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Lincoln County, Minnesota 
Genealogy and History



Biographies

 

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W. H. Allen
Source:  Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey 

W. H. Allen was born in Russell, Warren county, Pennsylvania, July 31st, 1840.  He enlisted in the 10th Pennsylvania Regiment in July 1861.  In July, 1864 he came to Minnesota, and the following August re-enlisted in Company E, 11th Regiment.  On January 26th, 1865, he was discharged and he returned to Fillmore county, where he made the acquaintance of Miss Helen Churchill, with whom he became united in marriage on March 4th, 1866.  Their one and only child, Mrs. Grant Matthews, is a well-known resident of the village of Lake Benton.  In 1879, Mr. and Mrs. Allen came to Lake Benton where the home has since been maintained. 

Mr. Allen was a faithful and consistent member of the Benton Lodge No. 146, A. F. & A. M.  He passed away at his home in Lake Benton on February 4th, 1894.


Mathias Andersen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Mathias Andersen was born at Forslet Mark, Kolding, Denmark June 27, 1863. He came to America, landing at New York, August 12th, 1881. He first located at Lyons, Iowa and came to Lincoln county on march 3rd, 1886, purchasing railroad land in section 33, Diamond Lake township. Mr. Andersen remained single until March 17, 1903, when he was united in marriage to Koren Dorthea Iversen of Gjesten Skov, Denmark. Two sons were born to the union: H. T. Andersen of Kalamazoo, Michigan and Iver C., who resides at home with his father. Mrs. Anderson passed away in 1934.

When Mr. Andersen first came to Lincoln county he resided with an uncle in two rooms over a stable for eleven years. He relates that Mr. Eiler Thomasen was the first Danish settler in Diamond Lake township. Mr. Andersen has acted as township treasurer, school clerk and secretary of the Danish Lutheran church, Diamond Lake, of which he was one of the organizers and a devoted and faithful member.

Mr. Andersen is a well-to-do farmer and a man of strict integrity and upright character. He is highly respected in the community in which he has resided for so long a time.


Ole Andersen
Birth: Mar. 3, 1862, Denmark
Death: Dec. 14, 1946, Lincoln County, Minnesota, USA
Husband of Sine Andersen.
In the summer of 1888, two young people were seen walking on the road north of Lake Benton. They were Ole Andersen and Sine Moller who had come from Dwight, Illinois and were on their way to the Cornelsen home. Later it was learned that they came form Langetved, Skrave Sogn, Sonder jylland, Denmark. In the early years of the Diamond Lake congregation it ws costomary to celebrate both the Danish Fest, June 5th, and the 4th of July Festival. They entertained themselves with games, and dancing, and at these celebrations it was Ole Andersen and Johannes Cornelsen, who played the violins for the occasion. In the fall of the same year, Ole Andersen and Sine Moller were married and then made their home on a farm in Drammen township. The next year, Mrs. Andersen's father, Jens Moller came here from Illinois, together with his son Jens and daughters Anne, Mathilda and Birgette. He and Ole Andersen purchased the farm where Ole lived and divided the land. In 1898 Ole's brother Christian came here from Denmark. He married Anne Moller in 1902, and they purchased Jens Moller's farm.

Children:
Andrew Andersen (1889 - 1975)
Ellen Marie Andersen (1893 - 1987)
Spouse: Sine Maria Moller Andersen (1866 - 1916)


Anders Anderson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Anders Anderson was born in Vastergotland, Sweden, June 16, 1825. He migrated to the United States in 1881 and located in Chicago, Illinois. In 1882 he came to Lincoln county, Minnesota, buying railroad land in section 35, Lake Stay township. In 1883 he took up a homestead on section 18, Island Lake township, in Lyon county, Minnesota, and lived the life of a farmer until his death on April 11, 1896.

He was married to Johanna F. Gustafson of Nerike, Sweden. Eight children were born to the family, five of whom are still living: John W. of Jelle, Minnesota; Otto and B. E. of Clearbrook, Minn., Mrs. P. Nelson of Arco, and Mrs. Hans Nelson of Ivanhoe. Mrs. Anderson died on August 29th, 1911.


Andrew Anderson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Andrew Anderson was born about the year 1834 and came to Marble township, Lincoln county about 1870 or 1871, and built a claim shanty. He then returned to Iowa and in the following spring came back with his family and Soren Larson, a lifelong friend. It was not for two years after Mr. Anderson settled on his claim that Uncle Sam's surveyors made their appearance. Ten years after locating his homestead, Mr. Anderson took a tree claim in the same township, and which was one of the finest in the county.

Mr. Anderson, or Shoemaker Anderson as he was called, was well known to all old settlers. His nearest neighbor was for some time Mr. William Trulock of Lake Hendricks, and his postoffice New Ulm. He was a lifelong member of the Lutheran church. The Marble church, of which he was the main financial support in early days, lost one of its greatest benefactors at the time of his death, March 10, 1894.


Anton Anderson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Anton Anderson was born October 14, 1857 at Hamer, Norway. He came to America in 1869 and spent one winter at Mankato, being then but twelve years of age. He then spent a year with his parents at Redstone, Minnesota, after which he went to Canby, Minn. where he secured a position as teamster with a construction crew of the Chicago & North Western railroad for a period of two years. Following his work with the railroad he spent some time on a farm in Yellow Medicine county, and in 1880 he homesteaded in Hansonville township and by dint of hard work and efficient management eventually became the owner of five fine farms in Lincoln county.

Mr. Anderson enjoyed reminiscing with old pioneers who, like himself, had braved all the hardships incident to developing a wilderness into a thriving agricultural community. His first home on his homestead was a small sod shanty. His dining table was constructed by driving stakes into the ground for its support and a rough board for its top. He used his sled for his bedstead in the summer. He began his farming operations with a team and one cow. Mr. Anderson assisted materially in the organization of the first farmers' elevator at Canby, and also the first one in Hendricks. He was a stockholder in the Farmers National Bank of Hendricks and served as its president for many years.

Mr. Anderson served his township as one of the board of supervisors from the time of its organization in 1882 for many years following. He was a member of the school board for more than thirty years, and in 1922 was elected as Lincoln county representative to the State Legislature. He crossed the Atlantic ocean five times, first when he came to this country in 1869 and upon two visits to his old home in Norway, once in 1906 and again in 1910.

Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Sandra Stutzman

Anton Anderson came to the United States from Norway in 1870 and lived a short time in Mankato. In 1872 he came west with his parents, being then a boy of fifteen years. The first summer spent in the west they were engaged in railroading, his father having sub-contracted on grading for the C. & N. W. railroad. Later his parents settled on a farm five miles south of Canby, Minn. Here he lived with his parents for several years. After he became of age he made a homestead entry on section 20, township of Hansonville, which he converted into a fine farm home. In 1884 he was united in marriage to Miss Mina Olson and established his home on the west bank of the west Twin Lake, where he resided for many years, He was one of the most prosperous farmers of Hansonville township. He took an active part in public affairs and held the offices of township treasurer, assessor, supervisor, road overseer, school director and served two terms in the lower branch of the state legislature. He also became interested in the banking business in Hendricks.


Charles G. Anderson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Charles G. Anderson was born August 7th, 1851 at Nerike, Sweden. In 1880 he came to the United States and settled in Chicago, Illinois for a few years. Here he remained until 1884 when he moved with his wife to section 35, Lake Stay township, in Lincoln couty. He bought railroad land in this township and took up the occupation of farming.

Mr. Anderson married Miss Emma C. Larson of Chicago in 1882. The union was blessed with six children: Ellen of Minneapolis; Mrs. Oscar Lundell of Cloquet, Minn.; Mrs. S. Klavdahl of Leavensworth, Wash.; Mrs. Julia Granquist of Duluth; Edwin and Oscar of Sturgeon Lake, Minnesota.

In 1896 Mr. Anderson sold his farm to Jake Schuler and moved with his family to Sturgeon Lake, Minnesota, where he spent the remaining years of his life. He died there March 25, 1900.


Erick G. Anderson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936); transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Erick G. Anderson was born In Tisselskog, Sweden on July 6, 1865. As a young lad of seven years he emigrated with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Erickson and family to America, settling in Mankato, Minn., in 1872. After a residence of four years in Mankato, the family moved to Lincoln County in 1876 where they established a permanent home and engaged in farming. Mr. Anderson spent the remainder of his years in this section and the immediate community surrounding Ivanhoe. At his death May 12, 1936 he was survived by one sister, Mrs. Oscar Carlson of Ivanhoe. For those many years he was an active and prosperous farmer of this section and was a citizen whose efforts and works were such that build up strong, independent, and thriving communities. His manner was quiet, his deeds common and unassuming, but his life was such that makes America proud of her pioneers. He never married.


Jens Anderson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Jens Anderson was born in 1840 at Hammer, Norway. He came to America in 1868 and ten years later, in 1873, came to Lincoln county and filed on a homestead in section 26. He was united in marriage to Rena Erickson of Lanesboro, Minn. in 1869. Two children were born to the union, a son, E. A. Anderson who resides at Lake Benton and owns the old homestead, and a daughter, Mrs. Julia Barrett of Valley Springs, South Dakota.

Mr. Anderson underwent many privations in the early days. On July 4th, 1883 he left home for Lake Benton in company with Ole Johnson and Lars Olson to bring home a load of wood. On the return trip a severe blizzard suddenly swept down on them and they lost the trail. Mr. Anderson dismounted from the load on one side and one of his companions on the other in search of the trail. The team had reached the edge of a deep ravine on Mr. Anderson's side and in his search for the trail he slipped and rolled to the bottom of the ravine into deep snow. His companions searched for him until they were convinced it was to no avail, and fearing to risk their own lives farther, they discovered the trail and drove to their homes. Mr. Anderson's frozen body was found the next day, January 5th, by Ole Thompson, only about sixty rods from the latter's farm home. He had fought his way three miles or more in his determination to reach home, before being overcome.


Knute Anderson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Knute Anderson was born near Bergen, Norway, and came to America when eight and one-half years old with his mother, a widow woman with five children, in a sailing vessel, landing at Quebec, Canada in 1864. It took two weeks to make the trip across to Quebec from Bergen. From Quebec, the family went directly to Winona, Minnesota and settled in Fillmore county, where the mother remarried shortly after. In 1866 the family moved to Brown county to reside. Mr. Anderson received a common school education in the public schools and later attended the Mankato Normal School, graduating therefrom in 1877. He taught school for about six years in Brown, Watonwan and Winona counties, and then entered the employ of Mr. S. D. Peterson of New Ulm, Minn., who owned and operated a string of farm machinery stores at New Ulm, Springfield, Lake Benton and other points in southwestern Minnesota.

For a time he was located at the New Ulm store, later being transferred to the store at Springfield and still later on to the Lake Benton store. After conducting the business at Lake Benton for a time he purchased a bankrupt stock of hardware and opened up a business of his own at Lake Benton, operating same for a number of years.

Having purchased the Henry Briffett, Nathaniel Briffett and John Snyder farms, all located in a body in the west edge of the village of Lake Benton, he sold his farm implement business to Ed. Osbeck and moved onto the farm, occupying the old Snyder homestead. Here he remained for eight years, operating the three places as one unit in the meantime. He then moved back to town and resumed the ownership and operation of the farm implement business, which he continues to conduct at the present time.

Some years ago he became interested in the banking business in Lake Benton, which proved to be a losing venture, owing to the financial depression which swept the country during the years from 1928 and until the present time.

Mr. Anderson had no political aspirations, but was several times drafted for the position of president of the village council and also as village councilman for several terms. He has always been a man of the highest integrity and enjoys a high standing in the community. Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Johanna Martin of Madelia, Minnesota on January 5, 1885. Two children were born to this union, George A. Anderson of Pine Island, Minn., and Miss Sophia Anderson of Lake Benton.


Halvor T. Appelen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Halvor T. Appelen was born December 31st, 1858 at Tilmarken, Norway. He came to America in 1860 and located in Fillmore county. In 1878 he came to Lincoln county, Minnesota, locating a homestead in section 10, Marble township. He was married November 4th, 1886 to Thilda Haugen of Canby, Minn. Seven children were born to the union; Austin and Tobia Appelen of Canby, Minn.; Mrs. Harry Holm of Porter, Minn.; Mrs. Celia Miller, Canby; Mrs. Albert Anderson (Alma) and Augusta, both deceased.

Mr. Appelen has occupied the positions of town supervisor and assessor, also was a member of the school board for several terms.


Zack Bailey
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Zack Bailey was a native of Massachusetts, but spent most of his younger days up to his majority in the state of New York. At twenty-one he moved to Wisconsin and engaged in farming until 1877. In August, 1862 he joined Company F, 25th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and continued in the service in the Civil War until December 28, 1863, when he was mustered out with an honorable discharge on account of ill health. He was a member and, for sometime Commander of Old Abe Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Lake Benton.

In 1857 Mr. Bailey was married to Miss Catherine J. House, a native of New York. They were the parents of six children. Mr. Bailey came to Verdi township, from Wisconsin where he had engaged in farming for a number of years, in 1877 and located on a homestead in section 32. He lived there three years when he sold out and moved to Verdi village where he established a grocery store. He continued in the mercantile business for a number of years when he sold out and retired.

Mr. Bailey took an active part in public matters, serving his township as the first chairman of the board of supervisors, was treasurer and also justice of the peace for ten years or more. He was also postmaster for several terms.


William Samuel Barker
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

William Samuel Barker was born at Knaresboro, Yorkshire, England. He came to America in July, 1854 and first located at Watertown, N. Y. and the spring following moved to Watertown, Wisconsin where he remained until March, 1881 when he came to Lincoln county and purchased a farm from Wm. Schultz in section 2, Marshfield township, near Dead Coon lake. Mr. Barker erected a small frame house on his land which became a social and civic center in an early day. This house is still in existence and occupied by his granddaughter, Miss Eliza Rackemann.

Mr. Barker was married in England in 1852 to Eliza Allison. Three children were born to the union: Margaret Ann and Marie, one child having died in youth. Mr. Barker was a self-educated physician and practiced his profession to some extent as a side line to that of farming.


John L. Bennett
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

John L. Bennett was a native of Michigan and came to Lincoln county in 1881. He located a soldier's homestead, remaining on same for two and a half years, and then upon securing a government title to his land he sold out and purchased a furniture store in Lake Benton. In January, 1889 he was appointed postmaster at Lake Benton and maintained his furniture store in connection with the postmastership for a time. He eventually returned with his wife to Michigan where he later died.

In 1862 Mr. Bennett enlisted in Company E, 26th Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He was with his regiment in New York during the Irish riot, after which his company joined the Army of the Potomac at Manassas Junction. He remained with his division throughout the war and was serving on the skirmish line when General Lee surrendered. He participated in many hard fought battles and was severely wounded at the battle of Spottsylvania. He was a member of Old Abe Post, G. A. R., of Lake Benton.


Peter Biever
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Peter Biever was born at Naspalt, Luxemburg, Germany, on November 2nd, 1858. He came to the United States with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Biever, when he was two years old, in 1860, and they first settled at Belview, Iowa. They resided there for three years and then moved to Wabasha, Minnesota. From there they journeyed to Tyler, Minnesota, arriving there in May, 1881. They then settled on a farm in section 22, Diamond Lake township.

Peter passed away January 27, 1929 at the home of his brother, A. J. Biever, in Lake Benton. His father, mother, a brother and sister passed away previous to his death. He was survived by five brothers and a sister; Nick of San Jose, Calif.; Mike of Wabasha, Minn.; Pierre of Flandreau, South Dakota; Tony and Frank of Lake Benton, and Mrs. D. S. Mahoney of Chicago.


Pierre Biever
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Pierrre Biever was born at Belview, Iowa, July 26, 1860, and died at Flandreau, S. D., July 11, 1936. When one year old he moved with his parents, Michael Biever and wife, to Wabasha, Minnesota where he grew to manhood. When eighteen years of age he came to Lincoln county and worked on a farm in Diamond Lake township for Julius Reek. He located a homestead in section 22, Diamond Lake township which his father filed upon not long after and to which the family moved two years later. Here, together with the other members of the family he resided for sometime.

He was married to Miss Ollie Davis at Flandreau, South Dakota in November, 1890, where he established his future home. The union was blessed with two children, Melvin of Flandreau, South Dakota, and Mrs. Edward H. Johnson of Lake Benton, Minnesota.


William Biggs
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

William Biggs was born in Fayette county, Ohio, June 5th, 1824. His parents, John and Sarah Evans-Biggs, were of English descent. In 1829, the family came from Ohio to McLean county, Illinois.

William was the youngest of a large family. In about 1855 he was married to Martha E. Shockey, who lived but a year after their marriage. On November 16, 1861, Mr. Biggs married Caroline N. Pumpelly of Sardis, Kentucky. There were two children born, both dying in infancy. In the spring of 1868, he moved to a farm near Saybrook and lived very happily. In 1881, he moved to Normal, Illinois, and after the death of his wife, in November of that year, he came and made his home on a farm near Lake Benton.

He moved to Chicago in January, 1896 where he died on March 1st, that year, at the age of 71 years.


Edward D. Bigham
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Edward D. Bigham was born at Lake City, Wabasha county, Minnesota, the son of John C. and Mary (Hannah) Bigham. He resided on his parents' farm until he was eighteen years of age, receiving a common school education. In 1878 he moved with his parents to Lincoln county, the latter settling in Marshfield township, Edward remaining with them until he was twenty-one years old. He was then married to Miss Cora E. Hodgman, daughter of Ed. And Artemetia Hodgman, also Lincoln county pioneers.

Mr. Bigham engaged in farming for a time after his marriage, then moving to Tyler, and taught school for a short time. In the spring of 1882 he purchased the Lincoln County Journal, now known as the Tyler Journal, a weekly newspaper published at Tyler, which he operated for several years. He took an active part in public matters and served as deputy sheriff for five years, clerk of the school board for five years and as member of the village council for two years. In July, 1883 he was appointed postmaster at Tyler which position he held for sometime.


John C. Bigham
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

John C. Bigham was born in Bally-Keil, County Down, Ireland, on November 1st, 1824. The early years of his life were spent as a weaver. After that he took to the sea and visited nearly every port of consequence in the world. Returning to Ireland he was married January 3rd, 1850, to Mary Hanna, setting sail immediately thereafter for America.

The young couple first settled in Pennsylvania and lived there four years. Then, with his young family, he emigrated to Illinois near Mount Morris, remaining one year, and from there to Lake City, Minnesota, coming all the way in a prairie schooner drawn by oxen in 1856. From there he came to Lincoln county and settled in Marshfield in 1878.

When the railroad was built through from Tracy west in 1879, he moved his family to Tyler where he resided until death. Mr. Bigham conducted the first feed mill in Tyler. He died at his home there November 16th, 1908, at the age of eighty-four years.


Joseph Bigham
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Larry Lakey

Joseph Bigham was a son of John C. and Mary (Hannah) Bigham, early settlers in Lincoln county and the parents of ten children. The parents underwent the most extreme hardships in rearing a large family of children in a new country, and were devoid of well nigh every luxury of life. However, they bravely met every obstacle incident to pioneer life and rounded out their earthly existence to a good old age.

Joseph received an early common school education, afterwards attending commercial college in Keokuk, Iowa for a time. Later he returned to Olmsted county, Minn., where the family resided, and engaged in business in partnership with his brother, Robert A., for a time at Red Wing, Minn. In the fall of 1878 he came to Lincoln county and took a homestead in section 24, Marshfield township. He taught school during the winters and operated his land in the summer until he finally purchased the land from the government and obtained a patent. He then returned to Wabasha and taught school a few months, returning to Lincoln county and engaging in the meat market business in partnership with Welliam Evans for about six months.

He then sold out and moved to Tyler where he engaged in the study of law with Andrews & Dean, with whom he continued about a year. He was later admitted to the bar and thereafter for sometime devoted his attention to the practice of law, school teaching, traveling and purchasing grain for different firms. He later became prominent in county and village affairs, both in Tyler and Lake Benton, being county attorney for a time and taking an important part in the organization of the Lincoln County Old Settlers association.


Thomas John Bigham
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

THOMAS JOHN BIGHAM was born in Blacklog Valley, Huntington county, Pennsylvania, November 20, 1851. He moved with his parents to Lake City, Wabash county, Minnesota, in 1856, again moving west in 1878 and locating at Marshfield, in Lincoln county. When the railroad was built through Tyler in 1879, thus causing Marshfield to become an inland town, that village broke camp, moving partly to Tyler and partly to Lake Benton, the Bighams cast their lot in Tyler, Thomas thus becoming one of the first setters in the new village, and where he resided until his death September 19, 1923.

On May 8, 1882, Mr. Bigham was united in marriage to Mary Magandy and four children were born to them. Mr. Bigham was a faithful attendant of the Mission church in Tyler. He was industrious and upright in character and highly respected by all who gained his acquaintance.



Ane Marie Nielsen Black
Birth: Jul. 30, 1856, Denmark
Death: Oct. 18, 1938, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA

Rasmus Black was born on Lolland, Denmark. In his youth he worked at a large "Herregaard" as a servant or "valet".
Later he became engaged to Ane Marie Nielsen, from Sjaelland, Denmark and in 1882 they came to Chicago. The next year, on September 14, 1883 they were united in marriage.
Mr. Black hadn't come to America to live in a large city, so after a short time they moved to Wisconsin where he worked on a tobacco farm for a number of years. He wanted to be a land owner so finally came to the Danish colony at Tyler and soon purchased a farm in Diamond Lake Township.
He first built a house with an addition to it which he used as a barn. Later a new house was built. There were 7 children in the Black family, and as they grew up they learned at an early age to help in the house and garden. The Blacks had a beautiful yard all landscaped with flowers shrubs, and trees of all kinds.
For many years Mr. Black led the singing at the church services and other gatherings. Mr. Black was blessed with many talents. He loved music and song, could make many things, was especially fond of horses, training them to do stunts as well as riding them.
Things went well for the Black's until the summer of 1924 when a dreaded cyclone struck the community and ruined their beautiful home, buildings, trees, flowers, everything. One son, Sofus Black lived just north of their place, and further north on a hill was another farm home, where their daughter, Mrs. Aage Nielsen had resided, but which was now vacant. Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus Black moved to this farm. Mr. Black's health began to fail and the following year he was taken ill and was bedridden for a long tome. He passed away on September 16, 1926. Shortly after this, Mrs. Black moved to Minneapolis where their daughter and sister, Ethel also resided.
Mrs. Rasmus Black passed away in October 1938 and brought back to Diamond Lake where she was laid to rest beside her husband.

Children:
Theodore Henry Black (1884 - 1964)
Clara Black (1888 - 1983)
Ethel B. Black (1898 - 1988)
Spouse: Rasmus Black (1862 - 1926)

M. L. Blegen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

M. L. BLEGEN was born in Norway in 1851. He came to the United States in 1872 and to Lyon county, Minnesota in 1878, settling on a farm near Florence. In 1885 he came to Lincoln county and settled in Lake Stay township, later moving to Arco where he resided until his death in 1936, with a son. Mr. Blegen was the parent of eleven children: Lewis, Edward, Iver, Petra, Albert, Agnes, Marcus, Augusta, Ida, Paula, and Ellen. Lewis and Iver preceded him in death some years ago, and Mrs. Blegen died in 1920. His son, Edward, resides on a farm in Lake Stay township, three miles north of Arco, and two sons live in Arco.


John P. Boulton
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

JOHN P. BOULTON was a native of England and became a stationary and locomotive engineer, following that occupation twelve years in England and twelve years in the United States. He came to America in 1868 and located in New Jersey, thence in Pennsylvania and Shenandoah. In the spring of 1880 he moved with his family to Lincoln county, purchasing a farm in section 2, Alta Vista township where he established a permanent home. He was married in England and was the parent of two children, Robert and William. He devoted his affairs principally to farming of which he was highly successful.


William Boulton
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

WILLIAM BOULTON was born at Dalton-in-Furness, Lancashire, England, March 13th, 1868. He emigrated with his parents to America arriving in this country in May, 1880. In June of the same year, his father located on the southeast quarter of section 2, Alta Vista township, Lincoln county, where Mr. Boulton has resided since, having assumed ownership of the farm after the death of his parents.

Mr. Boulton was married June 28th 1892 to Winifred Culshaw of Minneota, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Culshaw. Eleven children were born to the union: Mrs. Winifred Swedzinski, Taunton; Mary Boulton, Porter; Frances Boulton (deceased); Mrs. Florence Rogge, Porter; John, of Minneapolis; James, of Porter; Theresa, of Porter; Mrs. Helen Monson, of Boyd; William, George and Evelyn, of Porter.

Mr. Boulton's mother died in August, 1910 and his father in July, 1916, having resided on the old home place until their death. The farm has since been increased from a quarter section to a complete section and is one of the choicest farms of Lincoln county, located on a trunk highway within a short distance of a thriving town.

Mr. Boulton relates that during the early days his father's family experienced all the hardships incident to pioneer life, such as terrible blizzards, deep snows, no mail or train service for months at a time during the long, cold winters; a shortage of fuel and groceries, the family being obliged to twist hay and burn same for heat and cooking purposes. The family was kept busy during the winter twisting hay, grinding wheat with a coffee mill and roasting barley as a substitute for coffee.

Mr. Boulton is a republican and takes an active and interested part in political matters. He is a member of the Farm Bureau, the Farmers Union, and the Law and Order League. His religious faith is Roman Catholic and he has been a member of St. Edward's parish in Minneota, Minnesota, since moving to this county in 1880.


George Bradley
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

GEORGE BRADLEY settled in Lincoln county in 1874. He was engaged in farming the greater part of the time and was very successful in this occupation. For a short time he was in the hardware business, and afterwards was in partnership with his brother, W. H. Bradley of Lake Benton. He moved to Mankato and resided there until his death on March 19, 1895. He was married and had three children.


William H. Bradley
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

WILLIAM H. BRADLEY came to Lake Benton, Lincoln county, in 1885. He was a native of the state of New York, born in Tompkins county, that state, March 13, 1854. His parents were farmers but at the age of seventeen he entered as a clerk in the mercantile business and followed that occupation until 1874 when, his health having become impaired, he came to Lincoln county on a hunting trip and engaged in that pastime throughout the summer.

He then went to Minneapolis and engaged as a clerk in a dry goods store. After remaining in Minneapolis about a year he returned to his native state and remained until the winter of 1875-76 when he returned to Lincoln county and took a homestead, on which he lived for a short time. The year previous the county had been scourged with grasshoppers and the ground was full of grasshopper eggs. He remained on his claim until the grasshoppers began to hatch out and, concluding it would not be profitable to stay longer, went to Minneapolis and found employment as a clerk.

In the spring of 1877 he returned to his claim and resided upon same for four years, as a bachelor, proving up in 1883. He lived on his claim until June, 1885 when he traded if for a dwelling, a store building and a stock of groceries in Lake Benton and opened a grocery store which he operated until his retirement.

Mr. Bradley was married at Lake Benton in May, 1883, to Miss Fanny Fletcher. This union was blessed with three children, all of whom survive. Both Mr. and Mrs. Bradley have since passed on.


Cornelius N. Bressler
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

CORNELIUS N. BRESSLER, for many years a leading farmer of Diamond Lake township, Lincoln county, purchased a relinquishment of a homestead in section 33, April 19, 1882. On this place he lived for many years. There were about five acres broken on the place when he came into possession of it, and he commenced adding thereto and making improvements. He was one among the early settlers and has always been held in high esteem. Mr. Bressler was born in Monroe, Illinois and was one of ten children. His sister, Elizabeth, married A. J. Montgomery who owned a farm adjoining that of Mr. Bressler. The latter died in 1880.

Previous to coming to Lincoln county Mr. Bressler was engaged for several years as thresher, owning and operating his own threshing machine. After locating on his claim in Diamond Lake he not only operated his farm but owned and operated a threshing rig for many years. For many years Mr. Bressler was a member of the Lake Benton Band and still retains his membership in that organization. He returned from farming some years past and moved to Lake Benton where he is held in the highest esteem.

Mr. Bressler was married February 2nd, 1888 to Miss Lily Louisa Smith, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Amos Smith, also old settlers of Diamond Lake township. Mr. and Mrs. Bressler have two children, George who resides on a farm in Diamond Lake township, and Mrs. Albert Larsen who resides in Lake Benton at this time.


C. H. Brieffett (Briffett)
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

C. H. BRIEFFETT (BRIFFITT)(an autobiography) was born September 13, 1848 in Somerset Shire, England. In 1857 he came with his parents to the United States and settled on a farm in Columbia county, Wisconsin. Mr. Briffett came to Minnesota in 1865 and made his home at Money Creek, in Houston county. In May, 1869 he came west to Lake Benton and setled (settled) on a claim at the head of the lake. Here he resided for 17 years. In 1872 he was married to Rebecca Taylor daughter of William Taylor, the first settler at Lake Benton. Mr. Briffett was one of the county’s early successful farmers. He was the first town clerk of Lake Benton, served for a number of years as assessor and from 1878 to and including 1882 as county commissioner. Later he moved to Centralia, Lewis county, Washington, where he has since passed on.


Nathaniel Briffett
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Nathaniel Briffett was born at Story, England, March 4th, 1855 and died at Lake Benton, Minn., December 7, 1926. He was the son of James and Mary Briffett and came to the United States with his parents when only sixteen months old. He came to Minnesota in 1882 and settled at Yayzata, and for a time was in the employ of a brother-in-law who operated a boat building establishment on the shores of Lake Minnetonka. He came to Lake Benton in 1883 and was married the same year. Three sons were born to the union: Fred and John Briffett of Lake Benton, and Walter Briffett of Ivanhoe, Minn. Mrs. Briffett passed away August 10th, 1918.

At his death Mr. Briffett was survived by his three sons, a step-daughter, Mrs. Morgan Pitts, and two brothers, Frank and George. Two brothers, James and Henry, both Lake Benton pioneers, preceded him in death. He was a man of sterling qualities and held the esteem of all with whom he became acquainted. Mrs. Briffett was a daughter of Wm. Taylor, the first white settler of the Lake Benton community.


H. W. Brownell
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

H. W. BROWNELL was born in New York state in 1826. He moved to Lincoln county in 1876 where he resided until his death on July 31st, 1897. Two children survived him at death, his wife having preceded him to the Great Beyond.

John E. Buell
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

JOHN E. BUELL came to Lincoln county in 1878 and settled on a farm in Hope township. At the time of his settlement there were but three other resident families in the township, those of John Moore and Tom Robinson, half breeds, and Thomas Turner. Mr. Buell had resided in Lyon county previous to settling in Lincoln county and had passed through the grasshopper scourge of 1875-76 and 1877, and had endured many other privations incident to that period. He was twice married, his first wife dying and leaving him with seven children. He was a man of wide experience and extensive travel.


Agnes Stewart-Carlisle
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

AGNES STEWART-CARLISLE was born in the eastern section of the United States and later moved to Wisconsin where she was married to Lawrence William Carlisle at Ripon, Wis. Seven children were born to the union, six boys and one girl. Charles, Fred, Mart and Robert were born at Ripon, and Edward, Frank and Hattie were born at Eureka, Wis. where the family had moved later. Mr. Carlisle died at Eureka in 1873.

In November, 1877 Mrs. Carlisle moved with her family of seven children to Lincoln county, Minnesota and spent the winter with her brother, John Stewart, on his claim in Diamond Lake township. Soon after her arrival she purchased a quarter section of railroad land in section 27, adjoining her brother’s claim on the south. In the spring of 1878 she erected a set of small buildings on her land and with her family of six children bravely set to work to build up a farm home out of the raw prairie. In her efforts she is to be most highly commended. Providence seems to have crowned her endeavors with signal success, as she not only developed a fine farm from raw prairie soil, but provided a comfortable home for herself and children. Her children grew to become industrious and honorable men and her daughter became a highly respected and cultured woman. Charles and Fred have passed away some years past; Mart and Ed. live in Brookings where they are engaged in gainful business pursuits; Frank is a prosperous fruit grower at Spring Brook, Oregon and Hattie, now Mrs. Elmer Keeler is happily married and resides at Pipestone, Minn., her husband being county highway engineer; and Robert, who still resides on the Carlisle homestead in Diamond Lake.

Mrs. Carlisle passed away several years ago, having lived to a good old age and rounded out a noble and useful Christian life. Beset with difficulties that would have discouraged many another person, a frail woman endowed with an indomitable spirit, she quailed at nothing and met the hardships of pioneer life with a fortitude and trust that sustained her on every occasion.


Alvin H. Carpenter
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

ALVIN H. CARPENTER has probably experienced as varied a life as far as occupation is concerned, as any pioneer mentioned in these sketches. He was born in Ohio, and commenced his life occupation as farm hand, passing to that of farming for himself, mining in Colorado and California, and farming in California. He then returned to Ohio, purchasing his father’s farm and conducting same for about six years, at the beginning of which venture he was married.

He then removed to Randolph, New York and went into partnership in a planing and carpenter shop. Unfortunately the mill was burned and Mr. Carpenter lost most of his earthly possessions thereby. He then moved to a farm for a period of two years and then came to Minnesota, locating a homestead in section 10, Lake Stay township in April 1877. Through hard labor and thrift, Mr. Carpenter built up a fine homestead and enjoyed a comfortable home.

He took an active part in public affairs and occupied the offices of justice of the peace, assessor, supervisor, and treasurer of his township, and director of the school district at various times. He was postmaster in Lake Stay for several years. He was a most upright man and enjoyed the esteem of his many acquaintances.


Hans Caspersen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

HANS CASPERSEN was a native of Denmark and came to America in 1872. After following various occupations in Minnesota and Iowa he came to Royal township, Lincoln county, in 1878 and took a tree claim. He lived on the claim for two summers, finding occupation at Mankato and Rapidan, in Blue Earth county, during the winter. For three of four years thereafter he found employment in Freeborn county and again in 1884 returned to his claim for permanent residence. Mr. Caspersen was married to Miss Ella Hoven of Limestone township, Lincoln county, on January 11th, 1887. Their only child died in infancy.

Mr. Caspersen was chosen delegate to attend the first convention to be held in the county, at Marshfield, in 1881. He took an active part in public affairs and was chairman of the board of township supervisors, constable and was treasurer of the Farmer’s Alliance of the county for a time. He was a man of good character, a loyal citizen and was held in high esteem.


Peter Caspersen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

PETER CASPERSEN was born in Denmark in 1844. He was married in that country and accompanied by his wife and children, came to the United States in 1873. Mr. Capersen was the parent of four children, namely, Mrs. Al. Wred, Rasmus Caspersen, Mrs. Erick Krog, and Mrs. John Lund. The Caspersen family upon coming to Lincoln county, first made their home in Royal township not far from the location of Ivanhoe, but in 1898 moved to Diamond Lake township.

Mrs. Caspersen died in 1914, after which the widowed husband made his home with is son, Rasmus Caspersen, and family until his death January 7th, 1922.


John L. Cass
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

JOHN L. CASS was a native of the state of Wisconsin, removing to Minnesota with his parents to the vicinity of Owatonna. He had received a common school education in Wisconsin and for a time attended high school at Owatonna. After teaching school for a time he entered the law school at Ann Arbor, Michigan for two terms. He then taught school for a time and returning to Owatonna entered the political field. Being unsuccessful in this he again taught school until the spring of 1879.

He then came to Lincoln county and engaged in the practice of law at Marshfield until September when he removed to Lake Benton, where he resumed the practice of law on a small scale until March, 1880 when he was admitted to the bar. He then continued with his law practice until March 16, 1887 when he purchased the newspaper equipment of the Lake Benton News from Chas. M. Morse and engaged in publishing that publication. He operated the News for several years with more or less success.

He took an active interest in public affairs and was county attorney for two terms, and also served as deputy county treasurer. He was a member of Benton Lodge No. 146, A. F. & A. M.


George Henry Chapman
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

George Henry Chapman was born November 26, 1845 at Herkimer, N. Y. His father was a boatman on the Erie canal. The family lived at Herkimer until 1868 when they moved to Winona, Minnesota. After a short time he again moved to Austin, Minn. and a little later he moved to Lincoln county, locating on a homestead in section 22, Limestone township. Here the family resided for some time while Mr. Chapman traveled as collector for a commercial concern.

Mr. Chapman was married October 4, 1865 to Miss Cornelia Piper of Mohawk, N. Y. Five children were born to the union: Frank W., who died in 1931; Fred A., who died in 1883; Estella M., wife of W. B. Thorburn, Lynd, Minn.; Eugene C., Ashland, Wis., and Harry G., Sioux City, Iowa, now in the employ of the Great Northern railroad.

Mr. Chapman enlisted for service in the Civil War from Schenectady, N. Y., August 8, 1862 and was mustered out in 1865 at Blandenburg, Maryland. He served throughout the war in Company H, 134th New York Volunteer Infantry. He served as a private one year in the Army of the Potomac under McClellan, Burnside, Hooker and Meade. He took part in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and was then transferred to Chattanooga. He was at Buzzard's Roost, Georgia; Rocky Fish, Ga.; New Hope Church, Renesau Mountain, Peach Tree Creek and Atlanta. He was taken prisoner at Chattanooga and escaped before reaching the southern prison at Atlanta, also being wounded. He was also engaged at other points during his service.


Allen Fletcher Chase
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

ALLEN FLETCHER CHASE filed on a claim in section 22, in Lake Stay township, Lincoln county in the fall of 1878 and brought his family to his new home in 1879. Mr. Chase was a native of Indiana, his parents moving to Michigan when he was a child. He received a good education. In August, 1864 he enlisted in Company H, 8th Regiment Michigan Cavalry and saw hard service until the end of the war, being mustered out in June, 1865. After the war he attended a course of instruction in the Collegiate Institute of Ontario.

In 1872 he came to Brown county, Minnesota where he engaged in farming for a time and later in Renville county, four miles north of Fort Ridgley. His crop was destroyed by grasshoppers and he returned to Brown county where he remained for a time, his wife teaching school at Lone Tee Lake. Mr. Chase also taught school in Renville county. In 1874 they returned to Indiana and Mr. Chase taught school. After two years he came to Houston county, Minn. and opened up a broom factory in company with his brother. In 1877 he located in Brown county again and remained one year. He then came to Lincoln county in the spring of 1879, his wife spending the summer in the east. In the fall his wife joined him on his claim in Lake Stay township where they established their home.

Mr. Chase interested himself in public affairs and was made chairman of the town board for seven years, was assessor, town clerk, justice of the peace and director of the school district in which he lived. He also organized a Congregational church in the township, the first meetings being held at his home. The organization grew to be an influence for good in the community. He was a man of staunch character and was held in high esteem in the county.


Jens H. Christensen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

JENS H. CHRISTENSEN came to Lincoln county in 1885 and purchased a farm in Shaokatan township. He was a native of Denmark and came to America in early manhood. Previous to locating in Lincoln county he was variously engaged in the state of Wisconsin. He was for a number of years a supervisor in the township of Shaokatan and also served as school director. He was married and the parent of seven children.


Andrew Christianson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Sandra Stutzman

Andrew Christianson came to Hansonville township from Chicago, Illinois in 1885. Besides his farming operations he has been engaged in general merchandising in the village of Hendricks. He has occupied the positions of town supervisor and road overseer.


Christian Christianson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Sandra Stutzman

Christian Christianson was born in Norway May 20, 1851, emigrated to this country and came to Iowa, where he first established his home in Clayton county in 1871. In 1879 he came to the township of Hansonville, Lincoln county, and located on section 34 where he with his family resided until 1894, when he was elected county treasurer, which office he held four years. He took an active part in the Farmers' Alliance and People's Party organizations and owned a fine farm in the township, but resided in the village of Hendricks during his latter days. In public service, aside from the county treasurership, he held the offices of mayor of the village of Hendricks, assessor, supervisor, road overseer and school district officer.


Jens H. Christensen, Sr.
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Jens H. Christensen, Sr. was born May 13, 1848 at Livstrom, Schlesevig Holstein, Denmark. He emigrated to America in 1872 and located at Menominee, Wisconsin. He came to Lincoln county in 1884 and homesteaded in section 17, in the New Grove community, Shaokatan township. He was married to Mary Vizecky of Rawley's Bay, Door county, Wisconsin, November 4, 1875. Nine children were born to the union: Mrs. Eacie Christianson, Winter, Wis.; Mrs. Anna Eastman, J. J. Christensen, Louis A., Merton and Jens H. Christensen, Jr., all of Hendricks, Minn. Three children preceded the parents in death; Mrs. O. J. Evans, Hendricks; Lucy Christensen, Ellison Bay, Wis., and Grant Christensen, Shaokatan township. Mr. Christensen, Sr. died December 19th, 1927 and Mrs. Christensen, August 13, 1931.

Mr. Christensen was confirmed in the Lutheran faith at the age of fourteen years. As a young man he worked on a farm until he reached his majority when he enlisted in the Danish army and served three years, receiving an honorable discharge at the age of twenty-four. He then came to America and was employed in a saw mill at Menominee, Wis. for one year. He then purchased a farm near Ellison Bay, Wis. He became a naturalized citizen of the United States in July, 1881. The family moved to Shaokatan township in 1884 where our subject resided on his farm until late in life when he moved to Hendricks village for the remainder of his days.


Peter Christianson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Sandra Stutzman

Peter Christianson emigrated from Norway in 1875, lived for a short time in Iowa and came to Hansonville in 1880, where he and his family have lived for many years. He became an extensive raiser of high grade horses, cattle and other stock. He and his wife raised a large family and were thrifty and prosperous. He occupied the offices of supervisor, road overseer and school director.


William A. Clement
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

CLEMENT William A. Waseca. Editor and publisher. Born Feb 13, 1870 in Waseca County Minn. Son of Henry S and Nellie (Wilcox) Clement. Married in 1898 to Hilda C Ranke of Waseca Minn. Educated in the public and high schools Waseca Minn graduating in 1889. Located in Waterville Minn and learned printer’s trade; worked in printing office in Albert Lea, Austin and Lake Benton 1889-94; purchased Annandale (Minn) Post 1894 and published same 1 year; worked at Ellendale N D for short period; returned to Waseca 1885 and was employed at his trade; purchased half interest in Waseca Journal and conducted same under firm name of W A Clement & Co which was succeeded by the Waseca Journal-Radical Ptg Co. of which he became mngr. merging the Journal and Radical newspapers. Purchased entire stock of this company and has been sole owner and publisher to date. Served for 3 years in M N G. Member State Editorial Assn; commercial Club; Masonic Fraternity and K O T M.


George Cleveland
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

GEORGE CLEVELAND was born June 26, 1865 at Lancaster Massachusetts, and with his parents was among the early settlers in Minnesota. His father was frozen to death in a blizzard in Murray county, not far from Tracy, Minnesota, in an early day.

Mr. Cleveland was one of Pipestones's early pioneers, having operated the Morse ranch, a short distance south of Verdi. He was married to Miss Francis Heilig in the fall of 1878. Eight children were born to this union: Ora, Arthur, Grover, Alice, Lloyd, Willie, Wayne and Josephine. About 1890 Mr. Cleveland started buying grain at Verdi for the Van Dusen grain company, being transferred shortly after to Lake Benton, where he brought grain for the same company for a number of years. He then went on the road selling thresher machines and equipment, following this line until his death December 3rd, 1906.

Mr. Cleveland was a member of the Masonic, Workman and Modern Woodman orders and was well and favorably liked wherever known.


Patrick Clifford
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

PATRICK CLIFFORD was born in County Kerry, Ireland. He came to America in 1865 and located in the state of New York where he worked in the mines for a time, then moving to Wisconsin and later to Blue Earth county, in Minnesota. In 1876 he came to Marshall, Lyon county, and worked on the railroad. He came to Lincoln county in 1877 and located a homestead and tree claim in section 8, Marshfield township, which he proved up on later.

Mr. Clifford was married in Ireland. Three children were born to this union, Patrick, Jr., Kate and Mary, all of whom are still living, and residing upon the original homestead. Mrs. Clifford died in 1920, and Mr. Clifford died October 5, 1918. Patrick, Jr. died in 1935.

When Mr. Clifford first located upon his claim he erected a log house which served as a residence for the family for a number of years. He was a thrifty, had working man and built up a fine farmstead. During the first years of his pioneering he and his family underwent all the hardships common to the early settlers. Aside from operating his farm Mr. Clifford worked out as much as he could for other farmers. He even walked as far as Sleepy Eye and New Ulm to work in the harvest field to help support his family in those trying pioneer days. His early crops were badly damaged with grasshoppers, which added much to the difficulties of establishing a home on those western prairies. He was one of those sturdy, dependable, early settlers who labored so unfalteringly to develop and build up southwestern Minnesota.


John H. Cook
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

JOHN H. COOK homesteaded in section 34, Ash Lake township, Lincoln county, in 1876, He had also pre-empted lands in 1873. He was industrious and developed one of the best farms in the township. He was among the first settlers in the township and assisted in its organization in 1879. Mr. Cook was married November 15, 1875 to Miss Maggie Marcellus and had one child. He was quiet and congenial by nature and was well esteemed by all.


John Wesley Cooley
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

John Wesley Cooley was born January 8, 1849 at St. Albans, Somerset county, Maine, and died at Lake Benton, Minnesota, April 19, 1923. In 1866 he moved to Pason, Illinois and two years later, in 1868, was united in marriage to Melvina Taylor at Newton, Illinois. The union was blessed with four children, Herbert S., Cassius C., Mrs. Maude Bliven and Mrs. Mattie L. Johnson of Buffalo Springs, N. D.

In 1869 the family moved to eastern Minnesota and three years later, in 1872, came to Lincoln county and settled on a farm in section two, Lake Benton township, five miles northeast of Lake Benton village, where they lived until 1885 when they moved to Lake Benton village.

Mr. Cooley was one of the pioneers of Lincoln county, having lived here nearly fifty-one years at his death. When he first came to the Lake Benton vicinity he found only four white families living here. Many people remember the blizzards of 1880 and 1881. Mr. Cooley was caught out in one of the storms while carrying mail between Lake Benton and Pipestone and was compelled to remain out all night in a snow bank. (A detailed description of this experience will be found on page 206 of this history). Mr. Cooley drove a star mail route from Lake Benton to Pipestone and return, also from Lake Benton to old Wilno, Idlewild ("Doc" Mack store near the east end of Lake Shaokatan), and the New Grove postoffice in Shaokatan township.

Aside from the homestead in section two, Lake Benton township, Mr. Cooley also proved up on a tree claim in section fourteen in the same township. On coming to Lake Benton village in 1885 he purchased a livery business of William Elliott, which he operated with the assistance of his son, Herbert, until his death. Mrs. Cooley died in 1914. His son, Cassius, died April 4, 1928. The latter became one of the leading merchants of Lake Benton for many years. His son, Herbert, is still living and has been engaged in operating a dray line in partnership with his son, LeRoy, for a number of years past. L. H. Cooley, the elder son of Herbert, now operates the grocery business once owned by his uncle, Cassius. Our subject was appointed the first coroner of Lincoln county in 1874.


Dr. Albert Jeffrey Cox
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853–ed.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Dr. Albert Jeffrey Cox, of Tyler, Minnesota, is a native of Wisconsin, and traces his ancestry back to Colonial times. His mother, whose maiden name was Minerva J. Cook, was descended directly from Peter Lozier, of France, and Francis Cook, who settled at the Plymouth colony in Massachusetts. Her father, Rev. Nelson Cook, was a prominent minister of the Free Methodist and Wesleyan church. She was first married to Zebulon M. Viles, a nephew of John Hancock. Mr. Viles died shortly after their marriage, and his widow subsequently became the wife of James Cox, who was a native of England. Mr. Cox came to this country when but eight years of age. He has always been a farmer, and has acquired a competency. His son, Albert, was born in Trempealeau, Wisconsin, on March 2, 1862. The boy attended school at a neighboring schoolhouse, known in the vicinity as "the red schoolhouse." A feature of school life in the country districts in those days was the spelling school, brought, with other customs, from New England. The "red schoolhouse'' which young Albert attended, usually held the championship of the vicinity over all comers. In 1880 he entered the scientific course of Galesville University at Galesville, Wisconsin, and graduated from the academic department in 1883, having covered the three years course in two years of actual study. He was unable to attend continuously on account of lack of funds. For three years he was First Sergeant in the cadet corps of the institution. After leaving Galesville he taught school and studied medicine under Dr. Cyrus H, Cutter, of Trempealeau, Wisconsin. In the course of a year he found himself in a position to enter the medical department of the Michigan University, and by hard work and close application succeeded in making the freshman and junior studies during one year. He had intended to graduate from the medical department at Ann Arbor but his old preceptor advised him to go to Rush Medical College in Chicago, and accordingly he went there and graduated February 16, 1886. Upon graduation Dr. Cox went at once to Tyler, Minnesota, where he has since lived, practicing his profession. During the following spring he formed a partnership with J. W. Kendall, and for three years was interested with that gentleman in the drug business at Tyler. In 1890 he purchased Mr. Kendall's interest in the business, and has since conducted it himself with the aid of two clerks. When Dr. Cox went to Tyler the country was newly settled, but population has constantly been added, and though the work of building up a practice has been slow, it has been continuous. Dr. Cox was married to Miss Mary J. Bigham on June 23, 1887, at Tyler. They have two children, Floyd Albert Cox and Howard Bigham Cox. Dr. Cox is a member of the Congregational church. He is also a member of the Southwestern Minnesota Medical Society. His political faith is Republican. For the past two years he has been secretary of the Republican county central committee. In the order of the A. O. U. W; he has held the office of financier of Tyler Lodge No. 109, ever since its organization in 1888 he being one of the charter members.

Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) Transcribed by Helen Coughlin

DR. ALBERT J. COX was born in Trempleau county, Wisconsin on March 2, 1862. In his boyhood he attended district school where he received his rudimentary education. When eighteen years of age he attended Galesville (Wisconsin) University from which he graduated in 1883. By dint of hard work he succeeded in paying his own way through college. This he did by canvassing, working at farm work and teaching school intermittently. He attend (attended) the medical department at Ann Arbor, Michigan, one year and then returned to his father's farm the fall of 1885, and then entered Rush Medical College at Chicago, where he graduated in the spring of 1886. While at home he had previously studied medicine in the office of his father's family physician, Dr. C. H. Cutter.

After graduation he came directly to Lincoln county and established a practice at Tyler. He arrived in Tyler on February 22nd, 1886. He had become involved in debt for his college education and in getting established in his medical practice, but from the first he applied himself diligently to his profession and soon worked up a fine practice and by that means paid off all is indebtedness and also became well-to-do. He entered into a partnership with J. W. Kendall in the drug business in connection with his medical practice at which he did well until the spring of 1889 when he sold out his interest to Mr. Kendall.

Dr. Cox was married at Tyler, June 27, 1887 to Miss Mary J. Bigham, the daughter of John C. and Mary (Hannah) Bigham, old pioneer residents of Lincoln county. By this marriage he had two sons, Howard and Floyd. Dr. Cox eventually sold out his practice in Tyler and moved to Superior, Wisconsin and established another practice, where he later died.


A. J. Crain
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

A. J. Crain was born in Logan county, Kentucky, March 19th, 1847. In 1865 he removed to McLean, Illinois, where he resided until April, 1887, when he removed with his family to this county, where they have since resided. On November 5, 1874, he married Alice Curtis. By this union were born two children, a daughter and a son.

Mr. Crain was a hard worker and successful farmer and had amassed a competency of this world’s goods. He took an active interest in public affairs and had been chairman of the board of county commissioners and a representative from this (16th) legislative district in the Twenty-sixth legislature. His legislative career was marked by hard and faithful work for his constituents.

Mr. Crain joined the Methodist church in 1873 and was a faithful and honored member ever afterward. He was also an active member of the Benton lodge, A. O. U. W. He died November 17, 1892.


John Crofoot
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

John Crofoot was born March 23, 1851, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Crofoot, at Martville, Cyuga county, New York, where he spent his boyhood days. His mother died in his infancy. At the age of twenty-four he came west to Minnesota, took a homestead in the year 1878, and was united in marriage to Sophie Johnson. To this union nine children were born: Benjamin, Stella, Pernie, Pearl, Annie, Brainerd, DeWitt, Caroline and Victoria.

He remained on the homestead on the south shore of Lake Hendricks, known as the Morseth farm, for twenty-six years. He was a mail carrier in the early days before the village of Hendricks originated. He carried mail from what was then called Hendricks post office on a pioneer farm known as the Sivert Erickson farm. From this post office he went to what was called New Grove post office at the William Dorn farm and from there to Idle Wild post office on the Searls farm near Lake Shaokatan for about six years.

In 1902 he moved to what is now the village of Hendricks, residing there for about two years. He then moved to Minneapolis, where he lived until his death in January, 1935.


Patrick Cronin
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

Patrick Cronin purchased a farm in section 9, Marshfield township, Lincoln county, in 1878 and located on same in 1879. He was a native of New York. His parents came to America from Ireland, locating in New York some years previous to his birth.

When he was yet a small boy they moved to Wisconsin. His father was principally a railway employee. The family finally located near Rochester, Minnesota where they purchased a farm. Mr. Cronin remained with his parents until twenty-six years of age when he came to Lincoln county and located. He immediately commenced improving his land and adding to the acreage by purchase until he eventually owned three hundred acres of rich, fertile land. Subsequently, he builded a splendid set of farm buildings and developed one of the finest farms of the county.

Mr. Cronin took an active part in public matters and occupied the position of township supervisor and assessor. He was married in 1882 to Miss Mary Lawler. To this union four children were born. One son, Martin, still resides upon and operates the home place.


Charles Henry Curtis
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Charles Henry Curtis was born at Hayworth, Illinois on June 17th, 1866, and died June 17, 1927, in the state where he was born, at the age of sixty-one years. Coincidentally, death called him on the anniversary of his birth. At the age of eleven years he came to Lincoln county with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Curtis, the family taking land on the west shore of Lake Shaokatan.

This pioneer family of which Charles was the youngest, arrived here in April, 1877, building a home on the barren prairies of this section. The mother died while Charles was still a mere boy, the remains being laid to rest in the Shaokatan cemetery. "Grandpa" Curtis, as he was known to the pioneer settlers, lived many years in that vicinity and died at Glen, Minnesota, where interment was made.

Charles H. Curtis was married to Miss Anna Laura Miller at White, South Dakota on March 11, 1886. They took up residence on a farm on the east shore of Lake Shaokatan, where they resided until 1906, when Mr. Curtis was elected to the office of sheriff of Lincoln county. During his term of office, which he was very successfully re-elected to and served for sixteen years, the family lived in Ivanhoe up to 1923. Mr. and Mrs. Curtis moved to Montana where they lived two years, again returning to Ivanhoe, where the home was maintained for some time. Mr. Curtis was survived by his wife and eleven children.


John H. Curtis
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

John H. Curtis was a Kentuckyan by birth. In the spring of 1877 he came to Lyon county, Minnesota and became one of the earliest settlers of that county, where he remained for two years. In the spring of 1879 he located on a farm in Lincoln county on the shores of Lake Shaokatan. He was married to Miss Sarah Barclay, a native of Kentucky, in 1850. Six children were born to the union, all of whom lived to become respected citizens of Lincoln county.


Andrew Nissen Dahl
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

Andrew Nissen Dahl was born in Vonsild Mark, Denmark on July 22nd, 1848. He came to America in March, 1873 settling in Oxford, New Jersey. On August 23rd, 1873 he was united in marriage to Miss Dorthea M. Rhode at Oxford, New Jersey. Here they made their home for thirteen years, coming to Lake Benton in the spring of 1886, where they established the new home in Diamond Lake township, taking up the tasks of the early-day pioneer in changing the virgin prairie into the fine community which it is today.

In the fall of 1920 they moved to Lake Benton, where they resided until the death of Mrs. Dahl on February 5, 1924. After her death Mr. Dahl made his home with his various children. At the time of his death September 8, 1931, his survivors were three daughters, Mrs. Ferdinand Fehrman of Lake Benton, Mrs. Chas. Tyler, Minneapolis, and Mrs. Harry Bridenstine of Iowa; four sons, Chris, Andrew Jr., Jens and Fred Dahl, all of the Lake Benton community. One son, Christian Dahl, has since passed away.


Peter G. Daly
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

Peter G. Daly was born in Canada of Irish parentage. Early in his life his parents located in Olmsted county, Minnesota. Mr. Daly remained with his parents until about twenty-five years of age.

He came to Lincoln county in 1878 and purchased a tract of railroad land in Marshfield township. In 1879 he came to his farm and remained one season, returning to his parents and from that time until 1885 he spent his summers on his farm and his winters at the home of his parents. In 1885 Mr. Daly was married to Miss Hannah O’Connor of Olmsted county. Two sons were born to this marriage, John Francis Daly, who died in infancy, and Thomas William, who still resides upon the home place in Marshfield.

Mr. Daly eventually acquired 320 acres of valuable land and developed it into a fine, well-cultivated farm. He became interested in public matters to the extent of holding the offices of township clerk and also clerk of school district No. 24.


Hiram B. Danielson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

Hiram B. Danielson was born April 3, 1859 in Goodhue county, Minnesota, a descendant of the sturdy Norsemen, sometimes called the Vikings, who were strong for liberty, freedom of the seas and free trade. His ancestors were numbered among a colony of these sturdy pioneers who settled in Wisconsin in 1854, at which time his father came on to Minnesota and the family lot was cast in the southeastern section of this state.

In 1880 Mr. Danielson boarded a prairie schooner and came further west, selecting Lincoln county and its barren prairies in which to establish and maintain his home. He settled on the southwest quarter of section 15, Hendricks township where he lived continuously until his death January 12th, 1935, at the age of seventy-six year.

Mr. Danielson was twice married, his first wife, whom he married June 25, 1884, Amanda Sundell Danielson, having died in 1896, the mother of seven children. On December 2, 1908, Mr. Danielson was married to Mrs. Mathilda Danielson, the widow of his brother, Wesley, who was killed in a railroad collision at Enderlin, N. D. in 1906. This union was blessed with six children. Three of Mr. Danielson’s children preceded him in death.

Mr. Danielson was a public-spirited man, active in all lines of civic work, and always one of the first to sponsor any improvement or good for the community. He served his community in various capacities; was county commissioner and also served as Representative in the legislature. He was strictly honest and upright in all his dealings and was sympathetic and generous to those who were unfortunate or in trouble. While he never identified himself with the church, he had a deep regard for the Christian faith and often spoke of the sincerity and faithfulness of his parents and their strong principles of right and wrong. He was long a member of the Masonic order being affiliated with Morality Lodge No. 247, of Hendricks.


John A. Dass
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

John A. Dass was born in Germany June 17, 1869 and emigrated with his parents to America in 1872, settling at Iron Ridge, Dodge county, Wisconsin. He came to Minnesota with his parents in 1882 and lived on his father’s homestead in Lake Stay township until he grew to manhood. He was married to Emma Degner of Marshall, March 18, 1896, and remained on the family homestead. Five children were born to the union: Herbert and Herman, twins, the former now a resident of Marshall and the latter at home; John L., who is county highway patrolman near Arco; Rudolph, who died in 1922, and Elsie May, who resides at home.

Mr. Dass has served as town treasurer about twelve years, town chairman about twenty years, school district treasurer about twenty years, school district chairman about twenty years, and has been deacon of his church for a number of years.


Paul Dass
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

Paul Dass and family, consisting of three boys and one girl, emigrated to the United States in 1872 and settled at Iron Ridge, in Dodge county, Wisconsin. The family came to Lincoln county in 1882 and homesteaded on the northwest quarter of section 14, Lake Stay township. In those days hay was very abundant and was the main source of fuel for the settlers. Most of the people lived in dug-outs and sod shanties. The winters were long and severe with some terrible blizzards, snow often reaching a depth of 14 or 15 feet in ravines and on side hills. A string or rope, it is related, was often tied from the house to the barn so that the settlers could find their way to the barn through the storm, to take care of the stock and find their way back again. There seemed to be but little sickness and nearly everyone enjoyed good health, in spite of the numerous adverse circumstances.

The first postoffice in Lake Stay township, known as the Lake Stay postoffice, was established in 1885 or 1886. The office was maintained at the home of Mr. Carpenter, who was appointed postmaster. The first mail carrier in the township was a Mr. Optin. He had a long and slow route, which made it impossible for him to serve it more than twice a week with horse and buggy. There being no roads or bridges, he followed a winding trail around sloughs, through creeks and over hills. The sloughs and creeks were then full of water which added materially to the difficulty of travel. His route was from Marshall, through Lynd, Camden, Island Lake and thence to Lake Stay.

Marshall was then the nearest trading point to the Lake Stay community and was located at such a distance that it was seldom that the settlers were able to go to town.


James B. Davidson
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

James B. Davidson was born in Redford, Clinton county, New York, April 21st, 1842. He came to Minnesota in 1859, and in September 3rd, 1861 enlisted at La Crosse, Wisconsin, in the First Wisconsin Battery, Light Artillery. He took part in five major campaigns of the Civil War and was on the firing line 123 days, never refusing to perform any duty he was called upon to do.

Following his honorable discharge from military service on October 27th, 1864, he returned to Caledonia, Minnesota and on February 5th, of the following year, he was married to Miss Mary V. Pope. To this union three children were born, Minnie, John and Louis. Mr. Davidson came to Lake Benton in 1880, the family following in 1881, where he resided until his death October 14, 1910.


William E. Dean
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

William E. Dean was a native of Illinois. He received a common school education and studied law in Albert Lea, Minnesota two years, taught school intermittently and studied law at Iowa State University for a short time, but on account of sickness, was compelled to give up his course at that time. He later studied law in Marshall and was admitted to the bar in 1877.

Mr. Dean had filed on a claim in Marshfield township, Lincoln county in 1873, but soon after went to Albert Lea to study law. Not having the means for travel he walked from Albert Lea to his claim in Lincoln county and return several times. After returning to his claim he proved up in 1878 and moved to the village of Marshfield for the practice of law and in the fall of 1879 moved to Tyler where he engaged in the practice of law and the real estate business.

Mr. Dean was married in 1881 to Miss Mary Starr, the daughter of Isaac and Ellen (Hannah) Starr, also old Lincoln county pioneers. Two children were born to the union, Albert Low and William E. Dean, Jr. Mrs. Dean died in 1889. Mr. Dean took a keen interest in public matters and served Lincoln county as judge of probate for one term. He founded the Lincoln County Journal in1881, which newspaper was later changed to the Tyler Journal.


Alvin Derby
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

Alvin Derby was born in 1852 in Katarogus county, New York. He later located in Vernon county, Wisconsin and in 1878 came to Lincoln county, locating on a homestead in section 34, Royal township. It might be mentioned that the county court house is located on the east edge of his homestead land.

Mr. Derby was married in 1882 to Miss Sarah Hutchinson, whose father was also an early Royal township homesteader. Eight children were born to the union: Mrs. Charles Selleck, Hendricks; Mrs. R. W. Hanson, Shaokatan; Mrs. Melvin Cowles and Mrs. John Gackstetter, Hendricks; Myron, Claude and Melvin Derby. One daughter died in childhood.


William F. A. Dorn
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

William F. A. Dorn was born June 25, 1850, the son of William and Marie Dorn, in Germany and came with his parents to America when six years of age. The family settled in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin where they remained for two years. They then moved to Dore county, Wisconsin and engaged in farming where William remained with his parents for twenty-three years. In 1883 he came to Lincoln county and purchased railroad land in section 1, Shaokatan township where he developed a fine farm. Here he remained until 1897 when he retired.

Mr. Dorn was married in Wisconsin to Miss Ernestine Miller in 1871. Ten children were born to the union, six of whom, viz., Fred, Elizabeth Schwantz, Albert, Otto, Bertha Trautman and Rosella Willard, survived at Mr. Dorn’s death November 27, 1934. Mrs. Dorn died in 1911, and after her death Mr. Dorn spent his remaining days with his children.

Mr. Dorn was accompanied to Lincoln county by his parents, who resided with him until their respective deaths. Shortly after their arrival in Lincoln county, Mr. Dorn made arrangements with Missionary Boettcher for divine services to be held in his home, and this was the beginning of the Trinity Ev. Lutheran congregation of Hendricks. He was an industrious and frugal man and was highly successful in all of his ventures. During the time he was engaged in farming in Shaokatan township he occupied the positions of town supervisor and school director for several years.


Montreville Lafayette Dorwin
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

Montreville Lafayette Dorwin located on the southeast quarter of section 35, Lake Stay township, Lincoln county, in the spring of 1881. Mr. Dorwin purchased the land from the railroad company. His new home was about one-half mile from the former home of Houkak, a brother of the noted Indian chief, Little Crow. Houkak’s log house stood in this location for years after the Indian massacre. Little Crow used to visit his brother, it is said, about twice a year for the purpose of hunting and trapping, and would bring friends with him whenever he chose and almost eat Houkak out of house and home.

Mr. Dorwin took an active interest in public matters and held the offices of town supervisor and school clerk. He was a successful farmer, was married and the parent of seven children.


John Dressen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Bobby Dobbins Title

John Dressen was born at McGregory, Iowa in 1860. At an early age he moved with his parents to Red Wing, Minnesota, and in the year 1880 he became an early settler in the vicinity of Tyler, where he resided until his death. On October 16, 1893 he was married to Mary Clifford at Elkton, South Dakota and to this union five children were born: Mrs. Herbert Wilson of Arco; Mrs. Herman Doubledee of Tyler; John Dressen of Sherman, S. D.; Clarence of Tyler, and Lawrence Dressen of Lake Benton.


Mathias Dressen
Source: Early History of Lincoln County; Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Susan Geist

Mathias Dressen was born in Germany in 1828 and spent his early life in that county, serving three years in the Prussian army. When about twenty-seven years of age he came to the United States, this being in the year 1854. He first stopped in Rochester, New York for about four years, then moving westward to Iowa where he lived until about 1861 when he removed to Red Wing, Minnesota. He purchased a farm at Red Wing and resided thereon until 1877 when he came to Lincoln county and settled on a tree claim in section 10, Marshfield township.

Mr. Dressen was married in New York to Anna M. Flagel. Fifteen children were born to this union, Henry, Theodore, Mary, John, Charles, Kate, William, Theresa, Gretchin, Anna, Peter, Susan, Lizzie, Mathias (deceased), and Phyllis (deceased). Several of the sons remained in Lincoln county and became influential men in their community.

Mr. Dressen was a hard-working man, paying strict attention to every detail pertaining to his personal matters, and prospered from a man of poor circumstances to one of affluence. He made a specialty of tree culture and planted and raised a beautiful grove about his farmstead. He also made the breeding of hogs a specialty. He took an active part in public affairs and served as township supervisor and also as treasurer for several terms.


Frank Dushack
Source: Early History of Lincoln County, Compiled by A. E. Tasker; Lake Benton News Print (1936) transcribed by Sandra Stutzman

Frank Dushack was born in Bohemia and came to the township of Hansonville about the year 1882. He became a prosperous farmer and held the following public offices: Supervisor, road overseer and school director.



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