April 3, 1883.


Elijah Barton
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTON Elijah, Mound. Office Oneida bldg Minneapolis. Lawyer. Born May 25, 1855 in Pa. Married 1884 to Miss Ella A Austin. Attended district and state normal schools in Pa; graduated from law dept Univ of Mich 1884; post graduate course in law dept U of M; has practiced law in Minneapolis 1884 to date. Prof of medical jurisprudence Hamlin Univ medical dept. Member Commercial Club Minneapolis.


Frederick Barton
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTON Frederick W, St Paul. Res 1786 Marshall av, office 620 Manhattan bldg. Lawyer. Born July 31, 1870 in Wayzata, Hennepin county Minn, son of James S and Elizabeth (Blasdell) Barton. Married Sept 12, 1892 to Nell Haydon. Educated in common schools and graduated from law dept U of M 1893. Engaged alone in practice of law until 1896; atty for American Adjustment Co Minneapolis 1896-1901; same in St Paul 1902 to date.


George Barton
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BARTON George C, Minneapolis. Res 4047 Park boul, office 1033-1034 Andrus bldg. Physician and surgeon (R). Born April 20, 1853 in Pa, son of Baltzer E and Nancy Jane (Chilcote) Barton. Reared on farm; attended public and private schools and a state normal school in Pa; taught school in winter 1868-1877; studied medicine and graduated from Jefferson Medical College Philadelphia 1880. Practiced medicine in Bedford county Pa 1880-84; in Minn 1884 to date; prof of physiology in Hamline Univ St Paul 1893-99; gynecology 1899 to date; member board of trustees 1897-1906; dean of college since 1903; gynecologist to St Barnabas Hospital , Swedish Hospital and Minneapolis city Hospital; has written much for medical press; owned and edited the Buffalo (Minn) Gazette. Member Hennepin County and Minneapolis State Medical societies; American Medical Assn; Western Surgical and Gynecological Assn; Phi Ro Sigma college fraternity; Minneapolis Commerical Club.


Carl Bashaw
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BASHAW Carl Oscar, Minneapolis. Res Hotel Atlantic, office 118 N 4th st. Broker. Born Nov 30, 1884 in Arkansaw Wis, son of Carlos and Mary Charlotta (Johnson) Bashaw. Educated in the Plummer District School Pepin county Wis; Stockholm Wis 1891-94; Dunn County Agricultural College 1901; Metropolitan Business College Minneapolis 1902. Engaged with S C Tooker & Co brokers as clk and salesman 1903-1905; with Green & DeLaittre Co 1905 to 1906; engaged in business for self under firm name of C O Bashaw & Co brokers April 1906 to date.


William Bates
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BATES William E, Minneapolis. Res 2432 Chicago av, office Court House. Court commissioner of Hennepin county. Born Aug 9, 1875 in Lewiston Me, son of Wells H and Rosalie (Belleau) Bates. Attended public schools of Lewiston Me; graduated of State Univ of Iowa LL B 1896; U of M, LL M 1897. Practiced law in Minneapolis since 1897 and in 1904 elected county comnr.

Vincent Whitney Bayless
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BAYLESS Vincent Whitney, Minneapolis. Res 1786 Irving av S, office 836 Metropolitan Life bldg. Banking and timber lands. Born Oct 15, 1845 in Broome county N Y, son of Gen John and Almira (Cooper) Bayless. Married Oct 9, 1873 to Clara T Pomeroy of Cortland N Y. Attended district schools in native county; at 12 removed to Highland Kan with his parents; attended Highland Univ; attended a business college and founded Bayless Business College at Freeport Ill; was pres of same 1866-69; connected with City Nat Bank of Binghamton NY 1869-73; organized First National Bank of Chippewa Falls Wis; served as cashr of same 1873-76; organized Chippewa Valley Bank Eau Claire Wis 1876; half owner of and conducted same 1876-85; sold out interest in 1885 and same year moved to Minneapolis. Receiver U S land office Eau Claire Wis 1878-85; part owner and sec Coolidge Fuel & Supply Co Minneapolis 1886-90; part owner and sec and treas Mich Cedar Co 1888-98; buying and selling timber lands Minneapolis 1899 to date.


Hector Baxter
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BAXTER Hector, Minneapolis. Res 4200 Park boul, office 832-833 Lumber Exchange. Lawyer. Born Sept 22, 1849 at Eldon Ont, son of Dugald and Christian (McFadyen) Baxter. Married April 29, 1885 to Cornelia Barns. Attended public schools at Lorneville, Ont Can; Rockwood Academy 1870; taught school several years; graduated Univ of Mich LL B 1882. Pres and dir Minnesota & Manitoba R R Co; Minnesota & Ontario Bridge Co; Rainy River Investment Co; member Linden Hills Improvement Assn. Member Minnesota Commercial Club; council member Brotherhood St Andrew; supt St Mark's and St John's Sunday Schools; member Masonic fraternity 32d deg; Odd Fellows; K of P.

John Thomas Baxter
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

John Thomas Baxter is a lawyer practicing his profession at Minneapolis. His father, Thomas Baxter, was a miller, and was engaged in that business at Bangor, Wisconsin, at the time of his death in 1875. His mother's maiden name was Susannah Lewis. The subject of this sketch was born at Berlin, Wisconsin, October 14, 1863. He began his education in the common schools and attended the high school at West Salem, Wisconsin, walking back and forth, the distance of five miles, each day. In this way he made his preparation for college. He began his college course at Ripon, where he continued for three years. During his stay at Ripon college he earned his living as express messenger for the American Express Company, having a "night run," which took him away from home in the evening, brought him back in the morning, and thus enabled him to attend the college exercises in the day time. Mr. Baxter excels as a speaker, and represented his college in the Wisconsin state oratorical contest in his junior year. He took the first honors, and, therefore, represented Wisconsin in the interstate oratorical contest, held at Iowa City, in the spring of 1884. The same year he was elected president of the Wisconsin Collegiate Association. The course of study pursued by him was the classical, including Greek. At the end of his junior year he decided to drop out of college for a year and then finish his course at Williams College, to which he was attracted by the celebrated Dr. Mark Hopkins. He entered the junior class at Williams in 1885, and while there he was member of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, which was the oldest college society at that institution, and the chapter to which Garfield had belonged. He was elected editor of the Williams Literary Monthly, and received the first junior prize in oratory. In his senior year he won the Graves prize for an essay on "The New Political Economy." At graduation he was awarded the Van Vechten prize, given at each commencement to that member of the graduating class, who, by a vote of the faculty and students, is declared the best extempore speaker of the class. This distinction was won in a class of sixty-six members. But the incident of his college course which possesses the most interest for Mr. Baxter, was the fact that he was the last student who ever recited under the venerable Dr. Mark Hopkins. It was a recitation in moral philosophy. Dr. Hopkins died just before the commencement at which Mr. Baxter graduated. Mr. Baxter came to Minneapolis in 1887, and began the study of law with Kitchel, Cohen & Shaw, and was admitted to the bar in 1889. He has been in active practice since 1890, and has been the secretary of the Minneapolis Bar Association since February, 1892. In politics he is a Republican, but is independent enough to vote for measures and men without much regard for party lines. He is a member of Park Avenue Congregational church. October 14, 1891 he married Gertrude Louise Hooker, daughter of William Hooker, of Minneapolis, and niece of the late Judge Hooker. They have two daughters, Beth and Helen.

Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

BAXTER John T, Minneapolis. Res 4601 Fremont av, office 1105 Nicollet av. Lawyer. Born Oct 15, 1862 in Berlin Wis, son of Thomas and Susanna (Lewis) Baxter. Married 1891 to Gertrude Hooker. Graduated from Williams College Williamstown Mass A B 1887. Has practiced law 1890 to date; sec Minneapolis Bar Assn 1892-1905; gen counsel N W National Life Ins Co Minneapolis. Member Minneapolis Commercial and Six O'clock clubs; and American Bar Assn.


Willis Norman Beal
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BEAL Willis Norman, Minneapolis. Res 501 Forest av, office 392 Phoenix bldg. Lawyer. Born Dec 11, 1883 in Guilford Me, son of William and Abbie Florence (Weymouth) Beal. Attended public schools at Guilford Me; graduated from Guilford High School 1902; law dept U of M, LL B 1906.


James Beatty
Source: Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society (1912) Volume XIV; Page 41; transcribed by FoFG mz

Beatty, James, pioneer, b. in Fairfield county, Ohio, April 27, 1816; d. in Sauk Rapids, Jan. 1892. He came to Minnesota in 1848; conducted trading posts with the Indians at Sauk Rapids, and in Anoka and Blue Earth counties; was a merchant in Hennepin county, 1860-9; and afterward engaged in the hotel business at Sauk Rapids. He was a representative in the territorial legislature, 1852 and 1855.

John L. Beckman
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BECKMAN John L, Minneapolis. Res 1820 11th av S, office 1019 N Y Life bldg. Maunfacturer. Born Jan 8, 1866 in Sweden, son of Lars and Inga (Pierson) Beckman. Married June 16, 1897 to Marta G Rick. Educated in common schools of Sweden. Moved to Wright county Minn 1881; farmed until 1883; moved to Minneapolis and was employed in cement works 1883-88; organized and operated Franklin Stone Sidewalk Co 1888-1905; organized Minneapolis Paving & Cement Brick Mnfg Co Inc 1905 of which he is pres. Dir Swedish Hospital.


Henry Beemer
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) Submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Henry Beemer, of Minneapolis, is a son of Joseph Beemer, a well-to-do farmer, and Elizabeth Dean (Beemer.) Joseph Beemer resided at St. George, Ontario, and, while not a politician, in the usual sense of the word, he was chosen by his fellow-townsmen fifteen times in succession to represent them in the council. Henry Beemer was born at St. George, November 5, 1836. His educational advantages were confined to the town schools, as in those days very few farmers' boys in that country were able to enjoy the advantages of a college course. In 1860 Mr. Beemer removed to Michigan, locating at Pontiac, and went into the marble business. He continued in that business there until 1881, when he moved his establishment to Clinton, Iowa, and a short time later to Lisbon. He continued in the marble business in Iowa for nineteen years, making twenty-one years in all engaged in that line of trade, during which time he was very successful. In 1881 he closed up his marble business and turned his attention to life insurance. The following year he organized the Northwestern Aid Association at Marshalltown, Iowa, and three years later, in 1885, moved the headquarters of that association to Minneapolis and changed the name to the Northwestern Life Association. He incorporated under the laws of Minnesota, and for the past ten years has acted as general manager. He was mainly instrumental in placing it in the favorable position which it now occupies. Since his removal to Minneapolis he has also become deeply interested in agriculture, and in 1893 he fitted up a farm near Excelsior. The tract contained two hundred acres, and Mr. Beemer took great satisfaction in bringing it into a high state of cultivation and improvement. Mr. Beemer has never taken a very active part in politics, but is an enthusiastic Republican. In 1894 some of his friends took the liberty to present his name to the Republican city convention for the office of mayor, and although he was not an active candidate, he received seventy-six votes on the first ballot. Mr. Beemer is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was elected one of two delegates to the general conference in 1892. He has been intrusted with all the offices of his church from the lowest to the highest, and is now chairman of the finance committee of the Wesley M. E. Church, of Minneapolis. He is a man of sterling integrity and commands the confidence and respect of all who know him. He was married in 1857 to Nancy A. Averill, and they have had four children, Herbert Elsten, Marie Lucretia, Helena Augusta and Dayton. The first two are not living.


Henry C. Belden
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Henry C. Belden is one of the judges of the district court of Hennepin County. He is a son of Haynes W. Belden and Lydia P. Blake (Belden.) His father was a farmer in poor circumstances in Vermont. His father's ancestry was English and was among the early settlers of Connecticut. His mother's family was Scotch, and among the earlier settlers in New Hampshire. Henry C. Belden was born at Burke, Caledonia County, Vermont, on August 30th, 1841. The financial circumstances of his family were such that he could not have the advantages of college training. His early education was confined to the common schools and the village academy. Henry C. Belden has, however, not depended upon teachers and the class room for an incentive to study. He is widely read, and general scientific studies have been his favorites. He had not, however, neglected the study of politics and current economic questions. He began the study of law in the office of Hon. Thomas Bartlett at Lyndon, Vermont, where he remained from 1861 to April 1864. He was then admitted to the bar and began the practice of law at Lyndon. Subsequently he removed to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, where he remained until December 1884. He there formed a partnership in 1873, the style of the firm being Belden & Ide. This firm did a very extensive business and was one of the strongest law firms in the state. Mr. Belden has always been a Republican and served the people of Caledonia County, Vermont, as their representative in the state senate for two terms, from 1876 to 1880. He was also made a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Chicago in 1880 and voted for the nomination of Garfield. In December 1884 he removed to Minneapolis, where he formed a partnership with John B. Gilfillan and C. A. Willard, and continued the practice of his profession with great success. Judge Belden had never taken a very active part in Minnesota politics until 1894, when he was nominated by the Republicans to the office of district judge, and was elected. He owes his choice for the nomination to his recognized ability as a lawyer and to the reputation which he maintains as a gentleman of high character and sterling integrity. Judge Belden is a member of the Minneapolis Club; is a gentleman of broad and liberal views, and possesses those qualities which constitute in largest measure the equipment of a wise and successful judge. He is not a member of any church, as he regards church creeds too narrow to fit his ideas of religion. He is, however, a man of upright life, and highly honored in the community. He was married April 1865, to Carrie H. Kimball. They have five children. Mary, George, Helen, Agnes and Harry.

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BELDEN Henry C, Minneapolis. Res 306 Oak Grove, office 610-614 Loan & Trust bldg. Lawyer. Born Aug 30, 1841 in Burke Vt, son of Haynes W and Lydia P (Blake) Belden. Married April 1865 to Carrie H Kimball. Educated in the common schools and village academy of his native town. Studied law in office of Thomas Bartlett, Lyndon Vt 1861-64. Practiced in Lyndon and later moved to St Johnsbury Vt, practiced under firm name of Belden & Ide 1873-84; moved to Minneapolis and formed partnership under firm name of Gilfillan, Belden & Willard 1885-94; elected dist judge Minneapolis 1894; now member of firm of Belden, Jamison & Shearer. Member state senate Vt 1876-80; Nat Rep convention Chicago 1880. Member Commercial and Minneapolis clubs.

Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal, 1897 – transcribed by AJ

Henry C. Belden is one of the judges of the district court of Hennepin County. He is a son of Haynes W. Belden and Lydia P. Blake (Belden.) His father was a farmer in poor circumstances in Vermont. His father's ancestry was English and was among the early settlers of Connecticut. His mother's family was Scotch, and among the earlier settlers in New Hampshire. Henry C. Belden was born t Burke, Caledonia County, Vermont, on August 30th, 1841. The financial circumstances of his family were such that he could not have the advantage of college training. His early education was confined to the common schools and the village academy. Henry C. Belden, has, however, not depended upon teachers and the class room for an incentive to study. He is widely read, and general scientific studies have been his favorites. He had not, however, neglected the study of politics and current economic questions. He began the study of law in the office of Hon. Thomas Bartlett at Lyndon, Vermont, where he remained from 1861 to April, 1864. He was then admitted to the bar and began the practice of law at Lyndon. Subsequently he removed to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, where he remained until December, 1884. He there formed a partnership in 1873, the style of the firm being Belden & Ide. This firm did a very extensive business and was one of the strongest law firms in the state. Mr. Belden has always been Republican and served the people of Caledonia County, Vermont, as their representative in the state senate for two terms, from 1876 to 1880. He was also made a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Chicago in 1880 and voted for the nomination of Garfield. In December, 1884 he removed to Minneapolis, where he formed a partnership with John B. Gilfillan and C. A. Willard, and continued the practice of his profession with great success. Judge Belden had never taken a very active part in Minnesota politics until 1894, when he was nominated by the Republicans to the office of district judge, and was elected. He owes his choice for the nomination to his recognized ability as a lawyer and to the reputation which he maintains as a gentleman of high character and sterling integrity. Judge Belden is a member of the Minneapolis Club; is a gentleman of broad and liberal views, and possesses those qualities which constitute in largest measure the equipment of a wise and successful judge. He is not a member of any church, as he regards church creeds too narrow to fit his ideas of religion. He is however a man of upright life, and highly honored in the community. He was married April, 1865, to Carrie H. Kimball. They have five children, Mary, George, Helen, Agnes and Harry.


Austin L. Belknap
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BELKNAP Austin L, Minneapolis. Res 1974 Kenwood pkway, office N Y Life bldg. Insurance. Born May 12, 1859 in Northfield Vt, son of Lorenzo and Betsey (Austin) Belknap. Attended Northfield Vt graded and high school. Bkpr for Belknap, Ely & Co iron founders and machinists Northfield Vt 1875-77; in ins office of Shaw & Co St Johnsbury Vt 1877-79; paymaster Fairbanks Scale Works 1879-81; with Fletcher Bros taking part in lumber business in Minneapolis and stock raising in Montana 1881-86; in charge of ins dept of Corser & Co some years; member Corser-Belknap Agency; pres A L Belknap Agency; v pres Minneapolis Insurance Agency 1904 to date. Served 5 years in Vt militia. Member Sons of the American Revolution; Society of the Fine Arts; Minneapolis, Minikahda and Lafayette clubs Minneapolis.



John E. Bell
Source: Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers, Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

John Edson Bell was born at Brownsville, Jefferson County, N. Y., Oct. 10, 1834. He came to Minneapolis May 5, 1857, and entered the store of Amos Clark, as a clerk, on Bridge Square, corner of Hennepin avenue and First street. The next year, with Alexander Campbell of New York for a partner, he opened a general store on Bridge Square under the firm name of J. E. Bell & Co. In 186o his brother David bought Mr. Campbell's interest, and the firm name was changed to Bell Brothers, and the business continued until 1867, at which time the business was sold to J. W. Johnson and J. A. Wolverton. For the next three years. Mr. Bell was located in New York as Eastern buyer for Auerbach, Finch & Scheffer, wholesale dry goods dealers of St Paul.
In 1870 Mr. Bell returned to Minneapolis, and with E. S. Jones organized the Hennepin County Savings Bank, of which bank he was cashier until Mr. Jones' death, in 1890, since which time he has been its president. The bank is now the oldest savings bank in the state, and during its thirty-one years of existence has never passed a dividend, and has paid to its depositors over $800,000 of interest on their deposits and are now paying $45,000 of interest annually to their depositors, who are largely the laboring people of Minneapolis. During the financial panic of 1893 a few of its depositors gave notice of withdrawal of funds, but when the limit expired not a depositor wanted to withdraw funds except as in ordinary times.
Mr. Bell has been connected with the Plymouth Congregational church most of the time since its organization and was a teacher in its Sunday school for many years.

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BELL John E, Excelsior. Office 60 S 4th st Minneapolis. Banker. Born Oct 10, 1834 in Brownsville N Y, son of John and Sarah (Cooper) Bell. Married 1858 to Jennie C Smith; Feb 1, 1898 to Ruth Harris. Educated in dist school West Almond; Allegany county N Y. Gen merchandise Dexter N Y 1854-56; clerked in Minneapolis 1857-58; member Bell Bros merchants Minneapolis 1858-68; buyer in N Y for Auerbach, Finch & Van Slyck St Paul 1868-70; returned to Minneapolis 1870; helped organize Hennepin County Savings Bank 1870; pres said bank 1870 to date; dir Minn Loan & Trust Co. Alderman in Minneapolis and member Hook & Ladder Co 1857; pres Hennepin County Pioneers Assn; also of Minneapolis Atheneum Library 1880 to date; pres Minn Pioneers Assn; dir Minn State Sunday School Assn 1859 to date.

John Bentley Bemis
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BEMIS John Bentley, Minnetonka Beach. Office N Y Life bldg St Paul. Physician (O). Born Aug 24, 1858 in Janesville Wis, son of Jervis Orlando and Eunice M (Bump) Bemis. Married May 15, 1884 to Nannie C Hamilton, Alton Ill. Attended public schools; Evansville Wis High School; State Normal College Whitewater Wis; graduated from Northern College of Osteopathy and Surgery Minneapolis, D O 1897. On leaving school taught; began study of medicine under regular preceptor meanwhile engaging in business; became impressed with osteopathy and took it up. Charter member State Osteopathic Assn; chairman legislative committee which after 6 years fight secured act legalizing osteopathy; regent and lecturer on osteopathy in Northern College Osteopathy and Surgery Minneapolis. Member American Osteopathic Assn; Minn Osteopathic Clinic; Osteopathic Board of Examiners Minn; Commercial Club. V pres Cobb Hospital.


Karl Bendeke
History of the Scandinavians and Successful Scandinavians in the United States, Volumes I & II (1900)submitted by cd
Bendeke, Karl, physician and surgeon—Minneapolis—born 1841, in Kristiania, Norway. After going through the regular old country college course, he was admitted to the University of Norway as a student in 1859. He studied medicine there from 1863-68, when he was appointed surgeon on board an emigrant vessel which brought him to this country. He settled first in Chicago, where he practiced his profession for two years; moved to Minnesota in 1870; located in Minneapolis in 1875, where he has since resided. Bendeke has at different times visited foreign medical institutions for the purpose of extending his studies in certain specialties, principally diseases of the eye and ear. In 1877 he visited the eye clinics of London and Paris; in 1881 attended the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary for three months, and in 1891 spent about the same length of time at the university clinics of Berlin, Germany, where he studied the most modern methods of research and treatment in the various branches of medicine and surgery. His professional skill in conjunction with his long residence in the country has naturally given him a reputation as one of the leading Scandinavian physicians of the Northwest. In 1869 he was married to Josephine Fauske, of Bergen, Norway. They have one daughter, who is an accomplished violinist.


Albert Benham
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BENHAM Albert, Minneapolis. Res 2204 Humboldt av S, office 211-212 Phoenix bldg. Pres Benham Land & Investment Co. Born Oct 24, 1844 in Steuben county N Y, son of Samuel R and Rebecca A (Heliker) Benham. Married Sept 21, 1870 to Hettie R Wemple. Attended Hamline Univ in the 60’s and agent for the Univ part of the time. From 1869 to 1876 asst supt for the McCormick Reaper Co in eastern Minn and Western Wis. In 1876 and later years was engaged as field agent in Minn, Iowa, Dakota, Neb, Kansas and Indian Territory in inducing immigration and advancing educational and agricultural interest in these states. Held the first butter convention in Minn. Assisted in perfecting the invention of the wire and twine binders of grain and now identified with leading recent inventions. Discovered the clay bed and assisted in organizing the Pottery Works, Red Wing Furniture Co and the Red Wing Wagon Co at Red Wing Minn. Conducted hardware and machinery business in Goodhue and Redwood counties Minn. Now head of the firm of Benham Co engaged in cultivating farm lands and raising pedigreed stock. A scientific stock breeder and agriculturist. Directed the raising of a record crop of 2,560 bushel baskets of ears of corn on 8 acres in Minn. Member the Minn pioneers, Minn Stock Breeders Assn and State Agriculturist Society. Special interest taken by him all his life in advancing church and educational work in Minn and elsewhere.


Arthur E. Benjamin
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BENJAMIN Arthur E, Minneapolis. Res 2222 Blaisdell av, office 302 Pillsbury bldg. Physician (R). Born Dec 19, 1868 in Hutchinson Minn, son of John and Elizabeth (Garner) Benjamin. Graduated from Hutchinson Minn High School 1887; College of Medicine and Surgery U of M 1892; studied later in N Y, Philadelphia and London hospitals. Member of the staff of St Barnabas Swedish and City hospitals Minneapolis; clinical instructor in gynecology College of Medicine and Surgery U of M; member of American Medical Assn, Minn State Medical Society, Western Surgical and Gynecological Society, Minn Academy of Medicine and Hennepin County Medical Society Minneapolis. Contributor to a number of medical journals. Member of Minneapolis Commercial Club.


C. C. Bennet
History of the Scandinavians and Successful Scandinavians in the United States, Volumes I & II (1900) submitted by cd

Bennet, C. C, merchant—Minneapolis—born 1847, in Malmo, Sweden. He is the son of Baron Wilhelm Bennet, who was an officer in the Swedish army. Young Bennet received a good education; went to Copenhagen, Denmark, at the age of fifteen, to learn the furrier's trade; emigrated to Montreal, Canada, in 1867, where he worked at his trade for over a year; then traveled through several of the Eastern states, but returned to Montreal to become a member and manager of a fur company. In 1877 he went to Omaha, Neb., and opened a wholesale house in furs; but as the business proved unprofitable, he moved shortly afterwards to Minneapolis, where he has ever since been engaged in his trade. Always taking an active interest in the social life of his countrymen, Bennet has several times been president of the Swedish society Norden. He has been a prominent speaker at many important Scandinavian festivals and other great gatherings. He was the chief promoter in organizing, in 1888, Battery B of the First Battalion, which is composed mostly of Swedes; Bennet—generally known as Captain Bennet—has been commander of the battery ever since its organization. In 1874 he was married to a Canadian lady. They have grown children.


Jay Morgan Bennett
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BENNETT Jay Morgan, Spring Park, Lake Minnetonka. Office 417 Lumber Exchange Minneapolis. Wholesale jeweler. Born Nov 26, 1867 at Grand Rapids Mich, son of Joseph W and Hattie E (Charles) Bennett. Educated in the public schools of Minneapolis. Member Reed, Bennett & Co wholesale jewelers Minneapolis 1890 to date. Member Commercial Club Minneapolis.


Nathaniel C. Bennett
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BENNETT Nathaniel C, Minnetonka Beach. Office 405 N 4th st Minneapolis. Lumber. Born Oct 11, 1876 in Hersey Wis, son of Henry A and Mary E Bennett. Married Oct 4, 1902 to Bertha M Scott. Educated in Holmes School Minneapolis 1893; and Curtis Business College 1894. Engaged in lumber business 1894 with H A Bennett & Co; became a partner in firm of H A Bennett & Son 1897; changed to N C Bennett Lumber Co of which he is sole propr; sec Manteuffel Refrigerator Mnfg Co; treas Gardner, Bennett & Stearns real estate.


Jared Benson
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Jared Benson was born in Worcester County, Massachusetts, November 7, 1821, died May 18, 1894, at St. Paul, Minn. He received a common school education in his native state and settled in Minnesota in 1855, locating at Anoka. His chief occupation was that of a farmer, but at various times in his life he followed other pursuits for brief intervals. In the later fifties he graded a considerable part of the roadbed of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad. During the Civil War he had the contract for supplying the garrison at Fort Snelling with beef. Later, Mr. Benson was a director and right of way agent for the St. Paul & Pacific R. R.
As a farmer he took a genuine interest in all matters pertaining to his calling, especially in the raising of blooded stock, to which he devoted considerable money and effort. Mr. Benson took a deep interest in political affairs, and his tastes in this direction were evidenced by the fact that he held county and state offices almost continuously from his majority up to within a few years of his death. He was chairman of the Republican State Central Committee in 1858-59, clerk of the house of representatives in 1859-60, speaker of the house of representatives in 1861-62 and of the extra session of 1862 and in 1864, member of the house in 1879 and 1889, collector of internal revenue in 1872, regent of the state university in 1862.
Mr. Benson was married in 1842 to Miss Martha Taft, daughter of Arnold Taft, Esq., a prominent citizen of Worcester County, Massachusetts. Mrs. Benson still survives her husband. Besides his widow, five children, four sons and one daughter, survive Mr. Benson.

George Benz
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

George Benz was born in Osthofen, Germany, April 23, 1838. He came to Minnesota in 1856, and located in St. Paul, and soon thereafter started in the liquor business, and now conducts the largest wholesale liquor house in the Northwest. Mr. Benz was a member of the legislature in 1873-4-5, and has also served on the city school board. Mr. Benz was married to Rosa Voehringer April 26, 1861.

John N. Berg
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BERG John N, Minneapolis. Res 216 S 7th st, office 913 N Y Life bldg. Lawyer. Born Sept 24, 1867 in Norway, son of Nels J and Sarah (Hanson) Berg. Attended Minneapolis Academy 1890-92 graduating; U of M academic 1892-96 graduating B S with honors; law dept LL B 1899. Has practiced law in Minneapolis 1899 to date. Member Phi Beta Kappa Honorary Society at Univ.


Leonard S. Berg
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BERG Leonard S, Minneapolis. Res 2628 E 22d st, office 302 Nicollet av. Farm lands. Born July 17, 1864 in Christiania Norway, son of L F and Anna (Anderson) Berg. Married Jan 31, 1891 to Margit Hansen. Educated in the Latin School Christiania Norway. Moved to Minneapolis from Norway 1886. Was first engaged by the S E Olson Co (now Powers Mercantile Co) as gen, salsn 1886-1901. Organized Homestead Land Co of which he is pres 1903; engaged in buying and selling farm lands in Minn, Wis, N and S Dak. Member K of P and I O O F.


Peter Berkey
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Peter Berkey was born near Johnstown, Somerset county, Pa., Sept. 14, 1822. When a young man he worked for the Pennsylvania Canal Company. He displayed such faithful interest in his employers' affairs that he was advanced from time to time and finally became an agent for the company. Later on he ran a canal packet which made the trip from Johnstown to Pittsburgh. He was captain of the fast canal packet, which made the trip from Johnstown to Pittsburgh, one hundred miles, in twenty-four hours. In 1853 Mr. Berkey married Miss Annie E. Porter, of Westmoreland county, Pa. In the same year he came to St. Paul and became actively engaged in mercantile pursuits. In 1871 he built the St. Paul, Stillwater and Taylor's Falls Railroad, and was its president until 1876, when the road was sold to the Chicago, St.. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railroad Company. Mr. Berkey assisted in organizing the Second National Bank of St. Paul, and was also one of the organizers of the St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company in 1865. In 1883 he organized the St. Paul National Bank, with a capital of $500,000, and was president of this bank from its organization until he resigned, in 1892. Mr. Berkey's standing as a citizen and business man has always been above reproach. He has one son, John A. Berkey, of Little Falls, Minn.


Enoch Berrisford
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Enoch F. Berrisford was born May 27, 1846 upon a farm near, the town of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, England. His father left England with his family in 1856 to seek his fortune in America The main incident of this voyage across the water in the sailing vessel Lucy Thompson was the loss and recovery of the subject of this sketch. While playing with his brothers, on March 9th, Enoch was accidentally pushed overboard and remained in mid-ocean for twenty-four minutes, until rescued by the sailors of the vessel. All during his life Mr. Berrisford has celebrated the above date as his second birthday. On the arrival of the family in America, they went directly to a farm in Credit River township, Scott County, Minn., where an uncle had preceded them.
In the spring of 1862, when the Fifth Minnesota regiment was being formed at Fort Snelling, Enoch, with two of his young friends, presented himself as ready to engage in military service, but was rejected on account of his extreme youth and frail body. He returned home dejected, but made a second unsuccessful attempt the following spring, when the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers were enlisting to go with Gen. Sibley on what was known as "Sibley's Expedition against the Indians."
His third application, however, was successful. This time, the spring of 1864 the government was hiring men to go on the Sully Expedition, and Enoch was put in charge of a six-mule team and a government supply wagon. Here was the golden opportunity the young man had been waiting for, of serving his country. The remuneration was also a great consideration, in those days $30 per month and a soldier's rations being considered big pay.
After working in the employ of the government for over two years, Mr. Berrisford came to St. Paul and was admitted as partner in the wholesale and retail baking business of his eldest brother, Thomas. On April 8, 1867, Berrisford & Bro. formally opened their doors and continued to do business until the year 1872, when the firm was dissolved, E. P. taking the wholesale part and Thomas retaining the retail department
The brothers again united their business interests in 1884 and were incorporated under the name of The Berrisfords' Baking and Confectionery Co., with E. P. Berrisford as president. This company carried on a successful business for years, and finally, in 1890, sold out to the American Biscuit and Manufacturing Co.
Mr. E. P. Berrisford was retained as manager of the Berrisford factory of the American Biscuit and Manufacturing Co. until his resignation, in 1896, when he retired from active business, and has since been devoting his time to his large real estate interests.
In the early days Mr. Berrisford served five years as a volunteer fireman, and was foreman of the old Minnehaha Engine Co. No. 2 until his resignation, August 23, 1873. In 1873 he was elected from the second ward of the city, on the Board of Education, for a term of three years.
Mr. Berrisford was married in St Paul in December, 1868, to Miss Isabella J. Young. To their union have been born six children, five of whom are now living - Ada A., Katherine M., Isabella J., Gertrude F. and Emma D., wife of Dr. Chas. W. Fogarty of Brown's Valley, Minn.
To Mr. Berrisford the change in the Northwest since he drove his six-mule team across the country in 1864, and the present time is hardly credible. The wild prairie that was once inhabited by buffalo, antelope and deer is now cultivated into fields of golden grain. Prairie dog villages are replaced by prosperous cities and towns. The nightly bark of the prairie dog has been changed to the shriek of the modern locomotive. In place of the Indian we have the white man, the author of all this progress. Verily can it be said of him, "He made the desert smile."


John Berrisford
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

John Berrisford was born at Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, England, Sept. 21, 1842. His first work was in the Uttoxeter Pot Works, where he served as an apprentice for some time; this was discontinued when the family emigrated to America.
On arriving at Credit River Township, Scott County, Minn., he went to work on a farm for a Mr. Reagen, and continued in his employ until he moved to St. Paul. His first work in this city was with a Mr. Baxter, who kept a bakery on Jackson street between Fifth and Sixth streets. Stayed here four years, then went to Mississippi to bake for a large force of men that were building levees, but the war broke out, and poor John lost all his winter's pay, and had to borrow enough money to get back to St. Paul. On his return he enlisted in Company B, Third Minnesota Infantry, acting also as baker for the regiment; was at the Battle of Murfreesboro, where Col. Lester surrendered one of our best Minnesota regiments. Being paroled as prisoner of war he was sent back to Minnesota with his regiment, and engaged in the fight against Indians who had just massacred the frontier settlers. At Woodlake on the morning of Oct 23, 1862, the Third regiment showed its mettle, made a charge on the Indians and drove them over the hills. This ended the Indian campaign of 1862. John Berrisford also served in the Twentieth New York Independent Battery, and was discharged from United States service Aug. 5, 1865.
Mr. Berrisford returned to Minnesota in 1867 and engaged in the general merchandise business at Hamilton Station, Scott County; moved to St. Paul in 1887, where he carries on a fuel business at the corner of Rondo and St. Albans streets.
Mr. Berrisford was married in Chicago March 7, 1867, to Miss Jane E. Smith of that city. She died at Hamilton Station Nov. 2, 1886. Of this union were born six children, five of whom are now living, viz. William, Anatole, Thomas, George and Margaret.
Mr. Berrisford was again married in 1887 to Miss Elizabeth Youatt of Hamilton, Minn. Of this union two children have been born - Irene and Harriet.

Paul Berrisford
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Paul J. Berrisford was born on a farm at Credit River Township, Scott County, Minn., Sept, 22, 1857. He is of English descent, his father having emigrated to America and settling on a farm in Minnesota in 1856. It was on this farm that Joseph spent his boyhood years, and learned the art of farming. Being of an ambitious turn of mind he left the farm in 1873 and came to St. Paul to work for his brother Thomas, who kept a bakery on Fifth street. Here he learned the baking trade, and worked at the business until 1886, when he became one of the traveling salesmen for the Berrisford Baking & Confectionery Company. He stayed with the above firm until they sold out to the American Biscuit & Manufacturing Company, and is still on the road as one of the foremost salesmen for its successor, The National Biscuit Company. Mr. Berrisford is a kind and genial gentleman, who so thoroughly enjoys his work that he makes friends and customers wherever he goes.
Mr. Berrisford was married in 1880 to Miss Mary Furlong, who died in 1881. His second marriage was to Miss Mary E. Degan, and took place in St. Paul Jan. 15, 1883. Of this union two children have been born - Paul Joseph and Grace.

Thomas Berrisford
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Thomas Berrisford was born November 15, 1840, upon a farm near, the town of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, England. He came to America with his parents in April of the year 1856 and settled on a farm in Credit River township, Scott County, Minnesota, where he remained one year; drifted to St Paul and found occupation with a Mr. Robert Baxter, who kept a small bake shop on Jackson street. Here he learned the baking trade and remained until the Indian massacre of 1862, when Mr. Baxter was killed by the Indians. This year he went to Chicago, where he worked in some of the largest bakeries of that city until the spring of 1864, leaving there to take charge of a large bakery in Memphis, Tenn. He stayed there about eight or nine months, leaving his wife and family in Chicago. On his return to Chicago he worked in the aerated bread department of the Dake bakery, but finally returned to St. Paul in 1866.
In 1867 he started in the baking business with a brother-in-law, Owen Kernan. This partnership ended the same year, Mr. Kernan withdrawing, a younger brother, E. F. Berrisford, taking his place. The firm was known as Berrisford & Brother until 1872, when they dissolved, Thomas taking the bread and retail departments and E. F. the wholesale and cracker part of the business.
In the year 1884 the business interests of the two brothers were again united and incorporated under the name of the Berrisforde Baking and Confectionery Co. In this company Thomas Berrisford was one of the board of directors, and held the offices of vice president and treasurer. In 1889 he withdrew from the firm and opened a bakery on Robert street, where he continued until his death, which occurred at Hot Springs, S.D., March 14, 1894. His remains are interred in the family lot at Calvery Cemetery.
In the year 1862, while in Chicago, Mr. Berrisford became a convert to the Catholic church, and rigidly lived up to its laws and doctrines during the remainder of his life. He was always an active worker in the St. Vincent de Paul Society and devoted a large portion of his time in caring for the sick and needy. He was president of this society at the time of his death. judge Willis, in his resolutions, aptly said: "In the performance of his duties as president of this conference he was uniformly patient, courteous, kind and efficient. Whether presiding at our sessions, Visiting the poor, or laboriously performing duties connected with the distribution of alms, Thomas Berrisford ever carried the spirit and purpose which led Ozanam to an imitation of St. Vincent de Paul.
Mr. Berrisford was twice married. His first marriage occurred in St. Paul in 1861, when he was but little past twenty years, and was to Miss Mary Kernan. She died July 29, 1882. Of this marriage there were nine children, of whom five survive, viz.- Rose Ann, now Sister Titiana of the Good Shepherd's Order of Sisterhood; Frank J., Thomas Henry of St. Paul, Mary Jame, wife of James Kane; Ellen, wife of Herman Oleson, and Agnes Catherine.
His second marriage was to Miss Elizabeth A. McManus, and to this union were born seven children, five of whom are living - Enoch, Irene, Joseph, Thomas and Mark.


Frank Bertsch
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BERTSCH Frank, Minneapolis. Res 1081 12th av S E, office 615 1st av N E. Manufacturer. Born Oct 9, 1864 in Germany, son of Charles F and Anna N (Sam) Bertsch. Married Nov 13, 1885 to Rosena J Schrank. Educated in common schools. Worked at upholstering trade Dubuque Ia 1881-82; same in Chicago until 1892; foreman for McLeod & Smith Minneapolis 1892-1901; organized the Grau-Curtis Co Inc 1901 and has continued as pres to date.


Alfred Nicholas Bessesen
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BESSESEN Alfred Nicholas, Minneapolis. Res 1301 N Emerson av, office 403 Medical blk. Physician and surgeon (R). Born Jan 18, 1870 in Freeborn county Minn, son of John and Delia (Anderson) Bessesen. Married 1896 to Florence Emma Holland. Attended public schools at Albert Lea Minn and graduated from high school there in 1890; from Rush Medical College Chicago 1893; has practiced medicine in Minneapolis 1893 to date. Interne at St Mary’s hospital Minneapolis 1894; demonstrator of anatomy and professor of histology in medical dept Hamline Univ 1895-98; now surgeon Deaconess hospital Minneapolis. Member American Medical Assn; State and County Medical societies; Minneapolis Commercial and N Side Commercial clubs and Amateur Athletic Assn. Member of Board Trustees of United Church Hospital.


Nelson Daniel Bessesen
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BESSESEN Nelson Daniel, Minneapolis. Res 1307 Emerson av N, office 250 Temple Court. Lawyer. Born June 27, 1874 at Albert Lea Minn, son of John and Delia (Anderson) Bessesen. Married April 21, 1897 to Jennie Dailey. Graduated from Albert Lea High School 1893; U of M scientific course 1893-96; graduated from law dept in 1902. In theatrical business 1897-99; in charge legal and collection dept Powers Mercantile Co 1899-1902; in active gen practice of law in Minneapolis 1902 to date; senior member N W Bottling Co 1896 to June 1, 1906. Officer in U of M Cadet Corps while attending Univ. Member Phi Gamma Delta college fraternity; Minneapolis Commercial Club.


Fred A. Bill
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BILL Fred A, Minneapolis. Res 2203 Lyndale av N, office 2800 Washington av N. Purchasing agent. Born Aug 12, 1850 at Hartsgrove O, son of E C and Betsey O (Davis) Bill. Married in Sept 1877 to Clara M McMaster. Educated in the dist schools and at Grand River Institute Austinburg O. Steamboating on Mississippi river 1868; clerk, dir and gen freight and passenger agt Diamond Jo Line Steamers 1873-93; auditor, local treas and gen passenger and freight agent and mngr Hot Springs Ry at Hot Springs Ark 1893-1903; pres St Paul Boiler & Mnfg Co 1900 to date; sec, gen passenger and freight and purchasing agent Minneapolis & Rainy River Ry 1903 to date; purchasing agent Itasca Lumber Co 1903 to date.


Gustave E. Bingenheimer
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BINGENHEIMER Gustave E, Minneapolis. Res 816 16th av N, office 1728 2d st N. Born Mar 15, 1867 in Minneapolis, son of Jacob and Margaret (Snyder) Bingenheimer. Educated in the public schools of Minneapolis. Learned drug business with Crossman & Plummer while attending school. Engaged in drug business with E P Sweet 1885; engaged alone 1886-1904; purchased interest in Diamond Iron Works 1904; v pres and sec Diamond Iron Works; sec Diamond Mill Co; v pres Bingenheimer Mercantile Co Mandan N D. Member Commercial Club.


George Douglas Black
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

George Douglas Black is a minister of the gospel and pastor of the Park Avenue Congregational church, in Minneapolis. He was born in Knox County, Ohio, February 12, 1858. His ancestry was German on his father's side, and on his mother's Scotch and French. His home was in Mt. Vernon, the county seat of Knox County, until he was thirteen years old. There he attended the public schools, but at the age of thirteen, went with his parents to live on a farm in the same county. Having decided to make the Christian ministry his calling, he studied literature and theology from 1876 to 1880 with Rev. J. W. Marvin, of Knox County, a man of great ability and of unique magnetic influence over young men. Mr. Black says of this incident in his life: "I have never ceased to be grateful for the years of inspiration and intimacy spent with Mr. Marvin. After the blessing of a devout father and mother, no good has come to me in this world equal to the friendship and instruction of this man. I can say of him what Garfield said of Mark Hopkins, my conception of a university is a log with a student at one end of it and Marvin at the other. To feed on such a life is an unspeakable good to any young man." Having prepared for the ministry, Mr. Black's first important charge was at the college town of Yellow Springs, Ohio. He had two pastorates there, and impressed himself with special force upon the young men of the college. One of them published a sketch in which he said of Mr. Black: "He was only twenty-six. He came to talk Sunday after Sunday to college men and women, and before hearing him I wondered at his presumption. I felt then as I feel now, that a preacher should also be a teacher, rounded out on all sides, a spiritual and intellectual leader. Among the students he should be able not only to deepen their faith, but to solve their doubts. There was a dignity in this man's bearing, in the richness of his tone that charmed me from the first. As the Sundays went by the charm deepened. I felt sure that God meant him for a preacher. Somewhere he had learned the best and highest things a college can teach - he had learned to be a student. Somewhere, too, he had learned that deeper lesson, what it is to live with God. Although he had spent most of his time on a farm, began preaching at eighteen and prepared for his life work while doing it, he came among us familiar with the best authors and able to interpret them to us in the choicest language. This farm lad under the sun and stars had felt the immensity of the universe and the greatness of the soul through which it speaks. This young man was George Douglas Black." Mr. Black resigned his pulpit in Yellow Springs in 1892, to accept the editorship of the Herald of Gospel Liberty, the organ of the Christian denomination, published at Dayton, Ohio. It was while he was thus engaged that Dr. Washington Gladden visited Minneapolis in January 1893, and was asked by the committee of Park Avenue Congregational church to recommend some one for their vacant pulpit. Dr. Gladden recommended Mr. Black. He came by invitation, preached one Sunday, was called to the pastorate and entered upon his work within a few weeks. Since coming to Minneapolis he has been associated for nearly two years with B. Fay Mills, President George A. Gates, Prof. George D. Herron, Thomas C. Hall, Prof. John Bascom and others in the editorship of The Kingdom, a weekly religious newspaper, published in Minneapolis. Mr. Black has contributed to the Golden Rule, the Outlook, the New England Magazine and other publications, and is in demand as a lecturer before college societies and other literary bodies. He was married in 1879 to Miss Flora Bell Hanger, daughter of Rev. Andrew C. Hanger, minister of the Christian church in Ohio. They have three children, Georgia Eva, Wendell Marvin and Russell Collins.

John Wilford Blackstone
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BLACKSTONE John Wilford, Minneapolis. Res 1909 15th av S. Lawyer. Born Dec 22, 1835 at White Oak Springs, Lafayette county Wis, son of John W and Catherine (Tomlinson) Blackstone. Married June 20, 1861 to Ellen E Hardy. Graduated from Platteville Wis Academy in 1855; at Beloit College 1855-57; special course at Brown Univ Providence R I, 1 year. Studied law with John K Williams Shullsburg Wis; in partnership with him in law practice 1858-62; county judge Lafayette county Wis 1862-70; prosecuting atty 1872-74; assemblyman 1879; state senator 1880-81; pres Blackstone Mining Co 1882-86; special examiner in U S Pension Office 1880-83; court comnr 5th judicial circuit Wis 1885-92. Member Masonic fraternity.


John Dunklee Blake
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BLAKE John Dunklee, Minneapolis. Res 1124 Mt Curve av. Real Estate. Born in Marlboro, Windham county Vt May 16, 1838, son of B William and Marilla (Dunklee) Blake. Married April 15th 1858 to Julia R Ingram. Educated in the public and private schools of Vt. First engaged in country store at Williamsville Vt; became partner in the firm of Walker & Blake 1855; sold out in 1857 and became mngr of dry goods dept of Bracketts & Co at Brattleboro Vt. Purchased their business in 1858 under firm of Houghton & Blake. Removed to Rochester Minn 1860 and established firm of Blake & Co which continued until 1882; organizer and dir of the Union National Bank Rochester Minn; also gen mngr Chattanooga Iron Co 1874-89; owned an operated flour mill in Dodge county Minn; pres and gen mngr Southern Land Improvement Co and W Va Pineville & Tenn R R Co 1892-96; enaged in zinc and lead mining near Joplin Mo and Galena Kan 1900-1903; now engaged in real estate business in Minneapolis.


Henry Joseph Blakeman
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BLAKEMAN Henry Joseph, Minneapolis. Res 802 Western av, office 308 Andrus bldg. Real estate, insurance and employment. Born Feb 14, 1881 in Minneapolis Minn, son of Frank P and Magdalena A (Inveen) Blakeman. Married Sept 20, 1905 to Ethel May Shepard. Educated in public schools of Minneapolis and received diploma from Minn School of Business 1902. Engaged as grocery clk Minneapolis 1895-1901; supt’s office W U Tel Co 1902-1905; now propr of Blakeman Realty & Reference Co Minneapolis real estate, ins and employment bureau. Clk and asst dep head consul M W of A.


George M. Bleecker
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BLEECKER George M, Minneapolis. Res 1527 Fremont av N, office 519 Bank of Commerce bldg. Lawyer. Born Nov 19, 1861 in Whippany N J, son of Henry Ellis and Phoebe Wilson (Cook) Bleecker. Married 1888 to Mary Frances Martin. Attended Whippany N J Academy until 1880; special work in U of M 1883-84; law dept Univ of Mich 1885-87 graduating LL B. Has practiced law in Minneapolis 1887 to date. Clk probate court Hennepin county 1891-92. Member Minnesota Legislature 1893-94. Member Masonic fraternity, Knights Templar, Shrine, B P O E and I O O F.


Charles Blomstrom
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BLOMSTROM Charles, Minneapolis. Res 3405 Oakland av, office 249 6th av S. Machinist. Born Mar 9, 1869 in Sweden, son of Renol and Annie (Venerstrom) Blomstrom. Married 1894 to Matilda Sutherland. Educated in the common schools of Sweden. Came to U S 1887 and was employed as a machinist in Mich until 1890; moved to Minneapolis; in same trade 1890-1901; in business as Parten & Blomstrom Minneapolis 1901 to date.


Frederick H. Boardman
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) Submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Frederick Henry Boardman comes of good, old Colonial stock in New Brunswick. His father, George A. Boardman, originally a citizen of New Brunswick, is a retired lumberman of Calais, Maine. He was a man of scientific tastes and attainments, and is known as one of the leading ornithologists of the United States. George A. Boardman's wife was Mary Jane, Hill, a woman of noble character, whose memory is held in reverent and affectionate regard by her children. The subject of this sketch was born at Milltown, New Brunswick, April 25, 1848. His early education was obtained at St. Stephen's Academy, and at Philip Academy at Andover, Massachusetts., where he prepared for college. He then entered Bowdoin college, where he was a graduate of the class of 1869. While in college he was a member of the Psi Upsilon society; was the prize speaker of his class, and a leader in all college sports. He was awarded by the teacher in gymnastics a special cup for being the best at sparring and in all the athletic contests of the school. Having completed his college course he began the study of law with E. B. Harvey, of Calais, Maine, and was admitted to the bar in 1876. Two years later he came to Minnesota and settled in Minneapolis for the practice of his profession. He formed a law partnership with C. M. Ferguson, which continued from 1878 to 1885. He is now, and has for several years, been associated professionally with M. H. Boutelle, and the firm has always had its share of important litigation. Mr. Boardman has always been a Republican, and represented one of the Minneapolis districts in the Minnesota legislature in 1882 and 1883. His home has been in the city of Minneapolis until recently, when he removed to his farm at Blaine, Anoka county, where he now resides, although continuing his professional business in the city. He was married in Brunswick, Maine, in 1870, to Harriet C. Bouttele. They have two children, Lucy B. and Ralph T.

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOARDMAN Frederick H, Minneapolis. Res 1903 Mt Curve av, office 537 Andrus bldg. Lawyer. Born April 25, 1848 in Milltown N B, son of George A and Mary Jane (Hill) Boardman. Married in 1870 to Harriet C Boutelle. Attended St Stephen's Academy; prepared for college at Phillips Academy Andover Mass and graduated from Bowdoin College Me 1869. Began study of law in Calais Me; admitted to bar 1876; moved to Minneapolis 1878 and formed law partnership with C M Ferguson until 1885; later with M H Boutelle; now member firm of Boardman, Dever & Boardman. Member Minn House of Representatives 1882-83; county attorney Hennepin county 1901-1905.


Lincoln J. Bodge
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BODGE Lincoln J, Minneapolis. Res 1323 8th st S E, office 523 Boston blk. Lawyer. Born May 24, 1865 in Windham Me, son of John J and Martha M (Webb) Bodge. Married July 18, 1893 to Josephine Fling. Educated in Maine schools and graduated from Bowdoin College A B 1889. Moved immediately to Minneapolis and has been engaged in the practice of his profession 1890 to date. Member Theta Delta Chi college fraternity and B P O E.


Newton H. Bolton
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOLTON Newton H, Minneapolis. Res 1829 2 1/2 st S, office 166 Western av. Manufacturer. Born Feb 10, 1839 in Cleveland O, son of Hiram and Gracelia (Shepard) Bolton. Married Nov 12, 1865 to Mary L Norton. Educated in common schools and academy at Twinsburg O. Engaged in farming until 1861; in mechanical business 1861-65; supt of sawmill Omro Wis until 1872: moved to Minneapolis 1872 and engaged in machinery mnfg business; pres Bolton Lath & Shingle Machinery Co 1898 to date.


Charles E. Bond
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOND Charles E, Minneapolis. Res 1416 Willow st, office 418 Guaranty bldg. Lawyer. Born March 18, 1865 near Titusville N J, son of Charles C and Mary P (Jones) Bond. Married Dec 4, 1897 to Marie Antoniette Palmer. Attended common schools of N J; College of Pharmacy; Minneapolis School of Physicians and Surgeons (now part of Hamline University); law dept U of M, LL B 1890; LL M 1896; studied for D C L, U of M 1897-98; instructor law dept U of M 1896-97. Reared on a farm; bound to service as a farmer's boy 1876-80; worked in Minneapolis sawmills 1881; cook in grading camp on N P Ry Mont; in U S army 1881-86; in retail drug business 1887-90; admitted to practice of pharmacy in Minn 1887; capt 15th Minn Vols in Spanish-American War; practiced law in Minneapolis 1890 to date.


Lardber Bostwick
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Lardber Bostwick was born in Toronto, Ont., June 20, 1815, and was married March 6, 1843, to Eliza Kennedy. They had four children, two of whom are now living, Mrs. F. G. O'Brien of Minneapolis, and Mrs. H. A. Nott of Chicago.
Judge Bostwick died April 13, 1897, age eighty-two years, leaving a wife, the two daughters above mentioned, also a grandson, Edward J. O'Brien, a granddaughter, Mrs. W. O. Wolf, daughter of Mrs. Nott.
In 1843 judge Bostwick moved from Toronto to Chicago, and from thence to St. Anthony Falls in 1850.
He served his first term as justice of the peace in 1852. He was also the fourth judge of probate of Hennepin County; also court commissioner. He served as assessor of internal revenue from 1862 to 1866.
Judge Wm. Lochren, in an article some years ago, on reminiscences of the first lawyers in Hennepin county, says- "Lardner Bostwick was a man of unusual mental power, good literary attainments, and knowledge of the law, and Withal of spotless integrity and commanding dignity in court, while very genial and companionable in his intercourse with members of the bar and others. He was a most efficient magistrate, at a time when, owing to the rough manners of a pioneer community, such a man was needed to preserve order and respect for law."


Edward F. Bousfield
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOUSFIELD Edward F, Minneapolis. Res 19 S 13th st, office 2600 Marshall st. Manufacturer. Born Sept 4, 1849 in Kirtland, Lake county O, son of John and Sarah (Featherstone) Bousfield. Educated in the public schools of Cleveland O and at Oberlin College O. Shipping clerk for Bousfield & Poole mnfrs woodenware, lumber, sash and doors, and matches Cleveland O 1867-72; bkpr Ohio Woodenware Co Cleveland 1872-75; member Bousfield & Co mnfrs of woodenware Bay City Mich 1875-81; incorporated 1881-82; out of business 1882-84; pres Bousfield & Co Bay City Mich 1884-87; principal owner pres and treas Bousfield Woodenware Co organized 1890: incorporated 1904. Member Minneapolis and St Anthony Commercial clubs Minneapolis.

James C. Bowden
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOWDEN James C, Minneapolis. Res 3950 Portland av, office 633 Security Bank bldg. Lumberman. Born Feb 9, 1847 in Liverpool England, son of John and Mary (Eustace) Bowden. Married twice: in 1876 to Susan R Douglas; and in 1890 to Carrie I Winans. Educated in common schools Liverpool. Moved to Rockford Ill 1858; served in 65th Ill Inf 1862-65; from 1865-67 farmed and attended school at Rockford Ill; moved to Wis and engaged in lumber business 1867-87; in lumber business as pres of Bowden, Murray Lumber Co St Paul 1887-90; member of Fox, Wisdom Lumber Co sawmills near Duluth 1890-97; moved to Minneapolis 1897 and has been engaged in lumber business to date. Member Masonic fraternity.


Oliver P. Bowe
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOWE Oliver P, Minneapolis. Res 3215 S Colfax av, office 465 Temple Court. Lawyer. Born April 17, 1834 in Jefferson N Y, son of Prosper and Lois (Bachellor) Bowe. Married Nov 15, 1860 to Frances A Chase. Educated in common schools; graduated from Bradley Academy Belleville N Y 1853; read law at Watertown N Y; admitted to bar 1855; began practice at Fond du Lac Wis 1858; enlisted in 36th Wis Inf 1862 remaining in service until 1865; returned to Fond du Lac Wis and continued in practice of law until 1883; moved to Minneapolis 1883 and engaged in his profession to date. Member G A R.


Burton H. Bowler
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOWLER Burton H, Minneapolis. Res 619 9th av S E, office 501 Loan & Trust bldg. Lawyer. Born Nov 7, 1871 in Nininger, Dakota county Minn, son of James M and Elizabeth (Coleff) Bowler. Received his education in Bird Island public schools; high school Minneapolis; graduated from U of M law dept 1896. Engaged in practice Bird Island 1896-1904; moved to Minneapolis and has continued in practice to date. Member firm of Parsons & Bowler. Member Masonic fraternity.


James M. Bowler
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOWLER James M, Minneapolis. Res 619 9th av S E, office 501 Loan & Trust bldg. Real estate. Born Jan 10, 1838 in Lee Me, son of Edward and Clara Augusta (Smith) Bowler. Married Nov 30, 1862 to Lizzie S Caleff. Educated in public schools; Lee Normal Academy and Westbrook Seminary. Moved to Minnesota 1858 and was employed as a printer in St Anthony and teacher in country school until 1861; served in U S army 1861-66; engaged in teaching and farming in Dakota and Renville counties 1866-73; farming exclusively 1873-1901; moved to Minnaepolis 1901 and has been engaged in real estate business to date. Member State House of Representatives 1878-80; sec to speaker of House 1891; state dairy and food comnr 1899-1901; candidate for railroad commission 1904; candidate for lieut gov 1896-98 and for Congress on Peoples Party ticket 1894; v pres and dir Independencia Mining and Smelting Co; dir Copper Butte Mines; member real estate firm Bowler & Gibbs. Member Masonic fraternity, Loyal Legion and G A R.


Madison C. Bowler
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BOWLER Madison C, Minneapolis. Res 619 9th av S E, office 100 Oneida blk. Lawyer. Born Sept 26, 1875 in Renville county Minn, son of James M and Elizabeth (Caleff) Bowler. Educate in the common schools Bird Island Minn; high school Minneapolis; graduated from U of M law dept 1903. Began practice in Minneapolis 1903 as atty for Minn. Title, Ins & Trust Co and has continued in same position to date. Member Military Order Loyal Legion.


Alf E. Boyesen
Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal, 1897 – transcribed by AJ

Alf E. Boyesen, a lawyer of St. Paul, was born in Christiania, Norway, April 21, 1857. His father, Capt. S. F. Boyesen, of Christiana, was an officer in the Norwegian regular army. Capt. Boyesen's father was a landed proprietor of Norway, and the owner of "Hovin," one of the largest estates in Norway. "Hovin" is situated a few miles out of Christiania, Norway's capital, and is famous as one of the most attractive country seats in that region. The maternal grandfather of Alf E. was Judge Hjorth, of Systrand, on Sognefjord, Norway. Alf Boyesen attended the public schools in Norway, and also studied with his father, who was a man of fine educational attainments, until he came to the United States at the age of twelve years. On his arrival in this country he went to Urbana University, at Urbana, Ohio, where his brother, the celebrated author and philologist, the late Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen, was then engaged as an instructor. In 1878, having completed his university course, Mr. Boyesen came to Minnesota, located in Minneapolis, and was taken into the law office of Shaw, Levi & Cray, as a law student. He was admitted to the bar of Hennepin County in 1880, and shortly afterward went to Fargo, North Dakota, to engage in the practice of his profession. He continued there in that business until 1887, when he returned to Minnesota and located at St. Paul, where he has been engaged in the practice of law ever since. He is now a member of the firm of Munn, Boyesen & Thygeson. This partnership was formed in 1890, and constitutes one of the leading law firms of the state. Mr. Boyesen is what may be called a Cleveland Democrat in politics, is a thorough believer in sound money, in a low tariff and adheres to the principles of civil service reform. He has, however, never aspired to any political office, and has no desire to achieve honors or responsibilities of that kind. His political activities consist chiefly of a leading membership in the Civil Service Reform Association, of St. Paul. Mr. Boyesen was married in 1883 to Miss Florence Knapp, of Racine, Wisconsin. They have no children.


George Brackett
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

George Augusts Brackett was born Sept 16, 1836, at Calais, Maine. He arrived at St. Anthony April 30, 1857, and that summer drove the meat wagon for Stimson & Hayes, and in the winter worked on the dam of the Minneapolis Mill Company. The following spring he opened a meat market of his own. In 1862 he was given the contract to supply beef to the troops that were serving against the Indians. During 1864 he transported and supplied the troops under General Sully and the Garrison at Fort Wadsworth with provisions.
Later he operated the Cataract Flour Mill for several years in partnership with W. S. Judd, under the firm name of Judd & Brackett.
In the summer of 1869 he was assigned the duties of supplying a party of directors of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, who were out looking over the proposed route for the railroad across the plains, which he did successfully.
From 1870 to 1875 Mr. Brackett was purchasing agent for the Northern Pacific Railway Company, and interested as a contractor in the building of the road from the St. Louis River through to Bismarck. In 1873, in partnership with Anthony Kelly, he built the stone block at the corner of First avenue south and Second street, and the next winter engaged in packing pork.
Mr. Brackett was instrumental in organizing the fire department of Minneapolis, and in 1869 was made chief engineer, which position he held until 1872. At the first city election, in 1867, he was elected alderman from the Third ward. In 1873 Mr. Brackett was elected mayor of Minneapolis.
After his retirement from the city government he was appointed surveyor general of logs and lumber for the Second district by Governor Davis, which office Mr. Brackett held successfully for eight years. Mr. Brackett was appointed one of the commissioners of the park board of the City of Minneapolis at its organization, which office he held for six years.
In 1890 he was president of the Minneapolis Stock Yards and Packing Company, located at New Brighton, in which he was heavily interested. The venture was not a success financially and the panic of 1893 forced Mr. Brackett to the wall, and he disposed of his property to satisfy his creditors. When the discovery of large quantities of gold was made in the Klondike region he went out there, hoping to secure another fortune for his family. His many friends will be pleased to learn that his prospects in that direction are good at the present time.
Mr. Brackett was married to Miss Anna M. Hoit, daughter of William Hoit, Aug. 19, 1858. Mrs. Brackett died in December, 1891, leaving husband, seven sons and one daughter.


William Proctor Brackett
[Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota, 1907, page 19, submitted by Robin Line]
Brackett, William Proctor, Minneapolis. Res 3345 2d av S., office 25 Chamber of Commerce. Grain. Born Feb. 26, 1857 at Orono Me, son of H. H. and Mary Scott (Felton) Brackett. Married May 4, 1880 to Hattie B. Bryant. Educated in Minneapolis public schools and U of M. Engaged in grain business 1870 to date; now sec and treas Sheffield Elevator Co.

James H. Bradish
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

James H. Bradish comes of an old Massachusetts family which traces its line back to the early Colonial terms. His father, Cyrus Bradish, was born in Haverhill, New Hampshire, in 1814. His mother, whose maiden name was Hannah Bachelder, was a native of the same place. Soon after their marriage, Cyrus Bradish and his wife moved to Cabot, Vermont, where Mr. Bradish engaged in farming. Their son James, was one of six children. He came West with some of his brothers in 1862, settling at Menasha, Wisconsin. Though only sixteen years old he entered the army with his brothers, serving for a time as captain's clerk. Later in the war he enlisted as a regular private and served until August 30, 1865, when he was mustered out. His regiment went through the Atlanta campaign and participated in Sherman's great march to the sea. Mr. Bradish was wounded at Resaca, on May 14, 1864. Immediately on being mustered out of the army Mr. Bradish entered Ripon College, and after a six-years' course, graduated in 1871. He then entered Columbia College law school in New York City, and after two years graduated with the degree of LL.B. He at once begun the practice of law Ripon, Wisconsin. After about two years Mr. Bradish came to Minneapolis and became associated with the Honorable C. M. Pond, now Judge of the District Court. This partnership terminated after a time, but Mr. Bradish has continued in active practice. In the spring of 1892 he was appointed assistant general solicitor of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railroad Company. Since coming to Minneapolis Mr. Bradish has taken a very active part in politics. In 1888 he was elected alderman from the Ninth ward, for a term of four years, and was re-elected after a most vigorous contest in 1892. In the council Mr. Bradish has taken a particular interest in the patrol limits law of Minneapolis. One of his achievements in the council was that of securing the bridging of the Great Northern Railway tracks, at the street crossings on the East Side. He is chairman of the council committee on roads and bridges. Mr. Bradish became a member of the park board in 1891. On October 1, 1874, Mr. Bradish married a college class-mate, Miss Sarah E. Powers, a daughter of Moses H. Powers, of Green Lake, Wisconsin. Mrs. Bradish graduated in the classical course at Ripon College, traveled extensively in Europe and is a lady of highest culture. They have two children, Bertha and Herman. Herman is now senior in the High School, Bertha organist at Pilgrim church, and a fine musician.


Edward T. Brandebury
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BRANDEBURY Edward T, Minneapolis. Res 2409 Garfleld av, office 215 Security Bank bldg. Lawyer. Born March 28, 1859 in Deleware O, son of Charles B and Martha J (Hamilton) Brandebury. Married Nov 7, 1901 to Elizabeth Van Anda. Educated in public schools. Graduated Ohio Wesleyan Univ 1880; law school 1883. Moved to Minneapolis 1883 and continued practice there until 1887; practiced in Deleware O 1887-1904; removed to Minneapolis and has practiced there to date.

William Brander
Source: History of Anoka County and the Towns of Champlin and Dayton in Hennepin County, Minnesota, by Albert M. Goodrich (1905) transcribed by Sheila Gruver

William Brander was born on Prince Edward's Island Jan. 1, 1837.  He came to Champlin in February, 1863, where he engaged in blacksmithing.  In 1866 he was married to Almira Parker.  They have one daughter, Ella F. (Mrs. James Leach).


Jabez A. Brant
[Source: Encyclopedia of Biography of Minnesota, History of Minnesota by Judge Charles E. Flandreau, 1900, transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]

Like many of those who have attained to prominence in the business world, Jabez Anderson Brant, of Minneapolis, was born on a farm and had seventeen years of farm life before commencing the more varied and hazardous ventures that make or mar the fortunes of men. He was born at Berlin, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1845. His father, John J. Brant, was also a native of the Keystone State, born August 15, 1818, and alternated between the farm and the store, leaving at times the pursuit of agriculture for ventures in merchandising. He left his native State, in 1867, and removed to Illinois to engage in farming, and died December 28, 1887. Jabez A. Brant's early educational advantages were such as are commonly given by the public schools of Pennsylvania, supplemented by private schools at his home and in Maryland, where he fitted himself for teaching. As teacher and student, he attained a good education, with which he commenced his business life. In 1867 and 1868 he was engaged in mercantile business at Lonaconing, Maryland. The following year he went to Illinois, where for one year he resumed his vocation as teacher. In the fall of 1869 inducements were offered him to engage in the insurance business, to which he was well adapted. He then located at Pleasant Hill, Missouri. After four years of successful work he changed his location, in 1873, to Ottawa, Kansas, and subsequently to Dubuque, Iowa. He developed rapidly in the business. His judgment was respected, and his capacity for field work and as an adjuster were recognized by the higher officials. His quick perception of the varied hazards and the application of equitable ratings was appreciated, and his service became desirable. He was placed in full charge of an inspection and rating bureau at Dubuque, in January, 1884, which covered a large district in northeastern Iowa and northern Illinois. He continued in this service until January, 1893, when he was appointed to a supervisorship that controlled the special interests of companies at Milwaukee. Wisconsin. After completing his work under this special charge with gratifying success, he removed to Minneapolis, called there by an appointment as manager and inspector for the Minneapolis Underwriters' Association, with headquarters in the New York Life building in that city. During the War of the Rebellion Mr. Brant was assigned to duty as a civilian in the capacity of an engineer, attached to the Fifteenth New York Regiment of Engineers. Mr. Brant was married to Miss Minnie J. Clothier of New York at Carthage, Missouri, on May 20, 1892. He is a member of the Minneapolis Mounted Commandery, No. 28, Knights Templar; Zurah Temple of the Mystic Shrine; is a thirty-second degree Mason, and has membership in the Commercial Club of Minneapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Brant worship in the Westminster Presbyterian church. Mr. Brant, in the discharge of the duties assigned to him, has traveled extensively in the West, and has made a large and valued acquaintance. In politics he has always been a Republican, and he takes a lively interest in the affairs that mark the progress and prosperity of the community in which he resides, and bears with an inspiring cheerfulness his full share of the public burdens. In a vigorous manhood, and with a thorough knowledge of all the intricate questions pertaining to insurance, he is well fitted for a life of usefulness and prosperity. His chosen field in the business of insurance is full of opportunity for the employment of business ability and sterling integrity that characterize his life.


Alfred Harris Bright
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BRIGHT Alfred Harris, Minneapolis. Res 1004 Mount Curve av, office Soo Line bldg. Lawyer. Born Oct 29, 1850 at Adams Center Jefferson county N Y, son of Thomas and Jane (Crittenden) Bright. Married 1877 to Emily Haskell. Attended common schools; Univ of Wis graduating A B academic dept; LL B law dept. County atty Fremont county Wyo 1882-87. Returned to Milwaukee 1887; member law firm of Williams, Friend & Bright with special charge of Milwaukee & Northern R R business until 1891, gen sol and dir Minneapolis, St Paul & Sault Ste Marie R R (Soo Line) 1891 to date. Member Commercial Club, Men's Club of Church of Redeemer Minneapolis.


Anson Brooks
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROOKS Anson Strong, Minnetonka Beach. Office 649-654 Security bldg. Minneapolis. Lumberman. Born Sept 6, 1852 in Oswego county N Y, son of Sheldon and Jeanette (Ranney) Brooks. Married July 24, 1876 to Georgia L Andros. Educated in village public schools in southern Minn. Settled on a farm in Winona county 1856; telegraph opr in Wabasha county 1868-73; removed to Grand Forks N D 1881 and engaged in the country lumber business; removed to St Paul 1891; removed to Minneapolis 1897. Entered the firm of Brooks Bros grain dealers 1873; pres of Brooks Elevator Co; treas Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Co; sec Kentwood & Eastern Ry and dir of Nat Bank of Commerce. Member of Minneapolis, Minikahda, Lafayette and Minnetonka Yacht and Automobile club.


Frank C. Brooks
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROOKS Frank C, Minneapolis. Res 432 Ridgewood av, office Court House. Jurist. Born January 12, 1853 at Tauton Mass, son of Oscar M and Ann Brooks. Was married at Janesville Wis to Ella R Noyes (now deceased) in 1879. Resided in Cuyhoga county O 1859-72 and thereafter at Janesville Wis until 1881. Admitted to the bar in 1878. Practiced his profession for 3 years at Eau Claire Wis and in may 1884 removed to Minneapolis where he has since resided. Elected judge of the Dist Court of the 4th judicial dist in 1898 and re-elected to the same office 1904. Democrat.


Robert H. Brooks
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROOKS Robert H, Minneapolis. Secretary Public Service Club. Born Aug 13, 1881 in Chicago, son of Frank L and Fannie D (Harmon) Brooks. Married Sept 6, 1904 to Ida B Dunham. Educated in public schools of Minneapolis; preparatory school Lawrenceville N J and graduated from Univ of Dansas 1903. Engaged on editorial staff of the N W Miller until 1903; commercial editor of Minneapolis Daily Times until May 1904; sec of Public Service Club 1905-1906. Gen mercantile agency together with retail credit reporting collections and adjustments. Member Roosevelt Club Minneapolis.


Axel R. Brostrom
[Source: A History of The Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, A. E. Strand, Vol. 3, page 782-783 submitted by Robin Line]
Axel R. Brostrom, an expert accountant of Minneapolis, is of a fine Swedish family, whose representatives, both maternal and paternal, have rendered the fatherland faithful military family service. He was born in Jonkoping, Smaland, on the 17th of June, 1871, his father, who died in 1889, being long stationed there as colonel of the Vestgota-Dal regiment of infantry. His mother, who died in March, 1908, was the daughter of Captain Richter, of Vendes Artillery.

Axel, the only child of the family, received his earliest education in the public schools of his native city, and was later sent to the University of the city of Lund, from whose collegiate department he graduated in 1889. Soon afterward, he emigrated to America, arriving in Boston during 1890. The year of his residence at the Hub was not altogether congenial, as it was spent working as a factory hand, and he also longed for more extended association with his countrymen than he could enjoy in the eastern city. Minneapolis appealed to him in every point, and he therefore settled there in 1891. It has since been a home to him in the full sense of the word, and though the clerical positions which he has held in various banks and Mercantile establishments he has become an accountant of recognized expertness. At present he is employed as book keeper in the Minneapolis branch of the Jung Brewing Company, of Milwaukee.

In 1898 Mr. Brostrom married, in Minneapolis, Miss Ida Borglin, who is a native of Lund, Sweden, where the husband received his university education. The children of this union are Violet, born in 1899, and Marjory, born in 1901.


Charles William Brown
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Charles William Brown, or Captain Brown, as he is generally addressed by his acquaintances in Minneapolis, acquired his title while in command of an American vessel engaged in trade in Australia, India and China. Mr. Brown was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, June 14, 1858. His father was Jacob B. Brown, who was for many years a well known shipmaster of New England, and directly descended from John Brown, who settled in Rockingham County, New Hampshire in 1644. The farm occupied and improved by him is still owned by his descendants. Captain Brown's mother's maiden name was Anna A. Fitch. Her ancestors settled Fitchburg, Massachusetts, but, being loyal to the crown at the time of the Revolution, they emigrated to Nova Scotia, leaving considerable property behind them. Charles William began his education at Allen's English and Classical School at West Newton, Massachusetts, continuing it in Dummer Academy at Byfield, and graduating at Newburyport high school. Following the custom among New England boys he went to sea at an early age, and was some time in the service of the Chinese Merchants Steam Navigation Company on the coast of China. At the age of twenty-one he had attained such proficiency as a sailor that he was placed in command of the American barque Agate, and sailed for Adelaide, Australia. He continued for several years in that capacity, trading mostly with Australia, India and Japan. In November 1885 having left the sea and being attracted by the reputation of Minneapolis, he made a short visit to this city, and was so pleased with the business opportunities offered and the desirability of the city as a place of residence, that he associated himself with L. W. Young, and established the first stained glass manufacturing business in the Northwest. In April of the following year the firm became Brown & Haywood. Business continued to grow and included the handling of plate and window glass. In 1891 the firm of Brown & Haywood Company was incorporated with C. W. Brown as treasurer and general manager. The enterprise has been highly successful and has grown to very handsome proportions. While not taking any active part in politics. Captain Brown has been identified with the Republican party, reserving to himself, however, the right at any time to vote for the best man and the best policy, regardless of party lines. At present Captain Brown is president of the Jobbers and Manufacturers Association of Minneapolis. He was married October 31, 1883, to Alice Greenleaf, of Newburyport, Massachusetts. They have five children. Although Captain Brown has retired to the less eventful and exciting occupation of a merchant and manufacturer, he has not lost his interest in the sea, nor forgotten the pleasures and enjoyments of that adventurous life.


Edward Josiah Brown
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROWN Edward Josiah, Minneapolis. Res 3027 Pleasant av, office 39 Syndicate blk. Physician and surgeon (R). Born Jan 14, 1851 at Burke Vt. Son of Ira and Emily (Clark) Brown. Graduated from Kimball Union Academy Meriden N H 1870; Dartmouth College academic dept 1874; medical dept 1878; studied in the medical dept Univ of City of N Y 1878; College Physicians and Surgeons N Y 1888-89; Univ of Berlin summer of 1889; Royal Ophthalmic Hospital Moorfields London Eng fall of 1889. Practiced at Littleton N H 1879-80; Haverhill N H 1880-82; Minneapolis 1882 to date; eye, ear and throat specialist. Held chairs of chemistry, preventive medicine and diseases of eye and ear in Minneapolis College of Physicians and Surgeons. Member Hennepin county Medical Society; pres in 1888 Minn State Medical Society; American Medical Assn and Minn Academy of Sciences.


Frederick Vaness Brown
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Frederick Vanes Brown is of New England ancestry on his father's side. The earliest member of the family known to the family records was John Brown, who came to Massachusetts Bay colony in the ship Lyon in 1632. His descendant, William Brown, and the great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a soldier in the War of the Revolution. Frederick V. is a son of Orestus S. Brown, who resides at Shakopee, Minnesota. Orestus came to Minnesota from Michigan in 1869, and is a farmer in comfortable circumstances. His wife, Eveyln Bortle (Brown), mother of Frederick Vaness, died at Shakopee, March 8, 1871. Frederick V. was born in Washtenaw County, Michigan, March 8, 1862, and was seven years old when his parents came to Minnesota. He commenced his education in the common schools of Shakopee, and for one year attended the preparatory department at Hamline University. During his boyhood and up to the age of nineteen he worked on his father's farm during the summer months and attended school on the average about four months a year. At the age of nineteen he went to St. Paul, where he was employed in the office of the locomotive department of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha road. He remained there till 1883, when he returned to Shakopee to commence the study of law with Senator H. J. Peck. During the next two years he read law and taught in the public schools. June 17, 1885, Mr. Brown was admitted to the bar in Scott County, and formed a partnership with Judge Luther M. Brown, for the practice of law at Shakopee. Judge Brown died in 1886, and for the next three years, Mr. Brown was associated professionally with Senator Peck. In the spring of 1889 he removed to St. Paul, and shortly afterward became the special attorney of the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company, which relation continued until 1892. At that time he removed to Minneapolis and resumed the general practice of law. In 1894 he formed a partnership with George W. Buffington, which partnership still continues. Mr. Brown has devoted his entire attention ever since he was admitted to the bar to the practice of his profession, in which he has been highly successful. His political affiliations are with the Democratic party, and his first presidential vote was cast for the Democratic electors in 1884. He has always adhered to that party on national affairs, but has been independent in state and local politics. He has never sought or obtained political preferment in any form. Mr. Brown is a member of the Masonic Order, his partnership dating from 1887, when he was made a member of King Solomon's Lodge, No. 44, at Shakopee. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and is a member of the Minneapolis Mounted Knights Templar Commandery, No. 23. He has taken an active part in the work of various Masonic lodges, and has held various offices in the several bodies. Mr. Brown was married November 11, 1886, to Esther A. Bailey, of Prescott, Wisconsin. They have two children, Jessica Marie and Howard Selden.

Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROWN Frederick V, Minneapolis. Res 2117 Kenwood pkway, office Court House. Lawyer. Born Mar 8, 1862 in Washtenaw county Mich, son of Orestus S and Evelyn (Bortle) Brown. Attended common schools at Shakopee Minn and 1 year at Hamline Univ St Paul. Practiced law at Shakopee 1885-89; member of Peck & Brown lawyers Shakopee 1886-89; moved to Minneapolis in 1889 and has practiced there since; partner of George W Buffington in law practice 1894-1901; of Hon W A Kerr 1901-1905; appointed to dist bench 1905. Pres State Bar Assn in 1903. Member Minneapolis and Commercial clubs Minneapolis.


Henry Francis Brown
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853ץd.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Henry Francis Brown was a farmer boy in Maine, when the advantages of the West appealed to his ambition and invited him to the employment of his energies and abilities in the more promising field which they had to offer. His father was Cyrus S. Brown, a farmer regarded as wealthy at that time, and was located at Baldwin, Maine. He was a leading man of the neighborhood and prominent in state politics. His wife was Mary Burnham. Both were of old families in that section. Cyrus Brown was born in Baldwin, where he always lived, and reared a family of ten children, all of whom are living and in good health today. The parents have died but the children have retained the old homestead in Baldwin and go there every year for a family reunion. Henry F. Brown was born in Maine, on his father's farm, October 10, 1843, and when old enough was sent to the Fryburg Academy for two years. He was also at school at the Limerick Academy for two years. He came west when seventeen years old, and located in Minneapolis in 1859. He engaged in the lumbering business and has been interested in that business almost continuously ever since. He earned his first money at lumbering by driving a team in the woods at twenty dollars a month. The next year he rented a farm and taught district school for three winters in succession and worked the farm in the summer. His first thousand dollars earned in this way was put in the lumbering business, but he lost it all the first winter and found himself in debt a thousand dollars more. He continued in the business, however, in a small way and soon had recovered from his losses and has made a large amount of money since. Mr. Brown has also been identified with a number of other important enterprises. He has a three-fourths interest in two flour mills in Minneapolis. He is president and a large stockholder in the Union National Bank, a director in the North American Telegraph Company and one of the largest stockholders. He is also director and a large stockholder in the Minneapolis Trust Company. He sustains the same relation to the Minneapolis Street Railway Company and also the Minneapolis Land and Investment Company. Mr. Brown has always taken a great deal of interest in the breeding of fine stock, and his herds of blooded cattle are among the finest in the country. He maintains a large stock farm near the city of Minneapolis, and his fine herd of Short Horns took the sweepstake prize at the World's Fair in Chicago, besides numerous other prizes for individuals. Mr. Brown was married in 1865 to Susan H. Fairfield of Maine. They have a pleasant home at Fourth Avenue and Seventh Street South, Minneapolis, but have no children living. Mrs. Brown was a member of the World's Fair commission for the state of Minnesota, took an active part in the management of the woman's department of the fair, and is active in philanthropic work in her own city, where she is held in very high regard.

Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROWN Henry F, Minneapolis. Office 1014 N Y Life bldg. Lumber. Born Oct 10, 1843 in Baldwin Me, son of Cyrus S and Mary (Burnham) Brown. Married in 1865 to Susan H Fairfield of Maine. Educated in Fryburg and Limerick (Me) academies. Has been engaged in the lumber business since coming to Minn in 1859. Has had many other interests in which he has taken both active and financial parts. Among them have been Union Nat Bank, North American Telegraph co, Minneapolis Trust Co, Minneapolis Street Ry Co, Minneapolis Land & Ins Co. Is well known as breeder of fine cattle, his herds being known throughout the country.


Henry W. Brown
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROWN Henry W, Minneapolis. Res 2402 Portland av, Office 500 Washington av N. Threshing machines. Born March 13, 1867 in Minneapolis, son of John W and Mary (Hanscome) Brown. Married 1893 to Bessie E Perry. Educated in public schools and business college Minneapolis. With Buffalo-Pitts, Thresher Co 1890-93; with Gaar, Scott & co 1893-1902; mngr Huber Mnfg Co 1902 to date.


James D. Brown
Source: History Biography of North Dakota. Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

JAMES D. BROWN, cashier of the Steele County Bank, is a young man of exceptional business ability, and is a recognized leader in financial affairs in the county. He is a man of practical business methods, and his thorough knowledge of the intricate affairs of the institution with which he is connected are handled conservatively and with keen foresight.

Our subject was born in La Salle county, Illinois, August 4, 1866, and was the second child and oldest son born to James P. and Charlotte A. (McVean) Brown. The Brown family settled in Massachusetts prior to the Revolutionary war, and was connected for generations with the growth of the New England states. The great-grandfather of our subject was Major Micha Brown, of the war of 1812, and his son, the grandfather of our subject, then but ten years of age, acted as his aide. Three brothers of the Brown family came to America together, and one of the brothers settled in Massachusetts and later located in Vermont, and to this immediate ancestor of our subject three sons were born, as follows: Micah (Major Brown, of the war of 1812); James, a sailor; and William, who served in the British navy as lieutenant under Lord Nelson. To Micha Brown three sons were born, as follows: James C., the grandfather of our subject, who was a physician, and his father s aide; Cyrus M., a captain in the Civil war; and Charles R., a farmer. The father of our subject was the owner of the Bank of LaSalle, and our subject as a boy was engaged in the banking business, and his education consisted in part of the business methods of the institution of which the father was the head. The family removed to Minneapolis in August, 1884.

Our subject went to Hope, North Dakota, in 1881, near where the father owned land, and in September, 1886, a private bank was established under the name of J. P. Brown & Son, our subject assuming control of the business. This institution was reorganized in 1890, as a state bank, under the name of The Steele County Bank, with C. A. Brown, president; C. D. Brown, vice-president, and James D. Brown, cashier. The bank does a general banking business and handles real estate, insurance and loans.

James D. Brown was married, in 1889, to Miss Clara D. Ward, a native of LaSalle county, Illinois. Mrs. and Mrs. Brown are the parents of two children, as follows: Malcolm J. and Sylvia D. Mr. Brown is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Politically he is a Republican, and is a man who keeps abreast of the times on all public issues.


Rome G. Brown
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BROWN Rome G, Minneapolis. Res 1918 Queen av S, office 1006 Guaranty bldg. Lawyer. Born Feb 15, 1862 in Montpelier Vt, son of Andrew C and Lucia A (Green) Brown. Married May 25, 1888 at Marshfield Vt to Mary Lee Hollister. Educated at Montpelier Vt 1879 and graduated at Harvard Univ 1884 with degree of A B ԭagna cum laude; after graduation studied law for 3 years in the office of the Hon B F Fifield Montpelier Vt and was admitted to the bar Vt Oct 24, 1887; removed to Minneapolis 2 months later where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession; was first in the law office of Benton & Roberts and on Jan 1, 1890 formed a partnership with them under the firm name of Benton, Roberts & Brown which was dissolved in 1895 by the death of Col Benton; formed the firm of Rome G Brown & Chas S Albert Jan 1, 1900. Is a dir of the Crookston Waterworks; Power & Light Co; St Cloud Waterpower Co; v pres of the Minn Tribune Co; author of pamphlets on the Right to Take Water from Streams and Lakes for Public Water Supply and ԁ Summary of the Law Relating to the Pollution of Waters of Lakes and Streams, both published by the Am Waterworks Assn. Is a republican. Member of the Loyal Legion, Commandery of Minnesota; Minneapolis and Minikahda clubs; v pres of the Minn Harvard Club; pres of the Vt Assn of Minn; member Ex Com of the American Bar Assn; pres of Associated Harvard clubs of the U S.


William J. Bruce
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BRUCE William J, Minneapolis. Res 3017 Calhoun boul, office 712 Lumber Exchange. Lumber. Born Aug. 4, 1860 at Waterbury Vt. Son of Horace M and Esther (Mellon) Bruce. Married Oct 25, 1883 to Grace L Pickett. Attended Waterbury Vt High School and Barre Vt Academy. Engaged in manufacture of lumber in Vt 1880-89; removed to Iowa in 1889; managed retail lumber yard for J H Queal & Co Rock Valley Ia 1890-93; organized W J Bruce & Co retail lumber 1893 beginning business at Pringhar Ia; organized Bruce-Edgerton Lbr Co; moved headquarters to Minneapolis 1904 ; company has 26 lumber yards at present. V pres and mngr Bruce-Edgerton Lbr Co 1904 to date; v pres Fidelity Lbr Co Spokane Wash since 1905. Member Minneapolis Commercial Club.


John W. Bryant
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BRYANT John W, Minneapolis. Res 707 Delaware st S E, office 2601-2611 University av. Foundryman. Born 1866 in Chicago Ill, son of George M Bryant. Married July 3, 1885 to Katherine Fewer. Educated in the public schools of Minneapolis and Curtis Business College. Engaged with father in Eagle Foundry operated in Chicago 1868; same moved to Duluth 1872; moved to Minneapolis in 1878; succeeded to the business on the death of his father 1891; succeeded to the business on the death of his father 1891; incorporated as The Bryant & Lee Co 1904 of which he is now pres and treas. Member Masonic fraternity, Shrine and East Side Commercial Club.


Dennis Buck
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BUCK Dennis, Minneapolis. Res 2106 Lyndale av N, office 412 S 3d st. Machinery manufacturer. Born Mar 16, 1865 in Dodge county Minn, son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Briggs) Buck. Married Dec 26, 1895 to Dora Thompson. Educated in common schools. Moved to Minneapolis, employed in machinery business with Link Belt Mchy Co 1897-1902; organized Midland Machinery Co 1902 and has been pres of same to date. Member Masonic fraternity and Knights of Pythias.


Harrison Buck
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BUCK Harrison, Minneapolis. Res 2700 N 2d st, office 1601 Crystal Lake av. Lumber. Born June 6, 1840 at Sebel Piscataquis county Me, son of Seabury and Judith H (Gilman) Buck. Married Mar 28, 1876 to Alice Frances Pettergill. Has been connected with lumber trade for self and others 45 years.


Charles A. Bucknam
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BUCKNAM Charles A, Minneapolis. Res 129 E 25thst, office N Y Life bldg. Lawyer. Born Feb 5, 1849 at Columbia Falls Me, son of James L and Emeline A (Chandler) Bucknam. Married Nov 26, 1884 to Ella White. Attended public schools at Columbia Falls Me; Worthington & Warner Business College Bangor Me 1868; law school of Boston Univ graduating LL B 1878. Practiced law in Boston Mass 1879-83; in Minneapolis 1886 to date. Supervisor of schools Columbia Falls Me 1875-76; contributor to Central Law Journal 1881-83 and 1890-1901; and an editor of Indermaur's Common Law Cases 1883.


John Jay Bullis
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BULLIS John Jay, St Paul. Res 1301 Raymond av, office 300-306 Globe bldg. Life insurance. Born July 9, 1869 in Wolfe Island, Ont Can, son of John and Elizabeth (Davis) Bullis. Married in 1894 to Celestia A Chamberlain. Educated in the public schools of Canada and Minn School of Business Minneapolis. Asst sec Y M C A Minneapolis 1892-94; cashr New England Mutual Life Ins Co of Boston 1898-1905; gen agt southern Minn agcy John Hancock Mutual Life Ins Co 1905 to date. Member Commercial Club and Masonic fraternity.


Henry Burbank
Source: Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers - Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Henry Clay Burbank was born in Lewis, Essex County, N. Y., May 4, 1835. Came to Minnesota June 21, 1853. Mr. Burbank first went into business in 1857, at the age of twenty-two, at the foot of Jackson street, St. Paul, in the storage, forwarding and commission business and agents for the Galena, St. Paul and Minnesota Packet Co., under the firm name of J. C. & H. C. Burbank, out of which grew a wholesale grocery business, which was continued till 1868, the firm being then J. C. & H. C. Burbank & Co.
Mr. Burbank has been engaged in business of various kinds for forty-four years, among which may be named wholesale and retail merchandising, manufacturing of flour, lumber, ready made clothing and men's furnishing goods, extensively engaged for many years in government transportation, furnishing grain and other supplies to government, government contracting; also the transportation of the Hudson Bay Company's goods in bond from St. Paul to Fort Garry, Red River settlement, now Winnipeg, Man., under contract made with Sir George Simpson, for 5oo tons per annum for five years, commencing in 1858.
The building and operating of the first steamboats on the Red River of the North, under the firm names of J. C. & H. C. Burbank and J. C. & H. C. Burbank & Co.
The manufacture and wholesaling of clothing and men's furnishing goods in St. Paul covered a period from 1875 to 1898, twenty-four years inclusive, with a factory located in the East for twelve years of the time, seven years in Philadelphia and five years in New York City, under the firm name of H. C. Burbank & Co. Was receiver of United States land office at St. Cloud, Minn., from 1865 to 1870, and a member of senate, state legislature, for the years 1874 and 1875.
Mr. Burbank was married to Mary Cannon Mitchell, daughter of the late Gen. Henry Z. Mitchell, Sept. 3, 1868, at St. Cloud, Minn.

Edward P. Burch
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BURCH Edward P, Minneapolis. Res 1729 James av S, office 1210 Guaranty bldg. Consulting engineer. Born Aug 20, 1870 in Wis, son of Newell and Susan (Parris) Burch. Married in 1897 to Harriet Jackson. Graduate of Menominee Wis High School 1887; U of M, E E 1892; post graduate course and degrees 1894; instructor in electric eng U of M and lecturer on electric railways 1894-1906; chief electrical eng for Twin City Rapid Transit Co 1893-1903; magazine writer on electric railroading for "Electrical World," "Street Railway Journal," "Street Railway Review," "U of M Engineer," "American Institute of Electrical Engineers." Member of firm of Claussen, Burch & Pillsbury consulting engineers and designers of power plants 1899 to date. Dir Phi Gamma Delta fraternity; dir in water power, electric light and electric railway companies. Member 3d Regt Wis N G 1890. Pres Engineers club Minneapolis; local chairman American Institute Electrical Engineers; member Masonic order, Commercial club, Minneapolis (on Ry Committee of same).


Charles Jesse Burchard
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BURCHARD Charles Jesse, Minneapolis. Res 529 S 9th st, office 919 Security Bank bldg. Lumber. Born in 1867 in Freeport Ill, son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Fry) Burchard. Married in 1891 to Gertrude E Ellison. Educated in graded schools and Univ of S D. Engaged as yardman and bkpr St Croix Lumber Co Sioux City Ia 1887-1890; Sioux City Sash & Door Co as bkpr; salsn, mngr and asst sec 1891-95; Fullerton Lumber Co Minneapolis as bkpr, office mngr and buyer 1895-1903; gen mngr Interior Lumber Co Minneapolis 1903 to date. Member of the Hoo Hoo's.


Thomas Clawson Burgess
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BURGESS Thomas Clawson, Minneapolis. Res 1402 Nicollet av, office 713 Guaranty bldg. Railroad official. Born Oct 2, 1853 in N Y City, son of Thomas and Mary (McNie) Burgess. Educated in common and high schools Portland Me. From graduation engaged as ry clk Portland Me 1871-72; clk Mechanics Falls Me 1872-78; agent Great Eastern Line Portland Me 1882-83; same at Minneapolis 1883-92; commercial agent of Grand Trunk Ry System at Minneapolis 1892 to date. Member Commercial Club and Masonic fraternity.


Andrew H. Burke
Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal, 1897 – transcribed by AJ

The subject of this sketch is in the truest sense of the word a self-made man. Born in New York City, May 15, 1850, of humble parentage, he was left by the death of both father and mother at the age of four years a homeless and friendless child in a great city. That beneficent institution which has done so much for unfortunate childhood, the Children's Aid Society, took him in charge, and at the age of eight years he was sent West, where a home had been found for him with a farmer who lived near Noblesville, in Indiana. Here he lived and developed into a promising lad of exemplary habits until he reached the age of twelve years. In 1862 he ran away to enlist in the service of his country as a drummer boy in the Seventy-fifth Indiana volunteers. After serving in the war he returned home to take advantage of such educational facilities as he was able to procure, with the money he had saved from his pay as drummer. He was enrolled as a student at Asbury, now De Pauw University, at Greencastle, Indiana. From lack of means, however, he was unable to pursue his studies there as long as he desired, and was obliged, therefore, to lay aside his books and seek employment in business channels. Among his important business engagements was that of business manager of the Evansville, Indiana, Courier. Subsequently he removed to Cleveland, where he was employed in the service of a commercial agency. In 1877 he came to Minneapolis and was for two years employed as a bookkeeper by N. B. Harwood & Co., wholesale dry goods merchants. He was a fellow employe with S. E. Olson, now one of the prominent department store merchants of Minneapolis, and formed a close personal friendship with that gentleman which has continued ever since. Later he was employed by a lumber firm at New York Mills. In 1880 he removed to Casselton, North Dakota, where he was for a time engaged in commercial business, and subsequently became cashier of the First National Bank at that point. While holding this position he was elected treasurer of Cass County, and was twice re-elected and resided at Fargo, the county seat, during his six years incumbency of said office. In 1890 he was nominated by the Republicans for governor of North Dakota and elected, being the second officer of that rank in the new state. His administration was a very successful one, highly creditable to himself and advantageous to the state. Upon the expiration of his term as governor he removed to Duluth, where he now resides, and is engaged in the gram commission business. In this he has been highly successful, his honorable record both public and private in North Dakota having served to bring him business in his chosen line in larger volume than he would otherwise have enjoyed. Governor Burke, as he is still known, is a gentleman of high character, genial manners, and creditable literary attainments, and is held in great esteem by the people of North Dakota and Minnesota, who admire him for his sterling qualities and his native ability, and the distinguished success which he has achieved in spite of the adverse circumstances of his youth. He was married in Minneapolis in 1880 to Miss Carrie Cleveland, who was then a teacher in the public schools, of that city. He has two daughters, who are twins, born in October, 1885. Governor Burke is a thirty-third degree Mason, and, although not a member, is a liberal supporter of the Episcopal church, to which his wife and daughters belong.


Edward T. Burke
Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.

EDWARD T. BURKE, associate Justice, was born in Minneapolis, Minn., in 1870, and came to this state with his parents in 1871; was educated in the public schools of Fargo and Sheldon, attended the state university at Grand Forks and later graduated from the state university of Minnesota. In 1893 he located at Valley City and in 1900 was elected state's attorney for Barnes county, and re-elected two years later. In 1904 he was elected Judge of the Fifth Judicial District. In 1908 he was re-elected without opposition. He was married in 1900 and has two sons. He was elected associate Justice in November, 1910.


William J. Burnett
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

William J. Burnett, manager and proprietor of the Northwestern Hide and Fur Company, of Minneapolis, was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1843, the son of Virgil Justice Burnett and Harriet S. Burnett. His ancestry on both sides of the family were Scotch-English people, his father's family presumed to have been of the same as that of Bishop Burnett. In 1837 they were engaged in the grocery business in Newark, New Jersey, when their business was ruined by the great panic which wrecked so many fortunes. Unable to realize upon their accounts they turned over all their goods to their creditors and started for the far West. It was while they were en route that William J. was born at Pittsburg, then a small but thrifty city. Here the Burnett family halted for a time and the father, who was a carriage blacksmith by trade, engaged in his handicraft in order to earn money to pursue the Western journey to Terre Haute, Indiana. They went by boat from Pittsburg to Vincennes and by canal to Terre Haute. When they arrived there the father had just fifty cents left, but having friends, and, more important, having industry and skill he was .soon in comfortable circumstances. He was a man of studious tastes, and, like Elihu Burritt, became known as the "learned blacksmith." He was elected to the legislature in 1856, and was one of the prime movers in the passage of the famous Indiana liquor law. He died in 1859, honored by all who knew him and survived by his wife, six boys and two girls. The mother is still living at the advanced age of eighty-eight, and is in the enjoyment of remarkable health and vigor. On November 22, 1890, William J. Burnett commenced business in Minneapolis under the name of the Northwestern Hide and Fur Company at 417 Main street Southeast. In the fall of 1895 he purchased the property at 409 Main Street Southeast, where he provided himself with all modem conveniences for the transaction of his business. His great success is largely due to his progressive methods and to a number of valuable devices of his own invention pertaining to the hide and fur trade, which have proved a source of profit to him.

Mr. Burnett has displayed unusual enterprise in the conduct of his business, one exhibition of it being the employment of two men, hired within the past year, to explore on foot from the Deer River to Rainy River, through the great forests of that wild region, the chief purpose of this venture being to find what its resources are for agriculture, hunting, fishing and trapping. This information he has given to the public in various contributions to the newspapers. This section of the country, he believes, needs only transportation facilities to attract immigration, and which he thinks will soon add greatly to the wealth of the state and the growth of the Twin Cities. He has been strongly impressed with the fact that such a vast area of rich country, almost one-third of this great state, should not still lie idle right at the doors, as it were, of the great cities of Minneapolis, St. Paul and Duluth. He thinks that all that is needed is railroad facilities to create an interest in that section equal to that of the Dakotas in 1880, although the region he regards as superior in resources, as its numerous lakes and .streams are abundantly stocked with the choicest fish, and the forests are the home of the finest of game and fur-bearing animals, while in the summer it is the home of millions of waterfowl. Mr. Burnett was married to Miss Alida Suits, of Huron, South Dakota, in June 1888. They have one daughter, Harriet Alida, age six. They reside in Southeast Minneapolis and are members of the Andrew Presbyterian Church.

Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BURNETT William J, Minneapolis. Res 1405 Como av, office 200-204 N 1st. Manager N W Hide & Fur Co. Born 1843 in Pittsburgh Pa, son of Virgil Justice and Harriet S Burnett. Married June 1888 to Alida Suits. Was raised and attended school in Terre Haute Ind. Moved to Minneapolis and began business under firm name of Northwestern Hide & Fur Co and has been propr and mngr of same to date. Pres Economy Fuel Saver Co Minneapolis; member Publicity Club and trustee Como Congregational Church.


Hazel James Burton
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BURTON Hazel James, Deephaven. Office The Plymouth Clothing House Minneapolis. Merchant. Born July 14, 1847 in Boston Mass, son of Hazen James Burton Sr and Harriet Lincoln (Smith). Married July 20, 1870 to Alice Whitney of Southboro Mass. Educated in Dwight Grammar School, English High School and Mass Inst of Technology Boston. Junior partner in firm of Keating, Lane & Co Boston; pres The Plymouth Clothing House of Minneapolis and St Paul 1882 to date; res Mandan Land & Improvement Co 1883 to 1907; pres of the village of Deephaven Minn 1900 to 1907. Member of the Minneapolis, Minikahda, Lafayette and Minnetonka Yacht clubs.


Ward Cotton Burton
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BURTON Ward Cotton, Deephaven. Office Plymouth Clothing House Minneapolis. Merchant. Born Mar 3, 1876 in Cambridge Mass, son of Hazen James and Alice Gertrude Cotton (Whitney) Burton. Educated at Brookline Grammar School; Chauncy Hall in Boston; by private tutor in Minneapolis and graduated from Harvard Univ 1899. Sec the Plymouth Clothing House 1900 to date. Member Harvard Club of N Y; Harvard Union Cambridge; Pi Eta Society Harvard College; Beverly Yacht Club Wing's Neck Mass; Minnetonka Yacht Club Deephaven Minn; Minneapolis and Minikahda clubs Minneapolis; Lafayette Club of Minnetonka Beach.

Burridge D. Butler
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BUTLER Burridge D, Minneapolis. Res 1904 Park av, office Daily News. Newspaper man. Born Feb 5, 1868 in Louisville Ky, son of Rev Thomas D and Marie (Radcliffe) Butler. Educated in common schools. Reporter on Louisville Times 1884; Cincinnati Enquirer 1885; city editor Grand Rapids Democrat 1887-89; managing editor 1889-94; advertising mngr Majestic Range Co St Louis 1895; Scripps-McRae League 1896-99; associated with F W Kellogg and L V Ashbaugh founded the Omaha Daily News Oct 9, 1899; founded St Paul Daily News Mar 1, 1900; founded Minneapolis Daily News Aug 5, 1903. V pres Omaha Daily News; dir Des Moines Daily News; dir St Paul Daily News; pres Minneapolis Daily News. Member Masonic order; Minneapolis, Minikahda and Commercial clubs Minneapolis.


Nathan Butler
Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - Biographical Sketches of Territorial Pioneers] Contributed by Jo Ann Scott

Nathan Butler was born on a farm in the Town of Hancock, County of Hancock, State to Maine, Nov. 5, 1831. Came to Minnesota on the Steamer Northern Belle Nov. 10, 1856, and located at St Anthony Falls. Mr. Butler is a graduate of Waterville College of his native state. He is a civil engineer. He has practiced his profession and surveyed for the United States government in most parts of Minnesota. Mr. Butler has lived in Minneapolis many years, surveying and examining land. He examined in detail the entire land grant of the Great Northern Railway Co. He is now living on a farm of 600 acres, adjoining the City of Barnesville, in Clay County, in this state.

Walter P. Butler
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

BUTLER Walter P, Minneapolis. Office 309 Bank of Commerce. Cement stone. Born Jan 25, 1858 in Milwaukee Wis, son of W I butler and Amanda (Elmore) Butler. Married Feb 5, 1883 to Stella M Butler. Educated in the public schools of Milwaukee and N Y; Ripon College of Wis 1874-75; Univ of Michigan 1876-79; LL B 1879. Taught school near Winona; later entered office of chief eng of C M & St P Ry; removed to Aberdeen and engaged to lumber and mercantile business. City eng same place 8 years; in the office of U S surveyor S D 2 years; actuary for an investment company Minneapolis 1894-1898; later in life insurance business; gold mining at Nome Alaska 1900-1901; 1901 to date engaged in cast cement stone business.


Thor T. Bye
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Janice Louie

THOR T. BYE. A country must have some superior features and bright prospects for a gentleman of the wide experience of Mr. Bye to locate therein and make it his home. He has spent some years in other climes, and is not even a native of this land, but he has chosen for his abiding place Richland county, North Dakota. Here he has a pleasant estate on section 22, in Ibsen township, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres, and on which he has added many improvements and substantial buildings.
Mr. Bye was born in Norway, December 5, 1843. He followed farming in his native land until 1871, when he came to America. The stories of the wonderful physical resources of this country, of the opportunities afforded honest industry to gain a footing in business and society, attracted this young man, and he entered the field with many others of his countrymen, who are now found wielding the implements of the trades, opening up unsettled regions, and bringing the farm lands into high cultivation. He located first in Minneapolis, where he remained five years, during which time he was engaged in the mercantile business, and later served as mail carrier, and afterwards was employed as a clerk in a store. He left the confinement of a business life and spent some five years in travel and in mining in the Black Hills country, and in 1882 went to Richland county, North Dakota, and settled in what is now Ibsen township, where he has since been a resident. He is now the possessor of three hundred and twenty acres of land, and the entire estate is under the best of cultivation, and shows with what care he conducts the business as regards every detail. He is thorough and practical, and has made a success of the vocation which he has engaged in for over fifteen years. He was among the early settlers of that region, and has aided in its changes from a wild country to a fertile farming district, and his own estate is but the result of well-directed labor. He has erected such buildings as are needed to carry on the work in the most approved manner, and to look to the comfort of the family, and the garnering and shelter of the products, and has provided ample shelter for his stock.

Mr. Bye was married in Richland county, North Dakota, in the summer of 1885, to Miss Johanna Magnusson, a native of Norway. Mrs. Bye is an estimable lady, and is entitled to much credit for the share she has taken in the acquisition of the estate as the result of her words of cheer and counsel. Our subject is a gentleman who has ever taken an active interest in the affairs of his township, and has held various offices of trust. In the township of Dwight before the organization of the township of Ibsen he held various positions, and for the four years just passed he has served as county commissioner, his term of office expiring January 1, 1899. He has found his adopted land one in which a man who uses sound judgment and earnest effort will acquire not only a solid financial standing, but a place among the prominent men of his community. He is accorded the highest esteem by his fellow men, and his home is one of the pleasant places to be found in Richland county. He has wielded an influence for good that has been felt wherever he has made his residence, and he well deserves his success.


Timothy Edward Byrnes
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Timothy Edward Byrnes - Probably no man in the North Star State has been more active in campaign work in the interests of his party, than the man whose name stands at the head of this sketch. "Tim" Byrnes, as he is familiarly called by his friends is of Irish parentage. Both his parents (Daniel and Hannora Byrnes) were born in Ireland, emigrating to this country when children. His father followed the occupation of farming and was fairly successful in life. Timothy was born at Bellow's Falls, Vermont, November 22, 1853. He came to Minnesota, while yet a lad, with his parents, and his early education was
acquired in the common schools of this state. Subsequently he attended the University of Minnesota, taking the scientific course, and graduating from this institution in June 1879. Having then a desire to take up the study of law, he entered Columbia Law School in New York City. After having been admitted to the bar, he began the practice of his profession in the city of Minneapolis. In this he has been very successful. Mr. Byrnes, however, did not acquire his wide reputation so much through his law practice as in the field of politics. He has always been a Republican, and from the first an active supporter of his party principles. In 1887 he was elected a member of the executive committee of the National Republican League from Minnesota, and has remained a member of this committee since that time. Mr. Byrnes has never been a candidate for any elective office, but at this time he took a deep personal interest in the work of organizing the league in this state, and upon its organization was made president, which office he filled until 1891. During that year he was also organizer of the national league, and rendered very efficient service. In 1889 he was given the post of the chief of the appointment division of the United States Treasury Department under Secretary Windom, and for two years was Mr. Windom's most trusted assistant. During this time Mr. Windom gave him practical control of the entire patronage of the department, making all his appointments upon the recommendations of Mr. Byrnes. The Republican National Committee in 1896, recognizing Mr. Byrnes extensive ability, appointed him sergeant-at-arms for the National Convention, held at St. Louis that year. Mr. Byrnes devoted all his time to making the arrangements as perfect as possible and that the national committee's confidence was not misplaced, may be judged by the fact that they declared that this convention was the best managed of any in the history of the party. In all political campaigns Mr. Byrnes has been very active, and probably has given more time to national party work than any man in the state. He has an extensive and intimate acquaintance with men of prominence and national reputation in this country. On May 15, 1883, he was married to Clara M. Goodrich. Mr. and Mrs. Byrnes have three children, George G., Clifford H. and Frederick E.

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