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Kandiyohi County, MN


Biographies

Aaker, Hans H.
Source: Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, Volume 14; Minnesota Biographies (1655-1912) published 1912; page 1

AAKER, HANS H., educator, b. in Ridgeway, Iowa, April 16, 1862; came to Minnesota in 1883 to teach at Willmar. After 1894 he was principal of Concordia College, Moorhead.


Almen, Louis C.
Source: Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, Volume 14; Minnesota Biographies (1655-1912) published 1912; page 11

ALMEN, LOUIS C, Lutheran clergyman, b. in Sweden, March 30, 1846; came to the United States in 1870; was graduated at Augustana College in 1876; was ordained to the ministry, and three years later settled
in Minnesota; resided in New London, Kandiyohi county, after 1879.


 Almen, Louis G.
Source: History of the Scandinavians and Successful Scandinavians in the United States, Volumes I & II (1900) submitted by cd

 

Almen, Louis G., clergyman-Balaton-born 30 March, 1846, in Tosso, Dalsland, Sweden. At the age of twenty-four he emigrated to this country; worked at first as a common laborer; was a railroad contractor in Minnesota and Wisconsin for a couple of years; and after having attended Augustana College, Rock Island, Ill., for three years, he graduated from the theological department of this institution in 1876. His first charge was at Beaver, Iroquois county, Ill.; but after having remained there for about three years, he became for one year a traveling missionary in Yellow Medicine and Lac qui Parle counties, Minnesota; then accepted a call to New London, and settled at his present place in 1893. For over twelve years he was editor of the church and temperance departments of Skaffaren-the semi-official organ of the Swedish Lutheran Minnesota Conference. For a long time he has been the most ardent temperance advocate of any of the ministers of his denomination in the state of Minnesota, and is one of the ablest parliamentarians in the conference. Almen was married to Alice C. Johnson in 1876; they have several children living.


Anderson, DR.

A History of the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, Volume 3, page 1898, rll

Dr. Anderson graduated from the East Side high school of Minneapolis, and entered the medical department of the University of Minnesota, graduating with the class of 1904. He spent a year as interne in Bethesda Hospital, St. Paul, and then began practicing at Bayfield, Wisconsin, where he spent three successful years. In April, 1908, he removed to Atwater, which has since been his home. He is a member of the county medical society, and is enterprising and progressive. He belongs to the Modern Woodman of America, to the Elks, and the Swedish Lutheran church. Dr. Anderson married, December 2, 1905, Anna C. Tour, of St. Paul, who was born in Sweden and educated at St. Paul.


Anderson, Elias
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

 

ANDERSON Elias L, Minneapolis. Res 2102 Hennepin av, office 1301 N E Tyler st. Manufacturer. Born July 1, 1870 in Dassel Minn, son of Peter Anderson. Married June 25, 1901 to Rose A Hawkins. Educated in common schools. Moved to Atwater Minn 1878; farmed until 1887; moved to Minneapolis 1887 and attended Minneapolis Academy; employed by Crown Iron Works as bkpr 1889; in 1897 became interested in company; was elected treas and has continued in same office to date.


Archibald, Frank
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

ARCHIBALD Frank M, Breckenridge. Physician and surgeon (R). Born Dec 6, 1865 in Ill, son of Lyman and Phylindia (Burroughs) Archibald. Married in 1896 to Josephine W Bailey. Graduated from Coll of Physicians and Surgeons 1893. Has been engaged in practice of his profession in Gibbon Minn 1893-94; Atwater Minn 1895-1906; Breckenridge 1906 to date. Member American Medical Assn Minn State & Crow River Valley Medical societies; Masonic fraternity, I O O F and B P O E.


Arctander, John W.
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

John W. Arctander is a native of Stockholm, Sweden, where he was born in 1849. On his father's side he is descended from one of Norway's oldest families, prominent for several hundred years in Norwegian history, while on his mother's side he is closely related to the Nobels, of St. Petersburg and Paris, who are the petroleum kings of Europe, and, perhaps, next to the Rothschilds, the wealthiest family in the world. Mr. Arctander graduated with first honors from the Royal University of Norway in 1867. He had already gained a considerable name by his contributions to Norwegian literature, and after his graduation he became associated with the celebrated Norwegian poet, Bjornstierne Bjornson in journalistic enterprises and occupied a prominent position in the newspaper world of Norway. He was very radical in his political tendencies and the vigorous expression of his views soon brought him into conflict with the authorities so that in 1870 he became a political exile from his own country. Naturally the great republic of America attracted him and became his adopted country. From 1870 to 1874 he was connected with Norwegian papers in Chicago and New York, but during this time simultaneously pursued the study of law. In 1874 he came to Minnesota and shortly afterwards was admitted to practice as an attorney. He first settled in Minneapolis, but two years later moved to Willmar and for ten years devoted himself mainly to criminal practice. He built up quite a reputation in the western part of the state as a criminal lawyer, and in 1880 was by Governor Pillsbury appointed district attorney of the Twelfth judicial district, especially created by the legislature, and afterwards was elected to the position by the people. While for four years prior to this only one person had been convicted of crime in the entire district. Mr. Arctander during the first year of his incumbency of the office of district attorney sent forty criminals to the state prison. Terror reigned among the criminal classes which had infested the border counties of the state and the effect was wholesome and gratifying. In 1881 he was engaged as counsel for the defense in the impeachment trial of Hon. E. St. Julien Cox, and added considerable to his reputation by the able manner in which he presented the cause of his client. In 1885 Mr. Arctander was made a member of the commission which drafted the present penal code of the state of Minnesota, the commission having the satisfaction of seeing their work adopted by the legislature without a single amendment. In 1886 Mr. Arctander removed to Minneapolis where he has since occupied a prominent place among the members of the bar. In 1875 he wrote a practical hand book of the laws of Minnesota in the Norwegian language, which had a large sale. In 1895 he published a new edition in the same language and re-wrote it in Swedish. In 1803 he translated into English Henry Ibsen's '"The Master Guilder." Mr. Arctander has also indulged in his taste for literature in numerous contributions to periodical publications, and it is understood that he has in preparation a work somewhat more ambitious than anything he has yet published, but is not yet ready to announce it.



Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Marilyn Clore

ARCTANDER John W, Minneapolis. Res 3447 S Lyndale av, office 913 N Y Life bldg. Lawyer. Born Oct 2, 1849 in Stockholm Sweden, son of August H and Caroline (Ahlsell) Arctander. Married May 17, 1877 to Maratina Anderson. Attended the College of Skein Norway 1857-67; the Royal Univ of Norway 1867-70; graduating M A Ph B; degree of LL D from St John Univ Collegeville Minn. Has been in gen practice of law; up to 1888 made specialty of criminal law; since 1888 specialty of corporation law and negligence cases; county atty Kandiyohi county Minn 1877-79; dist atty 12th dist 1880-86; member of commission for drafting penal code of state with Atty Gen Hahn and Judge Egan of St Paul. Author of "Practical Handbook on Laws of Minn" in Norwegian and Swedish languages; translator into English of Hendrik Ibsen's drama "The Master Builder."


Beck, Ole J.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 647-648, rll

Ole J. Beck, a capitalist, and one who has been identified with the hotel business in Willmar, Kandiyohi county. Minnesota, for many years, is a native of the kingdom of Norway. He was born on the 19th of June, 1838, and is the son of John and Engeborg (Engebritson) Beck, natives of Norway. They emigrated to the Unites States in 1868, and located in Michigan, when they remained until their death. The father died 1872 and the mother in 1888. They were the parents of eight children, They were the parents of eight children, six now living, named as follows-Caroline, Engeborg, Ole J., John J., Andrew and Borne, and Mrs. Odin Anderson.

Mr. Beck, of whom this article treats, remained in his native land until 1869. His younger days were spent in attending school in his native country, and in May, 1869, he emigrated to the United States and located in Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he took a tract of Government land of eighty acres, where he remained, engaged in extensive farming and stock raising, operations until 1880. He then moved into the city of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, where he rented the Marlow House for one year, and at the expiration of that time purchased the same, which he has since been identified with. In 1886 he erected the Merchant's Hotel, at a cost of $26,000. It is of brick, three storied and basement, steam heated, sample rooms, billiard parlor, barber shop, and all modern improvement. It is one of the best hotels in the Northwest and has the general patronage of the traveling public. Mr. Beck is one of the best-known and most prominent business men in the county, and has done a great deal to advance the prosperity and welfare of his residence county and city. He is a man of sterling business qualifications and bears the respect and esteem of all who know him.

Mr. Beck was married in 1862 to Miss Lena Hanson, of Norway, and a daughter of Hans Hanson, a sailor by occupation. Mrs. Beck passed away on the 5th of December, 1888, and was buried at Willmar. She was an estimable lady and was beloved and admired by all for her many virtues.

Mr. Beck is a member in the ranks of the prohibition party and was the only person to cast a ballot for St. John in the city. He is one of the solid and substantial public men of the city and is actively interested in all local matters.


Beckman, P.

A History of Swedish Americans of Minnesota, 1910, compiled by A. E. Strand, page 152-153, rll

 

The Rev. P. Beckman is the oldest minister in point of years in the Augustana Synod. He was born in Helsingland, Sweden, in 1822, and came to Minnesota in 1856, when he received a layman's license to preach. He is a charter member of the Conference. Ordained in 1859, he has been a pioneer minister in Kandiyohi, Chippewa, Swift, Pope and Douglas counties and has experienced more of the the frontier hardships that probably any of the other pastors. He retired a few years ago to enjoy the hospitality of children at Troy, Idaho.


Berg, John A.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 559, rll

John A. Berg. Prominent among the business men of the village of Belgrade, Minnesota, is the gentleman whose name heads this article, who is engaged in the hardware, lumber and elevator business. He is a native of Norway, born on the 5th day of September, 1845, and is the son of Andrew and Ingeborg Berg, also natives of Norway.

Mr. Berg, the subject of this article, remained in his native land, attending school until he was nineteen years old. In 1864 he emigrated to the United States, and, after landing in New York City, in June, went direct to Dodgeville, Wisconsin, where he enlisted in the Forty-third Wisconsin Infantry, under Colonel Cobb, and served until the 24th of June, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. After his discharge he went to St. Cloud, Minnesota, where he attended school during the winter of 1865 and 1866. In the summer of 1866 he went to Chicago, Illinois, and enlisted in the Twenty-eighth United States Infantry, and was made sergeant. He served three years and was discharged April 20, 1869, in Camden, Arkansas. He then started for Chicago, and came as far as Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he engaged in the machinery business. In 1882 he paid a visit to Norway, and after five months' absence returned and took charge of the Northwestern Elevator Company's elevators, as traveling superintendent, for two years. He then resigned, and engaged in the machinery business in Willmar, and in 1886 located in Belgrade, where he opened up in the hardware, lumber and elevator business.

Mr. Berg was married on the 19th of February, 1871, to Miss Ellen Bjorge, and this union has been blessed with eight children-Lotta, Elma, Albert, Willie, Harry, and the following, who are deceased-Olgo Lenora, died 28th of June 1882, aged one year, three months; Clara Normana, died August 15, 1882, aged three and one-half years and John Elmor, died July 8, 1884, aged three months. Mrs. Berg passed away October 31, 1887, and was interred in Willmar. Our subject and family belong to the Lutheran church. He is president of the village council, and, while in Kandiyohi county, held the office of county commissioner for two terms. In political matters he affiliates with the republican party. He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is a member of Hogg Post, No. 125, Grand Army of the Republic. He is actively interested in all local matters, and is a business man of the strictest integrity and honor.


Branton, Berton J.
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Rhonda Hill

BRANTON Berton J, Atwater. Physician and surgeon (R). Born Sept 20, 1883 in Willmar Minn, son of J Franklin and Alice (Thompson) Branton. Married July 11, 1906 to Alice A Brown. Educated in common schools Willmar Minn: graduated medical dept U of M, M D 1905. Since engaged in practice of his profession in Atwater. Member Atwater Commercial Club, Kandiyohi Swift County, Crow Wing and Minn State Medical societies and American Medical Assn.


Broberg, Peter
Source: Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River, 1889, transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

PETER BROBERG is a member of the firm of Swenson & Broberg, of New London, Minnesota, one of the most extensive, solid and substantial business houses in Kandiyohi county. They carry a heavy stock of general merchandise, and are also engaged in the milling, lumber and machinery business. Mr. Broberg, of whom our present article will treat, is one of the pioneers of this part of Minnesota and is one of the survivors of the terrible Sioux Indian outbreak of 1862. A detailed history of all his experiences, adventures and hardships during pioneer days and Indian times would almost fill a volume of itself, and would be too long for insertion in this work, but we have gathered the most prominent facts in Mr. Broberg‘s history, and give the most important movements in which he has participated.

Mr. Broberg was born near Vargarda, in Sweden, on the 17th of December, 1854, and is a son of Daniel P. and Annastina Broberg, who were also natives of Sweden. The parents had a family of three children - Peter, Alfred and Albert. On the 28th of April, 1861, the whole family left their native land and sailed for the New World, landing at Quebec, Canada, on the 19th of June. They at once came to Minnesota, landing at Carver, in Carver county, on the 1st day of July. A few days later they started for what was known as the New Sweden settlement in Swift county, Minnesota, arriving there July 15, 1861. The father, D. P. Broberg, and his brother, Andrew, bought soldiers' script and each located on a quarter section of land. Here they at once erected cabins, began improvements and engaged in farming. Everything moved along in a prosperous and uneventful manner until August, 1862, when the Sioux Indians began their outbreak, killing defenseless men, women and children, and burning and destroying as they went. The little settlement at New Sweden consisted of thirty souls and little did they dream of the danger so near at hand. On the fatal 20th day of August, 1862, the Broberg families (D. P. Broberg and wife and three children, and Andrew B. Broberg and wife and four children), together with the Lundberg family and others, had gone to a neighbor's, two and a half miles distant, to attend a religious meeting. Our subject, Peter Broberg, and his two brothers and two cousins remained at home to care for the stock, etc. About noon twenty-five or thirty Indians, in war paint, surrounded the cabin. They entered the house, and the children, as usual, treated them to bread and provisions. Peter Broberg escaped from the house and ran to the meeting, where he gave the alarm. The services were at once adjourned, and the settlers started for home. The Broberg party, together with Lars Lundberg, started for home with their ox team. They met the Indians, and when near the house they gave the preconcerted signal and the horrible butchery began. Mr. Lundberg was in the rear with a gun, and he escaped and rescued a child. Those killed were D. P. Broberg and wife and two children; Andrew B. Broberg, his wife and three children. Our subject, Peter Broberg, jumped from the wagon at the first attack and escaped, running down a hill and disappearing in the tall grass of a slough. He continued his flight until he came to the house of a neighbor, where he took refuge. The Indians continued their murderous work and began plundering and burning and finally made an attack on the neighbor’s house. The family and Peter Broberg hid in the cellar, their hiding place being concealed by a neatly fitting trap door. The Indians destroyed the furniture and then left. About midnight the fugitives escaped from the house and spent the remainder of the night in a thicket. Finally Even Railson, now a. prominent farmer of Norway Lake township Kandiyohi county, assisted them, and they were conducted to a place of safety. Lundberg said he was fired at fifteen times but escaped unhurt.

The general history of the outbreak will be found in another department of this ALBUM, so it is unnecessary to refer to it further in this connection. The Indians were finally subdued and peace was again restored on the border. Mainly through the efforts of our subject, Peter Broberg, an appropriation was made at the last session of the legislature for the purpose of erecting a monument to the memory of the victims of the New Sweden massacre, so that their martyrdom will be commemorated in a fitting manner.

In 1877 Peter Broberg located at the village of New London, Minnesota, where he has since remained. He is one of the leading business men of that locality, and stands high as an exemplary citizen. He served for some time as town clerk, and has always taken an active part in matters affecting the welfare of that locality. He is a republican in political matters, and a member of the Lutheran church.

Mr. Broberg was married December 31, 1878, to Christine Larson and they are the parents of three children - Ella, Martha and Elmer P.


Brown, Calvin Luther
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Calvin Luther Brown - The Sixteenth Judicial District of Minnesota has as its judicial officer a man who grew up and received his education and legal training within the state. Judge C. L. Brown, of Morris, presides over the district composed of the counties of Stevens, Grant, Big Stone, Traverse, Pope and Wilkin. Born in the town of Goshen, New Hampshire, April 26, 1854, he came to this state with his parents when only about a year old. His father was Judge John H. Brown, who located at Shakopee in June 1855. He was admitted to the bar at Chaska in 1856, and continued the practice of his profession until 1875, when he was appointed judge of the Twelfth Judicial District by Governor Davis. He continued in that office without opposition until his death in 1890. Judge John H. Brown was a prominent Mason, having held the office of grand master of the state and grand high priest of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter. He was a judge of unimpeachable integrity and administered the duties of his office with conscientious fidelity. His wife's maiden name was Orrisa Margaret Maxfield. This family of Browns were descended from John Brown who came to this country from England in the ship Lion in 1632 and settled at Marlborough, Massachusetts. William Brown, the great-great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, served as a private in the Revolutionary War. He enlisted at the age of sixteen from the town of Henniker, New Hampshire, in 1781, and served in Col. Henry Dearborn's regiment of the New Hampshire Continental line. He was placed on the pension rolls in 1818, and lived until 1855, when he died at the age of ninety years. An uncle of Calvin Luther, Hon. L. M. Brown, late of Shakopee, Minnesota, was also a prominent member of the legal profession in this state, and was at one time judge of the Eighth Judicial District. Judge C. L. Brown was educated in the common schools of Minnesota. He resided at Shakopee until 1871, when his parents removed with his parents removed to Willmar. In 1878, having pursued the study of law with his father, and having been admitted to the bar, he left home at the age of twenty-two and located at Morris. He has resided there ever since. He has held numerous positions of trust, was elected to the office of county attorney of Stevens County in 1882, and continued in that office until he was appointed to the bench in 1887. In that year the Sixteenth district was created and Mr. Brown was appointed judge by Governor McGill, and has been twice elected to the same office without opposition. He is now serving his second elective term. Judge Brown has always been identified with the Republican party, but since taking his position on the bench, has given no personal attention to political matters. He is also a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, having been grand master of the state in 1894 and 1895. He belongs to the Minneapolis Consistory Scottish Rite Masonry, Zuhrah Temple, Mystic Shrine, Knights of Pythias and the A. O. U. W. He also belongs to the Minnesota Society Sons of the American Revolution, of which he is at present a member of the board of directors. He attends, but is not a member, of the Congregational church. Was married in 1879, at Willmar, to Miss Annette Marlow. They have had four children, Olive Lottie (deceased), Alice A., Montreville J. and Edna M.


Castberg, Benjamin
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Renae Donaldson

CASTBERG Benjamin, Detroit. Lawyer. Born Feb 27, 1871 in Brevig Norway, son of John C t and Hanna (Ebbesen) Castberg. Graduated from Royal Gymnasium 1886; attended Royal Univ Christiania 1 year; graduated from law dept U of M 1897; studied law at office of John W Arctander while attending college. Practiced law in Willmar Minn 1898-1904; in Detroit Minn 1904 to date.


Deming, George L.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 558, rll

 

George L. Deming, the present postmaster at Atwater, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, is one of the leading business men of that place, and will form the subject of our present sketch. He has been prominently identified with the business interests of that locality, and has been foremost in all enterprises which were calculated to aid in the growth and development of the village or surrounding country.

Mr. Deming was born in Vermont in 1823, and is a son of Gad and Bethiah (Woodard) Deming. His parents had a family of nine children, only three of whom, however, are now living. Our subject's childhood days were spent at home and in attendance upon the district schools. When he was eighteen months old his father died, and his mother kept the family together until George L. was eight years old, and then he and the rest of the boys were obliged to shirk for themselves and were thrown upon their own resources. George followed various avocations; he drove on the canal, worked his way up, and finally became captain of a boat. Later he engaged in the hotel business, and followed that for a number of years in the East, and was postmaster at Shorham, Vermont, under Abraham Lincoln's administration. In 1867 he came to Minnesota and settled at Belle Plaine, where he became agent for the American Express Company, and also engaged in keeping a hotel. In 1878 he came to Atwater, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he still lives.

Mr. Deming was married in 1847, to Miss Isabelle Moffit, and they became the parents of four children-William., George C., Eliza F. and Mary J. William H. is in business in Dakota; George is in St. Paul; Eliza is the wife of J. M. Spicer, the president of the Willmar & Sioux Falls Railway Company; and Mary J. is still at home.

Mr. Deming is a stanch democrat in his political belief, and is one of the leading member of that party in the county. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is highly esteemed as a man of integrity and a valued citizen.


Dale, Hans J.

Illustrated Album Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions. page 660-661, rll

Hans J. Dale, of the firm Dale & Roise, leading merchants, of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, settled in that place in 1874, and commenced business, handling drugs, groceries, dry goods, clothing, carpets, boots, shoes, hats, caps, etc., in partnership with Paul H. Roise, whose biography will be found in another department of this Album. Mr. Dale was born in Norway, on the 16th of November, 1849, and is the son of Jorgen and Martha (Larson) Dale, also natives of that kingdom. The mother died in 1853, and the father, who was a farmer, emigrated to the United States in 1860, and settled in Vernon county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming, owning a fine tract comprising 360 acres of land. Later he sold this farm to his son Peter J., and is now owner of the well-known Willmar Farm, two miles northeast of the city, comprising about 800 acres. He is living with his son Peter J. on this farm. The father has always voted the republican ticket. He and his wife belong to the Lutheran church. Peter J., the brother of our subject, while in Wisconsin was a member of the State legislature and held various important offices of his county. The parents of our subject had a family of the following-named children-Annie, now Mrs. Peter Goldberg; Peter J., who is living on the Willmar Farm; and Hans, the subject of this sketch.

Hans J. Dale, of whom this article treats, emigrated to this county when he was ten years old. Until he was seventeen years old he remained on the home farm and attended the district schools of the county. At the age of seventeen years he entered the school in Sparta, Wisconsin, where he remained three years, then engaging as drug clerk for O. F. Newton of that place, with whom he remained six years. In 1874 he removed to Willmar, Kandiyohi, county, Minnesota, where he engaged in partnership with Mr. Roise, in the drug and grocery business. They continued in that business until 1884, when they put in a full line of general goods, as before stated. They are among the leading and successful merchants of the village, and are doing an extensive business. In 1876 he erected his fine residence on Litchfield avenue, one of the finest places in the city. He is one of the stockholders in the Willmar Bank, and is also a director of the same. He also owns an interest in the town site of Britton, Marshall county, Dakota Territory.

Mr. Dale was united in marriage in 1874, to Miss Adrine Seierstad, who died January 11, 1879. Our subject married, for his second wife, Miss Martha Iverson, the daughter of J. H. Iverson, of Martell, Wisconsin. Mr. Dale is a republican in his political affiliations, and is actively interested in all local matters. He is a member of the board of education, and is one of the prominent and representative business men of the county. He is a man of the strictest honor and integrity, and is highly esteemed and respected by all who know him.


Egge, Thrond S.

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Anna Parks


EGGE Thrond S, Moorhead. Physician (R). Born Feb 15, 1859 in Norway, son of Swen T and Rogna Egge. Married Oct 12, 1901 to Petra Anderson. Educated in public schools and private academy in Valders Norway; Willmar (Minn) Seminary; graduated from medical dept U of M 1893; studied in Univ of Berlin 1897 and 1900; and N Y Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital 1896. Taught Norwegian and English school 1882-88; engaged in practice of his profession in Moorehead to date. Director First State Bank and Moorehead B & L Assn; coroner of Clay county 6 years; member American Medical Assn, Minn State and Clay-Becker County Medical societies; A O U W and M W A.


Elmquist, David

A History of the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, Volume 2, edited by Algot E. Strand, page 1097-1098, rll

David Elmquist, a successful jeweler of Willmar, was born April 29, 1848, in Sweden, and is the son of John M. Elmquist; John M. Elmquist was a farmer, and also interested in the manufacture of saltpetre until his death, about 1882. David Elmquist received his education in the public schools of his native country, and there learned the trade of watchmaker and jeweler, under the supervision of his brother, Peter J. Elmquist. In 1869 he removed to the United States, and for about four years worked at his trade in the employ of his brother, Peter J. He then came to Minnesota, locating first at Minneapolis, where he and his brother engaged in partnership under the name of Elmquist Brothers.

About five years later they dissolved partnership, and David Elmquist established an independent business in Litchfield, Minnesota, where he carried on a jewelry store for twenty-five years. In 1902 he removed to Willmar, where he engaged in business on Benson avenue, and by his strict attention to same has built up a lucrative patronage. He is thorough master of the details of his trade, and has established a good reputation for ability and integrity; he carries a first-class stock of goods. He is affiliated with the Ancient Order of Untied Workmen, and is a member of the Lutheran church.

Mr. Elmquist married, in 1870, Ida Matilda Hultgren, born and educated in Sweden, and they have seven children, namely; Emily C. E., married C. E. Redlund; Charles E.; Elemina C. E.; Arthur E.; Oscar E.; Hazel C. E.; and one son, who died when an infant.


Erickson, John O.
Source: The Illustrated History of Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, Victor E. Lawson and J. Emil Nelson, 1905; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

LAKE LILLIAN TOWNSHIP
John O. Erickson was born in town of Lake Lillian, Kandiyohi county, Feb. 7, 1874. His parents were Ole Erickson, born Jan. 9, 1846, and Brita Ersdotter, born Dec. 12, 1841, both natives of Gagnef parish, Dalarne, Sweden. Paternal grandparents, Jans Erik Johnson and Brita Ersdotter; maternal grandparents, Berg Erik Johnson and Brita Persdotter. Ole Erickson and family came to this country in 1872 and settled on a farm in town of Lake Lillian, where John Erickson was born and grew to manhood. He attended the common schools and afterwards studied for some time in the Willmar Seminary. After finishing his education he, in partnership with his brothers Erick and Albert, rented his father's farm, which they are still operating. The farm is in sections 16 and 17, Lake Lillian, and comprises 440 acres of land. It has a large residence and good farm buildings. The farm is sixteen miles from Willmar and thirteen miles from Olivia. It is on the Svea free delivery route, and is connected with the Kandiyohi telephone lines.

Brothers and sisters of John O. Erickson: Erick, born Aug. 20, 1869; Annie, born Aug. 10, 1871, now Mrs. Aaron Erickson of Kenmare, N. D.; Alfred, born Nov. 29, 1875, now living in Minneapolis; Hilma, born May 31, 1877, died March 21, 1894; Albert, born March 5, 1881.


Erickson, Lars
Source: The Illustrated History of Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, Victor E. Lawson and J. Emil Nelson, 1905; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

LAKE LILLIAN TOWNSHIP

Lars Erickson was born in Mockfjard, Dalarne, Sweden, Nov. 20, 1869. His parents were Erik Erickson, born Feb. 4, 1837, and Christine Persdotter, born march 27, 1838. The family came to America in 1883 and settled on a farm in town of Lake Lillian, where the mother still lives. The father died Feb. 2, 1902. Lars Erickson grew up on that farm, getting a common school education. He continued to assist with the farm work until in the spring of 1900, when he formed a partnership with Mr. Richardson of Bird Island and started a small general merchandise store near the Lake Lillian creamery. The next year Mr. Erickson bought out his partner's share in the business and has since that time conducted it himself, with good success. He was appointed postmaster at Lake Lillian, July 31, 1901, and still holds the position. Mr. Erickson is married to Christine Anderson. She was born in Lake Lillian, Oct. 20, 1879. Her parents were Peter Anderson, born in Gagnef, Dalarne, Sweden, Oct. 21, 1843, and Christina Erickson, born Dec. 9, 1842. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Erickson - Albin and Robert.


Foland, Walter
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Anna Parks

FOLAND Walter Alphonzo, Benson. Lawyer and editor. Born Mar 12 1846 in Dayton O, son of Solomon and Sarah Belle (Francisco) Foland. Married July 26, 1876 to Laura A Woodburn. Attended Terre Haute (Ind) High School; graduated from Ind State Univ 1870; law dept same LL B 1873. Moved to Willmar Minn and engaged in practice of law 1874 to date; county atty Kandiyohi county 1875; moved to Benson and practiced law 1876 to date; editor and publisher Benson Times 1885 to date, under firm name of Foland & McCune. Republican presidential elector 1888.


Gilger, William

Illustrated Album Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions. page 663-664, rll

William Gilger, the proprietor of the Willmar brewery, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, settled in that place in 1878, where he erected the brewery on the shores Foot Lake and has since remained. He is a native of the kingdom of France in Alsace, which with Lorraine became a part of the German Empire in 1871. He was born in 1850, and is the son of George and Catharine (Keiffer) Gilger, also natives of that locality. The father was engaged in the pottery business during active life, and a few years before his death, which occurred in 1859, led a retired life. The mother is still living in her native land. The parents of our subject were blessed with the three following-named children-George, Catharine and William, the subject of this sketch.

Mr. Gilger, of whom this article treats, received a fine education in his native land, and after leaving school engaged in the banking business for two years. At the expiration of this time he entered the mercantile business, and for the succeeding seven years had a large retail and wholesale trade. While in his native land he acquired a knowledge of the brewing business, although he did not follow that occupation while there. In 1873 he emigrated to the United States and located in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he followed the brewing business, in partnership with William Constans, for five years. In 1878 he sold out and removed to Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he purchased eleven acres of land in Willmar, where he built his residence and brewery at an expense of $15,000. He now has one of the largest establishments in that region, employing five men, and is doing a heavy business throughout this and adjoining counties.

Mr. Gilger was united in marriage in 1876 to Miss Harriette Lambrecht, of St. Paul, Minnesota, and the daughter of Franz and Henrietta (Schlief) Lambrecht. Mr. and Mrs. Gilger have been blessed with one child-Stella H. In political matters our subject is independent, reserving the right to vote for the best candidate regardless of party lines. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd-Fellows, and also the Sons of Herman of St. Paul. He is one of the prominent and substantial business men of Willmar, and is a man of integrity and honor, his word being considered as good as a bond.


Glarum Ole B.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 623, rll

 

Ole B. Glarum, the popular proprietor of the Glarum Hotel, on Third street, Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, has been a resident since 1872, when he settled in the village and opened a boot and shoe store, which business he carried on until 1880, when he purchased 160 acres of land one-half mile south of the city and engaged in farming. He has been identified with hotel interests in the city since 1876, when he erected his present fine building, which he has since run. He is a native on Norway, born in 1844, and is the son of Bendik and Maret (Oleson) Glarum, also natives of that kingdom. The parents who are farmers, still reside in their native land. They are the parents of six children, named in the following order-Ole, Lars, Ole B., John, Ragnild and Ragnild. The parents are devoted members of the Lutheran church.

Mr. Glarum, the subject of this article, spent his younger days in attending school in his native land, living at home until he was fourteen years old. He then engaged in sheep and cattle herding, and after three years entered an apprenticeship to the boot and shoe trade. After serving two years learning his trade he worked at it as a journeyman until 1870. Then he emigrated to the United States, and went direct to Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he remained two weeks. He then went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and after remaining two years working at this trade returned to Willmar and opened a boot and shoe store, as before stated. Since taking his farm he has added 155 acres to it and has fine building improvements, and is engaged in an extensive and successful farming and stock raising. He has always lived in the village since his settlement in the country, and is well and favorably known to the general traveling public.

Mr. Glarum was united in marriage in 1867 to Miss Johannah Christianson, the daughter of Christian and Gaala (Rasbak) Oleson, farmers of Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Glarum have been blessed with eleven children, five of whom have died, as follows-Bastian (deceased), Maret (deceased), C. Basten (deceased), Christiana (deceased) and Bendik Johan (deceased). Those living are-Mary, Bertha, Olena, John, Christian and Anna Louise. Mr. Glarum and his family belong to the Lutheran church. He is one of the solid and substantial business men of the place, and is a republican in his political affiliations. He is well known as a hotel man and has the reputation of running one of the best hotels in the county. He is an exemplary citizen, and is highly esteemed by all who know him.


Hagen, Gudbrand T.
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Richard Ramos

HAGEN Gudbrand T, Crookston. Editor and publisher. Born March 20, 1864 in Norway, son of Torsten Torstenson and Ingelborg (Olson) Hagen. Educated in public schools of Norway and evening schools; attended school in Mayville N D and Willmar (Minn) Seminary and Institute. Engaged as photographer 8 years in N D and Minn; founded Scandinavian paper at Elbow lake; sold out and purchased the Banneret a weekly at Holton N D; changed name of paper to Vesterheimen and published 1 year; in Mayville 4 years; moved to Crookston and has published Crookston Press 1897 to date. Member Minn Editorial Assn and I O G M.


Haley, Philip, J.

Compendium of History and Biography of Central and Northern Minnesota, page 819-820, rll

 

Philip J. Haley, a well-to-do farmer of Willmar township, is a pioneer settler of Kandiyohi county. He has become well known as a worthy citizen and enjoys deserved success as an agriculturist.

Mr. Haley was born on a farm in Lake township, Scott county, Minnesota, April 22, 1863. His father, John Haley, was born in county Kilkenney, Ireland, and was a farmer by occupation. He came to the United States with his mother when thirteen years of age and was reared in Scott county, Minnesota. He was one of the pioneer settlers of Kandiyohi county. His death occurred n 1896. He drove overland one hundred miles in a covered wagon in 1869, when moving to this county. He lived the first five years in a claim shanty, and the first crops were threshed with horse-power machines

Our subject was reared and educated in Kandiyohi county, attending the village schools. He began for himself at the age of twenty years. He then purchased eighty acres of his present farm and in 1888 began work thereon. In January, 1898 he enlisted in the Fifteenth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry as second lieutenant, and was among those who spent time in southern camps. At one time there were four hundred cases of typhoid fever in the regiment and twenty-two deaths resulted. Mr. Haley spent about one year in the army and was mustered out of the service in Georgia. He returned to his farm in the spring of 1899 and has since given his attention wholly to his farming. He has four hundred and sixty acres of land under cultivation and follows general farming and stock raising thereon. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in Chippewa county. On his home farm he has all necessary machinery, windmill, and a set of good buildings and has surrounded himself with all the comforts of a rural home. He is president of the Kandiyohi County Telephone Company. This company has one hundred miles of line in Kandiyohi and Renville counties.

Mr. Haley was married January 11, 1899, to Dean B. Condon. Mrs. Haley taught school in Scott county for several years. Her father, Patrick Condon, settled at Shakopee, Minnesota, in 1856. The parents were born in Ireland and came to the United States about 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Haley are the parents of two children, both of whom were born on the home farm in Kandiyohi county. They bear the names of Mary Geraldine and Phyllis. Mr. Haley has held numerous township offices and for eight years has served as chairman of the the township board. In political sentiment he is a Republican


Hanson, Hans O.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 551-552, rll

Hans O. Hanson is a leading citizen of the village of Stephen, Marshall county, Minnesota, where he is engaged in carrying on a large hardware and furniture business. He has a complete line of the best goods, and, by integrity and careful attention to the wants of his customers, has built up a large and increasing trade.

Mr. Hanson was born in Dane county, Wisconsin, January 16, 1853, his parents being Ole and Anna (Alma) Hanson, natives of Norway. His parents were well-to-do farmers, and came to this country some years before the son's birth. They settled in Dane county, Wisconsin, and lived there until Hans was four years old, when they moved to Buffalo county, same State, where they located on Government land, and were among the first settlers.

Mr. Hanson lived with his parents on the farm and attended district school until he was twenty-two years of age. At that age he went to Grant county, Minnesota, and took up Government land, on which he lived some six to seven years He was one of the first settlers in the town of Roseville, Grant county, Minnesota. He then sold out and returned to his parents home on a short visit. Thence he went on a kind of prospecting trip through California, Oregon and Washington Territory, after which he returned to his parents with whom he remained a few months. April 1, 1883, he went to Stephen, where he built a store building and dwelling, and put in a stock of hardware, and later built a store building in connection and put in a stock of furniture. He also purchased 160 acres of land on section 19, Sinnott township, Marshall county, Minnesota. He has continued his residence in Stephen ever since, and still owns and runs his farm.

Mr. Hanson was married at Morris, Stevens county, Minnesota, in 1880, to Miss Anna Kroke, daughter of Hans and Mollie Kroke, natives of Norway. This union has been blessed with two children, both living -Oliver H. and Martin A.

Mr. Hanson is one of the most public-spirited citizens of the village and has done more than his share in the improvement of his adopted town. He is intelligent, charitable, and of extensive travel and experience, and is well fitted for any place of trust to which he may be called. For three terms he was president of the village council in Stephen, and, while a resident of Grant county, was chairman of the board of supervisors for five years. He is a leading member of the Norwegian Lutheran church.


Hedin, A. M.
Source: The Illustrated History of Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, Victor E. Lawson and J. Emil Nelson, 1905; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

LAKE LILLIAN TOWNSHIP
A. M. HEDIN A. M. Hedin was born in Dalarne, Sweden, Feb. 13, 1861. His parents were Mathias Hedin, born in Dalarne, Sept. 25, 1825, and Christina Hanson, born in the same province July 28, 1831. Paternal grandparents, A. E. and Anna Hemmingson; maternal grandparents, Hans and Christina Hanson. Hedin lived in Mockfjard, Dalarne, until he was twenty years of age, attending the public schools till his sixteenth year and then taking a course at a seminary in the city of Fahlun. In 1881 he came to America, landing in Quebec, May 27th. He came directly to Lake Lillian, in this county, arriving there June 1st of that year, and has lived there since that time, with the exception of short periods spent in Wisconsin and North Dakota. He worked for a while as carpenter and machinist, then settled down to farming. He purchased the SE1/4 of section 22 from Mary E. Butturf of Fergus Falls and the SE1/4 NE1/2 of the same section from E. O. Linn. He has built the necessary farm buildings, and laid about 125 acres under cultivation. He devotes his attention principally to raising grain and stock. The farm is twelve miles from Bird Island, fourteen miles from Olivia and twenty miles from Willmar. The distance to school is one and one-fourth miles. The farm is connected with the Kandiyohi County Telephone Company's line in Lake Lillian.

Mr. Hedin has been a prominent factor in local public affairs. He served as assessor in his town from 1889 to 1901; school director for six years, and justice of the peace for two years. In 1900 he was elected county commissioner for four years. He has also served as treasurer of the Christine Swedish Lutheran congregation for a number of years. On Sept. 27, 1886, Mr. Hedin was married to Miss Anna Linn, daughter of E. O. Linn and Brita Linn. Mrs. Hedin was born in Dalarne, Sept. 22, 1865. Her parents were both born in the same province-the father Dec. 31, 1843, and the mother Oct. 7, 1845. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hedin: Josie Ella, age 18; Emil Nathanael, age 16; Mary Berthina, age 14; Amy Florence, age 5; Esther Grace, age 3 years.


Hedin, Olof Axel

A History of The Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, compiled by A. E. Strand, Vol. II, page 615-616, rll

 

Olaf Axel Hedin, dealer in real estate, whose office is in the Security Bank Building, Minneapolis, was born June 10, 1867, in the town of Arctander, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. His father, Lars Hedin, was born in Ransater parish, Vermaland, Sweden, September 2, 1833; he came to America and settled in the town of Arctander, Minnesota, June 6, 1867, four days before his son Olof A. was born. Mr. Hedin died March 16, 1904; he married Anna Maria Olson, also a native of Ransater parish, who is now living in Willmar, Minnesota. They were parents of five children, of whom only two survive, namely: Olof A. and Andrew G. The latter was born in 1869 and is in the butcher business at Willmar; he is married and has three children.

 

Olof A. Hedin received his education in the public schools and remained at home until 1881, being then fourteen years of age; on account of crop failure and financial stress he had to leave home and earn his own living, which he has done ever since. In 1882 he secured employment in a store in Morris, Minnesota, and remained about a year, when he removed to Willmar and secured a position in a store there. He worked at such occupation until 1892, and in that year established a general store of his own, which he carried on successfully until 1898.

 

Although Mr. Hedin never attended school after reaching the age of fourteen years, he has constantly made the most of his opportunities for obtaining learning and culture, and is an unusually intelligent, well-read man. He was very popular and well known in Kandiyohi county, and was elected by a good majority to the office of register of deeds, in 1898, serving until 1900.

 

In 1900 Mr. Hedin began dealing in land, and two years later sold his interests to remove to Turlock, California, to the Swedish Colony, but as the other members of the family did not like it there, he remained only a short time. Returning to Minnesota, he located in Minneapolis, and soon engaged in his present business, having since resided here. He spent one year in the brokerage business before settling down to the real estate business, in which he is now very successful. By his straight and business-like dealings Mr. Hedin has won the confidence of the public, and is well established in business. He handles large tracts of farm lands, both wild and improved, and also city property. He is a member of the Swedish Mission church, and owns a fine home at 2211 Buchanan street, Northeast, where he resides.

 

In the fall of 1893 Mr. Hedin married Maria Railson, born in 1869, daughter of Andrew Railson, a well-known farmer and prominent member of the State Legislature from Kandiyohi county. they have two children, Allyn, born October 8, 1894, and Mildred, born December 20, 1895, both born at Willmar and now attending school at Minneapolis.


Hilleboe, Hans S.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 637, rll

Prof. Hans S. Hilleboe, one of the prominent educational workers of the Northwest, is professor, of the Minnesota Lutheran Seminary and Institute at Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. He is a native of Wisconsin, born in Adams county on the 28th day of October, 1858, and is the son of Sjur II, and Gertrude (Hough) Hilleboe, natives of Norway. The father emigrated to the United States in 1853 with his parents, Hans S. and Herborg (Moe) Hilleboe, and settled in Adams county, Wisconsin. The grandfather of our subject was a schoolmaster in his younger days, but engaged later in mercantile pursuits and died in 1879. Sjur H., the father of Hans S., our subject, received a fine education in his native land and Wisconsin. He still remains on the old homestead of his parents, and is actively engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He is one of the representative citizens of that county, and for the past thirty years has constantly held various town and county offices. He is a prominent factor in church and school matters. He is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran synod. The father and mother of our subject were the parents of the following-named children-Prof. Hans S., Ole S., Herman (who died in 1887), John, Anna R. (deceased), Anna R., Peter, Gertrude, Inger and Sarah.

Professor Hilleboe, the subject of this biographical memoir, spent his younger days in school and at home, and at the age of sixteen years taught his first term of school. He attended Luther College, at Decorah, Iowa, form which he graduated in 1881. While attending college he taught one year and after graduation returned to his native county, where he engaged in the profession of school teaching, for one year. The next two years were spent in study and special preparation for teaching at the seminary and institute, which institution he had helped to establish in 1883. During the first three years Prof. A. M. Hove had charge of the seminary, but resigned on account of sickness, and since that time Professor Hilleboe has had full charge. The seminary has an attendance of some three hundred students annually, the students coming from all parts of Minnesota and Dakota, and some also form Iowa, Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin.

Professor Hilleboe was united in marriage in 1887, to Miss Antonialla Ytterboe, of Calmar Iowa. Professor and Mrs. Hilleboe have been blessed with one child-Gerturde M. Our subject and his family belong to the Lutheran church, and are actively identified with all church matters. Our subject has devoted his attention exclusively to education, and has taken very little part in politics, local or national. Mrs. Hilleboe is a daughter of Even and Mary Ytterboe. Her father was one of the pioneer settlers of Winneshiek county, Iowa. He has been a very prominent lay member in the Lutheran synod for over twenty years a trustee of the synod and also of Luther College, and has frequently held positions of trust in church affairs.


Hilscher, John Fremont
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

John Fremont Hilscher was born January 23, 1857, at Bethlehem, Indiana. Mr. Hilscher is the son of Joseph S. Hilscher and Louise Woland (Hilscher). Joseph S. Hilscher was a farmer at Lincoln, Illinois, where he owned and cultivated a large farm and amassed a comfortable fortune as the result of his life's labors. He died in 1885, respected by all who knew him and survived by his wife, who is still living. He and his wife were of German descent, but were both born in America, and for several generations the family have been residents of this country. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm near Lincoln, attending the district school in the neighborhood in his boyhood - only during the winter months, however; the summers, as is customary among farmers' boys, he occupied in farm work. The district school was usually well conducted, and as a feature of this there was a debating club for the older boys and men of the neighborhood in which the subject of this sketch took an active part and which no doubt materially influenced his choice of a profession in later years. At the age of eighteen he left home and began at La Salle, Illinois, among strangers, to carve nut his own career. He was employed on a farm and in various other occupations taught in the public schools, and in many ways earned sufficient money to enable him to obtain a college course, which was commenced at Lincoln University, Lincoln, Illinois, and finished at Knox College, at Galesburg. Having decided to become a lawyer he read law with an uncle at Lincoln for three years and was admitted to the bar by the supreme court of Illinois at Springfield, in 1882. He began the practice of his profession at Lincoln and continued there until November 1886, when he removed to Willmar, Minnesota. He continued in the practice of law at Willmar until the spring of 1894, when he removed to St. Paul, his present residence. Among the important cases in which he has been engaged was the defense of James Funk, indicted for the murder of his wife in 1887 at Willmar. In 1893 Mr. Hilscher went to Holland, where he organized a corporation of Dutch capitalists for the investment of money in America, and since then, acting as their agent, he has invested for them half a million dollars. Since removing to St. Paul he has made a specialty of real estate and commercial law, and has charge of the Northwestern business of a number of local and Eastern wholesale houses and manufacturers. His professional career has been a successful one. Mr. Hilscher was the son of an ardent Republican, and gets his name from the first presidential candidate for the Republican party. He has always been enthusiastically identified with that party. He was alternate delegate to the National Republican Convention in Chicago in 1888, and was chairman of the county committee of Kandiyohi County the same year. But aside from this and occasional service to his party on the stump, he has not taken an active part in political affairs. He is a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, of the Masonic Order, of the Knights of Pythias and the A. O. U. W. In September 1894, he was elected Grand Chancellor of Minnesota by the Knights of Pythias, and served the order until 1895, when he was elected Supreme Representative from the state. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Hilscher married December 30, 1884, to Miss Hetta Anderson, of Lincoln, Illinois. They have two children. Hazel, aged eight, and John F., aged four.


 Holter, Karl C.

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907), page 192, rll

 

Holter, Karl C., Minneapolis. Res 1601 Elliott av, office 416 8th av S. Publisher. Born Dec. 19, 1951 in Norway, son of Christopher and Anna (Christopherson) Holter. Married Oct. 20, 1881 to anna Marie Anderson. Moved to Stoughton Wis., 1861; to Fillmore county Minn 1863; attended common schools. engaged in farming in Kandiyohi county 1867; was Lutheran minister from 1880-88; moved to Minneapolis 1888, and in 1891 organized the K. c. Holter Publishing Co.


Hultgren, Aron

History of the Minnesota Valley, Including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neil, page 966, rll

Aron Hultgren was born in 1848 in Sweden, where he was a soldier two years, and came in 1867 to America. He was at St. Paul two years, in Kandiyohi county twelve years, and since 1881 has been in business at Pillsbury in company with John Strate. in 1870 he married Inge Anderson; six children: Theodore A., Manne, Amanada K., John R. Angus O. and Frethof.


Johnson, Charles E.
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907), transcribed by Mary Saggio. 

JOHNSON CHARLES E, Atwater.  Farming and stock raising.  Born May 28, 1860 in Fahlun Minn, son of P M and Eva H (Christophersen) Johnson.  Married June 12, 1882 to Wealthey Jane Church.  Educated in public and high schools Duluth.  Settled in Lake Elizabeth, Kandiyohi county Minn and engaged in farming and stock raising 1878 to date.  Served as county comnr 4 years; nominated on Prohibition ticket for state senator 1890; elected to Minn House of Representatives 1907; served as school clk 10 years; assessor 5 years.


Johnson, Christian
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Dr. Christian Johnson, of Willmar, is a native of Denmark, where he was born in Veile Amt, Jutland, July 17, 1853. He is the son of J. F. Ramsing, a farmer in comfortable circumstances, and Zidzel Christansatter (Ramsing). The ancestors of Dr. Johnson were largely identified with the military affairs of their county. His maternal grandfather was a cavalry officer in Napoleon's army in Russia. Christian was taught the rudimentary branches by his mother, who was a lady of many accomplishments. Later he attended the common school, but received his academic instruction under private tutelage. When but sixteen years of age he emigrated to America. He had no money, friends or acquaintances, but he worked at such odd jobs as he could secure in New York and Boston, in the meantime continuing his studies in the public schools and under private teachers as much as his means would allow. Having a desire to follow the medical profession, he commenced studying for that purpose in Boston. In 1874, however, he was compelled to return to Denmark to settle up the family estate. For the next three years he purchased the study of medicine in Copenhagen. In 1878 he returned to this country with the intention of completing his studies, but circumstances making it necessary that he should visit Minnesota, he decided to locate here, and in 1879 settled in Royalton, in Morrison County. In 1883 he passed the state medical examination and commenced the practice of his profession. He moved from Royalton to New London in 1886, residing in this place until the spring of 1895, at which time he moved to Willmar, Dr. Johnson has enjoyed a large and remunerative medical practice throughout Kandiyohi County. He has also served as United States pension surgeon at Willmar for several years. In addition with his professional practice he has been identified with a number of business enterprises. In 1895 he began the publication of the Willmar Tribune, but a few months later entered into partnership with Victor E. Lawson, under the firm name of Johnson & Lawson. This firm continued the publication of the Tribune, which was a decided success from the start. Dr. Johnson is one of the members of the New London Real Estate Company, which built the Great Northern hotel, and make extensive improvements in that two. He is also owner of considerable real estate in and around it. While a resident of New London Dr. Johnson was closely identified with every public enterprise. He was one of the incorporators, and until lately one of the directors of the State Bank of New London, and served as president of the village and of the school board, and in a number of other village offices. Up to 1893 Dr. Johnson affiliated with the Republican party, and took an active part in the local politics, serving the state central committee as a stump speaker. He disagreed with the party, however, on the issue involved in the repeal of the Sherman law, and joined the People's party in the campaign of 1894, taking an active part. He was a candidate for election to the lower house of the legislature, but was defeated by only twenty-nine votes. In the campaign of 1896 he was leading candidate for the People's party congressional nomination, and was also a delegate to the national convention of that party in St. Louis.


Johnson, John A.

History of the Minnesota Valley, Including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neil, page 966, rll

John A. Johnson, native of Norway, was born September 15, 1845. In 1868 he came to America; was farming and carpentering four years in Rock county, Wisconsin, after which he removed to Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, and 1876 located on section 28 of Hayes; he is clerk of this town. Married in 1873 Dorthea Larson; four children: Lewis, Alfred, Albert and John A.


Johnson, Marcus
History of the Scandinavians and Successful Scandinavians in the United States, Volumes I & II (1900) submitted by cd

 

Johnson, Marcus, state senator-Atwater-born 14 July, 1849, in the northern part of Helsingland, Sweden. When an infant of only two years of age he came with his parents to the United States; they settled at Waupaca, Wis., but moved to Kandiyohi county, Minn., five years later, where Johnson has resided ever since. In 1880 he was a delegate to the Republican national convention which met in Chicago and nominated Garfield for president, represented his district in the state legislature in 1883, and served in the state senate during the sessions of 1887-89. In 1890 President Harrison appointed him collector of internal revenues for Minnesota. He is interested in elevators, flouring mills, and other large enterprises in different parts of the state. Johnson is not married.


Johnson, P. S. J.
Source: The Illustrated History of Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, Victor E. Lawson and J. Emil Nelson, 1905; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

LAKE LILLIAN TOWNSHIP
The subject of this sketch was born in Mockfjard, Dalarne, Sweden, Jan. 14, 1849. His parents were John Peterson, born March 30, 1821, and Karin Peterson, born March 19, 1826, both natives of Mockfjard.

Johnson's earlier years were spent in Mockfjard, where he attended the public schools. At the age of twenty he came to America, landing at New York in 1869. He came to Tripolis, this county, on July 3d of that year. He took a homestead in town of Lake Lillian and settled down to farming. Since then he has bought several tracts of land, and now has a farm of 295 acres, embracing the following descriptions: SE1/4, E1/2, SW1/4 section 18; 15 acres in section 8 and 40 acres in section 17. Of this land, 200 acres is under cultivation. He has a fine dwelling house and large farm buildings. Six acres have been planted with trees.

A few years ago he also bought the Lars Turnquist farm in sections 6 and 7 of the same town, he devotes his attention to raising grain and stock. The home farm is sixteen miles from Willmar and twelve miles from Olivia. It is on the Kandiyohi Telephone Company's line and on the Olivia free delivery route No. 2. Mr. Johnson is one of the trustees of the Christine church, is a good citizen and is well thought of by his neighbors. The maiden name of Mr. Johnson's wife was Brita Person. She was born in Mockfjard, Sweden, Feb. 5, 1843. Her parents were Ris Per Person, born 1803, and Brita Olson, born in 1805. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Johnson: John E., aged 28, farming in Lake Lillian; P. August, aged 25, farming in Lake Lillian; Caroline, aged 23, now Mrs. August Johnson, living on a farm near Svea; Andrew, aged 19, farming in Lake Lillian; Ellen, aged 15, living at home.


Jorgenson, Martin

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 601-602, rll

 

Martin Jorgenson. The subject of this article is a resident of the city of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he is engaged in the manufacture of harness and saddles, also handling a full line of whips, trunks, traveling bags, robes, blankets, etc. He is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born on the 10th of October, 1839, and is the son of Casper C. and Maren D. (Smith) Jorgenson, also natives of Norway. The father, who was a tanner and prosperous farmer by occupation, was one of the prominent men of Norway. He was one of the signer of the constitution of Norway, and raised a large family, all of whom were prominently identified with the history of their native land.

Mr. Jorgenson, of whom this sketch treats, received his education in his native land, where he attended school until he was seventeen years old. He then secured a position in a store as clerk, and after one year entered an agricultural school where he remained two years. He then remained one year with his brother, and at the expiration of that time took charge of the home farm. When he was twenty-one years of age he emigrated to America, and after landing in Canada, went to Chicago, Illinois, and worked at the harness trade, which he had learned in his native land. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, Fifteenth Wisconsin Infantry, and after serving three years enlisted in the Sixth Regiment, Company B, Hancock Corps, as sergeant, which position he held until the close of the war. He was in a great many battles and skirmishes and was wounded at the battle of Stone River. After receiving his discharge on the 26th of March, 1866, he removed to Minnesota, settling in Dimon Lake, where he took Government land and, in connection with farming, followed the mercantile business in the village. In 1873 he went to Rushford, Fillmore county, Minnesota, where he purchased a harness shop, and after one years removed his stock of goods to Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he has since remained actively engaged in this line. He has one of the best stocked harness shops in the city and is having a good trade. Since settling in Willmar he has built himself a fine residence opposite the court house.

Mr. Jorgenson was united in marriage to Mrs. L. G. Paulson, of Fillmore county, Minnesota and this union has been blessed with four children, named as follows-Johannah, Charles, Laura, and Amy. Our subject is a stanch republican in his political affiliations and is actively interested in all local matters. He is stockholder and director of the Willmar Bank and was one of its organizers. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and is one of the representative business men of Willmar. He is a man of the strictest honor and integrity and is highly esteemed by all who know him.


Larson, Andrew

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 551-552, rll

Andrew Larson, among the leading and prominent business men of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, is the gentleman whose name heads this article, who is engaged in the mercantile business in that place. He is one of the oldest merchants of the city, having located there on the 15th day of May, 1870, and engaged in the business which he has since carried on. He is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born on the 15th day of August, 1842, and is the son of Lars and Gena (Johnson) Ellefson, also natives of that kingdom. The parents emigrated to the United States, in 1852, and remained there until their death. The father died in 1882, at the age of ninety-four, and the mother one year previous, at the age of eighty-one. They were the parents of the following-named children, who are now living-John, of Becker county, Minnesota, engaged in extensive farming operations; Andries, of Pierce county, Wisconsin, and Andrew, of whom this article treats.

Mr. Larson, the subject of this biographical review, remained on the home farm in his native land, attending school until he was ten years old, when he emigrated to the United States with his parents. He received his education in the district schools of Pierce county, Wisconsin, and remained at home until 1862. He then enlisted in Company D. Thirtieth Wisconsin Infantry, and, in Louisville, Kentucky, was on Major-General John M. Palmer's staff for one year, doing provost duty most of the time. He was in the service about three years and a half, and after his honorable discharge returned to Stanton, Wisconsin, where he engaged in mercantile business. After following that occupation for two years he removed to Minnesota, settling in St. Cloud, engaging in the mercantile business, where he remained for about five years. He then removed to Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, and opened his present business. In 1876 he erected his present fine store building, one of the best in the city. He is also president of the Kandiyohi County Bank, established in 1880, with a paid up capital of $50,000 surplus. He was one of its organizers and has been its president since 1884. He has been president of the high school board and member of the village council. Mr. Larson is one of the most prominent public-spirited citizens of the city and always assists all local enterprises with means and influence.

Mr. Larson was united in marriage in 1872 to Miss Mary Anderson, of Prescott, Wisconsin, and this union has been blessed with three children-Clara G., Archie M. and Freddy A. Our subject and his family belong to the Lutheran church. He is a republican in his political affiliations and a man of the strictest honor and integrity, his word being as good as a bond.


Larson, Lewis

Illustrated Album Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions. page 675-676,  rll

Louis Larson. There is probably no man in Kandiyohi county who is more worthy of favorable notice in a volume devoted to the pioneers of Minnesota than the subject of our present article, Louis Larson, the proprietor of the mill at New London, Minnesota. He is one of the pioneers of that locality, having been a resident of that village for over thirty years; and through his uniform integrity and honorable business methods he is rated as one of the most solid and substantial citizens of the county, and his word is recognized as being as good as a bond.

Mr. Larson came here in 1859, and during the first three years was engaged in hunting, farming and trapping. In June, 1862, he commenced building a saw mill, but was soon forced to abandon it on account of the Indian outbreak, which began in August of that year. With the other settlers he was driven away by the Indians, and he went to St. Paul and Minneapolis, where he remained until the spring of 1865. He then returned in company with Samuel Stoner, and in partnership they completed the saw mill, which was the first mill erected within the present limits of Kandiyohi county.  In 1872 Mr. Stoner sold his interest and our subject formed a co-partnership with others, under the name and style of Adams, Larson, Sperry & Wright. This firm owned the saw mill and erected a flouring mill, and they ran both for a period of ten years, when the saw mill was discontinued. They still continue to operate the flouring mill, which has been greatly improved and remolded. It is now equipped with eight sets of patent rollers, and has a capacity of 100 barrels of flour per day. They do quite an extensive shipping trade and also supply the home market.

Mr. Larson, whose name heads this article, was born in Bollnas, Helsingland, Sweden, on the 24th of June, 1836, and is a son of Peter and Christine Larson, who were farmers in Sweden. In 1852 the family came to the United States and located in Waupaca, Wisconsin, where they engaged in farming. Louis Larson came to Minnesota in 1857, and was followed by the family in 1858. They remained at St. Peter until the spring of 1859, when they came to Kandiyohi county and located at Nest Lake. The father is still living, a resident of New London; the mother died in April, 1876. The parents had a family which consisted of the following children-Louis, Peter, Erick, Oliver, Martha, Nels, Christine, and Erick. The two Ericks are dead, and all the others are still living.

Louis Larson was married January 19, 1869, to Carrie Olson, and they are the parents of two daughters-Mary Christine and Carrie Elizabeth. Mrs. Larson is a native of Sweden, and the daughter of Peter and Martha Olson. Her parents came to the United States in the fall of 1853, and settled in Chicago, where her mother died during the following year. Her father died in February, 1875.

Mr. Larson, after the Indian outbreak, aided in re-organizing Monongola county, it being the north half of what is now Kandiyohi county. New London was the county seat. Our subject also took a prominent part in the organization of the township and village of New London. He has always taken an active interest in all public affairs and has held various official positions. He was chairman of the board of supervisors for many years and also town treasurer. For twelve years he held the position of postmaster, and every move affecting the welfare of his town or county received his active support and encouragement. He is a stanch republican in political matters, and a member of the Lutheran church.

Mr. Larson has extensive property interests-besides his mill and other property, he owns a farm of 300 acres under a high state of cultivation, which he rents.


Lawson, Victor Emanuel

A History of the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, Vol. 3., A. E. Strand, pages 1114-1144, rll

Victor Emanuel Lawson was born at Paxton, Illinois, March 24, 1871, a son of Carl M. and Maria (Lindstrom) Lawson, both born in Sweden. Carl Mangnus Lawson (Larson) was born at Ekeberg, Mjolby parish, Linkopingslan, April 4, 1834, and Maria, his wife was born November 9, 1837, the first born child of Jonas Lindstrom, who resided near Ronneby, Sweden. James J. Lindstrom, a brother of Mrs. Lawson, born August 25, 1840, enlisted at the age of twenty-one in Company H. of the Forty-fifth Illinois Infantry at Rock Island. He served in General Grant's first campaign on the Tennessee river, and was wounded at the battle of Pittsburg Landing, necessitating the amputation of a foot. He taught school in the early days at Chisago Lake, Minnesota, and he died at Crystal Lake, Illinois, January 19, 1887. His widow, Mrs. Elsie E. LIndstrom, resides at New London, Minnesota, Andrew J. Lindstrom, another brother of Mrs. Lawson, born May 14, 1843, attracted as a youth the notice of the early founders of the Swedish Lutheran church. He was induced to continue his studies and was sent back to Sweden, where he graduated from the University of Upsala in 1869 with the degree of Ph, D. He was ordained to the ministry and became a professor at Augustana College, but his promising career was cut short by death. He died at Lake Jessup, Florida, whither he had gone for his health, January 24, 1872.

The Lawsons were among the early Swedish emigrants to arrive in America in the fifties, and the father of both Mr. and Mrs. Lawson fell victims to the epidemic of the Asiatic cholera. The families located at Rock Island, Illinois, and vicinity. Mr. Carl M. Lawson secured work in a sash and door factory and became a carpenter and contractor. During his stay in Rock Island he changed the spelling of his name slightly to distinguish it from other Larsons residing there. In 1863 the family moved to Paxton, Illinois, where Dr. Hasselquist had founded a Swedish colony in connection with Augustana College, and a modest little home was built within a block of the school, where the family continued to live for seventeen years. But in the interest of the health of Mrs. Lawson the family moved to Minnesota in the fall of 1880, locating at New London. They settled on a farm at that time covered with brush and timber, in section 16, a mile and a half from the village, but a few years later the farm was rented and a residence was built in the village, where the family now lives. Mr. Lawson labored at his trade continuously for more that fifty years. Both he and his wife are active members of the Lebanon Lutheran church. They became the parents of fifteen children, but of these nine died in infancy, and those surviving are: Carrie, now Mrs. F. O. Swanson, of Green Lake; Thomas J., who resides with his wife and five children at New Lebanon; Victor E., mentioned below; Eben E., who has obtained a reputation as an artist, and who resides with his wife at Pasadena, California; and Elsie Theodora and Esther V., who are with their parents.

Victor E. Lawson attended a private Swedish primary school and later the graded public school, and after the family came to this county his time was divided between attending the New London school, participating in the struggle to clear the land and doing the usual farm work. His early ambition was to learn the printer's trade, and all his small savings were invested in printing material, while the most of his leisure time was spent at this work and in reading all the books and literature within his reach. In the spring of 1889 he secured  a teacher's certificate and taught a term of school in district No. 8, and in the summer following he was offered the position of manager of the New London Times, which he accepted. Less than two years later he purchased the Times in the name of his brother, T. J. Lawson, as he was not of age at the time. In 1892 he was appointed deputy postmaster and erected a brick-veneered building to accommodate the postoffice and his printing business, and he was acting postmaster until the office went into Democratic hands, while besides being editor and postmaster he served as township justice, village recorder and chief of the fire department.

Mr. Lawson was in those days an ardent Republican, and his convictions led him into many a battle with the numerous Populists of the neighborhood, an these controversies also led him to study economics until finally he reluctantly saw one after another of his cherished political notions dissipated by logic and reason, the result being that the fire of enthusiastic youth was damped in the Times. When in the spring of 1895 the editor was offered the management of the new Populist newspaper at Willmar by Dr. C. Johnson, a former political associate, the chance for enlarged field of action was gladly accepted. He moved to Willmar in the spring of 1895, and thenceforth gave all his efforts to establishing the new paper on a permanent basis. It was a hard struggle during the first years, but the paper with decided opinions and zealous for the welfare and upbuilding of its home county and city.

In the summer of 1897 Mr. Lawson and F. F. Nelson erected a business block that became known as the Tribune Building. On January 12, 1898, J. Emil Nelson acquired a one-half interest in the business, Dr. Johnson at the same time retiring from the firm. Mr. Nelson became the business manager, and with his exceptional ability as a solicitor, the new firm did many big stunts in the way of special editions that were quite unusual for a country newspaper. The final enterprise of the firm of Lawson & Nelson was the publication of the Kandiyohi County History, on which work was begun in 1901, and which was brought to a successful conclusion in 1905. One eminent authority who examined this work stated as his belief "that never before was so small a political division enriched and dignified by a history of itself as Kandiyohi county is by this publication: The financing and soliciting for the work was done by Mr. Nelson and Mr. Lawson superintended the compilation of the subject matter, Martin E. Tew being the author of the chapters relating to the early and political history of the county and a number of other persons assisting in the work.

In January 1907, Mr. Nelson having become extensively interested in other business ventures, the firm was dissolved, and Mr. Lawson became the exclusive owner of the Willmar Tribune printing plant. He has purchased the lot adjoining the government building in this city and expects in a short time to erect a modern printing house and equip it with an up-to-date printing plant, and he will then have the necessary facilities for establishing a journal of special interest to Swedish-Americans throughout the country and which will fulfill a long cherished plan.

Since the collapse of the People's party movement the Tribune has remained independent in politics. It espoused the anti-license cause in 1898, and the Tribune was one of the very first local papers in Minnesota that came out openly for prohibition. County option for Minnesota has been  so for ten and a half years out of the last twelve, as well as the fact that nearly all the villages for many miles around are also without saloons, is due largely to the fact of the fearless stand taken by the Tribune years ago and its participation annually in the campaigns.

Mr. Lawson has been a member of the Minnesota Editorial Association for twenty years, and was elected a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society after the Kandiyohi County History appeared. He is an active member of the Willmar commercial Club and the chairman of its publicity committee, and is secretary of the Willmar Park Assembly. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran Bethel church at Willmar and is a member of its board of trusties. He has also been twice honored by election as lay delegate to the national assembly or synod, and was a member of the board of education which established the Minnesota College at Minneapolis in 1904.

On September 20, 1894, Mr. Lawson married Miss Minnie Nelson, a daughter of S. M. and Karolina Nelson, of New London, and she died on the 14th of December, 1901, without issue. On the 13th of May, 1909, he wedded Miss Julia Kallstrom, a native of Ishpeming, Michigan.


Linn, Fred
Source: The Illustrated History of Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, Victor E. Lawson and J. Emil Nelson, 1905; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

LAKE LILLIAN TOWNSHIP
Fred Linn was born in town of Lake Lillian, Kandiyohi county, Minn., Oct. 22, 1875. His parents were Erik O. Linn, born in Gagnel parish, Dalarne, Sweden, Dec. 21, 1843, and Brita Person, born in the same parish. Erik O. Linn, with his family, at that time consisting of wife, two girls and a boy, came to America in 1872, landing at Quebec. They came directly to Kandiyohi county, making their home in Lake Lillian, Mr. Linn being one of the pioneer settlers of that township. He took a homestead in Renville county, but abandoned this shortly and bought railroad land in sections 15 and 22, the acreage of the whole farm amounting to 240 acres. Mr. Linn was a practical and progressive type of farmer, and before his death in 1897 he had succeeded in making the farm a very attractive home and a valuable property. The home has telephone connections by means of the Kandiyohi County Telephone Company. Rural route No. 2 from Svea affords daily mail service. The schoolhouse in District No. 5 is only half a mile distant and the place is within one mile of the Christine church. Mrs. Erik O. Linn still continues to live in the old home and the farm is being worked by the eldest son, Ole Linn, who also has a farm of his own in the locality. The two daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Erik O. Linn were Anna and Christine. The former is now Mrs. A. M. Hedin; the latter died in 1897.

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood at the old home. After passing through the common school in District No. 5, Lake Lillian, he took the business course in the Willmar Seminary in 1897-99, and also a course at the state agricultural school in 1901-02.

After the death of his father he took charge of the home farm, which he managed for several years, in connection with his own land, which consists of SW1/4 SW1/4 section 15, and NE1/4 NW1/4 section 22, Lake Lillian, part of it purchased from the H. & D. railroad and part from Andrew Anderson. On Sept. 22, 1903, Mr. Linn moved to Willmar and in partnership with T. E Murphy opened the Park cafe, later adding hotel accommodations to the business. In the spring of 1905 Messrs. Linn & Murphy sold their business to E. T. Sandbo. Since January, 1904, Mr. Linn has been interested in the firm of Johnson, Fridlund, Norman Co. At present he lives in Minneapolis, where he is employed in a wholesale house.

While living in Lake Lillian, Mr. Linn served as town assessor in 1900 and 1901, as chairman of supervisors 1902-03, resigning in September of 1903 as clerk of School District No. 5 from 1901 to 1904, resigning in the summer of the latter year.


Lundborg, Samuel A.

History of the Minnesota Valley, Including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neil, page 395, rll

Samuel A. Lundborg is a native of Sweden, born in 1853. When eight years of age he and his parents went to Quebec, Canada, thence to St. Paul. The father purchased a farm of 320 acres in Kandiyohi county, on which they lived only one year, when they were driven away by the Indians. Samuel was wounded by them and his three brothers were killed. The remainder of the family moved to Afton, Washington county, and lived there until the spring of 1853. They rented a farm in Carver county, and four years later returned to their former home. Seven years subsequently they sold and located in Benton, purchasing 160 acres where they now live. The mother died in 1870 at the advanced age of sixty years. Mr. Lundborg married in 1874 Anna M. Rohnson. Two of the three children born to them are living.


Mastrud, C. J.

History of the Minnesota Valley, Including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neil

C. J. Mastrud is a native of Norway, where he was born in 1852; while living there he learned the trade of tinner. In 1870 he came to America; lived for a time in Winneshiek county, Iowa; came to Pillsbury in 1875 and started in a tin shop; now has a hardware store. Married in July, 1881, Christine Anderson.


Maynard, Arba K.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 529-530, rll

Judge Arba K. Maynard, attorney at law and justice of the peace of Atwater, is one of the leading and representative men of Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. He is a native of New York State, born in Madison county, New York, on the 25th day of April, 1803, and is the son of Moses and Annie (Lincoln) Maynard. Our subject's parents were of English descent, and the following narrative will be interesting in the history of his ancestry. Macaulay, in his History of England, relates that when William III. Invaded England and re-established the laws which James II. had subverted, he marched in triumph into London and was met by the different classes of citizens with addresses of welcome. The members of the legal fraternity of London marched in front to welcome the king, Sergeant Maynard at their head, then ninety-three years old and the acknowledged leader of the London bar. After he had presented the address of welcome, in the name of his brethren, King William said to him: "Sergeant, you must have outlived all the lawyers of your time." Yes, sire," replied the sergeant, "and but for your majesty would have outlived the laws." A coat-of-arms is another thing upon which the ancestry of our subject base their claims to aristocracy: the device being a hand with three hearts in the palm. The parents of our subject both died in New York State. They were the parents of four children, named as follows-Dr. Edward, of Washington City, District of Columbia; Butler, of New York City; our subject, and one sister, who is now living with her grandchildren in Michigan.

Mr. Maynard, of whom this article treats, remained at home, working on the farm, also working in a hotel at night. He received a good education, attending the district schools and when sixteen years of age became a school teacher. When he was twenty-one he began the study of law and classics under Judge Rogers . In 1832 he was admitted to the bar as an attorney, in New York City, and during the following year was admitted as a solicitor in chancery at Albany, New York. In 1835 he was admitted as counselor, and in 1837 was admitted to practice in the United States supreme court, at Washington, District of Columbia. Immediately after his first admission to the bar he opened an office in Norwich, Chenango county, New York. where he took a high place at the bar and remained for a number of years. He next went to New York City, where he opened an office and remained there in active practice many years. In 1855 or 1856 he was elected judge of the marine court, an exclusively civil court, and held this important position for nearly ten years. In 1864, with the intention of making a farmer of his son, he came to Minnesota and settled in Le Sueur county. He became largely interested in land and bought out a number of valuable claims, including prairie and timber lands, bordering upon the beautiful lakes of that vicinity. The son did not take to farming, and soon opened a country store in Le Sueur county. Later his son came to Atwater and opened a store while our subject sold his interests in Le Sueur county, and removed to St. Paul. In 1881 the Judge bought considerable tax title land in the vicinity of Atwater, and has since made this his home.

Judge Maynard is a democrat in political matters, and is one of the leading members of that party in the central part of the State. He represented Le Sueur county in the Minnesota legislature during the sessions of 1866-1867, and in the fall of 1867 was the nominee of his party for the office of lieutenant-governor, on the same ticket with Judge Flandreau, the latter being the nominee for governor. He has always taken a prominent part in public affairs and has held a great many local offices, having been justice of the peace nearly all the time since he came to Minnesota. A man of excellent legal and literary attainments, he is held in high esteem, both professionally and as an exemplary citizen. He is a member of the Masonic and Odd-Fellows fraternities, and is an active participant in all matters affecting the public welfare.

Judge Maynard was married in 1833 to Miss Minerva Gates, a sister-in-law of Judge Purdy. They became the parents of the following children-Minerva and Graydon.


Monson, Lewis

History of the Minnesota Valley, Including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neil, page 966, rll

 

Lewis Monson was born in 1837, in Norway. After coming to America in 1847 he lived until 1860 in Wisconsin, then Rice county, this state till 1865, when he came to Hayes and bought a farm, but resided in Kandiyohi county till 1876; held the office of county commissioner in that county and this. Married in 1864, Ingra Fige; the children are Martin, Uny, Anna, Isabelle, Olina, Josephine, George, Neolina and Marcus.


Neer, Joseph H.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 640-641, rll

Joseph H. Neer, real estate dealer and grain buyer of New London, Minnesota, is one of the most prominent business men, in Kandiyohi county. He has been one of the leading factors in the growth and development of the locality in which he lives, and his name is prominently identified with the history of the northern half of Kandiyohi county. A man of extensive property interests, enterprising, liberal, and energetic, every move calculated to benefit the town or county received his hearty support and encouragement.

Mr. Neer was born in Springfield, Clarke county Ohio, in 1834, and is a son of Amos and Hannah Neer, who were natives of Virginia. The mother died when he was three years old, and a few weeks after the birth of his sister Hannah. The father married again, and died in 1846.

Joseph H. Neer spent his boyhood days and received his education in his, native State, attending school until he was seventeen years of age. He then engaged in clerking and collecting, and while still a boy settled the accounts of four different firms in Ohio. In 1855 he came to Iowa and located at Muscatine, where he engaged in the hotel business, running the Irving House for a year. At the expiration of the time he went to St. Paul, Minnesota, and after clerking in a store there for one year, he took a pre-emption in Carver county, Minnesota. A short time later he engaged as a clerk on a steamboat and followed this for nine months, when he again returned to St. Paul and resumed clerking. He remained for some time and served two years as wood inspector. In 1863 he entered the quartermaster's department and accompanied General Sibley's expedition across the plains, going as far as Big Bend, near the present site of Bismarck, on the Missouri river. The expedition returned to St. Paul in the fall of 1863, and our subject remained in the quartermaster's department until the following spring, when he, in company with Zeb. Nash, went South as sutlers with the Sixth Minnesota Infantry. The regiment went into camp at Helena, Arkansas, and Mr. Neer remained with them util fall, when his health failed and he returned to St. Paul, and late in 1864 engaged as clerk in the Merchants' Hotel. After a years' service there, his health still being poorly, his physician advised him to go on a farm. He accordingly went to Steans county, Minnesota and assumed charge of Major Culiom's farm. He took there 865 sheep which he cared for, and they increased in numbers so that he re-let the most of them around Sauk Center and Holmes City. In 1868 he removed to Kandiyohi county and bought a farm, where he engaged in farming and teaching school during the winter months. In 1870 he went to the village of New London, where he has since lived. He engaged at that in the mercantile business in company with S. Adams. They remained in partnership about three years, when Mr. Adams sold out and Mr. Neer carried on the business alone until 1883, when he closed out the stock, and has since devoted his attention to real estate matters and buying grain. He has always taken an active part in public affairs, and has been justice of the peace for the past twelve years. He is one of the most careful and capable business men in the county, and has amassed a fortune through his own foresight and business sagacity, and he stands high in the esteem of all, both as a business man and an exemplary citizen.

Mr. Neer was married December 7, 1871 to Hannah E. Knowles, and they are the parents of two daughters, named Hattie May and Alice Lydia. Mrs. Neer was born near Oswego, New York, and is a daughter of Robert and Lydia A. Knowles.

The Neer family residence is a neat and comfortable one, being located on their farm near the depot at New London.


Nelson, N. A.

History of the Minnesota Valley, Including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neil, page 847, rll

N. A. Nelson was born October 9, 1849, in Sweden. In 1869 he moved to Winona, Minnesota, three years later went to Willmar, Kandiyohi county, but in 1877 located in Winfield. For several years Mr. Nelson has been a member of the town board. Yngebor O. Jensen, native of Norway, was married to him in February, 1877, and has three children; Anton, N., Ever O., and Magnus B.


Nelson, Nels O.

A History of the Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, Volume 2, edited by Algot E. Strand, page 1096-1097, rll

Nels O. Nelson, county treasurer of Kandiyohi county, was born October 17, 1854, in Sweden, and is the son of Ole Nelson; the latter was born in Sweden, November 26, 1822, and his wife April 27, 1821. 1871 Ole Nelson came with his family to the United States, landing New York, May 24, and in June settled on a farm at Whitefield.

Nels O. Nelson received his education in the public schools of Sweden, and in 1871 came with his parents to the United States, where for some time he helped his father on the farm, and later bought land in two hundred and eighty acres of rich land within eight miles of Willmar, along a free delivery route. He has moved with his family to Willmar, where he owns a comfortable residence, and for several years has been engaged in business in that city. He has long been manager of the Farmers" Elevator Company, of Willmar, at first in partnership with Swan Nelson, but subsequently alone. He is an energetic and enterprising business man, of proven integrity and good judgement, and has been successful in his dealings. Mr. Nelson has been a supporter of the Republican party since becoming a citizen of the United States, and has taken a keen interest in local affairs. He served as alderman of the Fourth ward, is now a member of the Municipal Water and Light Commission, has served as town clerk, and chairman and treasurer of the board of supervisors. He has served several years as treasurer of District 55, in 1898 was elected to the office of county treasurer of Kandiyohi county, Minnesota.

On July 14, 1880, at Svea, Minnesota, Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Olga Hanson. She was born in Fjelkinge parish, Kristianstads Ian, Sweden, September 5, 1860. Her parents were Hans Larson and Nilla Rasmusson. Three children were born in this marriage: Hattie C., born May 30, 1881, now Mrs. S. L. Benton; Nannie A., born September 14, 1883; and Marie A., born September 17, 1887. Mrs. Nelson died April 12, 1888. On June 7, 1889, Mr. Nelson was married to Miss Lina Regina Westerberg. She was born in Elmstad parish, Smaland, Sweden, July 27, 1864. Her parents were Lars Magnus Westerberg, born August 7, 1831, and Anna Frederickson, born December 11, 1835, both natives of the same parish. Two children have been born in the second marriage; Amy Olga, born April 23, 1891; and Carl Herbert, born April 26, 1896, died in infancy.


O'Brien, Dennis

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 687-688

Dennis O'Brien, vice-president of the Kandiyohi County Bank, Minnesota, and the present efficient postmaster of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, has been a resident of that county since 1870. He is a native of Ireland, born on the 7th of July, 1839, and is the son of Martin and Mary O'Brien, also natives of that land. In 1841, the parents of our subject emigrated to America and located in the Dominion of Canada, where they engaged in farming.

Mr. O'Brien, of whom this sketch treats, emigrated to Canada with his parents when he was two years old. He received a fair education in the common schools of Canada, and after leaving the school-room commenced in life for himself by clerking in a store. In 1862 he came to the States, and for the succeeding eight years was engaged in mining operations in California, Nevada, Idaho and Montana. He was successful in this venture, and after the expiration of eight years returned eastward and located in Minnesota, where he purchased 640 acres of land in Kandiyohi county, where he remained engaged in general farming and stock operations for sixteen years. In 1880 he participated in the organization of the Kandiyohi County Bank, with which he has since been identified. He is also actively interested in real estate and loan brokerage, and was formerly connected with a syndicate which owned thirteen elevators in different sections of the country. He, with Mr. Peterson, owns the elevator at Kandiyohi station. He is a member of a syndicated at Willmar interested in St. Paul and Minneapolis real estate. On the 4th of March he was appointed postmaster by President Cleveland, which position he has since filled with satisfaction to all parties concerned. He owns one of the finest brick residences in the city, which he purchased at an expense of $6,000. In 1886 he removed into the city, where he had for may years been identified with its business interests.

Mr. O'Brien was married in 1869 to Miss Kate Findlan, and this union has been blessed with the four following-named children-Mary, who is attending and will graduate in June, 1889, at the St. Cloud Normal School; Martin, who assists his father in the postoffice; Andrew and Julia. Mr. O'Brien is one of the prominent and solid business men of Willmar, and is an adherent to the principles of the democratic party. In 1888 he was chairman of the county democratic central committee, and for the last twelve years has regularly been a delegate to the State democratic convention.


O'Brien, Miss Julia

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 735-736

Miss Julia O'Brien. The subject of our present article is the editor and proprietor of the Press, a weekly journal, published at Atwater, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, and she is the only lady publisher in the central or northern portion of Minnesota. She has already attained considerable prominence in newspaper circles of the State, as she is a lady of excellent literary attainments, a pungent and capable writer, and an indefatigable worker.

Miss O'Brien was born at Rochester, Olmsted county, Minnesota, and is the daughter of John and Anna (Tierney) O'Brien, both of whom were natives of Ireland. Her father came to America when nineteen years of age, and after stopping a short time in Ottawa, Canada, in 1849 or 1850 went to California. There he was employed in the mines for about ten years, and at the expiration of that time settled in Olmsted county, Minnesota where he was one of the pioneers. He engaged in farming and remained there until 1868, when he came with his family to Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, and settled on a farm on Diamond Lake, Harrison township, about three miles from the village of Atwater. There he remained engaged in tilling the soil until his death, which occurred in April, 1887. He was a man of high character, and his death was sincerely regretted by a wide circle of friends. The widow and most of the family are still living on the old homestead.

Julia O'Brien, whose name heads our present article, received the most of her education in the district schools of Kandiyohi county, supplementing this with a course of study in the convent of "Our Lady of Lourdes," at St. Michael's, twenty miles form Minneapolis. She also spent one year in a seminary at Rochester, pursuing the studies of painting and music. After leaving the convent she returned to Kandiyohi county and engaged in teaching during the summer months and visiting home during the summer months and visiting home during the winter. This she continued for six or seven years, when, early in 1888, she became the proprietor of the Atwater Press and all its appurtenances, buying out the interest of D. P. R. Strong. The paper is republican in politics.


Odell, Peter A.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 579-580, rll

Peter A. Odell, sheriff of Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, is a resident of the city of Willmar, where he is engaged in his official duties.He has been a resident of the county since 1867, when he settled in the township of Norway Lake, taking a homestead of eighty acres, and purchasing 160 acres of railroad land, upon which he lived, engaged in general farming and stock-raising for many years. In 1879 he settled in the city, where he has since remained. He still owns his farm, which comprises 240 acres of well-improved farming and timber land. He is a native of the kingdom of Sweden, born in Calmar in 1838, and is the son of Carl and Stena (Hanson) Johnson, also natives of that kingdom. The father, who was a farmer, died in 1854, and the mother passed away in 1882. They were the parents of the following-named children-Christena, now Mrs. Johnson; Charles and Peter A. (twins); Headvig, who married Mr. Folstrom; Adolph, Mary, now the wife of Mr. Grenell; and Vandla, who was united in marriage to Mr. Erickson.

Mr. Odell received his education in his native land, and, after leaving the common schools, studied navigation in Malmo, Sweden. After his father's death, our subject went on the sea, as cook, and from that gradually worked up to the position of captain. He followed the sea in all for twelve years, and was a captain on the North sea for four years, in turn visiting France and Europe, and during this time he never lost a ship, although he encountered some of the worst storms ever chronicled. At one time he lost anchors, sails, small boats, etc., and was obliged to put into port without a pilot. During these perilous times he never prayed once, being a man of the world, and, as he relates,had no faith  in the efficacy of prayer at such a time. During six years of his sea-faring life, his brother Adolph, who now is a resident of Kansas, was the first mate. In 1864 our subject gave up his sea-faring life and emigrated to the United States, first setting in La Porte, Indiana, where he furnished ties for the railroad company, and engaged in farming on a tract of land comprising forty acres. In 1867 he removed to Minnesota, and, as before stated, settled in Kandiyohi county. He still owns his farm, which is one of the finest, and comprises 240 acres. In regard to his political and official connections, he has held the office of county commissioner for three years, been town clerk for eight years, justice of peace for eight years, and in 1878 ran on the independent ticket for sheriff and was elected by seventy majority. The second term he was on the regular ticket, and since that time has been re-elected every two years. He is one of the most prominent and public-spirited citizens in the city, and is highly esteemed by all who know him. He has also been alderman of the second ward in Willmar.

Mr. Odell was married in 1870 to Miss Carrie Reese, and this union has been blessed with eight children. In political matters, Mr. Odell is an adherent to the principles of the republican party. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is one of the substantial and representative men of the county.


Olson, Iver C.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 630-631, rll

Iver C. Olson, is a resident of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he is engaged in the furniture business, carrying a full line of furniture and undertaker's goods. He settled in that county in 1871, working a farm one mile from the village, in Willmar township, where he carried on general farming for one year, then settled in the village and followed house building for nine years, employing from two to eight men. He then engaged in his present business, purchasing his present place on the corner of Third street, in 1880, He is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born in 1848, and is the son of Ingebrit and Sarah (Jacobson) Olson, natives also of that kingdom. The father was a prominent farmer, and remained in his native land until his death in 1883. The mother is still living in Norway. They were the parents of but one child, Iver, our subject.

Mr. Olson, the subject of this article, remained on the home farm, in his native land, attending school until he was fourteen years old. At that period in life he entered an apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade, which he followed for a number of years. In 1871 he emigrated to the United States, and, after landing, removed at once to Minnesota, settling in Kandiyohi county, where he worked on a farm as before stated. He has built a number of houses in the village, including his fine residence, which is located on the corner of First street and Litchfield avenue.

Mr. Olson was united in marriage in 1871, to Miss Annetta T. Berg, the daughter of John T. Berg. This union has blessed Mr. and Mrs. Olson with four children, named as follows-Samuel, Ole, Conrad and Inga. Our subject and his family belong to the Lutheran church. He is a stanch republican in his political affiliations, and all local matters, whereby the town or county may derive benefit received his hearty support. He is a public-spirited citizen, and is one of the prominent representative business men of the city.


Olson, Martin

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907), page 298, rll

 

Olson, Martin, Atwater. Hardware, furniture and farm machinery. born Sept. 18, 1850 in Gausdal, Gulbransdalen Norway, son of Ole Iverson Myhren and Romoa (Nelson) Olson. Married Oct. 1878 to Gunnuld Sivertson. Educated in common school of his native country. Came to U. S. 1868 and was first engaged in railroad work for St P. M. & M. R. R. in st. paul and Later on N. P. R. R. with brother bought land in Irving township, Kandiyohi county, Minn., wherer he remained until 1878; moved to Atwater and engaged in mercantile business to date. Pres. and mngr The Atwater hardware and machine Co; owner Willmar Furniture Co; dir Security Bank of Atwater and N. D. Hardware Co. of Cleveland and Pingree N. D. Served as chariman Board of Supervisors Irving 2 years; town clk and postmaster of Irving. Member masonic faternity, B. P. O. E. and Atwater Commercial Club.


Otterness, Elev O.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 680-681, rll

Elev O. Otterness, formerly a prosperous and prominent member of the farming community of Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, is a resident of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he is living a retired life. He is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born on the 2d of February, 1821, and is the son of Ole and Anna (Oleson) Elifson, natives of Norway. The parents emigrated to the United States in 1850, and remained with our subject for fifteen years. Then, until their death, they remained with their other children. They were the parents of five children, four of whom are still living-Ole, of Wisconsin; Elev, our subject; Peter, now deceased; Marthe, now Mrs. A. Oleson, of Wisconsin; and Bertha, the wife of O. Gunderson, also of Wisconsin.

Mr. Otterness, the subject of this biography, remained at home in his native land until he had attained the age of eighteen years, during which time he attended school, early instituting into his mind those principles of industry, integrity and economy which so distinguish the nationality he represents. He then entered an apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade, at which he worked for four years. In 1845 he emigrated to the United States and settled in Dane county, Wisconsin, where he worked out among the farmers for one years, in order to repay the money he had used in his passage to this county. The second year he worked among the farming community, during which time he received from 50 to 75 cents a day for his work. At the expiration of that time he removed to Columbia county, Wisconsin, where he settled on a farm, and for eighteen years devoted his attention to general farming and stock-raising operations. In 1865 Mr. Otterness removed to Goodhue county, Minnesota, and purchased a farm of 160 acres in Wanamingo township, and after living there for nine years went to Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he had purchased a farm of 400 acres previously. He remained there three years, and at the expiration of that time went to Dover township, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he bought a farm of 400 acres, where he lived, engaged in a successful farming and stock-raising business, for a period of seven years. In 1884 he removed into Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he has since remained, leading a retired life. He has a fine residence, surrounded by a beautiful grove of trees, and has two city lots, located in the best portion of the city. He has held many offices in the different localities in which he has lived, including supervisor and school trustee while in Wisconsin, and since in Minnesota has been supervisor, county commissioner, member of the school board, city councilman and supervisor.

Mr. Otterness was married in 1847 to Miss Johanna Bottelson, the daughter of Christenson and Randa (Johnson) Bottelson, natives of Norway. This union has been blessed with the following children-Bautwell, who married Miss Oleson and now has three living children-Elif, Alma and Olena;

Annie, now Mrs. Larson, of OtterTail county, Minnesota, and the mother of seven children-Ellen, Rosa, Josephina, Charles, Leonard, Arthur and William; Petrina, now the wife of L. A. Vik, the assistant cashier of Willmar Bank; Christian, who married Miss Helmer, and has been blessed with three children-Elanor, Alphia and Eliza; John; Martin; George and Robert.

Our subject is a republican in his political affiliations, and is actively interest in all local matters. He and his family belong to the Lutheran church, and he is trustee of the Lutheran Seminary. He is actively interested in all church and educational matters, and has subscribed liberally to all such enterprises. He is a strong temperance advocate, although he does not accept the principles which govern the third party. He is a citizen highly esteemed by all, and is a man of the strictest integrity and honor, his word being considered as good as a bond.


 Otterness, Martin

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907), page 308, rll

 

OTTERNESS, Martin, Minneapolis. Res 2403 Fillmore st N. E. office 2401 Central av. Banker. Born April 28, 1867 in Goodhue county, Minn., son of Elef O. and Johanna (Lee) Otterness. Married June 10, 1896 to Ella L. Mantor. Moved to Kandiyohi county. educated in common and high schools and Willmar Seminary. Employed as bkpr in Kandiyohi county; Bank at Willmar 1888-96; engaged in mercantile business Willmar 1896-99; employed in banking business 1899-1905; moved to Minneapolis 1905 and became cashr Central Av Bank, which position he has held to date. Member of K of P.


Peterson, Daniel & Son

Illustrated Album Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions. page 548-549, rll

D. Peterson & Son, the heaviest dealers in general merchandise in the village of New London, Minnesota, are rated as one of the most solid and substantial firms of Kandiyohi county. They are men of high personal character and of the strictest integrity, and their straightforward and honorable methods of doing business have built for them a large and increasing trade.

Daniel Peterson, the senior member of this firm, was born on the 17th of December, 1822, at Vexio, Province of Smoland, in the southern part of Sweden, and is a son of Peter and Stina Peterson, who were also natives of the same kingdom. Both of his parents died in his native land, the father in 1840 and the mother in 1852. Daniel Peterson grew to manhood in the land of his birth, receiving the same training as to integrity, frugality and industry that so characterizes his nationality. He never attended school, but studied under the direction of his mother. In 1853 he came to the United States, landing in New York, and proceeded at once to Centre City, Chisago county, Minnesota. There he bought 160 acres of land and engaged in farming, remaining there for eighteen years. In 1871 he removed to Crow Lake, Stearns county, Minnesota, where he also followed agricultural pursuits. In 1883 he sold his land, and in company with his son, John G., formed the present firm, and they purchase the general mercantile business of J. H. Neer, at New London, which they have since successfully conducted.

Daniel Peterson was married September 5, 1846, to Anna Stina Johnson, a native of Sweden and a daughter of John Anderson. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have a family of six children-Louise, born in Sweden December 29, 1847; Christine, born in Minnesota March 29, 1855; Charlotte S., born August 27, 1857; John G., born October 21, 1860; Mary H., born July 12, 1862, and Nancy M., born March 1, 1865. Daniel Peterson has always taken a prominent part in all public matters and is one of the leading men of the locality in which he has lived. He has held various official positions, including assessor, supervisor, postmaster, census enumerator in 1880, besides others. He and his family are members of the Lutheran church, in which organization he is a deacon.

John G. Peterson, the junior member of the firm of D. Peterson & Son, was born in Centre City, Chisago county, Minnesota, October 21, 1860, and is a son of Daniel Peterson, whose sketch has just been given. He received his education in Chisago and Stearns counties, Minnesota, attending the district schools, and completed his education at the Cogan Academy, Pope county, Minnesota, spending one year in that institution. He then clerked in a store at Melrose for a time, after which he came to New London, Minnesota, and for eight months kept books for Johnson Bros. In 1883, as has been stated, the present firm was formed, and since that time they carried on business. They carry a full line of clothing, dry goods and groceries, and do an extensive business.

John G. Peterson has taken an active part in every move calculated to benefit his town or county, and has held various offices-he was justice of the peace, chairman of the board of supervisors, and is the present township clerk.


Peterson, L. J.
Source: The Illustrated History of Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, Victor E. Lawson and J. Emil Nelson, 1905; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

LAKE LILLIAN TOWNSHIP
L. J. PETERSON. Lars J. Peterson was born in Mockfjard. Dalarne, Sweden, Sept. 25, 1860. His parents were John Peterson, born March 30, 1821, and Karin Peterson, born March 22, 1826, both natives of Mockfjard. In 1869 the family came to this country, landing in New York July 3d of that year. They came to Tripolis, where they spent the first three months, then they moved to the old Norlander farm in Fahlun, where they spent the winter. In the spring they settled on a homestead in town of lake Lillian. Here L. J. Peterson grew to manhood, assisting with the farm work, and attending the common school at intervals between the work. When he had reached manhood he bought some land and settled down to farming, in which he has been very successful. He gradually bought more land near his farm, and in 1897 he bought the Willie Salander farm. The home farm comprises the following tracts of land: SW1/4 NE1/4 lots 1, 2 and 3. NE1/2 SE1/4 section 19. The Salander farm includes E1/2 SW1/4 section 19, and N1/2 NW1/4 section 30, all in town of Lake Lillian, a total of 480 acres. The land is devoted to raising wheat and stock. About 275 acres are under cultivation. There is a dwelling house, barn and granary on each farm. The home farm is on Olivia free delivery route no. 2 and on the Kandiyohi Telephone Company's line. It is twelve miles from Olivia and seventeen miles from Willmar. Distance to school, one and three-fourths miles.

Mr. Peterson has served as clerk of the school district in which he lives about ten years, and has been a member of the town board of supervisors for six years. He is public spirited and stands well in the community.

 

On Sept. 26, 1884, at Willmar, Minn., Mr. Peterson was married to Miss Anna Hanson of Lake Lillian. Miss Hanson was born on Feb. 14, 1866, in the same parish from which Mr. Peterson came. Her parents were Peter Hanson, born Dec. 24, 1832, and Karin Hanson, born May 20, 1840, both of Mockfjard parish. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Peterson: Oscar, aged 18; Rhoda J., aged 14; Elvin T., aged 10; Ernest B., aged 5; Fred W., aged 1. All are still living at home.


Quam, Nels

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 658-659, rll

Hon. Nels Quam, the subject of our present article, is the representative from Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. He well deserves appropriate mention in a work devoted to the prominent men of Northern Minnesota, as he is one of the leading republicans in the county in which he lives, and is highly esteemed both as a man and exemplary citizen. He is a native of Minnesota, but as his parent were born in Norway he springs from the same race which has furnished the Northwest with so many of its most valuable citizens-a race proverbial for integrity, frugality and economy. The parents of our subject were John Nelson and Anna (Thompson) Quam, who were married in Norway in 1852. They came to America in 1854, landing at Quebec, and proceeding at once to Koskenong, Wisconsin. There they carried on a farm and remained until 1856, when they came to Minnesota, and the father took a pre-emption in Havana township, Steel county, where Nels, our subject, first saw the light. In 1878 the father sold out and removed to Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he purchased a farm in Lake Andrew township, where they still reside. The parents had a family of eleven children, only five of whom, however, are now living.

Nels Quam, whose name heads this article, was born February 16, 1859, in Havana, Steele county, Minnesota, as above indicated. He spent his boyhood there, at work on the home farm, and his educational advantages were limited until after he had attained the age of eighteen years. After that period he attended school for two years in Minneapolis, and extensive reading has ripened his knowledge so that he is a well-read and well-posted man on all public questions. He has since lived on the home farm, and had general charge of the business.He has always taken an active and prominent part in all public matters, and is one of the leading citizens in the locality in which he lives. He has held various local positions and in 1888 was elected to represent Kandiyohi county in the house of representatives, by a large majority, and is now filling that position with ability. He was the principal factor in organizing the local Farmer's Insurance Company at his home and is president of the same. he is also president of the Farmer's Alliance.

Nels Quam was married on the 12th of October, 1879, to Anna Augusta Mankel, and they are the parents of five children as follows-Andrew, William Edward, Stella and Oscar. Mrs. Quam was born at Northfield, Minnesota, December 24, 1863.


Railson, Andrew
Source: History of the Scandinavians and Successful Scandinavians in the United States, Volumes I & II (1900) submitted by cd

Railson, Andrew, state senator-Norway Lake-born 16 Aug., 1833, in Sigdal, Kristiania stift, Norway. He emigrated to this country at the age of seventeen; worked in the pineries and at other common labor in Green county, Wis. for about five years; visited his native country, and on his return located in Stillwater, Minn., working in the saw mills for a couple of years; then took a claim in Kandiyohi county, being one of the earliest settlers in this part of the country. At the time of the terrible Sioux Indian outbreak, in 1862, Andrew and his brother Even were among the bravest defenders of life and property; but nevertheless they were driven away from their homes by the fierce Redskins, and did not return until 1865. He has been county treasurer of Kandiyohi county for five years; was receiver of the U. S. land office at Redwood Falls from 1884-87; represented his district in the state legislature in 1871; served in the state senate during the sessions of 1872-73, and has held various local offices. Andrew Railson, Jonas Lindall of Chisago county, and Ole Peterson of Pope county were the first Scandinavians who were elected state senators in Minnesota; but many other Northmen, how-ever, had served in the lower branch of the legislature ever since the state constitution was adopted, in 1857. Railson was again elected to the state legislature in 1892. In 1860 he was married to Bertha Johnson. They have children.


Railson, Andrew (2)

Illustrated Album Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions. page 684-685, rll

Hon. Andrew Railson, the subject of our present article, is one of the most prominent citizens in the central portion of Minnesota, being a resident of section 9, Lake Andrew township, Kandiyohi county. His name is indissolubly associated with the history of the county in which he lives, as he was one of its early settlers and has filled many important public offices. He took a prominent part here during the Indian outbreak of 1862, and is one of the survivors of that memorable time.

Mr. Railson was born in Sigdal, in the central part of Norway, August 16, 1833, and is a son of Reinef and Christine Railson. The mother died during the same year in which our subject was born. Later the father was again married, and in 1849 came to the United States.

Andrew Railson, whose name heads this sketch, spent his boyhood days and was educated in the land of his birth, receiving the same training as to industry and integrity which is so characteristic of the race from which he springs. At the age of seventeen, in 1850, Andrew came to the United States, and went at once to Green county, Wisconsin. He remained about five years, working in the pineries and at various other occupation's, and at the expiration of that time, returned to his native land, remaining there nine months. In 1856 he again came to the United States and settled at Stillwater, Minnesota, where he remained for two years at work in the saw mils. At the expiration of that time, in 1858, he went to Monongala count, Minnesota, now the north half of Kandiyohi county, in company with his brother Even. They each pre-empted 160 acres of land, on which they still live, and named the lake near by Norway Lake, which name it still bears. They were among the earliest settles in that region, and during pioneer days they underwent many hardships and disadvantages. In 1862 the terrible Sioux Indian outbreak occurred, and this region was in the heart of the hostile Indian country. A great many were killed through here, and the pioneers lost a great deal through the Indians burning buildings, running off stock, etc. Andrew Railson, together with his brother Even and others, buried the Broberg and Lundberg families, the victims of the New Sweden massacre. Upon the beginning of the outbreak all the settlers went to Paynesville, and our subject and his brother joined the volunteers, and participated in the movements against the Indians form St. Cloud, under Captain Freeman, who was afterward killed by the redskins.

In 1865 our subject returned to his land, and after living alone through the winter was then joined by his family. This has since been their home.

Mr. Railson was married in 1860 to Bertha Johnson, a native of Norway, and they now have five children-Robert, Maria, Edwin, Anna and Ida.

Mr. Railson has always taken a very active and prominent part in all matters of a public nature. He represented his district in the lower house of the Minnesota Legislature during the session of 1871, and was State senator during 1872 and 1873. He was one of the most influential members of that body, and was prominently identified with some of the most important legislation in the history of the State. He then served for five years as county treasurer of Kandiyohi county, and was mail agent on the Manitoba Railway, between St. Paul and Breckenridge, for about five years. In 1884 he was appointed receiver of the United States land office at Redwood Falls, and served until January, 1887. He served in every position with ability, and his official career as well as his private life has been unsullied. He is a man of the strictest integrity, and stands high  both as a man and as an exemplary citizen.

In political matters our subject is a stanch republican, and in religious views a Lutheran.

Ramsett, Henry J. 

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907), page 335, rll

 

Ramsett, Henry J., Willmar. Clerk district court. Born May 16, 1859 in Bad Axe Wis, son of S. K. and Bertha (Johnson) Ramsett. Attended graded schools Viroqua Wis. and Curtiss Business College St. Paul. Taught school Kandiyohi county Minn; asst postmaster Willmar Minn; justice of the peace, recorder, alderman and city treas. Willmar; dep. county auditor and clk district court Kandiyohi county Minn.


Riese, O, E.
Source: Warren Sheaf (MN) January 12, 1881; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

 

Biographical Sketch of the Officers of the Senate.
ASSISTANT SERGEANT-AT-ARMS.

O. E. Reise, Norway Lake, Kandiyohi county, single, farmer, age 30, born in Norway, settled in Minnesota in 1867, and served as assistant sergeant-at-arms in the house in 1877.


Roise, Paul H.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 644-645, rll

Paul H. Roise. The subject of this biographical memoir is a resident of the city of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he is engaged in a general merchandising business, in partnership with Hans J. Dale, whose biography will be found in another department of this work. Mr. Roise is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born on the 21 day of August , 1848, and is the son of Halvor and Anna M. (Jenson) Roise, also natives of Norway. The father was engaged in the farming, lumbering, and milling business, and was one of Norway's wealthy men. He retired from active life in 1872, and passed away in 1884. The mother is still living. They were the parents of the seven following-named children-David, Gunhild, now Mrs. Davidson of Swift county, Minnesota; John, Paul H., Ole, Edward and Maren E., now Mrs. Melby of Norway. All are in Norway except our subject and one sister.

Mr. Roise, of whom this article treats, remained at home, and attended the excellent schools of his native land until he had attained the age of seventeen years. He then emigrated to United States, and settled in Wisconsin, where he attended the high school at Sparta for some time and then engaged a position as clerk with O. D. Randall, with whom he remained eight years. At the expiration of that time, in 1874, he removed to Minnesota and located in Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he entered into partnership with Mr. Dale in the drug and grocery business. After continuing that business for ten years they established their present general merchandise business, and have since been engaged in a large and increasing trade.In 1881 they erected their present brick building, one of the finest in the place, in which they have carried on business ever since. They have a large patronage throughout Pope, Swift, Renville, Chippewa and Kandiyohi counties and are doing the heaviest business of any firm in the city.

Mr. Roise was united in marriage in 1873, to Miss Olena Amundson, and this union has been blessed with the following-named children-Hilder A., Petra O., Mena J. and Edward O. In political matters Mr. Roise is an adherent to the principles of the republican party and is actively interested in that party's campaigns. He is a public-spirited citizen and any laudable home enterprise receives his hearty support.


Sather, Andrew O.

Illustrated Album Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions. page 669, rll

Andrew O. Sather, of the firm of Larson & Co., general merchants of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, is a native of Norway. He was born in 1848, and is the son of Ole and Johannah (Otterson) Sather, also natives of that kingdom. The father, who was a blacksmith by trade, emigrated to the United States in 1852, with his family, and located in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, where he followed his trade until 1854, when he removed to Pierce county, Wisconsin, where he is still residing, engaged in farming.

Mr. Sather, of whom this sketch treats, emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1852. He remained at home, attending the common schools until he was seventeen years old, when he entered the public school at Hudson, Wisconsin, and after remaining one term engaged in the profession of a school teacher, which vocation he followed for two years. At the expiration of that time he entered the high school at River Falls, Wisconsin, and after leaving there again engaged in school teaching. In 1870 he went to Winona and entered upon a course in the normal school, from which he graduated in 1872. Then, after teaching for two years, he took a business course at the Curtis Business College in Minneapolis, graduating in 1875. In 1877 he was married to Miss Carrie A. Anderson, of Martell, Wisconsin, and removed to Cannon Falls, Minnesota. After remaining there for six months, engaged in the mercantile business, in 1884 his store was destroyed by fire, and he came to Willmar and became and became a member of the above-mentioned firm.


Snicker, John

History of the Minnesota Valley, Including the Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neil, page 847, rll

John Snicker, who is a native of Sweden, born in 1829, was brought up on a farm; in 1873 immigrated to Kandiyohi county, Minnesota; since 1874 his home has been in the town of Winfield. Mr. Snicker's wife, Anna Erickson, was born in Sweden; their marriage occurred in 1853; eight of their twelve children are living: Anna, John, Christina, Andrew, Betsy, Ida, Selma and George


Sperry, Albert H.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 618-619, rll

 

Albert H. Sperry, the subject of this article, is a resident of the city of Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he is engaged in the machinery business, also dealing in live stock, in partnership with his brother Berton W., whose biographical memoir will be found in another department of this album. Mr. Sperry is one of the pioneers of the county, having settled there in 1858, coming from Le Sueur to Harrison township, Kandiyohi county, where he took 160 acres of land and engaged in farming. He has been a resident of Willmar since 1880, when he removed form his farm into the city, where he has since remained, engaged in business in partnership with his brother. He is a native of New York State, born in Livingston county, New York, on the 14th day of December, 1840, and is the son of Jeremiah and Jerushia (Osborn) Sperry, natives of New Haven and Hartford, Connecticut, respectively. The father removed to Michigan in 1840 and to Minnesota in 1857, located in Kandiyohi county. He remained there until the Indian outbreak in 1862, when he, with other settlers, had to flee for their lives. The father was in two engagements, in Meeker county, with the Indians, and very nearly lost his life by being cut off from the wagon train. The mother was so frightened, and also on account of exposure, she died the year following in Minneapolis, Minnesota. After the second day's fight at Forest City the father left to meet his family that had gone on ahead, with the exception of our subject and his brother, who enlisted in the State militia, and were in active service of about one hundred days. Our subject was in a four-day's running conflict in Meeker and McLeod counties, and after the trouble had been quelled, he joined his parents and family in Minneapolis, where he engaged in the carpenter's trade, helping to construct the saw-mils at St. Anthony Falls. He remained there until 1863, when he enlisted int he First Battalion, Minnesota Cavalry, better known as Hatch's Battalion. He was in the service three years, in Dakota, and was first stationed at Pembia, where they built the fort. At the close of the service he returned to the old homestead in Kandiyohi county, and engaged in farming, buying the homestead from his father, and also adjoining lands. He owned a fine farm of 400 acres, and in 1876 established a store in the village which he ran for four years. In 1880 he removed into Willmar, and engaged int he stock and meat business, doing a heavy shipping business. He is also engaged in the machinery business, handling all kinds of agricultural implements, etc. He has been president of the county agricultural society since 1886.


Mr. Sperry was united in marriage in 1867 to Miss Ellen Tracy, the daughter of John and Catherine Tracy, natives of Vermont. Mr. and Mrs. Sperry have been blessed with six children, three of whom are now living, named as follows-Roy, Charles and Jennie. Mrs. Sperry passed away in the spring of 1883. She was a devoted member of the Baptist church, and was esteemed and beloved by all who knew her. Our subject was married, a second time, to Miss Jennie Wilson, and they have been blessed with two children-Walter, and Bernice, who died a year ago. Mr. Sperry is independent in his political ideas, and is actively interested in all local matters. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic. He is a citizen of the strictest honor and integrity and is highly esteemed by all who know him. He is a public spirited citizen and one of the Representative business men of the city.

Sperry, Berton W.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 522-523, rll

Berton W. Sperry, of the firm of Sperry Brothers, dealers in stock, meat, and agricultural implements, in Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, is one of the most prominent and respected citizens of the city. He is a native of Michigan, born in Amboy, Hillsdale county, on the 19th day of August, 1843, and is the son of Jeremiah and Jerusha Sperry. The father was born in New Haven, Connecticut, April 4, 1802. He remained there until about 1824, when he was married and removed to Livingston county, New York. There  he followed the cooper's trade and also farming until 1840, when he removed to Michigan. In 1857 he settled in Kandiyohi county, Minnesota.

He was a stanch democrat throughout his life and supported Andrew Jackson for President. The father met his death from an injury received at a political convention held at New London, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. He was in a heated discussion with a man about thirty-five years of age, and, without warning, the man struck and kicked him. It threw him into a fit of apoplexy from which he never recovered, not speaking after the injury was inflicted, and died about August 15, 1870. The mother died May 21, 1862, from the effects of exposure in escaping from the Indians in 1862.

Our subject removed with his parents to Kandiyohi county, Minnesota; where he remained on the farm, utill the Indian outbreak in 1862. Then they were driven away by the Indians, and went to Forest City, Minnesota, where our subject joined a band of old settlers, who returned to their homes to recover what the Indians had not destroyed. While at their home the Indians intercepted their retreat, and the settlers, hastily gathering up the most valuable household goods, returned in a roundabout way. While they were gone the soldiers at the fort, learning that the Indians had come between the party and Forest City, supposed them murdered and sent out a scouting party, which was repulsed by the Indians. In the fall of 1863, after the outbreak had subsided, our subject attended school at Elk River, and then enlisted in the quartermaster's department, and went South to  the front, where he remained six months. In the spring of 1867 he joined a band or train of 120 men, 40 families, and 67 wagons, and went across the plains, and settled in Jefferson Valley, Madison county, Montana, where our subject engaged in mining and stock-raising, at which he was moderately successful.In 1876 he returned on a visit, and again went back to Montana. where he remained until 1880. Then he went to Hamilton county, Iowa, where he was united in marriage to Miss Ada A. Wydeck, the daughter of Ryle Wydeck, and then removed to Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, where he purchased an interest with his brother in their present business. They are among the prominent and successful merchants of the city and are doing a heavy business.

Mr. and Mrs. Sperry have been blessed with three children-Ernest, Nellie and Mason. Our subject is now assistant chief of the fire department, which position he has held for two years. He has been president of the school board for the past four years, and is a democrat in his political affiliations. He is a man of the strictest integrity and honor, and is highly esteemed by all who know him. He is a business man of sterling qualification and is actively interested in all local matters, whereby the city or county, may derive benefit. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, holding membership with Sharon Lodge, No. 104, and has filled all the principal offices in the lodge.


Spicer, John M.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 596-598, rll

John M. Spicer. The subject of the present article, president of the Willmar & Sioux Falls Railway, is one of the most prominent men in Central Minnesota. No man has done more than has he to aid in the growth and development of the State, and none have been more prominently identified with the history of its progress. A man of large ideas, intelligent, enterprising and liberal, he has been foremost in every project to advance the interests of the State and county of his house.

Mr. Spicer was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, December 9, 1841, and is a son of John and Mary (Maguire) Spicer, who were natives of Switzerland and Washington, District of Columbia, respectively. The father was brought to America by his parents when he was an infant, and they settled at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood,and subsequently engaged in the mercantile business. In 1852 he came West with his family and located at Polo, Illinois, where he lived a practically retired life until his death, which occurred in 1867. The mother died in 1886. The parents had a family of nine children, eight of whom are still living.

John M. Spicer, whose name heads our present article, grew to manhood and received his education in Illinois. In 1860 he went to St. Paul, Minnesota, where for ten years he was employed at clerking. At the expiration of that time he went to Belle Plaine, Scott county Minnesota, where he engaged in the mercantile business and remained two years. In 1871 he removed to Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, which place has since been his home. He has been engaged in the mercantile business, as well as every important project, have felt the influence of his energy, perseverance and enterprise. He has prominently identified himself with county and State matters, purchasing a vast amount of property, including interests in St. Paul, Minneapolis, Sioux Falls and other cities and towns. He erected the bank building on the corner of Fifth street and Pacific avenue; a brick store building on Sixth and Pacific avenue, as well as the brick block where he has his office Willmar. His residence on Nelson avenue is one of the finest in the city, and the grounds, which include some six acres, are beautified by shade and ornamental trees. He has at all times been closely identified with real estate matters, and has probably done more to aid in the settlement and development of Kandiyohi county than any other man.

Mr. Spicer was the originator of the St. Cloud & Willmar Railroad, and the preliminary work as to its organization and construction fell upon him. He served as its president for some time. He was also the founder of the Willmar and Sioux Falls Railway, and has been president of that corporation ever since its organization. He was also the founder and is the president of the Willmar & Sioux Falls Townsite Company. The capital stock of this corporation is $150,000, all of which is paid in. They own town sites all the way from Willmar to Sioux Falls, including valuable quarries and other important plants. It may be of interest to state that one of these towns was named after Mr. Spicer. It is located on the banks of Green lake, on the line of the St. Cloud & Willmar Railway.

In political matters Mr. Spicer is a democrat and one of the most prominent members of that party in the State. He was a delegate from Minnesota to the National Convention at Chicago in 1884, and also to the St. Louis Convention in 1884, and also to the St. Louis Convention in 1888. He has always taken an active interest in local and educational affairs, and has served as president of the city council, president of the board of education, etc. He is an honored member of the Masonic fraternity.

Mr. Spicer is a self-made man in every sense of the word. His possessions, which are estimated at from $300,000 to $400,000, are all the results of his own efforts, as he began life a poor boy. He is a man of iron determination and he recognized no such thing as defeat when once he undertakes an enterprise. The successful consummation of the gigantic projects which he has inaugurated demonstrate the characteristics of the man. We would have been pleased to have given a detailed account of the building an organization of the railroads with which he has been so intimately associated, but as he is a man who is loth to talk of his own undertakings, the writer has been confined almost wholly to those facts which are public knowledge.

Mr. Spicer was married in 1869 to Miss Francis Deming, and they are the parents of seven children-Agnes, Amy M., Mason W., Russell P., Jessie I., Ruth and Raymond. The three oldest have been attending St. Mary's Hall and Shattuck School,Episcopal institutions at Faribault, for the past three years.


Stanford, Ralph Waldo

Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907), page 375-376, rll

 

Stanford Ralph Waldo, Willmar. Lawyer. Born June 6, 1879, in Kandiyohi county Minn., son of Edward M. and Mary (Adams) Stanford. Reared on a farm: attended public schools; St. Cloud Normal School 1895-96; taught country schools 1896-97; attended Willmar High School 1897-98; graduated 1898; graduated from law dept. U of M 1902. Law partner of Ludwig Arctander Minneapolis 1902-1906; removed to Willmar Minn. 1906. Sec. and treas. C. W. Dressler & Co. Minneapolis; v pres. North American Life Assn. Minneapolis. See State Central Committee Peoples party 1899-1903.


Svenson, Peter

A History of The Swedish-Americans of Minnesota, compiled by A. E. Strand, Vol. II, page 372, rll

 

Peter Svenson from Algutsboda, Kronoberg's Lan, arrived in Knoxville, Illinois, in 1852. Also he had read the article by Norberg and by the same was induced to emigrate. Accompanied by six other Swedes, he came to St. Paul, thence he went to Carver and St. Peter, finding that part of the country wild and entirely unsettled, he returned to St. Paul, whence he went to Chisago Lake, settling to the east of that water.


Thorpe, Lars O.
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis, The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Lars O. Thorpe, cashier at the Kandiyohi County Bank at Willmar, is a type of successful Scandinavian-American settlers frequently found in the state of Minnesota. He was horn in Vikor Parish, Hardanger, Norway, on December 24, 1847. His father, Ole Thorpe, was a teacher in the common schools and owned a small farm. He was in moderate circumstances. His wife was Miss Britha Skaare. Both were well connected and religious people. Young Lars attended the common school near his home for a few months, but after his father's death, when he was but five years old, he received little schooling. His stepfather owned a freighting vessel, and Lars made several trips as cook on this ship. For three years he was employed on a fishing vessel. When seventeen years of age the poor prospects for the future suggested to the young man immigration to America, and, with the help of his step-father and his own little savings, he managed to come as far as Detroit, Michigan. From that point a fellow passenger assisted him to Sharon, Wisconsin. Here Mr. Thorpe worked on farms and attended the common schools for about three months during the succeeding winter. In the spring of 1865 he came to Winona and worked in a planing mill and later on a farm. The next winter he went to Dodge County, and was employed as teacher in a parochial school. In the following spring he followed a company of land hunters, and traveled with oxen and covered wagons along the Minnesota river as far as Chippewa County, where they settled. He returned to Dodge County during that summer, and in the fall of 1867 left for Norway to fulfill a promise given his parents, that he would return in four years. In the spring of 1868 he returned to America with a brother and sister, and they all located in Dodge County. The next year found Mr. Thorpe contracting for railroad work in Meeker County, and in the same summer he located a homestead in Kandiyohi County. At this time he concluded to learn the printers trade and came to Minneapolis and commenced type setting on the Nordisk Folkehlad. But printing did not agree with his health, and he accepted an offer from A. J. Clark, who had just established the Kandiyohi Reveille, and went to Kandiyohi County in the spring of 1871. In the fall of that year the county seat was established at Willmar, Mr. Clark's paper suspended and Mr. Thorpe was thrown out of employment. He located on a farm in Dovre, Kandiyohi County, and tried to combine farming in a small way with teaching and the duties of Justice of the Peace and Town Clerk. In 1875 he was elected Register of Deeds of the county, which office he held for three terms. In 1881 the directors of the Kandiyohi County Bank tendered Mr. Thorpe the position of cashier. He accepted the offer and has occupied the position ever since. During the next year the Willmar Seminary was established and Mr. Thorpe took an active part in putting the institution on its feet. As a member of the republican party Mr. Thorpe has taken an active part in the county and state elections. He was presidential elector in 1884 and was elected state senator in 1894. He has held numerous local offices. As a member of the Lutheran Synod, he has been a member of several important committees, and is now alternate for the member-at-large of the Church Council. One of Mr. Thorpe's hobbies has been practical temperance work. On June 6, 1870, he was married to Martha Qvale, of Dodge County. They have had nine children. Six are now living, Dorothea, now Mrs. J. O. Estreem, of New London; Edward Lawrence, Christian Scriver, Edith Beatrice, Jane Olea, Bertha Herborg.


Thorpe, Lars O. (2)

Little Sketches of Big Folks, Minnesota 1907, page 396, rll

Thorpe Lars O, Willmar. Banker. Born Dec 24, 1847 in Norway, son of Ole T. and Brita (Skaare) Thorpe. Married June 6, 1870 to Martha Quale. Farmer from 1871 to 1875; register of deeds 1876-82; cashr Kandiyohi County Bank of Willmar 1881 to date. Pres Willmar Seminary; Aitkin Farm Land Co; and Eureka Coal and Brick Co Ltd. State Senator 12 years; delegate to state and national conventions; presidential elector.


Wiggins, John H.

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 691-692 rll

 

John H. Wiggins of the firm of Williams Brothers & Company, prominent millers of Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, is a resident of Willmar, where he is engaged in the milling business with the above-named firm, being the company of the same. He is a native of Prince Edward Island, born in 1850, and is the son of James and Eleanor (Green) Wiggins, natives of Grand Lake, New Brunswick, Canada, and Prince Edward Island, respectively. Early in life the father was a house carpenter by trade, then followed farming and later in life engaged in the lumbering and milling business in Prince Edward Island, in the village of Albeton. The mother died in 1883, and the father is now retired from active live. They were the parents of ten children, the following-named being the only ones now living-Virgenia, the wife of T. F. Walker; Sarah, now Mrs. Wright; Elizabeth, who married J. French; John H. and Samuel H.

John H. Wiggins, the subject of this article, remained in his native island until he was twenty-one. During that time he had attended school in the winters and in the summers assisted his father operate the home farm. At the age of majority he commenced in life for himself, and for the succeeding five years followed agricultural pursuits. At the expiration of that time he entered the milling business in partnership with his father and brother but after three years they were burned out, losing all he had.

Our subject had to commence at the foot of the ladder once more. He now spent two years working in a machine shop on his native island, then went to New York City, where he secured a position in a machine shop, where he worked for one year. Then, in 1880, he removed westward and settled in Kerkhoven, Swift county, Minnesota, where he remained for a period of five years, engaged in elevator work. In 1885, in partnership with William Brothers, he purchased a custom mill at Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. After three months the mill was destroyed by fire, and they purchased several lots and erected their present mill. It is one of the finest in the county, and they are doing a heavy local and shipping business. They employ five men, and are among the prominent and leading millers in that part of the State.

Mr. Wiggins, of whom this article treats, was united in marriage in 1870 to Miss Sarah D. Williams, a native of Prince Edward Island, and the daughter of William S. and Charlotte (Greene) Williams, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Wiggins in this union have blessed with one child-William D. In his political affiliations Mr.Wiggins is an adherent to the principles of the republican party. He is a member of the Ancient Order of Unite Workmen. He has a fine residence on Benson avenue, surrounded with beautiful evergreen and shade trees. In all public matters, whether political or local, Mr. Wiggins is actively and prominently identified with them, always giving his support to any laudable enterprise. He is an exemplary citizen, and is highly esteemed and respected by all who knew him.


William's Brothers

Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 652-653, rll

Williams Brothers, of the firm of Williams Brothers & Company, proprietors of the roller flouring mills in Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, are among the most prominent and leading business men of that place.

John Williams, the senior member of the firm, has been a resident of Willmar since 1879, and has been engaged in milling, contracting and building throughout the Northwest. He has been connected with the present mill since it was built in 1885. Mr. Williams is a native of Prince Edward Island, born in 1853, and is the son of William S. and Charlotte (Green) Williams, natives of England and Prince Edward Island, respectively. The father is living in Willmar, where he is engaged in contracting and building. The mother died in 1883. They were the parents of six children, five of whom are now living, named as follows-Eliza, Mrs. Gould; Sarah, now the wife of J. H. Wiggns; John, Benjamin and Joseph. John Williams, the subject of this biographical memoir, received his education in the common schools, and after leaving he school-room engaged in the contracting and building business. He has gradually worked into the milling industry, until now he is one of the most efficient millers in his county. in 1879 he settled in Willmar, where he has since remained, engaged in contracting, building and milling. Mr. Williams was united in marriage in 1875 to Miss Maggie Sharp, the daughter of James Sharp, and this union has been blessed with four children, named as follows-Laura E., Zilpha B., Harry B. and Ethel B. Our subject is a republican in his political affiliations, and is one of he prominent and representative business men of the city. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd-Fellows, and also the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is alderman form the Second Ward, and is actively interested in all local movements.

Benjamin Williams, the subject of this biographical review, is a member of the firm of William Brothers & Company, proprietors of the Willmar Roller Mills, at Willmar, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota, and a brother of John Williams, whose sketch precedes the present memoir. He is also a native of Prince Edward Island, and is the son of William S. and Charlotte (Green) Williams. Benjamin Williams received his education on his native island, and in 1885 engaged in the milling business in Willmar. The mill is doing a heavy business, and is one of the largest in the county, four stories high, 30x40 feet in size, engine room 20x30 feet in size, one story, and an addition 14x46. Mr. Williams, our subject, has a fine residence on Litchfield avenue, and is one of the leading and most substantial citizens of the place. Mr. Williams was married to Miss Harriet Tanton, the daughter of George Tanton, of Prince Edward Island. In this union Mr. and Mr.s Williams have been blessed with the following-named children-George, Mabel F. and Albert I., deceased. In political matters our subject is an adherent to the principles which govern the republican party. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd-Fellows, and also belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a public-spirited citizen, and any laudable home enterprise received his hearty support and encouragement.


Woolson, L. B.
Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and Park Regions, page 713-714, rll

 

Dr. L. B. Woolson, who will from the subject of our present article, is the leading physician of Atwater, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. He is an old settler of that place, having been prominently identified with its business interests and his name in indissolubly associated with its history. A kindly, genial gentleman, a man of high character and integrity, and a skillful physician, he is highly esteemed both professionally and as an exemplary citizen.

 

Dr. Woolson was born in Plainfield, Washington county, Vermont, on the 7th of September, 1812, and is a son of Charles R. and Susana (Bancroft) Woolson. His mother came from one of the most intellectual and noted families known to American genealogy, being a niece of the historian, George Bancroft. The father of our subject was drum-major of a regiment during the War of 1812, and participated in the battle of Plattsburg.  Charles R. Woolson and wife were the parents of ten children-Preston, Fannie, George (all of whom died in childhood), Ephraim, Moses, Sarah (died April 11, 1888, aged ninety-one), Gardner, Albina, Loina and George. The father moved to Vernon, Oneida county, New York, in 1816, where the family was raised and educated.

 

Dr. Woolson, whose name heads our present article, was raised and educated in Syracuse, New York. He received an excellent education, attending the common schools and taking a course at the high school in that city. He then took a thorough and practical course of reading in medicine at Fayetteville, New York, In 1856 he came to the then Territory of Minnesota, landing at the village of St. Paul on the 12th of March. He went to Shakopee, where he remained two months and then settled at Belle Plaine, Scott county, Minnesota. There he kept the old Basswood Hotel, and took an active and prominent part in the development of that locality, remaining there until 1871. During that year he came to Atwater, Kandiyohi county, where he has since lived. He has practiced medicine continuously since his settlement here, and in 1876 opened a drug store, which he ran in connection until it was destroyed by fire in May, 1888. The doctor is a republican in political matters. He is still hale and hearty, having borne well the brunt of life's battles, and after a long life of usefulness and uncommon activity is spending his declining years, enjoying, in the fullest sense, the esteem and regard of all who know him.

 

The doctor was married on the 22d of June, 1835, to Miss Annie Downie, of Esperence, New York. She died March 31, 1888, aged seventy-one years.


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