Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota

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Leonard B. Sage
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Susan Geist

Leonard B. Sage, a well-known and progressive hardware merchant at Dawson, is a native of Wisconsin, born at Fall River, that state, July 2, 1867, son of Solomon B. and Addie C. (Dunn) Sage, the former of whom was born at Rutland, Vermont, and the latter at Lockport, New York. Solomon B. Sage, now deceased, was a substantial farmer in the Fall River neighborhood, where his widow is still living. They were the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this biographical sketch was the first-born, the others being Solomon B., Lina E. and Margaret M.

Reared on the paternal farm in Wisconsin, Leonard B. Sage received his education in the common schools and after working at farm labor for awhile became a bookkeeper and was thus engaged for some time, later becoming a traveling salesman for a wholesale hardware house, his territory being the state of Missouri. In 1892 he and his brother came to Minnesota and opened a hardware store at the village of Beaver Creek, in Rock county, under the firm name of Sage Brothers, and were thus engaged for six years, at the end of which time Sage Brothers engaged in the grain business and L. B. Sage was thus engaged, his business taking him to various parts of the state, until 1911, in which year he opened a hardware store at Dawson and has ever since been engaged in that business at that place, being recognized as one of the leading merchants of the town.

In 1900 Leonard B. Sage was united in marriage to Clara M. Martin, of Chicago, and to this union one son has been born, Theodore. Mr. and Mrs. Sage are members of the Presbyterian Church. They have a very pleasant home at Dawson and take a proper interest in the general social life of the community and in such movements as are designed to advance the best interests of the same. Mr. Sage is a Mason and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that ancient order.


Ole O. Sandbakken
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Helen Coughlin

Ole O. Sandbakken, one of the successful farmers of Maxwell township, Lac qui Parle county, was born in Norway on January 1, 1862, being the son of Ole and Marit (Hanson) Sandbakken. These parents were natives of Norway and were educated in the public schools of that country. There they grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. It was there that their large family of ten children were born and there the mother died about 1897. After the death of the wife and mother, Ole Sandbakken, the father, came to America in 1901 to make his home with the son, Ole O. Sandbakken. Here he died in March, 1914, at the age of eighty-two years.

Ole O. Sundbakken, one of the successful farmers of Maxwell town - Norway and there grew to manhood. Until he was twenty-two years of age he remained a resident of the country of his birth and there engaged in farming. In 1884 he decided to leave his native land and come to America. After landing in this country, he went direct to Wisconsin, arriving there on May 29, of that year. He remained in that state for a short time, after which he came to Minnesota and located in Houston county. He remained here until 1886, when he came to Lac qui Parle county, locating in Lac qui Parle village. Here for a time he worked for Ole Loe, county commissioner at that time. He remained in the neighborhood of Lac qui Parle for about three years, working as a farm hand. At that time he and his brother, Hans, purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land in Baxter and Camp Release townships. After farming the place for two years together, Ole sold to his brother and purchased eighty acres in section II, Maxwell township. After buying this eighty acres, in 1892, which is still his home, he devoted himself to the improvement and development of the tract. Being railroad land, it was for the most part wild prairie and all had to be broken. By much hard work, a part of the land was in shape to be cultivated. Satisfactory crops were grown and in time Mr. Sandbakken purchased another eighty acres, making him one hundred and sixty acres in his present farm. He was at one time the owner of another eighty, that he later sold. On his present farm he has erected good and substantial buildings and set out a fine grove. Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising and is most successful. His farm is evidence that he is a believer in intensive farming and that he devotes much time to thorough cultivation.

On April 23, 1891, Ole O. Sandbakken was united in marriage, in Montevideo, to Bertha Hanson Lund, a native of Norway and the daughter of Olson and Mary Olson Lund. Olson and Mary Lund were natives of Norway, where they grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. They came to the United States about two weeks after Ole O. Sandbakken came. They all located at Westby, Wisconsin. There Mr. Lund bought eighty acres of land and there he and his wife lived until the time of their death some years ago. They were the parents of the following children: Amund, Bertha, Olena and Ole, all of whom are living. To Ole O. and Bertha Sandbakken have been born the following children: Oscar, Marie, Paul, Inga and Alfred. The family are active members of the Trinity Lutheran church at Boyd and take an active interest in all church work.


Kanut Sandmoen
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Kanut Sandmoen, a successful farmer of Garfield township, and the son of Alner and Martha (Olsten) Kanusen, was born in Atoletesolert, Norway, on December 15, 1843.

Alner and Martha Kanusen were natives of Norway and spent their lives in their native country, where they were farmers and considered successful for farmers in that country. They were the parents of the following children: Christiana, of Seattle, Washington; Saren, a resident of Montana; John, Omstnet, Chester and Kanut.

Kanut Sandmoen received his education in Norway, where he grew to manhood and engaged in farming. As a young man he married Jennie Loun, a native of Norway. To this union three children were born, Michael, Ada and Henry, two of whom, Michael and Ada, were born in Norway. Ada and Henry are married and have homes of their own.

In 1878 Kanut Sandmoen decided to seek a new location for a home, where the advantages would be better for himself and family. In that year he left his little family in the Fatherland and came to the United States to establish a home. After two years the wife and children joined him in the new land. They located at Northfield, Minnesota, where they remained two years, after which they came to Lac qui Parle county, where they have since resided.

In 1883 they entered one hundred and sixty acres of land, which is their present farm home. The place was undeveloped and unimproved. In time, as the ground was broken, seed planted and the harvests gathered, substantial buildings were erected, trees planted and prosperity was evident as the result of earnest effort. Mr. Sandmoen is engaged in general farming and stock raising, and although quite feeble, is active in the management of his farm.

Mr. Sandmoen and family are members of the Lutheran church, and take an interest in all church activities. In Norway, Mr. Sandmoen was a trained soldier.


Sigfred J. Sather
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Sigfred J. Sather, a successful young farmer of Garfield Township, Lac qui Parle County, and chairman of the board of supervisors of that township, was born in Norway on February 15, 1887, the son of Julius P. and Sophie Sather, natives of that same country, who, in 1888, came to the United States and located in Minneapolis. In November of 1899 Mr. Sather and family returned to Norway. In 1902 he returned and worked at his trade, that of a carpenter, in Lac qui Parle County, for two years. In 1891 he purchased two hundred acres of wild prairie land in section 16, Garfield Township, but continued to work at his trade to some extent, and at the same time built for himself a small house and barn. He started to develop his farm and planted three acres of box elders, maple and ash. To Julius P. and Sophie Sather were born six children, Sigfred, Oscar, Selma, Elfrida, Geverda and Rudolph. Oscar lives in Dawson, where he is a carpenter. Geverda and Rudolph are living in Norway, where their parents now reside.

Sigfred J. Sather received part of his education in Norway, and also attended school in Lac qui Parle County. At the age of sixteen he started to work at the carpenter trade with his father, having returned in 1903 from Norway. He located on the two-hundred-acre farm of his father, which he rented until January 1, 1916, at which time he bought the place.

On December 2, 1909, Sigfred J. Sather was united in marriage to Alice Ray, who was born in Lac qui Parle County, and to this union have been born three children, Orville, Stella and Stanley.

For years past Mr. Sather has devoted his time and attention to grain farming, but is now devoting some attention to the breeding and raising of high-class horses, cattle and hogs, and has a number of registered animals. He is progressive and takes an active interest in all local affairs, his influence always being exerted in behalf of movements that will tend to advance the interests of the community in which he lives. He is interested in the elevators at Madison and at Hadenville. He has served for five years as treasurer of the school board and is at present chairman of the board of supervisors.

Severin P. Satre
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Severin P. Satre, one of the best-known and most progressive merchants of Madison and a large landowner of Lac qui Parle County, who is senior member of the mercantile firm of Satre & Thorson, dealers in agricultural implements, is a native of the state of Iowa, having been born on a farm in Winneshiek County, that state, January 13, 1868, son of Petre and Martha Satre, both natives of Norway, the former born in 1831 and the latter, in 1846.

Petre Satre came to the United States when a young man and proceeded to Illinois, where he remained for some time, later going to Iowa, where he married Martha Satre, who had come to this country when she was twelve years old, with her parents, Ole and Bertha Satre, who later went to South Dakota, where their last days were spent. Petre Satre bought a farm in Iowa and there spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1900. His widow is still living. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom the subject of this biographical sketch is the eldest, the others being, Ole, Elizabeth, Lauris, Pauline, Alert and Elmer and four who died in infancy.

Severin P. Satre was reared on the paternal farm in Winneshiek County, Iowa, and was brought up in the faith of the Norwegian Lutheran Church, of which his parents were devout members. In 1892, he then being twenty-four years of age, he came to Minnesota and bought two hundred and forty acres of land in Garfield Township, Lac qui Parle County, to which he gradually added, as he prospered in his farming operations, until he is now the owner of eight hundred acres of land in that township, besides which he is the owner of a tract of valuable farm land in north Dakota. In 1905 Mr. Satre retired from the active labors of the farm and moved to Madison, the county seat, where he engaged in the agricultural-implement business in partnership with Halvor O. Thorson, under the firm name of Satre & Thorson, and has ever since been thus engaged. He owns the building in which the business is carried oh and a fine residence property in Madison and is regarded as one of the most substantial citizens of that city. Mr. Satre has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs and during his residence in Garfield Township served as township treasurer and school treasurer. He and his wife are members of the United Lutheran Church and take a proper interest in all local good works.

It was in 1901 that Severin P. Satre was united in marriage to Ida Sjole, who was born in Lac qui Parle County in 1870, daughter of Sever and Hannah Sjole, both natives of Norway and pioneers of this section of the state. Sever Sjole came to the United States when a young man and located in Dakota County, this state, where he married and later settled in Garfield Township, Lac qui Parle County, where he homesteaded a quarter of a section of land and timber-claimed another quarter of a section and there established his home, both he and his wife still living there. To Mr. and Mrs. Satre have been born seven children, Mabel, Inga, Pearl, Arnold, Deloris, Eingolf Melvin and Walter, the last-named two of whom are deceased.


Albert E. Schacherer
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Albert E. Schacherer, a well-known farmer of Hamlin Township, was born in Delaware County, Iowa, on September 26, 1870, being the son of John and Anna (Leibold) Schacherer, who were born in Germany. John Schacherer came to the United States in 1856 and resided for a time at Buffalo, New York, and later came to Dubuque County, Iowa, where he was married, Mrs. Schacherer having come to the county in 1846 with her parents, they having settled there after coming to the United States from Germany. So after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Schacherer engaged in farming in Dubuque County, where they resided for some years, after which they removed to Delaware County, where she died some years later. Mr. Schacherer returned to Dubuque County, where he still resides. John and Anna Schacherer were the parents of the following children: Mary, John, William, Albert E., Anna, Regina, Margaret, Edwin, Laura and Eugene.

Albert E. Schacherer received his education in the common schools of Iowa. After completing his education he engaged in farming, near Estherville, Iowa. He remained here until 1905, when he came to Lac qui Parle County, locating on his present farm of two hundred and forty acres in Hamilton Township. The farm was for the most part in the native state, and the well-developed farm of today is the result of the earnest work of Mr. Schacherer. He has erected substantial and modern buildings, planted groves and built fences. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, being interested in breeding Shorthorn cattle and Duroc-Jersey hogs.

In 1897 Albert E. Schacherer was united in marriage to Anna Alcorn, a native of Clayton County, Iowa, and the daughter of Henry and Emile (Le Fevere) Alcorn. To this union have been born the following children: Clara, Nina, Wayne, Paul, Katherine, Lawrence, Mary, Henry, Constance and Herbert. The family are members of the Catholic Church at Madison and Mr. Schacherer is a member of the Knights of Columbus.

Mr. Schacherer has always taken an active part in local affairs and has been active in the successful work of consolidating the schools of the township and the complete consolidation is about to be accomplished. He has served for nine years as a member of the board of school directors and has ever been a leader in all that tends to place the schools on a higher plane.


John Schlosser
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Another of the German-born citizens of Lac qui Parle County who has greatly augmented his fortunes by casting his lot with the people of this locality is John Schlosser, farmer, of Perry Township. He was born in Germany on January 10, 1848, and is a son of Peter and Margaret Schlosser, who spent their lives in the Fatherland, but all of whose children came to the United States, these children being Lutze, Nicholas, John, Margaret, Gustav, Mathias and Peter.

John Schlosser spent his boyhood in his native land and there attended the common schools and worked out until he came to America at the age of nineteen years. He located in La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he worked some time, then went to St. Louis, Missouri, and worked on a steamboat between that city and New Orleans, Louisiana; later worked a short time in a packing house in St. Louis, also on the wharf there, remaining there until 1878 when he came to Minnesota, locating in Lac qui Parle County, but in a short time went back to Wisconsin and spent one summer logging on the river, then returned to Lac qui Parle County and worked as a farm hand near the village of Lac qui Parle for two years; then pre-empted two hundred and forty acres, on which he constructed a small sod shanty and sod barn, and went to work with his team and improved the place in general and put it out to crops, farming there until 1897 when he sold out and moved from Madison Township to Perry Township, where he bought two hundred acres, on which stood an old house and barn, and there he still resides, and has made many important improvements on the place. Surrounding his buildings is a grove of about two acres, which he set out himself. He has erected a new dwelling, new barn and other buildings.

On February 13, 1883, John Schlosser was united in marriage to Mary Hiepler, a native of Germany, who came to the United States when nineteen years old, and to this union seven children have been born, namely: William, a farmer of Perry Township, who married Anna Small and has two children, Rudolph and Edwin; Emma, who married Frank Koch, a farmer of Arena Township, and has three children, Esther, Herbert and Gertrude; Matilda, who married Edward Tessin, of Perry Township, and has an adopted child, Irene; Ida, John, Adolph and Herman, who are at home with their parents.

Mr. Schlosser is an independent voter. He served as township assessor for about sixteen years, and is clerk of school district No. 88, a position he has held for about sixteen years. His long retention in these offices would indicate that he is a faithful and able public servant. He is a member of the Lutheran Church.


Casper Schmieding
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Susan Geist

Casper Schmieding, a well-known and substantial farmer of Arena township, Lac qui Parle county, proprietor of a fine farm of four hundred acres on rural route No. 3, out of Madison, and actively interested in the development of that part of the county, is a native of Germany, but has been a resident of the United States since he was eight years of age. He was born on a farm in Westphalia, May 16, 1850, son of John and Elizabeth Schmieding, who came to this country with their family in 1858, landing at New Orleans, and proceeding on up the Mississippi river to Dubuque, Iowa. In the neighborhood of that city John Schmieding rented a tract of land for four years in the adjoining county of Delaware, where he bought eighty acres of school land, unbroken prairie, for two dollars and forty cents an acre. There he erected a small house, the lumber for which cost him forty dollars and the labor on the same, forty dollars, and established his home. He later bought an adjoining tract of forty acres, at five dollars the acres, and had his place well improved at the time of his death in 1870, he then being fifty-nine years of age. His widow survived him many years, her death occurring in Plymouth county, that same state, in 1904, she then being eighty-two years of age. They were members of the Catholic church and their children were reared in that faith. There were six of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow: Theresa, who married Anton Krogman, of Delaware county, Iowa, and died on March 15, 1916; John, who married Mary Reinhlander and is living on a farm in Shelby county, Iowa; Elizabeth, widow of Bennett Niehaus, of South Dakota; Katherine, wife of John Oken, of Arcadia, Iowa, and Anna, wife of August Schaefer, of South Dakota.

Casper Schmieding was about eight years of age when his parents came to the United States and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Iowa. He was twenty years old when his father died in 1870 and for seven season thereafter followed threshing , the first three years as a “hand” and then as part owner of a threshing-rig, continuing, however, to make his home with his mother. Before his marriage in the fall of 1877 he bought the home farm and owned and operated the same until, 1880, in which year he sold out and went to Plymouth county, same state, where his mother had bought a quarter of a section of land, and he rented and operated that farm until 1900, when he went to South Dakota. He bought an improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres in that state, later buying an adjoining “eighty,” and lived there until 1904, when he rented his place and came over into Minnesota, and bought one hundred and sixty acres on section 21, of Arena township, Lac qui Parle county, where he ever since has made his home. Some time after locating there Mr. Schmieding sold his South Dakota farm and bought additional land adjoining his home farm in Arena township and now has a fine farm of four hundred acres, which he has improved in good shape and brought to a high state of cultivation. Among the improvements on his place is a concrete silo, sixteen by forty. Mr. Schmieding has given considerable attention to the raising of live stock and has done very well. He is a Democrat and for two years served as assessor his home township. He is a stockholder in the elevator company in Haydenville and in the telephone company at Marietta and also in the Madison Creamery Company.

Casper Schmieding has been married twice. It was on November 26, 1877, in Delaware county, Iowa, that he was united in marriage to Mary Felshiem, who died in 1891, that same state, leaving six children, Margaret, John, Elizabeth, Paul, Mary and Rosie. On October 15, 1894, he married, secondly, Mrs. Josephine (Goebel) Moorman, a widow and the mother of six children, Katherine, Michael, Caroline, Philomania, Martha and Elizabeth. To this second marriage four children have been born, Anna, Nicholas, Bernhard and Albert. The Schmiedings are members of the Catholic church and take a warm interest in parish affairs, as well as in all neighborhood good works.


John Schneider
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) – Transcribed by Veneta McKinney

John Schneider, a prominent and successful business man and farmer, the son of Philip and Christine (Mayring) Schneider was born on March 9, 1867, in Washington county, Wisconsin.

Philip Schneider was born in Germany on November 30, 1826, and came to America with his parents when eighteen years of age. The family, after landing at the port of New York, came direct to Milwaukee, where he remained for some time and worked as a laborer. He later removed to Washington county, Wisconsin, where he died on January 13, 1901. Philip Schneider was first married to a Miss Keller, who died shortly after their marriage. He later married Susanna Thull, a native of Wisconsin and to this union the following children were born: Catherine, Joseph, Nicholas and Margaret. Susanna Schneider died in 1862 and some year s later Mr. Schneider married Christine Mayring, and to this union eight children were born; Henry, John, Gertrude (deceased), Mary, Frank, Philip, Mathias and Jacob. Philip Schneider was a man of prominence and influence in the community. Politically, he was a Democrat and served his home county for three terms in the state senate. He and his family were active and devout members of the Catholic church.

John Schneider was educated in the common schools of Washington county, Wisconsin and two years in the high school. He grew to man-hood on the home farm and assisted his father with the work. In early manhood he was married to Margaret Bendel, of Washington county and the daughter of John Rendel and wife, who were early settlers of the county. To this union were born the following children: John P., Albert, Margaret and Bernard, all of whom are at home with their parents.

John Schneider purchased his present farm of three hundred and twenty acres in 1894. •The place was unimproved and undeveloped. He has erected all the excellent buildings, developed the farm and planted groves of box-elders, ash, willow and cottonwood. Mr. Schneider is engaged in general farming and the raising of stock, being interested in Shorthorn cattle, Poland China hogs, and Percheron horses. Besides his extensive interests on the farm, Mr. Schneider is secretary of the Farmers Elevator Company. He drew the plans for the elevator and was superintendent of construction. The elevator is located in Arena township and has a capacity of thirty thousand bushels. He is clerk of the school board and is much interested in the success of the schools of his township.


Joseph Schneider
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by SD

Joseph Schneider, a well-known farmer of Arena Ttownship, Lac qui Parle County, was born in Washington County, Wisconsin, November 4, 1858, a son of Philip and Susanna (Thull) Schneider.

Philip Schneider was educated in Germany, where he was born and reared. He worked on a farm in his native country and when he was eighteen years of age came to America with his mother and stepfather. They settled in Washington county, Wisconsin, and engaged in farming. There Philip Schneider bought one hundred and twenty acres of wild timber land and began the work of improving the same. He had to clear the land of timber, build the necessary house in which to live, and do a great amount of hard work before he had the land in a condition for raising a crop. He made his home there the rest of his life, his death occurring on January 13, 1902, he then being seventy-six years of age. Philip Schneider was three times married. His first wife was Barbara Keller, who died one year after marriage. His second wife was Susanna Thull, who was the mother of Joseph Schneider. She lived eight years after marriage. The third wife was Christina Myring, who died on September 18, 1906, aged sixty-nine years.

Joseph Schneider was educated in the common schools of Washington County, Wisconsin, and worked on the farm during his schools years. On February 21, 1887, he married Mary Pockey, who was born in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, July 10, 1863, a daughter of John and Susannah (Winegardner) Pockey, the former of whom died on December 18, 1898, aged seventy-eight years and the latter, April 25, 1903, aged eighty-one years.

Their children were: John, deceased; Jacob, deceased; Mary, wife of Mr. Schneider, and Anna. In the year in which he was married Joseph Schneider came to Minnesota and settled in Lac qui Parle County, buying one hundred and twenty acres of land in Section 23 of Arena township. He afterwards made an additional purchase of eighty acres in Section 24, built a residence and other farm buildings and made all the improvements on the land. To Mr. and Mrs. Schneider five children have been born, Anton, Mathias, Frances, Clara and Marie. Frances Schneider married Mat Heinzen and has one child, Bernetta. The Schneiders are members of the Catholic Church. For twenty-five years or more Mr. Schneider has served on the township board in Arena Township.


Philip J. Schneider
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc (1910) transcribed by Mary Kifer

Philip J. Schneider, assistant cashier of the Madison State Bank at Madison, was born at St. Michaels, Washington county, Wisconsin, September 12, 1875, a son of Philip and Christina (Myring) Schneider, who were natives of Germany, the former of whom came to this country at the age of eighteen years with his mother and stepfather, settling in Washington county, Wisconsin, where he married and established his permanent home. He bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres and there spent the rest of his life, his death occurring on January 13, 1902, at the age of seventy-six years. He was married three times. He had no children by the first marriage. The children by the second marriage were Catherine, Joseph, Margaret and Nicholas, and by the third marriage those besides the subject of this sketch were Henry, John, Gertrude, Frank, Mary, Mathias and Jacob.

Philip J. Schneider received his elementary education in the common schools of Washington county, Wisconsin, and supplemented the same by attendance for three years at the college at St. Francis, Wisconsin. During his school years he worked on his father's farm and after leaving college, in 1894, he came to Minnesota and for five years was engaged in teaching in the parochial school at Rosen, Lac qui Parle county. He then was employed as a clerk in a store for one year, at the end of which time he accepted the position as manager of the local branch of the Great Western Elevator Company at Madison, and was thus engaged for nine years, at the end of which time he was appointed assistant cashier of the Madison State Bank at Madison and has held this latter position ever since.

On January 14, 1903, Philip J. Schneider and Suzanna Bendel were united in marriage and to this union two children have been born, Raymond and Vincent. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider are members of the Catholic church at Madison. Mr. Schneider is a member of the Knights of Columbus at Watertown and of the Foresters at Madison.


Michael W. Schouweiler
Source: "History of Dakota Territory", by George W. Kingsbury - Sub. by Karen Seeman

MICHAEL W. SCHOUWEILER (1912) is proprietor of the Klondike Saloon of Marshall. He is a native Minnesotan, having been born in Wabasha county February 25, 1863. Until he reached his majority he resided on his father's homestead in that county, and then he started out to make his own way in the world. Mr. Schouweiler has engaged in a great many occupations and has resided in many parts of the country. He farmed near Warren, Minnesota, one and one-half years, lived in Butte, Montana, five months, worked for a brother-in-law in Wabasha county one year, and then completed his education with a year's course in the Winona High School. He spent a short time in North St. Paul thereafter, lived in Lac qui Parle county one season, farmed in Wabasha county one year, conducted a saloon in North St. Paul two years, in Wabasha county two years, and then bought a farm in that county and operated it two years.
Plainview, Minnesota, was the next home of our subject. There he was the proprietor of a saloon one year and of a restaurant and pool hall four or five years. At Pollock, Campbell county, South Dakota, Mr. Schouweiler erected a building and engaged in the saloon business ten and one-half years. He operated a saloon at Sanborn, Minnesota, six months, and on January 22, 1912, he located in Marshall and purchased the Klondike Saloon. He has met with success during his short residence in the city and has built up a good trade. Mr. Schouweiler owns a farm in Campbell county, South Dakota.
The marriage of Mr. Schouweiler to Katie Losch occurred in New Richmond, Wisconsin, July 5, 1888. She is a native of Iowa. They have seven children: Lilly, the wife of Louis Traxinger, who tends bar for Mr. Schouweiler; Laura, Agnes, Olevia, Rosa, Jesse and Magdelin. Frank and Eva (Leonard) Schouweiler, the parents of our subject, were born in Germany, came to America in 1854, lived in Iowa a few months, and then took a homestead claim in Wabasha county, Minnesota. On that farm they lived the rest of their lives. They celebrated their golden wedding on June 6, 1904, and died a few years later. They had fourteen children, of whom the following named six sons and five daughters are living: John N., Michael W., Frank, Peter, Garrett, Andrew, Katie, Maggie, Jennie, Annie and Lizzie.


Otto W. Schulz
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Gladys Lavender

OTTO W. SCHULZ, former mayor of Madison and for years one of the best-known lawyers of that city, is a native son of Lac qui Parle county, having been born on a pioneer farm in Camp Release township, June 7, 1876, son of August F. and Dorethea (Otto) Schulz, both natives of Germany, born in the province of Brandenburg, who became influential pioneer residents of Lac qui Parle county, later moving to California, where both are still living.

August F. Schulz came to the United States in 1866 and located at Chicago, where he remained for two years, at the end of which time he came to Minnesota and for two years was located at Minneapolis, after which, in 1870, he came to this part of the state and pre-empted a quarter of a section of land in Camp Release township, Lac qui Parle county, where he presently married and established his home. It was about 1870 that August F. Schulz’s parents, Fred Schulz and wife, also came to the United States and located at Minneapolis, where they lived until old age, when they joined their son in Lac qui Parle county and in his home spent their last days. August F. Schulz became one of the most substantial and influential residents of Camp Release township and he and his wife continued to make their home there until the spring of 1910, when they retired from the farm and moved to Montevideo, where they resided until September, 1914, when they moved to Upland, California, where they now live in comfortable retirement. Mrs. Schulz also is a native of Germany. It was in 1868 that she came to this country with her father, Joachim Otto, and her brother, William Otto, and located at Minneapolis, where they remained until 1870, in which year they came to this part of the state and settled in Lac qui Parle County. Both Joachim Otto and his son, William, homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in Camp Release township and after the father’s death the tract that he had pre-empted, and which joined the Schulz homestead, was bought by August F. Schulz and added to the latter’s extensive land holdings in that township. To August F. Schulz and wife six children were born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being as follow: Rudolph F., Ottilie, who married G.T. Lajord, of Montevideo; Edward F., Lydia M. and August C., all of whom are living.

Otto W. Schulze was reared on the homestead farm in Camp Release township, receiving his elementary education in the district school in the neighborhood of his home, supplementing the same by a course in Windom Institute at Montevideo, from which he graduated in 1899. He then entered the College of Law of the University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1903. In that same year he was admitted to the bar and began the practice of his profession at Madison, where he formed a partnership with H.L. Borgendale, present clerk of court, which mutually agreeable arrangement continued until Mr Borgandale’s retirement to enter upon the duties of his public office in 1914, since which time Mr. Schulz has been practicing alone. Mr. Schulz also is interested in the abstract, having been a member of the company that organized the Lac qui Parle county Abstract Company at Madison in 1905. For some time he served that company as vice-president, but is now serving in the more active capacity of secretary and treasurer and is thus practically manager of the same.

Mr. Schulz not only long has been recognized as one of the leading lawyers of his home county, but he is widely known as an active, public-spirited citizen, who takes an earnest interest in civic affairs generally and in all movements designed to advance the interests of the community at large. He has contributed unselfishly of his time and energies to the public service and has served the city at one time or another as mayor, as city attorney and as city recorder. He is a Mason, an Odd Fellow and a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, taking a warm interest in the affairs of these several organizations, as well as in the general social activities of his home town.


Franklin Sear
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Franklin Sear, one of the successful and well-to-do farmers of Maxwell Township, Lac qui Parle County, was born in Dakota County, Minnesota, on March 3, 1874, being the son of Solomon Sear and wife. (For extended history of Solomon Sear, see another page of this volume.) Franklin Sear came to Lac qui Parle County with his parents in 1878. Here he received his education in the public schools of Maxwell Township and grew to manhood on the home farm, where he assisted his father with the work. As a boy and man he remained on the farm and some years ago he purchased the old homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in section 10. Since assuming possession of the farm, Mr. Sear has rebuilt the house and made it modern and he has practically erected the other buildings on the place. The farm is under high cultivation and well improved. Mr. Sear believes in intense farming and is most successful. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising and specializes in the breeding of thoroughbred hogs. At present he has some of the finest hogs in the township.

Franklin Sear is one of the progressive and influential citizens of the township and the county. He is a man of broad views and most excellent judgment, his advice on matters of importance in the township being often sought. He has always been active in local civic affairs and has had much to do with the development of the township in which he lives. He is at present a director in the Equity Elevator Company, at Dawson, and was one of the original stockholders. For the past seven years he has been township chairman and chairman of the school board, and during this time much advance has been made, both in the schools and in township affairs.

In 1900 Franklin Sear was united in marriage to Susan E. Robinson, a native of Wisconsin and the daughter of Titus and Mary E. (Redhead) Robinson, who located in Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, in 1886. To this union have been born the following children: Hester Leon, Mattie A. and Almond F., all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Sear are active members of the Congregational Church and take much interest in all Church work. They take much pleasure in local social activities and are held in high esteem by all.


George W. Sear
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Although it is undoubtedly true that many fall exhausted in the conflict of life in every community, a few, by their inherent force of character and strong mentality, rise above their environment, and all which seems to hinder them, until they reach the plane of affluence toward which their faces were set through the long years of struggle that must necessarily precede any worthy accomplishment. Such was the history, briefly stated, of George W. Sear, late county commissioner of Lac qui Parle County.

Mr. Sear was born in Castle Rock Township, Dakota County, Minnesota, December 30, 1862, son of Solomon and Sarah (Mayette) Sear, the father a native of England and the mother of the state of Michigan, but of English parentage. Solomon Sear spent his earlier years in his native land, immigrating to America when young and here he married and established his permanent home, locating in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota, in 1877, but did not bring his family here until the following spring. He took up a homestead and tree claim in Maxwell Township – three hundred and twenty acres, and he later purchased two hundred and forty acres more. He improved his land, was a successful genera] farmer, and spent the rest of his life there, dying on December 29, 1910, at an advanced age, his birth having occurred on January 3, 1833. His wife died in the fall of 1905. They were the parents of fourteen children, namely: Sarah Jane, Hannah, Lydia died in infancy, E1iza, George W., William T., Rosa, Eli, Walter Martin, Knut died in infancy, Grant died in infancy, Frank, Lillie and May. The father of these children was an influential man in his township, filling the office of treasurer for some time, was also treasurer of the school board in his district in Maxwell Township. He belonged to the Episcopal Church, and his wife was a Baptist.

Solomon Sear was about twenty years old when he came to the United States. After spending about one year in Michigan, where he married, he moved to Pine Bend. Minnesota, about 1854, and pre-empted land in that vicinity, remaining there about three years. It was a wild country, many Indians still living there, but they were friendly to the whites, although at war among themselves. They annoyed the settlers only as beggars, often coming for food. Mr. Sear removed from there to Castle Rock Township, Dakota County, where he also owned land and also additional land in the Hampton Township, which joined Castle Rock Township. He made his home there until coming to Lac qui Parle County. His parents and a younger brother came to America about one year after he came, he having sent them the money, which he had saved after a year's work at eleven dollars per month. The parents located on a farm in Michigan, and they spent the rest of their lives in that state. A brother of Solomon, named Eli Sear, came to America and joined the Union army, and was killed in the battle of Antietam. He had been in the service three years and had just returned to his regiment after a stay at home on a furlough. The maternal grandparents, Thomas and Sarah Mayett, came to America a few years previous to the coming of the Sear family. They located on a farm near Jackson, Michigan, where they spent the rest of their lives.

George W. Sear grew up on the home farm where he worked hard when a boy. He had little opportunity to obtain an education, but attended the public schools in Castle Rock Township, Dakota County, a short time. He left home when twenty years old and began life for himself as a farmer, buying eighty acres of railroad land in Maxwell Township, Lac qui Parle County, later buying an adjoining eighty. He went to work with a will and improved this land and had a good farm on which he resided until November 1905, when he moved to Dawson, where he resided until his death, which occurred on June 3, 1916.

He had long taken an active interest in public affairs, and was supervisor for three years, then became chairman of the board of supervisors, which position he held for a period of twelve years, when he resigned, although importuned to remain in office. After coming to Dawson he was kept quite busy for three years viewing ditches for the county, by appointment. In 1910 he was elected county commissioner. He was an alderman in Dawson ever since he located here. Once he resigned, but two hundred of the best citizens of the town petitioned him to again accept the office and he did so. He performed his duties as a public servant in a most admirable, faithful and commendable manner and had the esteem and good will of all classes.

Mr. Sear was married on December 30, 1888, to Selma Fondell, who was born in Chicago, but reared in Louisville, Kentucky. She was of Swedish parentage, a daughter of Andrew and Christine Fondell, who located in Maxwell Township, Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota, about 1885 and bought land which they farmed until the mother's death, about 1903, after which Mr. Fondell moved to Dawson and made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Sear until his death, in March 1912. His family consisted of five children, three of whom are still living, namely: Axel, Selma and Jennie. Mrs. Sear is a Lutheran. Mr. Sear gave freely to the support of the various churches of his community, but belonged to none. Politically, he was a Democrat.

Mr. Sear passed away on June 3, 1916. He had achieved an enviable reputation. In his service to the public he was inspired by lofty motives, that made him a man of worth and distinction. His death was mourned by his many friends. Lac qui Parle County lost one of its best citizens in the passing away of George W. Sear.


Rev. Valnetine Schiffrer
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Helen Coughlin

The Rev. Father Valentine Schiffrer, pastor of St. Michael's Catholic church at Madison and one of the best-known and most influential young clergyman in this section of the state, is a native of Austria, but was ordained to the priesthood in Minnesota and all his active labors in the church have been performed in this state, hence he feels as much a Minnesotan as one "native and to the manner born," and is as deeply interested in all movements having as their object the advancement of the best interests of the great Northwest as any native son. He was born in the beautiful province of Carniola, Austria, February 12, 1881, son of Joseph and Francisca (Zirovnik) Schiffrer, both natives of Austria, the former of whom died on June 29, 1910, and the latter of whom is still living.

Father Schiffrer received an excellent education in his native land, supplementing his schooling in the public schools of Laibach by attendance at Laibach College and Krainburg College, after which thorough course of instruction he came to the United States and pursued his studies further at St. Paul, this state, where he presently was ordained to the priesthood. Father Schiffrer's first assignment after his attainment to holy orders was as assistant to the pastor of the church of St. Francis de Sales in West Seventh street, St. Paul, where he remained about two years, at the end of which time he was transferred to Redwood Falls, where he served as pastor of St. Catherine's church for two years, after which, in 1910, he was transferred to Madison, where he ever since has been performing a most acceptable service as pastor of St. Michael's Catholic church and during which time he has done much to increase the efficiency of that parish along all lines. Father Schiffrer is a public-spirited citizen and takes a warm interest in all measures calculated to promote the general advancement of this community along material as well as cultural and ethical lines and enjoys in a high degree the confidence and regard of the entire community. He is ably aided in his parish work by his sister, Miss Antonia Schiffrer, who acts as his housekeeper and takes an active interest in the general good works of her brother's parish.


Iver Selvig
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Among the many natives of Norway who have done much to develop and improve the state of Minnesota, few deserve more credit than Iver Selvig, a prosperous and successful farmer of Lac qui Parle County. Coming to a strange land, as a mere toy, without funds and only his determination to win, he has succeeded, and today is the owner of an excellent farm in Riverside Township.

Iver Selvig was born in Norway on March 8, 1871, the son of Andrew and Helen Selvig, both of whom were natives of that country, and who spent their lives in their native country, where they were educated and grew up and were married. It was there that they reared their family, and there they died some years ago. Andrew Selvig devoted his life to agricultural pursuits and was successful, for a farmer in that country. The parents lived to see their children grown and the little family separated, as some of the children had come to America. The family was a highly respected one in their native land, there they were devout members of the Lutheran Church.

The children born to Andrew and Helen Selvig were Lorance, Iver, Martha, Thomas, Helen, Bertha and Ludwig. Lorance, Martha and Ludwig are still living in the native country, the others having come to the United States to make homes for themselves and families.

Iver Selvig received his education in the public schools of his native country and there lived until he was fourteen years of age. Being ambitious to accomplish more than he thought his native land offered him, he sailed for the United States. He landed in the United States in 1885 and came direct to Illinois. For a time he located in Lee County, but later removed to DeKalb County. Here he worked on a farm for some four years, after which he became a resident of Elgin, where he engaged in teaming, and remained in this work for about seventeen years.

In the fall of 1906, Mr. Selvig purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land in Riverside Township, near Dawson. He did not leave his home in Elgin until 1907, and on March 4, of that year he took up his residence on his new farm. On assuming possession of the farm he at once set to work to develop and improve the same. The land is all tinder high cultivation and is most productive. He is devoted to general farming and stock raising, being interested in the breeding and raising of the best Shorthorn cattle, of which he has many fine specimens.

In 1896, Iver Selvig was united in marriage to Alma Taylor, a native of Illinois and at the time of her marriage, a teacher in the schools of Elgin, Illinois. Her success as a teacher was marked and she had the confidence and the respect of the school authorities, as well as the community in which she taught. Mrs. Selvig died in 1909 after a life of usefulness and well-doing. She and Mr. Selvig were the parents of one child, Ruth Irene. Mr. and Mrs. Selvig and daughter were members of the Lutheran Church and took an active part in all church work. They were prominent in all social as well as church activities and were highly respected and admired by the community in which they lived.

Iver Selvig has always been active in local affairs and has devoted his best efforts to the advancement and development of the township and county in which he lives, lie is recognized as one of the successful men of the community and one in whom all have the utmost confidence.


Thomas Selvig
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Mary Saggio

THOMAS SELVIG. Norway has furnished the state of Minnesota many of its most prosperous and successful citizens. Here we find natives of that far-away country successfully engaged in all branches of work. They are among our best people and have done much toward the development and improvement of this, one of the greatest of the states of the Union. Their industrious habits and sterling worth have given them prestige wherever they have located. Coming from a country where perseverance and economy are necessary assets to a successful life, they have brought with them the essentials of a prosperous and successful life in a new country.

Thomas Selvig, one of the successful and well-known farmers of Lac qui Parle county, was born in Norway on September 21, 1873, son of Andrew and Helen (Eames) Selvig, both natives of that same country, who spent all their lives in their native country. It was there that they reared their family and there they died some years ago. Andrew Selvig devoted his life to agricultural pursuits and was successful for a farmer in that country. The parents lived to see their children grown and their little family separated, as some of the children had come to America. The children born to Andrew and Helen (Eames) Selvig were Loranca, Iver, Martha, Thomas, Helen, Bertha and Ludwig. Loranca, Martha and Ludwig are still living in their native country, the others having come to the United States to make new homes for themselves and families. Here they have been successful and have made for themselves not only homes, but many new and valued friends and are classed among the best citizens of their respective communities.

Thomas Selvig received his education in the public schools of Norway, where he lived until he was fifteen years of age. In connection with his school work he assisted on the farm and early formed habits of industry and thrift. As a boy he had determined to make for himself a home worthy of his ability and he soon came to the conclusion that his opportunities would be better in America, and though but a boy he determined to come to the United States. In 1888, with a firm determination he bade goodby to the home folks and sailed for America. He had no funds, but he did have a strong determination to win. On landing in the United States he proceeded to Illinois, where he worked by the month on a farm in Lee county, where he remained until about 1900 and where, by strict economy, he saved some of his earnings. On leaving Illinois he came to Minnesota and located for a time at Madison. He later bought one hundred and sixty acres near Marietta, but never lived on the farm, presently selling that tract and purchasing one hundred and sixty acres of land in Hamlin township. He never took up his residence on that farm either, but sold the same some years later. During the time he owned the two farms, he resided in Madison and rented a farm, which he cultivated for a number of years. After selling his farm in Hamlin township, Mr. Selvig purchased three hundred and twenty acres in section 30 of Riverside township, and has since made his home there. He has greatly developed and improved the place and today has one of the ideal farms of this township. He believes in intensive farming and thorough cultivation. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, being interested in Shorthorn cattle and has some fine specimens of that breed. He has erected modern and substantial buildings and takes much pride in the upkeep of the place.

In 1901 Thomas Selvig was united in marriage to Martha Larson, daughter of Mathias Larson and wife. Mr. and Mrs. Larson were natives of Norway, where they grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. They came to the United States when Martha was but three years of age, and settled in Lee county, Illinois, where they now reside. Mr. Larson is a successful farmer and both he and his wife are highly respected in the community in which they reside.


John C. Shule, Jr.
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by SD

John C. Shule, Jr., a successful farmer and stockman of Garfield Township, Lac qui Parle County, was born in Gilman, Illinois, on April 1, 1876, the son of John and Margaret Shule, both natives of Germany.

John Shule received his education in Germany and came to the United States when but fourteen years of age. He located in Illinois, where he worked for a number of years as a farm laborer. He was also engaged in the harness business and later purchased a farm and bought cattle. There he married, the young woman who became his wife having come to the United States with her parents in her girlhood. Some years later John Shule sold his farm in Illinois and came to Minnesota, settling in Lac qui Parle County in 1884. There he purchased six hundred acres of wild prairie land. Before leaving his home in Illinois he had suffered a disastrous fire on his farm, losing in the neighborhood of sixty thousand dollars, and when he located in Lac qui Parle County had very little capital.

After locating on his new farm Mr. Shule erected a small house and barn, and at once began to develop and improve the tract. The first year he had but a small crop of oats and flax. By hard work and close application he became successful and in time became the owner of more than two thousand two hundred acres of Minnesota and South Dakota land. In 1900 he retired to Madison where he still resides. At that time he sold a part of the land and divided the rest among his children. Mrs. Shule died in 1914.

To John and Margaret Shule were born the following children: Elizabeth, George, Hattie, Delie, Sadie, John C, Arthur and Lula, all of whom are living. Elizabeth is the widow of Louis Eppelhimer and resides in Madison with her father. George is a retired farmer of Gilman, Illinois. Hattie is the wife of Plenry Brightenfield, a cigar manufacturer of Fremont, Nebraska. Delie is the wife of Charles Ebel, a retired farmer of Madison. Sadie is the wife of H. Hauck. Arthur is a farmer near Madison and Lula is the wife of John Moliskie, a barber of Crookston, Minnesota.

John C. Shule, Jr., was educated in the district schools of Garfield Township and at Madison. He remained at home and assisted his father on the farm until he was twenty-two years of age, when he married Sybil Emeline Farnham. At that time John Shule, his father, presented him with one hundred and sixty acres of land and on that tract John C. Shule, Jr., began farming for himself. He farmed his own quarter section and another quarter section that he rented from his father until 1914. He has been quite successful in general farming and stock raising, selling from three hundred to five hundred head of hogs each year. Mr. Shule also owns eighty acres of land in Lake County, this state.

To Mr. and Mrs. Shule the following children were born: Alice, Mildred, Olive, Elsie, Earl, Margaret, Norman, Walter, Dorothy and Blanche. Mrs. Shule died on February 8, 1915.

Politically Mr. Shule is an independent voter, but takes an interest in all local affairs. He and his family are members of the Evangelical Church and take an active part in church work.


J. T. Sigedahl
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

The farm of J. C. Sigedahl, in Cerro Gordo township, Lac qui Parle county, indicates to the observer that it is managed by a man who believes in up-to-date methods of agriculture. Mr. Sigedahl was born in Norway, March 25, 1866. He is a son of Thomas and Annie (Sampson) Sigedahl, both natives of Norway, where they spent their lives. The father was a sailor and a fisherman. To these parents five children were born, namely: Sam Karena, J. T., Thorn and Jennie. J. T. Sigedahl grew up in Norway where he was educated in the public schools, and when a young man worked on the farm. He came to Minnesota in 1886, locating in Cerro Gordo township, Lac qui Parle county, where he worked out as a farm hand for about seven years. In 1893 he rented a farm in Maxwell township for three years, and in 1896 purchased a farm in that township, and lived there until 1906 at which time he bought his present farm on section 22, Cerro Gordo township. He now owns two hundred acres, eighty of which lie on section 15. He has made many extensive improvements here, including the erection of all the buildings with the exception of a granary. He has an excellent farm and is engaged in general farming and stock raising.

Mr. Sigedahl was married in 1894, to Christine Holton, a native of Goodhue county, Minnesota, and a daughter of Hans and Anna Maria Holton.

To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Sigedahl ten children, all living at this writing, have been born, named as follows: Hilda, Alma, Joseph, Selmer, Hans, Ervin, Palmer, Oscar, John and Clara.

Politically, Mr. Sigedahl is an independent voter. He and his family belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church, of which he is a trustee.


G. P. Simones
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

G. P. Simones, of Cerro Gordo township, Lac qui Parle county, was born in Wisconsin, August 25, 1864, and is a son of Greger P. and Ingeborg (Mork) Simones, both natives of Norway, where they married and lived on a farm until coming to Wisconsin in 1861, where they lived until the close of the Civil War. In 1864 the father enlisted in Company C, Eleventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, in which he served until the close of hostilities, having participated in several battles. After the war he moved with his family to Chickasaw county, Iowa, where he resided until the fall of 1880, when he came to Lac qui Parle county, Minnesota, spending the rest of his life in Cerro Gordo township. He was a carpenter by trade. He and his wife are both now deceased. He belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic, and they both belonged to the Norwegian Lutheran church. They were parents of five children, namely: Cora, Anna (deceased), Nellie, G. P. and Peter (died when young).

G. P. Simones received his education in the public schools of Iowa and Minnesota. When a young man he began farming in Cerro Gordo township, and since 1886 he has operated his present place for himself, owning one hundred and sixty acres, on which he has erected all buildings and made general improvements. He has met with success all along the line as a general farmer.

Mr. Simones was married on June 24, 1885, to Esther Haukedahl, a native of Norway, born on February 3, 1854, a daughter of Lars and Esther (Grieberastad) Haukedahl, both natives of Norway.

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Simones has been without issue, but they have raised their niece, Pauline Swenson.

Politically, Mr. Simones is an independent voter. He is the present assessor in Cerro Gordo township. He belongs to the Norwegian Lutheran church in which he is a trustee.


Simon M. Simonson
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Sharon Witt

A very energetic and persevering young farmer is Simon M. Simonson, of Cerro Gordo township, Lac qui Parle county. He was born on Gunder Holton's homestead in the above named township, March 22, 1879, and is a son of Marvin and Emma (Holton) Simonson, both natives of Norway, the father born in 1847, and the mother born on September 29, 1849. There they spent their earlier years and lived on a farm until immigrating to Wisconsin in 1869, but after a short time they located in Renville county, Minnesota, and finally to Cerro Gordo township, Lac qui Parle county, where the father bought one hundred and sixty acres. Like most of the pioneers here in those days he had a hard struggle, lived many years in a sod house, but he persevered and improved his land, erected a good group of buildings and still operates the place successfully. His wife died May 29, 1913. He eventually became one of the large landowners of this locality, and now owns three hundred and seventy-three acres. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. His family consists of three children, namely: Simon, Edward and Mary.

Simon M. Simonson grew up on the home farm where he worked hard when a boy, and he received his education in the public schools of Cerro Gordo township. He continued to assist his father on the home place until 1907, when he started out for himself at Summit, South Dakota, on his father's farm there, where he remained until 1911, when he returned home, and his since engaged in general farming and stock raising.

Mr. Simonson was married in 1902, to Oline Vollan, a daughter of Peder H. Vollan. To Mr. and Mrs. Simonson six children have been born namely: Alma, Alvina, Pearl, Matilda, Olga and Edna. Politically, Mr. Simonson is an independent voter. He belongs to the Norwegian Lutheran church.


Ludwig B. Simpson
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by SD.

Ludwig B. Simpson, one of the well-known and successful farmers of Lac qui Parle Township, in the County of that name, was born on the old home farm near Lac qui Parle village on November 27, 1871, the son of Peter Simpson and wife, pioneers of that Section, the former of whom, an honored veteran of the Civil War, is still living in the Lac qui Parle neighborhood and a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume.

Ludwig B. Simpson was educated in the public schools of his home neighborhood and at Windom Institute, Montevideo, taking the commercial course at the latter school. Upon completing his schooling he returned to the old home farm, where he has since resided and where he is engaged in the management of the place.

Ludwig B. Simpson married Lena Lokken, who also was born in Lac qui Parle County, daughter of Hans J. and Mary (Mork) Lokken, natives of Norway and early settlers in Lac qui Parle County, and to this union four children have been born, F'lovd M., Eleanor B., Palmer G. and Roy Arthur. The Simpsons are members of the United Lutheran Church and fraternally, Mr. Simpson is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, affiliated with the lodge of that order at Montevideo. He has filled the position of school director for a number of years.


Peter Simpson
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Peter Simpson, a prominent and successful farmer of Lac qui Parle township, was born in Norway, on May 14, 1842, being the son of Seming S. and Dortha (Bretnenger) Eggen, both natives of Norway, where they lived and died. They were farmers and considered successful ones in that country.

To Seming S. and Dortha Eggen were born the following children: Nels, who came to the United States and enlisted in Company G, Ninth Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry, died while in the service and was buried at Louisville, Kentucky; Gunder, of Omaha, Nebraska; Martha, of Iowa; Goro, of Lac qui Parle township, and Peter, the subject of this sketch.

Peter Simpson lived in Norway until 1862 when he came to the United States. After landing at New York he went direct to Chicago where he arrived on morning at four o'clock and by nine o'clock that same forenoon he had enlisted in Company I, Eighty-second Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He served in the regiment until the close of the Civil War. At the close of the war he located at Eldora, Iowa, where he learned to to a blacksmith and a worker in wood. He lived there for three years and devoted most of his time to woodwork in the making of wagons. In 1869 he came to Lac qui Parle township and here entered one hundred and sixty acres of land, just southwest of the village, being located on section 34. He later added forty acres to the tract, all of which he developed and improved. He did general farming and was interested in the raising of Shorthorn cattle.

In 1901 Mr. Simpson retired from the farm and engaged in the mercantile business at Lac qui Parle for three years. In 1904 he retired from active life. His son, Ludwig, is working the farm.

In 1868 Peter Simpson married Ida M. Olson, a native of Norway and the daughter of Lars and Bertha (Peterson) Olson. The Olson family came to the United States in 1861 and located in Lac qui Parle county. To Peter and Ida M. Simpson have been born the following children: Nels, deceased; Ludwig, on the home place; Samuel, a farmer of Chippewa county; Ida B., the wife of A. N. Kohr, of Montevideo, and Lucy H., the wife of Carl Hieren.

Peter Simpson has always taken an active part in the political affairs of the county, where his ability and integrity has always been recognized. He was the first sheriff of the county and held the position for four years. He has been township supervisor and chairman of the township board as well as having served as a school director for twenty years. Mr. Simpson is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and has held all the offices of the post. He and his family are active members of the United Lutheran church, Mr. Simpson having been one of the organizers of the church at Lac qui Parle.


Ole M. Sjolie
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Ole M. Sjolie, one of the early settlers of Garfield township, was born in Norway on September 2, 1852, being the son of Martianus and Ingeborg (Olson) Sjolie. Martianus Sjolie was a native of Norway, where he was educated, grew to manhood and was married. In 1859 he and his family came to the United States and settled in Dakota county, Minnesota, where Mr. Sjolie died in 1875. On settling in Minnesota, Mr. Sjolie located on a farm and in time accumulated three hundred and twenty acres of land. Here he was engaged in general farming and kept some stock. He had never taken part in actual warfare, but was one of the trained soldiers of Norway. He and his wife were the parents of the following children: S. M., Ole, Martin, Peter, John, Magnus, Mary and Ann, all of whom are living.

Ole M. Sjolie came to the United States with his parents when a child and lived at the family home in Dakota county until thirty-four years ago, when he came to Lac qui Parle county. Here he entered one hundred and fifty-six acres in section 2, Garfield township, and later took a tree claim of one hundred and sixty acres in section 2.

Ole M. Sjolie married Hellena Sandmoen and to this union the following children were born: Henry, Melvin and Carmelius. Melvin and Carmelius are deceased. Henry, who was born on August 13, 1891, is at home.

At the time Mr. Sjolie settled on his farm it was a wild prairie tract with no improvements of any kind. The land was in time put under cultivation and modern and substantial buildings erected and today he has one of the well improved and developed farms of the township. He has been most successful in general farming and the raising of cattle and horses. He is a Democrat and served as constable for one term.


S. M. Sjolie
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

The late S. M. Sjolie, a well-known farmer of Garfield township, was born in Norway on May 13, 1849, being the son of Martianus and Ingeborg (Olson) Sjolie. Sever Sjolie, the grandfather of S. M. Sjolie, was a farmer in Norway and there lived and died. He was a devout member of the Lutheran church.

In 1859 Martianus Sjolie and family came to the United States where they settled in Dakota county and here Mr. Sjolie died in 1875. On locating in Minnesota, Martianus Sjolie engaged in farming and accumulated two hundred and forty acres of land. He and his wife were the parents of the following children: S. M., Ole, Martin, Peter, John, Magnus, Mary and Anna, all of whom are living.

S. M. Sjolie came to the United States as a child, with his parents, with whom he lived in Dakota county, until he came to Lac qui Parle county, thirty-four years ago. In 1880 he was married to Hannah Nelson and to this union have been born the following children: Albert, Ida and Oscar, all of whom are married and have homes of their own.

When S. M. Sjolie located in Garfield township he entered one hundred and sixty acres, which he increased to two hundred and forty. The original one hundred and sixty acres are on section 12 and the eighty is on section 1. The farm as entered by Mr. Sjolie was in the wild, with no improvements at all. For a year the family lived in a sod house which has long since been replaced by a substantial and modern one. The barns and outbuildings were all placed by Mr. Sjolie and are all in excellent condition. On the farm are several groves of trees that were planted and cared for by Mr. Sjolie. He engaged in general farming and stock raising until his death, which occured on July 13, 1916.

Until within the past few years Mr. Sjolie always took an active part in church and civic, activities. He served his township in many of the offices and in some instances was the first officer to serve after the office was created. He always stood for progress and his efforts were for the advancement and development of the community in which he lived, and his death was widely mourned throughout this section.


Henry Skaalen
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B.F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Sarah Montgomery

Henry Skaalen, a well-known and successful farmer of Ten Mile Lake township, Minnesota, was born in Lyon county, Minnesota, on October 8, 1878, being the son of John and Gunhild (Flaten) Skaalen.

John and Gunhild were born in Norway, where they received their education, grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. In early life Mr. Skaalen learned the tailor trade, at which he was engaged, in addition to his work as a farmer. Shortly after his marriage, he and his wife decided to locate in America. After bidding farewell to the scene of their childhood and the little home where they lived after marriage, they set sail for the United States. After their arrival here, they located for a time in Freeborn county, Minnesota, after which they became residents of Lyon county, where they remained but a few years. They then removed to Yellow Medicine county and there resided until 1890, when they came to Ten Mile Lake township, Lac qui Parle county, where they entered land, which they improved and developed, and here Mr. Skaalen lived until his death in 1911. The family were active in the social life of the community and were active in the work of the Norwegian Lutheran church, to which they belonged. To Mr. and Mrs. Skaalen were born the following children: Nels; Knut; Astred; Lena; Sarah and Henry.

Henry Skaalen received his education in the public schools of Yellow Medicine and Lac qui Parle counties, where he grew to manhood on the home farm. As a young man he engaged in farming on the home place, Ten Mile Lake township, where he remained until the fall of 1912. At this time he moved to the farm of one hundred and sixty acres where he now lives in section 33. At that time but little of the farm was developed and was without improvements. Here by hard work and close application, Mr. Skaalen has succeeded in making the farm one of the best in the township. Here he has erected substantial and modern buildings and today has an ideal farm home. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has been most successful. He is now engaging in the breeding of blooded Shorthorn cattle and has some fine specimens for the nucleus of his growing herd.

In 1907, Henry Skaalen was united in marriage to Martha Jorgenson, and to this union the following children have been born: John A.; Gladys H. and Clifford E. Mr. and Mrs. Skaalen are active members of the Lutheran church and take an active interest in all church work. They are prominent and active in the social and religious life of the community and are held in high esteem by all who know them. Mr. Skaalen is identified with the Republican party and has always taken an active part in the civic life of the township and the county. He is a man of much ability and sound judgment and is often consulted relative to the affairs of the district. He is a progressive farmer and a strong believer in good roads and good schools. His influence is ever exercised in the direction of advancement in all lines of work, that will tend to make a better township and community. Mr. and Mrs. Skaalen are ideal entertainers and their home is often the scene of merrymaking.


H. A. Skallerud
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

H. A. Skallerud, a well-known farmer of Arena township, was born in Norway on December 16, 1845, being the son of Andrew and Ellen (Exer) Skallerud. Hans Skallerud, the grandfather of H. A. Skallerud, was a farmer in Norway and never came to the United States. Andrew Skallerud and family came to the United States in 1868 and lived for one year in Goodhue county. They then removed to Minneapolis, where the father was engaged as a tailor until his death, in 1886. Ellen Skallerud died some years ago, at the age of seventy-six years. Andrew and Ellen Skallerud were the parents of six children: H. A.; Anton, of Minneapolis; Anna, deceased; Julia, of Minneapolis: Mary, of Portland, Oregon, and John, who died June 9, 1890.

H. A. Skallerud grew to manhood in his native country and there received his education in the common and agricultural schools. He specialized in the breeding and raising of cattle.

Mr. Skallerud was first married to Eliza Hanson and to that union one child was born, Henry, now of Minneapolis. After the death of Eliza Skallerud, he married Julia Olson, of Minneapolis, and to this union the following children were born: Oscar, the first white child born in the township; Noble Martin, Albert and Ellen. Oscar married Charlotte Linseth; Noble married Alma Moe; Martin married Lena Wingel, and Ellen is the wife of Gust Vinge.

Ten years after coming to the United States, in 1878, H. A. Skallerud entered the one hundred and sixty acres of land, where he now lives, in section 26. The tract was wild prairie with no improvements, but by hard work and much effort, Mr. Skallerud succeeded in erecting some buildings and breaking and seeding a part of his farm. Notwithstanding his effort, his first crop of grain, hay and wood was destroyed by prairie fires. With all his early difficulties he has succeeded in developing and improving the farm, until he now has one of the best in the community.

Politically, Mr. Skallerud is independent and for sixteen years he served his township on the board, but is now retired. He and his family are members of the Norwegian Hauges Lutheran church and take much interest in all church work. Mr. Skallerud's influence has been greatly felt in the building of the churches and the schools in the township.


C. B. Skorseth
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Mary Saggio

C. B. SKORSETH, for years a well-known carpenter and builder at Canby, now a substantial farmer and stockman in Freeland township, Lac qui Parle county, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of this country since he was eight years of age and of Minnesota since he was about fourteen. He was born on July 22, 1863, son of Peder and Mathea Skorseth, the former of whom was a skilled mechanic, who came to the United States with his family in 1871 and settled at Manistee, Michigan, where he worked in a machine shop for six years, at the end of which time he came to Minnesota and settled in Lac qui Parle county, where he spent the remainder of his life.

Upon coming out to this part of Minnesota Peder Skorseth entered a claim to a homestead of a quarter of a section of land in section 32 of Freeland township, Lac qui Parle county, where he established his home and in due time developed a fine bit of farm property. He built a sixteen by fourteen frame house on his land and made his home in that house until he presently was able to erect a more substantial house, which is still standing on the place. He planted a good grove and otherwise improved the place and there continued farming until his retirement about 1907, his last days being spent in the home of his son-in-law, Bastain Hanson, where he died in the spring of 1912. His wife had preceded him to the grave about two years. They were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follows: Ole, who makes his home with his brother-in-law, Andrew Amundsen; Petra, who married Andrew Amundsen, a farmer of Freeland township; Sophia, who married Bastian Hanson, and Bennie, who is farming in northern Minnesota.

As noted above, C. B. Skorseth was about eight years of age when he came to this country from Norway with his parents in 1871 and his elementary schooling was obtained in the schools of Manistee, Michigan, being continued, after he came to Minnesota, in the schools at Wilmar and at Montevideo. He remained on the home farm until he was twenty years of age and then went to Monevideo, where he learned the carpenter’s trade under John Hanson and continued working for the latter for four years, at the end of which time he went to Spokane, Washington, where he was engaged at his trade for a year. He then returned to Minnesota and for four years worked at his trade at Duluth, after which he returned to his old home and built a new house for his father and erected a new church for the local congregation of the Lutheran church. He then married and started housekeeping at Canby, where he continued working at his trade until 1910, when he gave up building and bought his father’s old homestead farm, which he ever since has been quite successfully operating. Mr. Skorseth has a fine place of two hundred and forty acres in Freeland township. In addition to his general farming he lately has been going in somewhat extensively for raising pure-bred Shorthorn cattle and is doing very well.

C. B. Skorseth married Inga Johnson, also a native of the kingdom of Norway, who had come to Minnesota in the days of her youth with her parents, and to this union four children have been born, all of whom are at home save Dell, the second in order of birth, who married Edward Fellows, a farmer of Freeland township, the others being Elmer, Carl and Morris. The Skorseths have a very pleasant home and take a proper interest in the general social activities of the community in which they live. They are members of the Lutheran church and take an active interest in the affairs of their local congregation, as well as in all neighborhood good works, helpful in the promotion of all causes having to do with the general advancement of the community at large.


Julius O. Skotterud
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Helen Coughlin

Of the many successful natives of Norway who have settled in Minnesota, few deserve more special mention than does Julius O. Skotterud, one of the well-known and successful farmers of Riverside township, Lac qui Parle county. A native of Norway, Julius O. Skotterud came to America when but one year of age, yet, through his parents he inherited the characteristic qualities of his native country, and that same determination of purpose that is a predominant trait of the natives of Norway has been one of the prominent characteristics of Mr. Skotterud.

Julius O. Skotterud was born in Norway on October 9, 1869, being the son of Ole E. Skotterud and wife, both of whom were natives of that country, where they were reared and married. Ole E. Skotterud devoted his early life to agriculture. Some years after his marriage, he decided to leave his native home and cast his fortune in a foreign land. Being a man of much determination and one who had an ambition to make a home for himself and family, he bade good-bye to the scenes of his childhood and early life and in 1870, with his little family, set sail for America. On landing in the United States he came direct to Minnesota, where he located in Lac qui Parle county. Here he purchased a farm and made a home for himself and family. In time he prospered and became one of the prosperous farmers of that community.

Julius O. Skotterud received his education in the common schools of Lac qui Parle county and here grew to manhood. After completing his education, he assisted his father on the farm. Here he remained until 1894, at which time he was married and engaged in business for himself. He purchased a farm in Riverside township, where he still resides. Here he has one hundred and sixty acres of well-improved and highly-cultivated land. The farm at the time Mr. Skotterud made the purchase was for the most part undeveloped and unimproved. By hard work and successful management, he has succeeded in making the farm one of the ideal ones of the township. Here he has erected modern and substantial buildings, and has built for himself a beautiful home. He takes much pride in the upkeep of the buildings and the farm, which is one of the best in the county. He has been most successful and is considered one of the prominent and energetic citizens of the section. Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, being interested in the breeding of Black Angus cattle. He is a firm believer in intensive cultivation and the keeping of the best of stock. His farm is an index of the successful farmer and his stock shows careful and prudent breeding.

On October 13, 1894. Julius O. Skotterud was united in marriage to Tobia Sundby, a native of Lac qui Parle township, Lac qui Parle county, and the daughter of John and Anna (Westby) Sundby, both of whom were born in Norway, where they were reared, educated and married. While living in his native country, Mr. Sundby was engaged in farming, and after coming to the United States in 1871 he located on a farm in Lac qui Parle county, Minnesota. Here he pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he developed and improved and here made his home for many years. He was most successful in his chosen work and was considered one of the most thorough and successful farmers and stock raisers in the community. He later retired to Madison, where he died some years ago. The widow, Tobia Sundby, is now a resident of Dawson.

To John and Anna Sundby were born the following children: Ever, Anton, Koren, Gerena, Tobia, Amilia (1) and Amilia (2). Anton, Gerena, and Amilia, the first, are deceased. The family were active members of the Haugus Lutheran church and took an active part in all church work. John Sundby was one of the organizers of the early church in Lac qui Parle township and was always active in promulgating the interests of the society. Much of the early success of the church was due to his untiring interest and earnest work.

To Julius O. and Tobia Skotterud have been born the following children: Oscar, Joseph, Alma, Clifford, Mildred, Ruth, Clarence, Ernest and Jalmer, all of whom are living. The family are active members of the Hauges Lutheran church.

In addition to his many duties relative to his extensive farm, Mr. Skotterud has always been interested in local affairs and has devoted much time to the advancement and development of the township and county in which he lives. He has served as a member of the township board and is at present one of the efficient members of the school board.


Ole Skotterud
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by SueAnn McKnight

Ole Skotterud, one of the well-known and successful farmers of Riverside township, Lac qui Parle county, and one of the early pioneers in that section, was born in Norway on April n , 1833. In his native country he received his education, grew to manhood and was there married. He remained a resident of the land of his birth until he was twenty-seven years of age, in 1870, at which time he came to America. On landing in this country he came direct to Minnesota and located at Red Wing, where he remained but a few weeks. That same fall he came to Lac qui Parle county, pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land in Lac qui Parle township, and here he lived until his retirement from the active duties of farm life and moved to Dawson, where he now resides.

Some years before coming to the United States, Ole Skotterud was married to Randie Knudson, also a native of Norway, where she was educated and grew to womanhood. She accompanied her husband to the new country and assisted in making his life's work a success. By much hard work and close application to his business, Mr. Skotterud succeeded in developing and improving his tract of land. The tract at the time they came here was little more than a waste of wild prairie, and fhe breaking of the many acres was a task that required much labor. Yet in time the farm became one of the best in the township, with well-cultivated fields and substantial buildings. Mr. Skotterud engaged in general farming and stock raising and, being careful, prudent and saving, he was soon enabled to purchase another tract of four hundred and eighty acres in Riverside township, which is now owned and operated by his sons.

To Ole and Randie Skotterud were born the following children: Christena, Erick, Julius', Ole, Robert O., Mary and Albert. Christena is the wife of John Logland, of Dawson; Erick is resident of Dawson; Julius is a prominent farmer of Riverside township; Ole is on the old homestead in Lac qui Parle township; Robert is a farmer in Riverside township; Mary is at home in Dawson; Peter is a farmer in Riverside township, and-Albert is at Burns, Oregon.

Mr. and Mrs. Skotterud have always been prominent and active in the community in which they have lived. Being members of the Hauges Lutheran church, they took much interest in all church work, Mr. Skotterud having much to do with the organization, growth and success of the local church. He was always active in the local civic life of the community and did much for the growth of the township and the county. Being broadminded and a man of most excellent judgment, he was often consulted relative to the governmental affairs of the locality. He was most progressive and advocated the support of good schools as well as civic improvements that had to do with the prosperity and comfort of the community.


James I. Slende
Source: History of Chippewa & Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, Volume II, Illustrated, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Janice Brazil

James I. Slende, a prominent farmer of Hamlin township, was born in Norway on March 1858, being the son of Lars and Guri (Ulmim) Slende.

Lars and Guri Slende were natives of Norway, where they were educated, grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. Lars Slende died in 1868, when the son James was ten years old. The next year Mrs. Slende came to America and with her four children landed in Quebec. Later she removed to Wisconsin and located at Storden, Dane county. After nearly ten years’ residence in Wisconsin, Mrs. Slende came to Lac qui Parle county in 1870 where she lived until her death.

To Lars and Guri Slende were born the following children: Nels, James, Guri and Andrew. Nels, Guri and Andrew are deceased.

James L. Slende received his education in the schools of Norway and came with his mother to Canada when but a lad. After locating in Wisconsin, James worked away from home as a farm hand. When his mother came to Lac qui Parle county he came with her. Shortly after locating in the county he purchased the homestead right to the farm in Hamlin township, where he now resides. The farm at the time James Slende purchased it was undeveloped and unimproved. He built a dug-out and for five years he looked after his home and developed his farm. In 1884 he returned to Dane county, Wisconsin, and on March 13, of that year, he was united in marriage in marriage to Barbara Rorge and to this union the following children were born: Louise, Oscar, Alfred, Sadie and Elmer. Barbara Slende died at home in Hamlin township in October, 1895.

James L. Slende now has four hundred and eighty acres of well improved land. It has been through his own efforts that the land has been developed and improved. He has erected modern and substantial buildings and planted beautiful groves. Today he has an ideal farm where he is engaged in general farming and stock raising.

Mr. Slende’s life has always been an active one and since locating in Lac qui Parle county he has taken an active interest in all church, social and civic activities. He assisted I n the organization of the township of Hamlin and the school district. Always interested in the schools, he has served for many years as a member of the school board, being the first clerk of that body. He has served as chairman of the township board of supervisors and his influence has always been toward the advancement of the township and county.


Gunder E. Smaagaard
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Gladys Lavender

GUNDER E. SMAAGAARD, sheriff of Lac qui Parle county and for years a former well-known retail dealer in meat at Madison, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born there on May 20, 1851, son of Eric Christopherson and Gertrude Peterson (Chrislock) Smaagaard, both natives of that same country. Eric C. Smaagaard died when the subject of this sketch was about eighteen months old and his two elder sons, Christopherson E. and Peter E. Smaagaard, some years thereafter came to the United States and settled in Goodhue county, this state, becoming substantial pioneers of that part of the state. In 1865 the widow Smaagaard, her son Gunder, and the other members of the family followed the elder sons and also located in Goodhue county, where Gunder Smaagaard grew to manhood.

Gunder Smaagaard was about fourteen years old when he came to this country and his schooling was completed in the public schools of Goodhue county. He worked on farms there and also for a time was engaged as a clerk in a store and when he was twenty-one years old came to the western part of the state and pre-empted a quarter of a section of land in Cerro Gordo township, Lac qui Parle county, being one of the earliest settlers in that part of the county. He proved up his claim, after which he disposed of it to advantage and returned to Goodhue county, where he married in 1877. Eleven years later, in 1888, he returned to Lac qui Parle county, having disposed of the farming interests he held in Goodhue county, and engaged in the retail butcher trade at Madison and was tush engaged for several years. He then served as a policeman in Madison for about four years. At the end of which time he went to Hanover, Griggs county, North Dakota, where he remained about four years. He returned from North Dakota in 1910. In 1912, he was elected sheriff of Lac qui Parle county, entering upon the duties of that office on the January following, and in 1914 was re-elected for the term ending in January, 1917, and is now serving his second term, one of the most popular officials in the court house at Madison.

In 1877, in Goodhue county, this state, Gunder E. Smaagaard was united in marriage to Christina Wilson, of that county, and to this union five children have been born, Edward, Adolph, Matilda, Clara and George. Mr. and Mrs. Smaagaard are members of the Hauges Lutheran church and for years have taken an earnest interest in the affairs of the same.


William H. Smith
Source: History of Chippewa & Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, Volume II, Illustrated, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Janice Brazil

William H. Smith, a well-known and successful farmer of Hamlin township, was born in Dekalb county, Illinois, on April 19, 1865, being the son of Henry and Harriette (Hummel) Smith.

Henry and Hariette (Hummel) Smith were natives of Germany and the state of New York, respectively. They located in the state of Illinois and here Henry Smith died in 1871. Mrs. Smith remained in Illinois until the spring of 1886, when she came to Minnesota and located in Lac qui Parle county, where she died in 1904. They were the parents of four children, Emma, William H., George and Hattie. Emma, George and Hattie are deceased.

William H. Smith received his education in the common schools of Illinois, where he lived until 1886, at which time he came to Lac qui Parle county with his mother. After completing his school work and after growing to manhood he engaged in farming, which occupation he has always followed. In 1890 he purchased his present farm of three hundred and thirty-five acres in section 7, Hamlin township. He at once entered into the task of reclaiming it from wild prairie, and today he has an ideal farm, with modern and substantial buildings. Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has been most successful. The farm is under a high state of cultivation and his stock is among the best in that section of the country.

In 1901 William H. Smith was united in marriage to Clara (Sydow) Haueter. To this union have been born three children, Loyd, Harriett and Clarabelle. The family are active members of the Evangelical Association of North America; Mr. Smith is a member of the board of trustees of the latter.

Mr. Smith has always been active and interested in local affairs and has done much toward the improvement and advancement of the township, being a man highly respected and whose judgment is highly prized. He has served as chairman of the township board of supervisors and is now a member of the school board. Besides his many duties as a farmer and as a member of the school board, he is interested in the Farmers Elevator at Madison.


Nathaniel F. Soderberg
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by mj

Nathaniel F. Soderberg, county attorney of Lac qui Parle county and one of the best-known lawyers at Madison, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his life and in Lac qui Parle county since he was four years old. He was born in the city of St. Paul on December 10, 1875, son of Nels and Mary (Sjodahl) Soderberg, both natives of Sweden, who came to this country in 1869 and located at St. Paul, where they lived until they moved to Lac qui Parle county in 1879.

Nels Soderberg, who is now living retired at Dawson, was born in 1840. Upon moving to Lac qui Parle county he homesteaded a quarter of a section in the Dawson neighborhood and there established his home. To that quarter section he gradually added, as his affairs prospered, until he became the owner of several hundred acres. His wife died in 1885 and in 1905 he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved to Dawson, where he is now living. Mr. Soderberg is a Republican and from the very beginning of his residence in this section of the state has taken an active part in local civic affairs. For about twenty years he served as a member of the township board and in other ways contributed to the public service. He is a member of the Lutheran church, as was his wife, and their children were reared in that faith. There were four of these children, of whom the subject of this biographical sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being Albert W., Alexander H., who died in 1905, and Mary E., who married C. F. Bahre, of Dawson.

Nathaniel F. Soderberg was four years old when his parents moved to Lac qui Parle county from St. Paul and he was reared on the paternal homestead near Dawson. Upon completing the course in the Dawson schools at sixteen years of age he joined the ranks of public school teachers and for four years was engaged in teaching. He then entered the South high school at Minneapolis, from which he was graduated in 1899, after which he entered the University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1904. The next year, 1905, he was graduated from the law department of the same institution and upon being admitted to the bar began the practice of his profession at Dawson. In 1906 he was elected county attorney and in 1909 moved to Madison, the county seat, where he ever since has been engaged in practice. Mr. Soderberg is the present county attorney of Lac qui Parle county and has held that position, with the exception of about eighteen months, since his first election in 1906. During his residence at Dawson he also served as a member of the council and was for some time a member of the school board.

In 1913 Nathaniel F. Soderberg was united in marriage to Lucile P. Crary, of Northfield, this state, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Robert Crary, born on February 20, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Soderberg are members of the Lutheran church and take a warm interest in the various social and cultural activities of their home town, being among the leaders in all good works thereabout.


Mr. and Mrs. C. W. E. Sommermeyer
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

The lives and interests of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. E. Sommermeyer, the parents of Mrs. B. F. Swezey, of Bellingham, Minnesota, were so closely woven together that it would be difficult to write the biography of each separately. They lived up to their family motto – "One for all and all for one," so their life history must necessarily come under one head.

Mr. Charles William Edward Sommermeyer, pioneer manufacturer, for many years, of both Eau Claire County, Wisconsin, and Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota, was born in Gardelegen, kingdom of Prussia, Germany, on February 22, 1830, and is the son of Henry and Marie (Jennerich) Sommermeyer. The former was born on November 9, 1798, in the kingdom of Hanover, Germany, and died September 6, 1851. He was a grain dealer and manufacturer of pearl buttons; and the latter was born at Kloetze, Germany, on March 19, 1801, and died at Madison, Wisconsin, June 28, 1886.

Mr. Sommermeyer received a common-school education, but during his vacations and spare time, he took up mythology, geology, music and Bible history as recreation studies. He was confirmed at the age of fourteen and had the honor of having the highest standings in his class, next to the minister's sons, who are always favored with the highest standings. He also studied law for four years, after which he entered his father's button factory in Gardelegen, Germany, and for seven years after the latter's death, had entire charge of the business. During this time, he conceived the idea of artificially making the smoked pearl buttons. This secret remains in the family. So successful was the process that the white buttons, smoked, retained their jetty color like the genuine black pearl, no matter what treatment they were subjected to. Whereas, nowadays, all artificially smoked buttons turn red after being in use for a while.

On September 17, 1858, Mr. Sommermeyer landed in America and was met in New York by his brother, Henry, who came here a few years before, and wending their way westward, they located at North Bristol, near Madison, Wisconsin, and engaged in general merchandise business. Having remarkable business ability and understanding human nature thoroughly, in four years he more than made good; also learned to talk both the Norwegian and English languages. In 1859 his mother and sisters came from Germany to North Bristol.

A few years before leaving Germany, Mr. Sommermeyer became engaged to Miss Sophie Charlotte Huebener, daughter of George Frederick and Wilhelmina (Winegartner) Huebener. She was born at Gardelegen, kingdom of Prussia, Germany, on September 17, 1834, and came to America on August 17, 1862, accompanied by her sister, Louise (who later married Henry Sommermeyer). Her father was the owner of an estate near Gardelegen, known as "Die Buschmühle."

In the little stone church at Leeds Corners in Columbia County, Wisconsin, on September 5, 1862, Miss Sophie Charlotte Huebener and Charles William Edward Sommermeyer were married by Reverend Preuss. To this union five children were born, Charlotte Virginia, Emelie Helene, Antonie Sophie, Adele Fredericke, and Edward Frederick. They lived at North Bristol a short time and then, in 1863, went to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, where Mr. Sommermeyer and his brother, Henry, engaged in the mercantile business again and also owned the flourmill at Elk Lake and an elevator at Fall Creek, Wisconsin. In 1882 Mr. Sommermeyer moved his stock of goods to Milbank, Grant County, South Dakota, but retained the home he and his wife built and where most of their children were born. After moving to Dakota, he and his brother, Henry, saw what a wonderful country this was destined to be and so invested in land, buying ten sections, using the sections for a cattle ranch, which they operated for three years, giving employment to many people. In June 1884, Mr. Sommermeyer's family joined him. In 1885 the Minneapolis & St. Louis railroad was run through to Watertown, South Dakota, and it was then that Marietta was platted on land owned by Mr. Sommermeyer and his brother. Shortly after this time the brothers dissolved partnership, sold that part of the cattle ranch that was fenced in, divided the land equally, but retained equal interests in the town of Marietta. Henry Sommermeyer and family moved from Milbank, South Dakota, to Madison, Wisconsin, and C. W. E. Sommermeyer and family moved to Marietta, Minnesota, October 1, 1885, where they lived till November 17, 1886, when they returned to Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Mr. Sommermeyer built the first store in Marietta and had a large trade. He also built three dwelling houses and the first schoolhouse, which was used on Sundays for religious purposes. Mr. William Cross was the first schoolteacher. The upstairs of this building was used for dancing, then arranged for a Masonic temple and, as the population increased, for school purposes. A Masonic lodge was formed through the efforts of Mrs. Sommermeyer's brother, Mr. Frank Huebener. It was for the first Fourth of July celebration held at Marietta that Mr. Sommermeyer had a large flag made by Mrs. J. F. Mosier, which floated from a high pole set on the hill on what is now block 14, lot 7. As no band music could be had, Mr. Sommermeyer and his son, Edward Frederick, then a child of eight, now a dentist in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, played the fife and drum nearly all day and helped in other ways to make it a day never to be forgotten. Being of a hospitable nature, Mr. and Mrs. Sommermeyer's home was always open and many were the social gatherings held there. They were always ready and willing to give assistance in times of joy or sorrow. They believed in observing all national holidays with fitting entertainment for each day for their family and friends.

After Mr. Sommermeyer's return to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, he did not engage again in mercantile business, but in 1891, owing to the passage of the McKinley bill, in partnership with Mr. George C. Huebener, brother of his wife, he started a factory for the manufacture of pearl buttons, giving employment to sixteen men and five women. After several months they were persuaded to form a stock company, which proved to be a political scheme, as the majority of the men were Democrats and in time the entire concern was broken up. Mr. Sommermeyer was always an ardent Republican, casting his first vote for Abraham Lincoln.

After this deal went through, Mr. Sommermeyer did not engage in active business again, but having retained his land and other interests here in Lac qui Parle County, he just devoted his time to them. He dealt some in real estate, later, but reserved enough for himself and family to be comfortable. He improved his property by putting up two sets of farm buildings on section 5, and now this and his other land is all under cultivation. Since the death of Mr. and Mrs. Sommermeyer, this estate is being looked after by their son and daughter Antonie (Dr. and Mrs. B. F. Swezey), of Bellingham, Minnesota, for the heirs. Being a great student of languages. Mr. Sommermeyer could converse fluently in five languages, both took and dialect, and could understand and speak some in four others; so, many were the times that he gladdened the hearts of the foreigners here and the Sioux
Indians by interpreting for them.

On September 5, 1912, Mr. and Mrs. Sommermeyer celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in the same home they built forty-five years before. All their children and three grandchildren were with them and many were the friends who came to extend best wishes and congratulations to them. As a tribute of their love, the children crowned their mother with a myrtle wreath of gold and gave their father a sprig of the same, both being designed by their daughter, Miss Charlotte V. Sommermeyer. The bride wore her wedding dress of fifty years ago and the hand-carved, white ivory bracelets, given her by the bridegroom at the time of their betrothal, fifty-six years ago.

The family circle had never been broken, but a few months later, on the night of November 11, 1912, death came suddenly to Mr. Sommermeyer, who, considering his advanced years, had been in fair health up to this time. He was a man of extremely rare intellect, a fine musical critic and had a great love of home and family. He was a kind, loving husband and father and a loyal citizen of the United States.

On August 14, nine months to the day, that Mr. Sommermeyer's funeral was held, Mrs. Sommermeyer followed him and the day of her burial was the fifty-first anniversary of the day she landed in America. So peacefully did the end come, that members of the family by her bedside did not know the exact time of her passing. She was a woman of a most estimable character. She came from one of those strong fine, intelligent German homes, which did so much in the way of real culture and life ideals for the children who grew up in the home, and its training and standards fitted her to make her home in America – a real and beautiful home. Her mind was always full of God's beautiful thoughts, which she was careful to impart to her growing children. She was quiet, earnest, hopeful, trusting, patient and loving and loyal to the just and good. She accepted trouble quietly and bravely and with a strong faith that the eventual outcome, because a good God reigned, would be something of good, something of joy and something of happiness and that was the reason she was such a help to those with whom she lived.

As a girl of fourteen years of age in the church of her home, she was confirmed. It made a deep impression on her and the words which were spoken to her then, full of wise and Christian counsel, she treasured all the world over. Her confirmation certificate has this Bible verse: "Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in Him and He will bring it to pass" (Psalms 37:15), and on that certificate expressed in German, in the poetical form, is the thought of these words: "As God thee leads, so must thou go, Be it through thorns or hedges; Doth God at first His light withhold, The outcome will reveal That He, according to His counsel wise, Thee true and well did lead:
This be thy faith's anchor." And this was her faith's anchor. She hoped, she trusted, she tried to do her part. She looked well to the ways of her household. The years truly were golden years for Mr. and Mrs. Charles William Edward Sommermeyer. Both were members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, of Gardelegen, Germany, and of the Old Settlers Association, of Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

Their life work is over and they are peacefully resting in a sealed tomb in Forest Hill cemetery, Eau Claire, Wisconsin. The last large wreath of linden blossoms, from the trees they planted around their home, twined by the wife for her husband, now lies over both coffins linking them together as the lives of these two people were linked. "Peace be to their sleep - May flights of angels sing them to their rest."


Halvor L. Sorknes
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Mary Saggio

HALVOR L. SORKNES, former judge of the municipal court of Madison and for years one of the best-known lawyers of that city, former county attorney, former president of the city school board and for years secretary of the city library board, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born in Grue, on February 7, 1870, son of Lars H. and Aletta (Rensmoen) Sorknes, both natives of Norway and both of whom are still living there, substantial farming people.

Mr. Sorknes was well prepared, in the way of elementary education, before coming to this country. He completed the course in the school corresponding to the American high school in his native land and when eighteen years of age, in 1888, came to the United States, proceeding straightway to Minnesota, his destination being Ashby, in Grant county. In the fall of that same year he came south and located in the village of Lac qui Parle, where he attended school that winter and during several succeeding winters, thus thoroughly familiarizing himself with the English language, meanwhile working on farms in that neighborhood during the summers. After awhile he passed the examination for public school teachers and during the winters of 1891-95 taught school in Lac qui Parle. In the meanwhile, he had been sedulously pursuing the study of law and was well versed in the elements of the law when, in 1895, he entered the law school of the University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1898 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, later receiving from the University the degree of Master of Laws. Thus admirably equipped for the practice of the profession to which he had devoted his life, he opened a law office at Madison and has since then been very successfully engaged in practice, long having been regarded as one of the leaders of the bar hereabout.

Ever since locating at Madison, Mr. Sorknes has given his earnest attention to public affairs and to all movements having to do with the advancement of the best interests of the community. In 1900, two years after entering upon the practice of his profession, he was elected county attorney of Lac qui Parle county, a position he occupied until his resignation six years later. In 1910 he was elected municipal judge and presided over the city court for two years, at the end of which time he resigned. When the library board was organized he was elected secretary of the same and for five years served in that exacting capacity, rendering the public a valuable service in the way of getting the public library established upon a substantial and systematic basis. For three years he was a member of the city school board, during two years of which time he was president of the board, and in that capacity also rendered a valuable public service, doing much to elevate the standard of education in Madison. He also is a member of the board of directors of the Ebenezer Hospital, an institution of great benefit in this community, and has given much careful thought to the development of the hospital.

Mr. Sorknes has been twice married. In December, 1899, the year following his location at Madison, he was united in marriage to Gundrun Tharaldsen, who died in September, 1900, and in February, 1902, he married Carine J. Jerde, to which union seven children have been born, Herbert, Marie, Louise, Helen, Carine, Doris and Valborg. Mr. and Mrs. Sorknes are members of the United Lutheran church and take an earnest interest in the general good works of the community. Mr. Sorknes is a Mason and a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Ancient Order of United Workmen of the Sons of Norway, in the affairs of all of which organizations he takes a warm interest.


Ole Sorknes
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Ole Sorknes, a successful farmer of Garfield Township, was born in Norway on November 26, 1871, being the son of Lars H. and Alette Sorknes. Lars H. and Alette Sorkness were natives of Norway and are still living on a farm in their native country. They are the parents of the following children: Mary, Halver, Ole and Lars. Mary never came to the United States and Lars is with his parents in the old home.

Ole Sorknes received his education in his native country and lived at home until he was sixteen years of age. During the time he was not in school he assisted his father on the farm. In 1888 he came to the United States and located in Iowa where he remained one year, working on a farm. He later came to Minnesota, where he worked for some years in Otter Tail County, and while there he was employed on a farm. He then came with his brother, Halver, to Lac qui Parle County, where the two purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Garfield Township, section 6. The land was wild and with no improvements. They at once built a small shanty and began to improve and develop the place. In a short time Ole purchased his brother's share and continued, by his own efforts, to develop the farm. The original one hundred and sixty acres purchased by Ole Sorknes has been increased to three hundred and twenty acres, all of which is well improved and developed. Some years ago he built a large and substantial house, which burned in 1911, after which he built his present fine home, with modern conveniences. The farm is further beautified and improved by a ten-acre grove and an orchard of fifty apple and plum trees.

On March 20, 1897, Ole Sorknes was united in marriage to Katie Halvorson, who was born in the United States, but whose parents were natives of Norway. To this union nine children have been born: Cornelius, Obert, Adolph, Mabel, Clara, George, Conrad, Harry and Lucile, all of whom are at home.

Besides his large interests in general farming and stock raising, Mr. Sorknes is interested in the elevators at Madison and at Hadenville. Politically, he is a Republican and takes an active interest in all local affairs. He and his family are active members of the Lutheran Church.


Frank Stay
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Gladys Lavender

FRANK STAY, one of the prominent and successful farmers of Camp Release township, was born in Canada on July 10, 1837, being the son of Francois and Amelia (Demarais) Jette, both of whom were natives of Canada, where the mother died in 1852. The father died in Massachusetts on May 19, 1903. Francois Jette was the father of ten children by Amelia Jette and of twelve children by Sophia (La Parte) Jette, his second wife. Of the first family four are living and of the second family, but three are alive.

Frank Stay was educated in the public schools of Canada, where he lived until he was seventeen years of age. He moved to St. Paul in 1854, where he worked on boats. Soon afterward he located at Carlton lake, where he remained for one year, making rails for the Sioux Indians, of Red Iron village, the chief of the tribe there being Red Iron. After leaving Carlton lake, Mr. Stay lived for a time at Yellow Medicine, Red Wood, and at Hanly Falls. He remained at the latter place until 1862 where he was engaged in farming. While there he was warned by the Indian chief, Red Dog, that the Indians were coming to kill him. He at once made his escape and for a time lived in the woods. He later made his way to Ft. Ridgely, which he helped to defend against the Indians. For a number of years after this he was engaged in fighting the red men, being at the battles of Ft. Ridgely, Wood Lake and at the siege of Birch Coulie. He was later with General Sibley, as body guard, at Camp Release. It was here that the woman who later became the wife of Frank Stay was a prisoner in the hands of the Indians. After the trouble at Camp Release, in 1863, Mr. Stay with some four thousand men were on the plains all summer fighting Indians. This expedition went as far West as Bismarck, North Dakota. They built Ft. Wadsworth in 1864, leaving one hundred men before going on to Ft. Rice, where they left three hundred men. The campaign that followed took them into the Black Hills and the Bad Lands, where they had a two-days’ battle. In 1865 he was wounded at Lake Stay, named in his honor. During this year he took a homestead near Sacred Heart, Minnesota, and remained there one year, when he sold out and came to Camp Release township. Here he homesteaded one hundred and sixty-seven acres of land, for which he paid one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. It is here that he has made his home, on the beautiful farm he has developed and improved with modern and substantial buildings.

Politically, Mr. Stay is a Republican and has always taken an active part in all local affairs. He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He was school clerk of his district for six years.

In 1880 Frank Stay was united in marriage to Mrs. Celia Charron, the widow of Joseph Charron, of Canada, who was a messenger during the Indian wars. Mr. and Mrs. Charron were the parents of the following children: Fred, Antonette, Elizabeth, Euphema, and John A. Antonette is deceased; Elizabeth lives at Watson; Euphema is the wife of John Werts of Montevideo and John A. is a resident of Braham.

Celia Stay was the daughter of Antone J. and Mary Ann (Dolton) Campbell and was born in St. Paul on October 10, 1848, where the family resided until 1851. In 1851 they left St. Paul on a flat boat for Traverse des Sioux, Minnesota, where Mr. Campbell was to be interpreter for the Sioux Indians. The father and grandfather of Mr. Campbell spent much of their lives among the Indians, where they were engaged in buying furs for a large company. The grandfather was Sir Colin Campbell.

Antone J. Campbell and family were captured by the Indians in 1862 at Lower Sioux agency, twelve miles west of Ft. Ridgely, and taken to Camp Release, where they were held for some time. They were later released and taken to a camp which was in control of Passing Hail, a friendly chief. This happened a short time before General Sibley arrived at Camp Release. Mr. Campbell spent a part of his life in St. Paul as a bookkeeper and was for some years in Nebraska. He died on January 9, 1913, the last four years of his life having been spent with his daughter, Mrs. Stay. He having been born on November 25, 1825, was eighty-eight years of age at the time of his death.

To Frank and Celia Stay have been born the following children: Frank; Onesine, who works the home farm; Veronica; Mary, the wife of O.E. Kettleson, of Canada, and Joseph. Mr. Stay is a member of the Catholic church.


Arne A. Stemsrud, M. D.
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

The County of Lac qui Parle has reason to take pride in the personnel of her corps of medical men from the early days in her history to the present time. On the roll of honored names that indicates the services of earnest and capable citizens in this field of endeavor there is gratification in reverting to that of Dr. Arne A. Stemsrud. He was born in Norway, March 19, 1872. His parents are mentioned in the sketch of Ole A. Stemsrud, which appears on another page of this work.

Arne A. Stemsrud spent his childhood in Norway, where he attended school, being nine years old when his parents brought him to America, the family locating in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota. Here he grew to manhood and finished his education in the common schools and Windom Institute, Montevideo, from which institution he was graduated in 1894. He then entered the medical department of the University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1901, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He then spent about one year as intern at the Swedish Hospital in Minneapolis. He then came to Dawson, in 1901, and began the practice of his profession, remaining alone for some time, then formed a partnership with Dr. H. M. Johnson and subsequently took Dr. O. N. Meland in partnership. He was successful from the start and has built up a large and lucrative practice in Dawson and the surrounding county. He was active in organizing the Dawson Surgical Hospital in 1914, which has proven to be a successful venture. He is a member of the board of directors of the same. It is well equipped and modern in every detail and absolutely fire-proof and would be a credit to a much larger city. It meets a long-felt want, which the people of this section of the state fully appreciate. Doctor Stemsrud has taken post-graduate work in New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago along general lines and special work on the eye, ear, nose and throat.

Dr. Arne A. Stemsrud was married in November, 1905, to Minnie Lindell, of Grove City, Minnesota. She is a graduate nurse of the Northwestern Hospital at Minneapolis. To this union the following children have been born: Alice, Harold, Ruth and Helen.

The Doctor is a member of the American Medical Association, the Minnesota Medical Society, and the Camp Release Medical Society. Politically, he is a Republican. He is deserving of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished in the face of obstacles, for he is purely a self-made man. When a lad he worked on a farm to get money to defray the expenses of an education, and in order that he might have means for a medical course he taught in the public schools six years. He is a man of excellent personal characteristics and is widely and favorably known.


Martin A. Stemsrud
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Sharon Witt

In a biographical sketch relating to Ole A. Stemsrud, well-known banker of Madison and elder brother of the subject of this sketch, presented elsewhere in this volume, there is set out at considerable detail further particulars relating to this influential family in Lac qui Parle county, which it will not be necessary to repeat in this connection, further than to say that Arne H. Stemsrud, father of Martin A. Stemsrud, arrived in Lac qui Parle county from Norway in 1880 with a part of his family, bought a farm there and prepared for the reception of his wife and the other children of the family, who arrived in 1881 and the home was established in the Dawson neighborhood.

Martin A. Stemsrud was born on September 9, 1869, and was therefore about twelve years old when he came to this country from Norway with his mother, one of his brothers and two sisters in 1881 and took his place in the new home that had been provided by the father and the elder brothers in preparation for the coming of the mother and the other children. The schooling that had been interrupted when he left his native land was resumed upon arriving at his new home and the course in the public schools was supplemented by a comprehensive course in the Windom Institute at Montevideo, from which he was graduated in 1894. Upon completing his schooling Mr. Stemsrud was engaged in teaching school in Lac qui Parle county for several years, and then was called to further service in behalf of the public in the court house at Madison, where he served for two years as deputy county treasurer and afterward for two years as deputy county auditor, he having previous to his attendance at Windom Institute served as deputy register of deeds under his brother. He then was elected county treasurer and was re-elected to that important office, thus serving for eight years as treasurer of Lac qui Parle county. At the conclusion of that period of service, Mr. Stemsrud was elected cashier of the First National Bank of Madison and served in that capacity for more than eight years at the end of which time, January 12, 1915, he resigned his position at the bank in order that he might give his undivided time to his extensive and growing farm-loan business and has been thus engaged since that time, being recognized as one of the leaders in that line in this part of the state. Mr. Stemsrud is also an extensive landowner, operating between six hundred and seven hundred acres of land, and since 1898 has acted as treasurer and a member of the board of directors of the Lac qui Parle Town Farmers' Union Fire Insurance Company. For years Mr. Stemsrud has given earnest attention to local educational affairs and is a member of the Madison school board, in which capacity he has done much to elevate the standard of education hereabout.

In 1902 Martin A. Stemsrud was united in marriage to Ella Swann, daughter of J. R. Swann, for years one of the leading citizens of Madison, a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and to this union five children have been born, Elmer, Margaret, Stella, Oliver and Walter. Mr. and Mrs. Stemsrud are members of the Lutheran church and take an active interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in the general good works of the community and are regarded as among the leaders in all movements having to do with the advancement of the common interest in this part of the state.


Ole A. Stemsrud
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Ole A. Stemsrud, cashier of the Lac qui Parle County Bank of Madison, former mayor of Madison, former councilman and for seventeen years a member of the school board of that city, former register of deeds for Lac qui Parle County and otherwise prominently and actively identified with the business and civic life of this part of the state, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born on August 18, 1862, son of Arne H. and Oliana (Rensmoen) Stemsrud, both natives of Norway, who came to Minnesota in the early eighties, settling in Lac qui Parle County, where they established their home. Arne H. Stemsrud and the elder sons of the family came to the United States in 1880, proceeding straightway to Minnesota and locating in Lac qui Parle County. He bought a farm in Cerro Gordo Township, in the neighborhood of the village of Cerro Gordo, and then sent for his wife and the rest of the children, who arrived in 1881. Mr. Stemsrud was an excellent farmer and became a substantial and influential citizen of Cerro Gordo Township. He died in the summer of 1912 and his widow is still living on the old home place. They were the parents of seven children, of whom the subject of this biographical sketch was the eldest, the others being Hans A. (deceased), Maren, Martin, Arne, Olivia (deceased) and Wilhelmina (deceased).

Ole A. Stemsrud was about eighteen years of age when he came to Minnesota. He had received an excellent education in this native land and for two or three years after arriving in Lac qui Parle County was engaged in teaching school. In 1884 he was appointed deputy register of deeds for Lac qui Parle County and in 1886 was elected register of deeds, rendering such excellent service in that important public capacity that he was re-elected and served continuously until 1893. In the meantime he had become connected with the Lac qui Parle County Bank of Madison and was elected vice-president of the same. That position he held for eighteen years, or until 1898, in which year he was elected cashier of that bank, which position he has held ever since, long having been recognized as one of the leading bankers of this part of the state. Mr. Stemsrud has ever given his thoughtful attention to the civic affairs of his home community, particularly to the affairs of the schools of Madison, and for seventeen years served the public very efficiently as a member of the city school board, during which long term of service he did much to elevate the standard of education in and about Madison. He also has served one term as mayor of Madison and two or three terms as a member of the city council.

In January 1887, Ole A. Stemsrud was united in marriage to Bertha Hoyum, of Cerro Gordo Township, Lac qui Parle County, and to this union five children have been born, Olivia, Alma, Helen, Roy and Myrtle. Mr. and Mrs. Stemsrud are members of the Hauges Lutheran Church and give their earnest attention to all movements designed to advance the general welfare of their home community.


Gustav Stoick
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Lac qui Parle and adjoining counties have furnished comfortable homes for many enterprising citizens from Germany, among whom is Gustav Stoick, of Perry Township. He was born in Germany, August 2, 1862, a son of Fritz and Rosa Stoick, also natives of Germany, where they grew up, married and established their home. The father was a gardener and farmer. Both he and his wife died in their native land. They were parents of the following children: Othilia (deceased), Theresa, Edmunda, Martin (deceased), Leopold, Rhinhold, Gustav and August (deceased).

Gustav Stoick grew to manhood in his native land, there attending the public schools and learning farming under his father. In 1882 he came to the United States and proceeded to Minnesota, arriving in Lac qui Parle County on March 9 of that year, shortly thereafter pre-empting thirty-seven acres and buying one hundred and twenty-seven acres. He prospered by good management and close application and gradually added to his original holdings until now he owns a well-improved and valuable farm of four hundred and eighty acres. His original holdings were all wild land, on which he first built a sod shanty, later a twelve-by-fourteen-foot frame hut. He bought a yoke of oxen, with which he upturned the prairie sod and later bought two horses. He added improvements from time to time, building a large two-story modern residence in 1912; also has built a large barn and other convenient outbuildings and a sixteen-by-thirty-five cement-block silo. Surrounding his buildings is a splendid four-acre grove. He also has a fine orchard of one hundred and twenty plum trees, one hundred apple trees and other fruit. Among his up-to-date equipment may be mentioned a large gas engine and feed grinder. He has made all these improvements himself. In his earlier career here he raised mostly grain, but recently has turned his attention very largely to the livestock business.

In 1887 Gustav Stoick was married to Lecta Samaro, also a native of Germany, who came to the United States when young. Her death occurred many years ago. In 1892 Mr. Stoick married Rosalie Rogenbuck. His family consists of fourteen children, namely: Rosa, Arthur, Ben, Reuben, Alvin, Frank, Hettie, Katie, Elizabeth, Paul, Otilda, Theresa, Gertrude (deceased), and Gustave, the three eldest children being those by the first marriage. Rosa Stoick married John Walshleiger, a farmer of Perry Township. Arthur Stoick married Hilda Thorson and lives in Minneapolis.

Politically, Mr. Stoick is a Republican. He has been supervisor of his township for the past five years and has also served as treasurer of school district No. 88. He is a member of the Catholic Church at Nassau.


Peder C. Strand
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Peder C. Strand, a well-known and successful farmer of Baxter township, Lac qui Parle county, Minnesota, is a native of Iowa, where he was born on October 21, 1874, being the son of O. K. and Gunheld (Pederson) Strand.

O. K. Strand received his education in the public schools of his native country and there grew to manhood. He was born on September 6, 1848, and remained a resident of the land of his birth, until he was twenty years of age. In 1868 he decided to locate in America, and on his arrival in the United States, he came direct to Wisconsin, where he remained for a year, after which he located in Winneshiek county, Iowa, where he remained for seven years. During his residence in this county he and Gunheld Pederson were united in marriage in 1871 and here the son, Peder C. Strand, was born. In 1876 the family removed to Lac qui Parle county and here Mr. Strand pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land in Ten Mile Lake township, on section 2. This farm he developed and improved and in time had one of the ideal farms of the township. He was successful and before his death, on August 30, 1910, he was the owner of two hundred and eighty acres of land in Ten Mile Lake township and one hundred and sixty acres in Baxter township.

To O. K. and Gunheld Strand were born two children, Peder C. and Gilbert O. Mr. and Mrs. Strand were active in the work of the United Lutheran church, Mr. Strand having served as a trustee of the local society for a number of years. He was always active in the local affairs of the township and had much to do with the early civic life of the township and the county. He was the first clerk of Ten Mile township and was regarded as a most capable and careful officer.

Peder C. Strand received his education in the public schools of Ten Mile Lake township and at the normal school at Madison, Minnesota. He grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad and young man he assisted his father with the many agricultural duties. After completing his education he returned to the home place, where he engaged in farming until 1905, at which time he came to the farm where he now lives in Baxter township. Here he owns the one hundred and sixty acres in section 35 that had belonged to his father. He has since added eighty acres on section 36 to his farm. Since assuming possession of the farms he has done much in the way of development and has erected all the buildings on the place, all of whom are substantial and modern. Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has been most successful. He has a model place and one that is well kept and well managed.

On May 10, 1905, Peder C. Strand was united in marriage to Carolina Lageson, a native of Yellow Medicine county, where she was born on November 17, 1878. To this union have been born three children: Palmer C, born on June 24, 1908; Elliot O., November 11, 1912, and Pearl G., October 3, 1914. Mr. and Mrs. Strand are active members of the United Lutheran church and take an active interest in all church work.


A. A. Stratholte
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

A. A. Stratholte, deceased, one of the well-known and in his time one of the prosperous and successful farmers of Baxter Township, Lac qui Parle County, was torn in Norway, October 11, 1847, being the son of Andreas Stratholte and Karen Stratholte, both of whom were natives of that country. Andreas Stratholte, the father of A. A. Stratholte, was a native of Norway, where he owned a small farm, where he engaged successfully in agricultural pursuits. There he lived his life, having died in his native land some years ago. To him and his first wife, Karen, were torn the following children: Olia, Martin, Peter, Knut, A. A. and Bernt. By his second wife, Dortha Stratholte, he was the father of the following children: Karen, Martha and Gustave. A. A. Stratholte received his education in his native country where he grew to manhood.

In 1869 he decided to seek a new home in America. After landing in this country he located for a time in Wisconsin. Later he removed to Rice County, Minnesota, where he remained for two years. In 1872 he came to Lac qui Parle County, and here pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land in Baxter Township. The land was all undeveloped and unimproved, and at the time was a wild prairie. With much hard work and the expenditure of months of time, Mr. Stratholte succeeded in developing the place into one of the best farms in the township. Here he erected all the buildings and made all the improvements. He later added another one hundred and sixty acres to his original tract and here he made his home until his death, on May 19, 1915.

After coming to this country A. A. Stratholte was united in marriage to Anna R. Ruud, who was born in Norway, December 25, i860, and to them were born the following children: Clara Sophia, Delia A., Carl Albert, Sam Richard, Oscar W., John Arnt, Victor L, Selma V., Evangeline B. and Harold T. The family are active members of the Hauges Lutheran Church and take an active interest in all church work. For the past few years the family have dropped the first part of the name and are now known as Holte.

John Holte was born on the home farm in Baxter Township, on November 18, 1887, receiving his education in the schools of the township, and there grew to manhood. He is engaged in farming and stock raising on the home place and is most successful. Victor Holte is associated with his brother, John, in the management of the home farm. He was born on the old homestead on August 15, 1891, and was educated in the public schools of Baxter Township. In 1909 he and his brother assumed the management of the home place, and here they are successfully engaged in mixed farming and the raising of good stock.

On December 16, 1914, Victor Holte was united in marriage to Alma Gullickson, and to this union has been born one child, Andre Victrine. The family are active members of the Hauges Lutheran Church.


C. L. Strom
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Sharon Witt

C. L. Strom, owner of a fine farm in Madison township, Lac qui Parle county, was born in Norway, February 7, 1859. He is a son of John and Dorothy (Ingebretson) Strom, both natives of Norway. The father was born on April 13, 1821, and died on July 13, 1904; the mother was born on April 14, 1816, and died on January 10, 1905. They grew up in their native land and married there, living on a farm until 1870, when they came to America, locating in Red Wing, Minnesota, but in a short time moved to Pierce county, Wisconsin, where they resided for five years. In 1878 they came to Lac qui Parle county, Minnesota, locating in Madison township, where the father pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres on section 26, which place he developed and farmed during the remainder of his active years, spending the last six or seven years of his life in retirement, at the home of his son, C. L. His family consisted of four children, namely: Carl, deceased; Carrie lives in Madison; Hans is deceased, and C. L., the subject of this sketch.

C. L. Strom spent his early boyhood in Norway, being eleven years old when his parents brought him to America. He attended the public schools in his native land. In 1881 he pre-empted eighty acres on section 23, Madison township, Lac qui Parle county, and here he has since resided. He worked hard improving his place and added to it from time to time until he now owns four hundred acres, which he has kept well improved and on which he erected a commodious residence and numerous outbuildings. He carries on general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. He is one of the most progressive farmers of his township.

Mr. Strom was married in 1883, to Louisa Nelson, who was born in Norway, March 20, 1865. She is a daughter of Hans P. and Petrina (Peterson) Nelson. She received a common school education and came to the United States when young. To Mr. and Mrs. Strom eight children have been born, namely: Laura; Dena died in infancy; Cora; Dena; Anna; Haaken; Clara, and Clarence.

Politically, Mr. Strom is a Republican. He has served as school treasurer of his district for about twenty years, also for about the same period as supervisor of his township. He is at present a member of the township board of supervisors. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church of which he was one of the principal organizers, and of which he has been a trustee for about fifteen years. He is one of the influential and public-spirited men of his locality and is held in high esteem by his neighbors.


Henry Harrison Sumner
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, by L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by SD

Henry Harrison Sumner, one of the well-known and successful farmers of Maxwell township, Lac qui Parle County, was born in Exeter, Scott County, Illinois, on November 29, 1844, son of Ebenezer and Adaline ( Niles ) Sumner, both natives of Vermont, the former born at Wells in 1806 and the latter in 1813.

Ebenezer and Adaline Sumner were educated in the public schools of their native state, later moving with their respective parents to within twelve miles of Buffalo, New York, where they were married. Some time after their marriage they left the state of their birth and early life and removed to Illinois in 1837. There they located in Scott County, where Ebenezer Sumner engaged in milling, shoe making and saw-mill work for some eighteen years. He also for a time was engaged as a steam-boat cook, and while thus engaged went through with the first boat that went through the Erie canal. In 1855 they came to Minnesota, and here pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land in Olmsted county, where they remained until 1874, when they came over to this part of the state, settling in Lac qui Parle County, where they homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres in section 2, Maxwell Township. They developed and improved the farm and made their home there. Substantial buildings were erected and a grove was planted, much being done to improve and beautify the tract. There Mrs. Sumner died in 1892, at the age of seventy-nine, and there Mr. Sumner continued to live until the year 1900, when he moved to Dawson, where he continued to reside until the time of his death, in 1904, at the age of ninety-eight years.

Ebenezer and Adaline Sumner were the parents of the following children: S. Durain, George W., Albums Perry, Mary Rosina, Zella Sophia, Sarah Hannah, H. H., Martha Louisa, Julia Frances, Ella Arminda, Silas Daniel, Ezura Olive and Rosilinda Ellen. George W. Sumner, at the time of the Civil War was in the South and was there pressed into the Confederate Army. Albinus Perry Sumner was a soldier in the Union army and saw active service in many of the important battles of the war. He died at Sharpsburg, Maryland, and was buried at that place.

Henry Harrison Sumner received a limited education at home, having no opportunity to attend school. As a boy and young man he remained with his father and assisted with the work on the farm. At the age of twenty-seven years he began to work for himself and on July 1, 1872, he arrived in Lac qui Parle County and there pre-empted land in Lac qui Parle Township, which he later sold. He then moved to his present home in Maxwell Township, where he pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of a tree claim. The land at that time was all unimproved and undeveloped, and much work was needed to be done before the tract could be at all productive. Mr. Sumner walked to Benson and back to file on his claim. After much time and many days of hard work, Mr. Sumner has succeeded in making his farm one of the best in the township and has most excellent buildings and a fine orchard. Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, and is most successful. In addition to his home place he has one hundred and twenty acres in Hubbard County, which he homesteaded. He also owns a valuable dwelling block at Dawson.

On January 21, 1876, Henry Harrison Sumner was united in marriage to Sarah Lake, a native of Pennsylvania, born on October 13, 1850, daughter of Chester and Mary Lake. Chester Lake was born and reared in Rutland County, Vermont, while Mary Lake was a native of Alleghany County, Pennsylvania, where she was educated and where she grew to womanhood and was married. Soon after their marriage they settled in Illinois and later moved to Dodge county, Minnesota. In 1854 they moved to Moore County, this state, where they died some years ago. John Johnson, a half-brother of Mrs. Sarah Sumner, was a soldier in the Civil War, having served more than three years and taking part in twelve battles. A brother of Mrs. Sumner, Alva Lake, was for over two years engaged in the Indian Wars and saw much service, being under the command of General Sibley.

To Henry Harrison Sumner and wife have been born three children: Sylvia Aditha, Perry W. and Manley C. Mrs. Sumner and daughter are members of the Christian Science Church. The family takes part in all social activities of the community and are prominent and influential members of the township. Mr. Sumner has always taken an active interest in local affairs and has served his township as a justice of the peace.


John R. Swann
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc (1916) transcribed by Mary Kifer

John R. Swann, former mayor of Madison, president of the Commercial Club of that city, president of the Madison Milling Company, former president of the First National Bank of Madison, president of the Lac qui Parle Hotel Company, treasurer and principal stockholder of the Madison Telephone Company, for years one of the leading merchants of Madison, president of the Louisburg State Bank, a stockholder in the Peoples Bank of St. Paul, a stockholder in the Madison State Bank, a large landowner and in other ways interested in the financial and industrial enterprises of this part of the state, is a native of Sweden, but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was fourteen years of age and consequently early was inbued with the spirit of the great Northwest and by easy and natural stages grew into the affairs of Madison and Lac qui Parle county. He was born in the kingdom of Sweden, January 13, 1853.

It was in 1867, several years before the arrival of his parents in this country, that John R. Swann came to the United States, at the age of fourteen years, accompanying an uncle. In the winters of 1869-70 and 1870-71 he attended school at St. Paul and there became employed as a clerk in a drug store, later moved to Willmar, where he was thus engaged for five years, at the end of which time he was taken in as a partner in the business, the firm becoming Clark & Swann, which connection continued until the death of Mr. Clark in 1887. To his late partner Mr. Swann attributes much of his later success in life, giving him large credit for the fair treatment received at his hands and for the valuable business training received under his careful direction. Clark & Swann also had the postoffice and express business at Willmar and not long after the beginning of Mr. Swann' s partnership connection with the firm established a branch store at New Richland, which Mr. Swann operated until 1890. In 1891 he moved to Madison, where he ever since has made his home and where he very early in his residence there took a prominent and influential position in the commercial and financial life of the city and in the general civic affairs of this part if the state, which he has ever maintained and during which time he has proved one of the foremost factors in the work of developing the general interests of this section.

Upon arriving at Madison, Mr. Swann formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, George A. Qvale, and established a department store there which then was and still is the largest store in the town. In 1901 he took over his partner's interest in the store and continued the same alone until 1908, in which year Mr. Hauck and Mr. Huckins became his partners and this arrangement continued until 1914, when Mr. Swann sold his interest in the concern to his partners and retired from the mercantile business, since which time he has devoted his whole attention to his official and financial interests, he having, during his long connection with the store developed numerous other important material interests, at the same time being called to perform his part in the public service in more than one important capacity, and served four terms as mayor of Madison. Mr. Swann also has given his earnest attention to state affairs and for the past five years or more has been a member of the state board of visitors for four public institutions of Minnesota. He also is a member of the tuberculosis sanitarium commission and in other ways has contributed ably of his efforts in behalf of the interests of the state at large, while in local affairs his activities have proved of large value in the way of promoting the general interests of his home town, he having been for many years past continuously retained in the position of president of the Madison Commercial Club.

Few men in the part of the state have been more active in the general financial and industrial life of this section than has J. R. Swann. For ten years he was president of the First National Bank of Madison.

Particularly in the western part of the state, he has long been accounted one of the substantial citizens of this section of Minnesota.

In 1877 John R. Swann was united in marriage to Sophia Qvale and to this union six children have been born, namely: Ella, who married M. A. Stemsrud, of Madison; Clarence Richard, of Madison; Sarah Mabel, who married M. Alfred Larson, present treasurer of Lac qui Parle county; Esther, who is at home; Stella, a student at Carleton College, and George Walter, a student in the Madison high school. Mrs. Swann is an attendant on the services of the Lutheran church and she and Mr. Swann ever have taken a warm interest in the general social and cultural activities of their home town. They have a fine summer home at Eagle lake, five miles out of Willmar, where they spend most of their summers, and they also spend considerable time in instructive traveling.


Benjamin Franklin Swezey, M. D.
Source: History of Chippewa and Lac Qui Parle Counties Minnesota, L. R. Mayer and O. G. Dale, Volume II, Illustrated; B. F. Bowen & Co. Inc. (1916) transcribed by Genealogy Trails Transcription Team – Vicki Bryan

Success in the medical profession comes as a result of merit and painstaking effort. In the industrial world one may, by the proverbial "lucky stroke," win results or may come into possession of a lucrative business through inheritance, but professional advancement, especially, as a physician, is to be obtained solely by critical study and research, long continued. Realizing this at the outset of his career, Dr. Benjamin F. Swezey, of Bellingham,
Lac qui Parle County, has spared neither pains nor expense in becoming properly equipped for his chosen vocation.

The parents of Doctor Swezey are Samuel George and Nancy Anne (Burnett) Swezey. The father was born on January 24, 1837, in Ohio, but when quite a young man, moved to Iowa, where he met and married, at Knoxville, Miss Nancy A. Burnett, who was born in Illinois, January 11, 1838. To this union eight children were born, of whom five are living.

By profession, Samuel G. Swezey was a teacher and lawyer. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted as a private in Company E, Eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged in 1862 for total disability. After his discharge, he and his family went to Nebraska, in which state he ran a ranch in connection with his professional duties. He was always on friendly terms with the Indians and many times acted as peacemaker between them and the white people.

Mrs. Swezey was one of those women of whom could be said "that the world was better for her having lived in it." She was very proficient along all the lines pertaining to her sphere and gave her children the inheritance of a good heart and noble soul. All her thoughts and aims in life were for her husband and children.

On July 12, 1908, Mr. and Mrs. Swezey celebrated their golden wedding anniversary at Hiawatha. Kansas, where they lived the latter part of their lives and where both are now resting. Mr. Swezey passed away on June 20, 1910. and Mrs. Swezey on February 27, 1912.

Dr. Benjamin F. Swezey was born at Fremont, Nebraska, on November 1, 1873, and is of German-American descent. Pie received his education in the public school in Nebraska and then went to Keokuk, Iowa, where he
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, which now has consolidated with the State University of Iowa. He graduated from this college on April 28, 1903, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He practiced his profession in Iowa for four years before coming to Minnesota. In 1908 he came to Lac qui Parle County, practicing in Nassau and Marietta, coming to Bellingham on February 27, 1912, where he has since been engaged in general practice with considerable success. The Doctor belongs to various medical societies: The Yeomen lodge of Des Moines, Iowa, the National Geographical Society, and is a member of the Christian Church.

Politically, he, as was his father, is a Republican.

He has a very kind disposition and is always ready to say the word of encouragement and cheer to anyone who may need it. He has devoted much time to character study and never judges anyone hastily.

Being of an inventive turn of mind, Doctor Swezey, in his spare moments, has perfected and has had patented in the United States and Canada, a device to prevent snow drifts in railroad cuts, and which will prove indispensable to the railroad companies.

On November 1, 1910, Doctor Swezey and Miss Antonie Sophie Sommermeyer were married, at the parental home, by Rev. Carleton L. Koons, of the First Presbyterian Church of Eau Claire, Wisconsin. She is the third daughter of Charles William Edward and Sophie Charlotte (Huebener) Sommermeyer and was born on September 1, 1873, at Eau Claire, Wisconsin, where most of her life was spent. She received a public school education and later specialized in housekeeping, music, painting and woodcarving, besides taking a course in law and business principles from her father. She is member of the First Presbyterian Church and has devoted a great deal of her time to the up-building of Christian Endeavor Societies and Sunday schools. In 1906, being superintendent of the primary department of her church, she outlined graded work in Bible study, suitable for children of from three years to twelve. This graded work was adopted by nine Sunday schools in Lac qui Parle County, after she explained the work at the first district convention of Sunday schools, held at Marietta, Minnesota.

Mrs. Swezey is a member of the Eau Claire Woman's Club, which belongs to the State and General Federation of Woman's Clubs of the United States. She became an active member of the club in 1895, working in the literature, music and art departments and was usually on the social committee and, the year before her marriage, served on the board of directors as first vice-president. At the time of her marriage, in appreciation of her work and interest in the club, the board sent her a card signed by the president of the State of Wisconsin Clubs, Emma Crosby, introducing her to any Federated Woman's Club in the United States, whose meetings she may wish to attend. Always being interested in medicine and surgery, Mrs. Swezey is a helpmate in the various ways a doctor's wife should be.

Dr. and Mrs. Swezey have one child, Benjamin Franklin Swezey, Jr., born on February 14, 1913, at Bellingham, Minnesota. Though only three and a half years of age, he is a child of much promise and has reasoning powers that are remarkable for one so young. He speaks German and English fluently and knows and prints most of the letters of the alphabet. He is being brought up to "Trust God, do right and fear no one." He was baptized by Rev. F. S. Wheeler, of the First Congregational Church, of Appleton, Minnesota, on March 25, 1913. Benjamin, Jr., can trace his ancestry back six generations on his mother's side. All the descendants of the Swezey family hold an annual reunion in New York state or Pennsylvania, and in time he, too, will become a member of this association.

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