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Mille Lacs County, Minnesota

 


Biographies


Thomas Leger Firth Armitage
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotall

Armitage, Thomas Leger Firth, physician; born in County Down, Ireland, Nov. 22, 1860; son of Thomas and Agnes (Shaw) Armitage; educated in Dundalk Grammar School, County Louth, Ireland; Leamy School, Limerick, and by private tutors; at Trinity College, Dublin, 2 years; Royal University, Ireland, 2 years; Queen's College, Belfast, 3 years; Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 year, 1892. Stood 12th best in public examination at Philadelphia in 1892, out of over 230 M.D.'s. Began practice of medicine, 1891, in America. Served with medical staff in the British Soudan Campaign, 1885-87, and won medal and bar and Khedive's bronze star. Located in Princeton, Minn., 1898; president and treasurer Minnesota Rural Telephone co.; owner Princeton Drug Store. Episcopalian. Member American Medical Association, American Health Association, American Association for Advancement of Science; secretary U.S. Pension Examining Board, etc. Mason; member I.O.O.F., Knight of Pythias, Good Samaritans. Married at Pittsburg, Pa., June, 1898, to Margaret Helly. Address: Princeton, Minn.


Almon P. Barker
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Almon P. Barker, one of the leading attorneys and representative men of Mille Lacs county, was born at Naples, Cumberland county, Maine, on the 11th of August, 1846. He was reared on a farm, and provided with such educational facilities as were furnished by the common and high schools of the locality, with a few terms at Bridgton Academy and one term at Westbrook Seminary. In 1864, he commenced teaching school during the winter months, and followed that occupation more or less until after settling in Princeton in 1873. He came to Minnesota in 1868, and was admitted to the Bar the following year, but returned to Maine in 1870, and was in business at Ellsworth for some time. In the spring of 1873, he returned to Minnesota, and after being employed as bookkeeper for Farnham & Lovejoy at Minneapolis, for six months, came to Princeton and occupied the position of Principal of the graded schools during the school year. In July, 1874, he opened a law office, and has been in active practice ever since. In the same year he was appointed Superintendent of Schools for Mille Lacs county, and elected Town Clerk and Judge of Probate, holding the former office four years, and the latter, two years. In 1876, he was an independent republican candidate for Representative in the State Legislature, but defeated by seventeen votes. In 1877, he received the regular republican nomination for State Senator, which, however, he declined. In 1878, he was elected County Attorney, and re-elected in 1880. Mr. Barker is also largely interested in the real estate business. He was united in marriage with Miss Olive Ross, daughter of the late Samuel Ross, Esq., of Princeton, on the 13th of July, 1876.


Henry F. Barker
Source: History and Biography of Central and Northern Minnesota, Geo. A. Ogle & Co., Chicago, 1904. Transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman.

Hon. Henry F. Barker was born in the town of Naples, Cumberland county, Maine, in 1850, and now lives in Cambridge, Isanti county, Minnesota, where he is widely known and respected both for his sterling manhood and manifest ability. Maine has sent a host of sturdy and upright men to settle in Minnesota, and Mr. Barker is a worthy representative of the very best. He comes of Yankee stock, and his father, John Barker, was a life-long farmer, and his grandfather, Asa Barker, served in the war of the Revolution, being present on the battle-field of Saratoga. The maternal great-grandfather of Henry F. Barker was Isaac Larrabee, who was also a soldier for the American colonists, having served with distinction on many a hard-fought Revolutionary field of strife. He was at Bunker Hill, in the very beginning of the war, and bore his part throughout that momentous struggle.

Henry F. Barker is the third member of his father's family of children, and was reared and educated in Maine, where he attended the local schools and Bridgeton and Westbrook Academies. There was much hard farm work to be done, and the youth of Mr. Barker was a busy and industrious one. Selecting the law for his vocation, he read and studied at Albany, New York, where in 1874 and in 1875 he took a law course, and where he was admitted to the New York bar in 1875. After securing his admission to the profession he came back to his native state to enter upon the practice of his profession. In company with A. F. Burnham, he opened an office at Ellsworth, where he remained until the month of December, 1876, when he broke up and came west to Minnesota, whither so many of his state's people had already gone and had done so well. For a time after his arrival in the state he taught school at Princeton, and also engaged in the practice of his profession with his brother, Judge A. P. Barker, who had first come to the state in 1868. Judge A. P. Barker died in 1883, and our subject and his brother, Dr. G. A. Barker, of Menominee, Wisconsin, are the only surviving members of the family.

Mr. Barker located at Cambridge in the summer of 1878, the county being sparsely settled at that time. In July, 1878, he opened an office in the new and struggling village of Cambridge, and has been continuously engaged in the practice of his profession in this county for the last twenty-three years. In that time he has built up a large and extensive business, not only in the law, but quite as largely in real estate. He has handled Isanti county wild lands, farms and town lots, and is still doing much work in that line.

Mr. Barker was married in 1879 to Miss Margaret C. Byers. She was born at Princeton, where her father, Samuel Byers, is a general merchant and an extensive farmer. In his early days he was a teacher and a carpenter. To this union has come a family of children as follows: Minerva, who is in the junior year at Carlton College; Ethel and Ruth, who are in the Academy at Carlton College; Blaine and Henry, at home.

Mr. Barker is a Republican, and was elected as county attorney in 1878, a position which he held for fourteen years, being elected seven times. In 1882 he was sent to the state legislature, and again in 1886. In 1898 he was elected as a member of the senate of the state. He is the first senator from Isanti county. For twenty-one years he served as treasurer of the school board of Cambridge, and at different times has been a member of the village board, in which he has acted several times as president of the board.

Mr. Barker is president of the Cambridge Milling Company, and also of the Cambridge Starch Company. He is president of the Cambridge Commercial Club, and was one of the strongest supporters of the Cambridge Milling Company and the starch plant, watching the slow growth of these two important enterprises with an anxious eye. In 1893, there was organized the Cambridge, Minneapolis & Duluth Railway Company to promote the building of a railroad between these two important points that should touch at Cambridge. Surveys were made in its behalf. A second railway company was also projected, running from Minneapolis into Isanti county, of which W. D. Washburn was president and Mr. Barker a director. Mr. Barker was indefatigable in his efforts to secure railway connection for Cambridge with the outward world, and success finally crowned his efforts.

Mr. Barker is a Republican, and has attended every national convention of his party since 1876. In 1900 he was a delegate to the Philadelphia convention.


George Bockhoven
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
George Bockhoven, one of the pioneers of Mille Lacs county, was born in New York in the year 1818. He came to Princeton with his family in 1856, and settled on a farm on section thirteen. He was married in his native State to Miss Sophia Brooks, the event taking place in 1850. Of nine children, the result of this union, seven are living ; Nancy M., George H., John F., Lafayette D., Cora E., Leonard, and Lemuel.


John S. Bouck
SOURCE: History of Morrison and Todd Counties Minnesota by Clara K. Fuller, Volume II, 1915, B. F. Bowen & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. Transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman.

It is not often that true honor, public or private, comes to a man without some basis in character or deed. The world may be besieged by fortune or by ornamental or showy qualities without substantial merit and may render to the undeserving a fortuitous and short-lived admiration, but the honor which wise and good men value and that lives beyond the grave must have its foundation in real worth. Not a few men live unheralded and almost unknown beyond the narrow limits of the city or community, wherein their lots are cast, who yet have in them, if fortune had opened to them a wider sphere of life, the elements of character to make a statesman or public benefactor of more than passing fame.

The Hon. Charles W. Bouck, representative from Morrison county in the Minnesota state Legislature, is a citizen whose work extends beyond the limits of his home county. The testimony of his fellow citizens is ample that he is a good citizen in the full sense of the term and worthy the honor and public trust that have come to him. As the Duluth Tribune said of him in referring to his work in the last session of the Minnesota Legislature: "To Representative Charles W. Bouck, of Morrison county, was entrusted all the highway legislation. No man in the house began to know as much about the subject as 'Charley.' Only one man in the Legislature knew more about it-Bob Dunn. Bouck put through many bills, simply on good fellowship. Personally, no man in either branch of the Legislature was more popular than he."

Charles W. Bouck was born on February 29, 1852, in Rockford, Illinois, the son of John S. and Elizabeth (Elliott) Bouck, the former of whom was born near Buffalo, New York, on a farm, in 1824, and who died in 1906 at the age of eighty-two years. The latter was born in Brighton, England, and came to America when a small girl with her parents and settled near Rockford, Illinois, where she lived until her marriage.

When a young man, the late John S. Bouck sailed on the lakes. After he had finished his education, he came to Illinois and was instructor in a seminary, where he met his wife and was married. After living a few years at Byron, near Rockford, Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. John S. Bouck immigrated to a farm of two hundred and eighty acres near Independence, Iowa, which Mr. Bouck cultivated for twelve years. At the end of that time he sold out and purchased one hundred and sixty acres adjoining the corporation of Independence. There he lived until 1877, when he again sold out and purchased one hundred and sixty acres in Morrison county, Minnesota, five miles northeast of Royalton. Here he lived for a number of years. During the later years of his life, he was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal church and preached in the locality where he lived. Still later he moved to Princeton, Millelacs county, Minnesota, where he was twice elected judge of the probate court. At the close of the last term, he was taken ill with pleurisy of the heart and died one week later. He was a Republican in politics, and before his election as judge, had served as a justice of the peace for many years. He was also supervisor of the town of Royalton. Mr. and Mrs. Bouck were members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

John S. and Elizabeth Bouck were the parents of eleven children, all of whom grew to maturity. Charles W. Bouck was the first child of the first pair of twins, three pairs having been born to his parents. Mr. Bouck was educated in the log school, twelve miles southwest of Independence, Iowa, and one and one-half miles from his father's home farm. He also attended the high school at Independence, Iowa, for two years and afterward helped his father on the farm until twenty years old, when he began working for the Welsh & Company mercantile store. He remained with them for one year and then went to work for the state of Iowa as manager of the insane hospital farm at Independence.

While still living at Independence, Mr. Bouck was married to Marv L. Ball, the daughter of John and Levisa (Ellis) Ball, natives of Vermont. Mrs. Bouck was born in Plattsburg, New York, in 1854, and went to Iowa with her parents, settling near Independence. Mr. and Mrs. Bouck have been the parents of one son, Albert Charles. Three years after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Bouck moved to a farm sixty miles east of Washington, D. C, near Cambridge, Maryland, where they remained a year and a half. They then came to Royalton, Minnesota, where Mr. Bouck was employed in a saw-mill and where he worked in the harvest field. The next year he moved to Brainerd, where he was employed by the Northern Pacific railroad, building bridges, section houses, etc. He remained with this railroad until December, 1889, when he came back to Royalton. Here he built the opera house and then purchased a hardware store, which, in partnership with his son, he operated until March, 1914, when he sold the store to his son.

During the nineties, Charles W. Bouck was a member of the city council and president of the council. He has always been active in politics. In 1906, he was a candidate for the Legislature on the Republican ticket and was elected by a big majority, serving one term. He was a member of the re-apportionment committee and chairman of the road committee. In 1914 he was re-elected to the House for a term of two years, receiving a large majority once more. His term will expire on December 31, 1916. Mr. Bouck has always taken a prominent part in the good roads movement in Minnesota, and during his legislative career at the last .session, served as chairman of the roads committee.

Mr. Bouck has about sixteen hundred acres of land in Morrison county, Minnesota, a part of which is under cultivation. He owns the C. W. Bouck business block in Royalton and a magnificent home at his farm on the edge of Royalton.

Mr. and Mrs. Bouck and son are members of the Episcopal church. During the past seventeen years, Mr. Bouck has been a member of the state hardware board, a member of the state fire insurance board and director of the Graham Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Knights of Pythias.


Joseph L. Brady
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Joseph L. Brady, also a prominent lawyer of Princeton, was born at New Lebanon Springs, Columbia county, New York, on the 14th of February, 1849. When he was seven years old the family came to Minnesota, and settled in what is now the town of Palmer, Sherburne county. He attended the St. Cloud Institute, where he graduated in 1866, and subsequently pursued classical studies under a private tutor until 1868. He commenced writing for the public press in 1869, contributing valuable articles to the "Minnesota Monthly" and "St. Paul Pioneer," besides a number of eastern and local journals; also a series of articles entitled "Sketches and Incidents of Western Life," which appeared in the "Gleaner," and were afterwards republished in pamphlet form. From 1874 to 1877, he was Principal of the graded school at Paynesville, Stearns county, and on the 19th of September, 1878, was admitted to the Bar as an attorney, at Princeton, where he is now engaged in the active practice of his profession. Mr. Brady has taken quite a prominent part in public affairs since settling here, and is now County superintendent of Schools, and also Village Attorney of Princeton. Miss Mary J. Kenely became his wife on the 17th of September, 1873.


Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Brands
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, January 4, 1912; submitted by Jim Dezotell

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brands and child, who were visiting here during the holidays, returned to their home at Roseburg, Ore., on Thursday of last week. They enjoyed their visit very much, but would not care to make their home in this climate again.


J. W. Brigs
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, March 2, 1905; submitted by Jim Dezotell

J. W. Brigs writes the Union from his new home at Coquille, Oregon. He refers to the recent cold snap that we had here and says that the coldest they have had it there has been twenty-eight above. We might state here that for the past two weeks or so we have
been having the finest kind of April weather and the snow is about all gone. The ice cream freezer and the ice mane are looking up and indications are - that we will have a blizzard most any day now. Mr. Briggs says that he has finished building him a ten-room house and has set out 104 fruit trees on his tract of eighteen acres. He has sowed wheat and oats already and they are plowing their gardens there at present, and they are not using snow shoes, either.


Andrew J. Bullis
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Andrew J. Bullis was born in Knox county, Ohio, in the year 1844. The family removed to Indiana when Andrew was a child, where he grew to manhood and learned the carpenter trade. He came to Princeton in 1866, and after following his trade until 1879, opened a wagon shop, which he now carries on, making a specialty of job work. Source: History of the upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s. Robert D. Byers, a son of Samuel Byers, was born in New York, in March, 1850. He came to this State with his parents when seven years old, and lived at home until 1874, when he took a trip to California and was engaged in lumbering there for one year and a half. Returning thence to Princeton, he made that his residence until 1878, when he moved to his present farm on section seven.


Samuel M. Byers
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Samuel M. Byers, one of the pioneers of Princeton, was born on the 9th of November, 1828. He came to Princeton from New York in 1857, his family being the first to arrive after the town site was laid out. He took a claim on sections twenty-two and twenty-three, township thirty-six, range twenty-six west; where he resided two years, having erected a house in the village in the mean time, to which he then removed. Mr. Byers was the first Clerk of the Court in Mille Lacs county. He taught the second school, and until 1874, spent a considerable portion of his time in that occupation. Since the latter date, he has carried on the mercantile business, his annual sales now amounting to $12,000.


Daniel A. Caley
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Daniel A. Caley is a native of Canada, and was born on the 15th of August, 1849. When quite young the family removed to Janesville, Wisconsin, where Daniel resided until 1864, when he enlisted in the Forty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served till the close of the war. He then went to Cresco, Iowa, and learned the tinner's trade, and in 1868, came to Minnesota. After remaining a few months in St. Paul he came to Anoka, and followed his trade until coming to Princeton in 1870. He at once opened a hardware store here, being associated with Fitch & Smith of Anoka, as partners. In 1871, his brother entered the firm, and in 1873, Daniel disposed of his interest to Robert M. Neely, and in July of the following year engaged in the drug business which he still continues. Mr. Caley has held the Position of Register of Deeds and Justice of the Peace, and is now serving his fifth term as Clerk of the District Court.


Francis M. Campbell
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Francis M. Campbell is a native of Maine, and was born in the year 1837. His father kept a hotel and Francis was reared in that occupation until 1857, when he went to California and remained six years west of the Rocky Mountains, engaged in mining and lumbering. Retuming to his native State he enlisted in the eighteenth Maine Volunteer Infantry, serving one year. After his discharge he came to Minnesota, in 1866, and remained one year in Minneapolis, coming thence to Princeton, where he has since lived. His first business venture here was the purchase of the American House, which he conducted until 1879, and sold to Henry Webster, the present proprietor. Mr. Campbell is President of the Bank of Princeton, and for the last six years has been Treasurer of Mille Lacs county. He also carries on a livery stable and does quite an extensive logging business.


Edward W. Cater
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Edward W. Cater is a son of Martin V. B. Cater, and was born in Barrington, New Hampshire, in 1855. When he was two years old the family removed to Minnesota, and with the exception of two years at school in Minneapolis, resided at home until 1875, when he bought a farm of three hundred and twenty acres, located on sections twenty-three and twenty-four, where he now lives.


Joseph L. Cater
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Joseph L. Cater was born in Barrington, New Hampshire, on the 28th of March, 1828. He grew to manhood in his native State, and in 1855, came to Princeton, but returned to Maine the same fall. Coming again to Minnesota in the spring of 1856, he took a claim in Baldwin township, Sherburne county, and also erected a house in Princeton the same year. He disposed of both those claims in 1862, and has since lived on his present farm, which consists of three hundred and twenty acres and adjoins the village of Princeton.


Martin V. B. Cater
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Martin V. B. Cater is also a native of Barrington, New Hampshire, and was born on the 15th of August, 1831. He was reared to farming pursuits, and in 1857, came to Minnesota and was engaged in freighting between St. Paul and Princeton for a few months. In the same fall he took a claim in Baldwin township, Sherburne county, where he lived for eleven years. He then sold his farm and removed to Princeton township, where he now owns five hundred and twenty acres, over two hundred of which are under cultivation.


John W. Cormack
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
John W. Cormack was born in Illinois in the year 1816. He is one of the very early pioneers of Minnesota, having visited the present site of Stillwater as early as 1844. As early as 1848, he commenced rafting lumber down the St. Croix and Mississippi rivers to St. Louis, following that occupation most of the time until 1874. He settled at St. Anthony in 1859, and made that place his home until his removal to Princeton in 1874. Although nearing the threescore and ten years generally allotted to man, Mr. Cormack still retains much of his youthful vigor, and spends a great portion of his time logging and lumbering, and exploring the wilds of this northern country.


Fay Cravens
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotall

Cravens, Fay, editor; born at Princeton, Minn., Nov. 20, 1873; son of William J. and Lucinda (McFadden) Cravens; educated in public and high school, Princeton; married at Milaca, Minn., 1894, to Miss Amanda Plude. Was born, raised and educated in Mill Lacs Co.; came to Milaca, 1894, and bought the Mille Lacs County Times which he has since conducted. Member Knights of Pythias. Adress: Milaca, Minn.


Albert B. Damon
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Albert B. Damon, the oldest living settler of Mille Lacs county, was born in Troy, Maine, on the 4th of June, 1824. He came to Minnesota in 1852, and after remaining one winter about five miles north of the present city of Minneapolis, came to Princeton, and made the first claim on the site of the present village. "Banjo Bill" and one or two others had been here before, but did not make claims. The former had built the first shanty, and Mr. Damon built the second, a log house which still stands in the rear of the North Star House. There was no settler nearer Mr. Damon than Elk River, on the Mississippi. In 1855, he sold his claim to Samuel Ross, and selected the quarter section adjoining his first claim on the south, a portion of which he has since surveyed and platted, and is now known as Damon's addition to Princeton. In 1862, Mr. Damon enlisted in the Eighth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and served three years. On returning from the army he settled in section eighteen, Baldwin township, Sherburne county, where lie now lives on a fine farm of three hundred and twenty acres.


John W. Dimmick
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
John W. Dimmick, also one of the pioneers of Princeton, was born in Tompkins, Delaware county, New York, on the 29th of August, 1818. When he was twelve years old the family removed to Livingston county, and five years later, to Allegany county, where John lived, being engaged at the carpenter trade and as a millwright until 1855. He came to Minnesota in the fall of the latter year, and in January, 1856, came to Princeton and took a claim on section twenty-nine. He lived with Mr. Ross during the winter, and in the spring, built a house on his claim, and on the arrival of his family from New York, took possession of it, and still resides on the old homestead. His wife was Miss Cynthia Payne, of Massachusetts, and of seven children born to them, five are living. His son, William W. Dimmick, is also a resident of Princeton. He was born at Ossian, New York, in the year 1844, and came to this county with his parents. He owns and operates a farm in Isanti county.


Robert C. Dunn
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Robert C. Dunn, editor and proprietor of the "Princeton Union," was born in county Tyrone, in the North of Ireland, on the 14th of February, 1855. His parents were of Scotch descent, and members of the Established Church of England. Robert attended a National school regularly until he was fifteen years old, in all about one hundred months of school days. He was then apprenticed in a dry goods store in Londonderry, Ireland, but after serving six months, the business being distasteful to him, he took "French leave" and came to America, making his way alone to friends in Wisconsin, in April, 1870. The following winter he went to St. Louis, and soon after to Vicksburg, Mississippi, and spent six months as clerk for a railroad contractor. Returning to St. Louis, he entered the office of the " Missouri State Atlas," with the intention of learning the printer's trade, for which he had long cherished a desire. After the campaign of 1872, the "Atlas" suspended, and Robert entered the office of the " Industrial Age," and later, the "Journal" office, where he finished his apprenticeship. He continued his journalistic labors there until January, 1876, when he was prostrated by partial paralysis, and suffered severely for four months. For the benefit of his health he came to Minnesota, where he soon partially recovered, and on the 30th of December, by the kind assistance of friends, he issued the first number of the "Princeton Union." He was then less than twenty-two years old, and probably the youngest editor in the State. Since then the " Union" has steadily increased in popularity, and under his management, has attained an extensive circulation in Mille Lacs and the adjoining counties of Sherburne and Isanti, and will compare favorably with any country newspaper in the State. Mr. Dunn is well liked by the people of Princeton, irrespective of party, and his paper is noted for its political independence, although the editor is a republican.


Robert Campbell Dunn
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853-ed.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Robert Campbell Dunn is the state auditor of Minnesota. He was elected to represent a principle, that of fair and honest administration of that important office, and devotes his every energy to the best interests of the state. Mr. Dunn was born February 14, 1855, at Plumb Bridge, County Tyrone, Ireland. His father, Robert Dunn, owned his own land, about two hundred and fifty acres, and, besides carrying on agriculture quite extensively for that country, was a storekeeper. He is still living, a hale and hearty old gentleman of seventy-seven. He is an Episcopalian and a liberal Protestant, but never affiliated with the Orangemen. Robert's mother's maiden name was Jane Campbell. She is descended from an old Scotch family of strict Presbyterians. Two of her uncles, Col. Robert Campbell and Hugh Campbell, were among the best known residents of St. Loins, the former settling there when it was only a small village of two hundred people. Mr. Dunn's eldest brother, Samuel, is a magistrate in Ireland, and his youngest brother, William, is a graduate of the Glasgow medical college, and a successful physician in London. Two of Mr. Dunn's uncles, Andrew and Samuel, were among the first white settlers of Columbia County, Wisconsin. Mr. Dunn, when a lad, in Ireland, attended the common national school from the time he was old enough to be admitted until he was fourteen. This school was conducted continuously throughout the year, with the exception of one month. That was all the schooling he received. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed to a dry goods merchant at Londondery, about twenty miles from home. To him it seemed like five hundred miles. He was bound for five years, but the man to whom he was apprenticed proved to be a hard task master, very strict in his requirements, and young Robert found his situation very uncomfortable. After six months, by the aid of a brother at home, he succeeded in raising money enough to pay for a second cabin passage across the Atlantic, and before his parents knew he had left Londondery he was with his uncle, Samuel Dunn, in Wisconsin. He remained on his uncle's farm for nearly a year, then went to St. Louis in search of his fortune, and from there to Mississippi, where he was employed in a store in the Yazoo Valley for six or eight months. He then returned to St. Louis and learned the printer's trade. He remained there till 1876, when he came to Minnesota and settled in Princeton, where he commenced the publication of the Princeton Union, in the fall of that year. He has been the editor and publisher of that paper ever since, and it is in a flourishing condition. In 1878 Mr. Dunn was elected town clerk of Princeton, the fees of which office amounted to the princely sum of three hundred dollars a year. This amount, however, was valuable to the publisher of a country weekly, and Mr. Dunn held the office for eleven years. In the meantime he was elected county attorney of Mille Lacs County in 1884, and was re-elected in 1886. In 1888 he was elected to the lower house of the legislature from the districts composed of the counties of Todd, Crow Wing, Morrison and Mille Lacs. He was elected again in 1890, but his seat was contested and he was thrown out. He was re-nominated by the Republicans in 1892 and was elected. Mr. Dunn was a member of the Republican National Convention in 1892 from the Sixth Congressional district of Minnesota; was a member of the committee on credentials, and worked and voted for James G. Blaine. In his second term in the legislature Mr. Dunn led a movement for reform in the administration of the land interests of the state, and was so successful in protecting the state and so completely demonstrated the necessity of reform in that particular that the people elected him to the office of state auditor in 1894, and committed the land interests of the state to his charge. He has fully justified the confidence which was reposed in him, and has administered the office to which he was elected with distinguished ability. Mr. Dunn was married to Lydia McKenzie, of Spencer Brook, Isanti County, February 14, 1887, and they have two children, George R., and Grace. He is thoroughly devoted to his little family, and when not engaged in his official duties, can always be found with them in their present home at Hamline, where he resides during his term of office.

Source: The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotell

Dunn, Robert Campbell, editor and publisher Princeton Union; born in Ireland, Feb. 14, 1855; son of Robert and Jane (Campbell) Dunn; educated in national schools until 14. Was apprentice for 5 years to a Londonderry merchant who proved such a hard task master that at the close of 6 months the young apprentice escaped and came to an uncle in Wisconsin; learned the printer's trade at St. Louis, Mo.; removed to Princeton, Minn., 1876, and began publication of the Princeton Union of which he has ever since been editor and publisher. Republican. Was town clerk of Princeton, 1878-89; county attorney Mille Lacs Co., 1884-88; member Minnesota Legislature, 1889-93; State auditor, 1895-1903, 8 years. Republican; candidate for governor, 1904, but owing to dissentions and a bolt in the part was defeated by 7,000 votes. Married at Spencer Brook, Minn., Feb. 14, 1887, to Miss Lydia McKenzie. Address: Princeton, Minn.

Source: Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Kim Mohler

DUNN Robert Campbell, Princeton. Publisher. Born Feb 14, 1855 in County Tyrone Ireland, son of Robert and Jane (Campbell) Dunn. Married Feb 14, 1887 to Lydia McKenzie. Educated in national schools Ireland. Came to U S 1870 and learned printer's trade in St Louis Mo; established Princeton (Minn) Union 1876 and still publishes same. Town clk Princeton 1878-89; county atty 1884-88; member legislature 1889 and 1893; state auditor 1894-1902; Republican nominee for governor 1904; defeated.


W. W. Eastman
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, April 6, 1882; submitted by Jim Dezotell

W. W. Eastman, one of Minneapolis' cross-grained mill men and heavy real estate owner, but whining tax-payer, of this county, was cowhided in a Jacksonville (Florida) hotel by the brother of a lady whom he had assaulted on the cars. Taking Eastman's version of the affair, as telegraphed to the St. Paul and Minneapolis papers, he richly merited the castigation.


E. C. Gile
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
E. C. Gile, M. D., was born in Addison, Steuben county, New York, on the 9th of September, 1836. After taking the usual preparatory courses, he entered the Bennett Medical College at Chicago, where he graduated in 1870. He practiced medicine four years at Cambridge, Isanti county, but has since resided at Princeton in the active practice of his profession.


Thomas Goulding
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Thomas Goulding, deceased, one of the early settlers in this region, was born in England, but became a resident of Ohio in 1830. He came to Minnesota in the spring of 1855, and spent the summer in making the road from St. Paul to Leech Lake. The following spring he settled in Isanti county, and after a residence of two years, came to Princeton and purchased the property on which the American House now stands. There was then a small house, 16x24 feet, standing on the premises, which was soon replaced by the American House, Mr. Goulding conducting it until its sale to F. M. Campbell in 1867. The subject of our sketch died at Princeton in the year 1875. Source: History of the upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s. John W. Goulding, a son of the subject of the last brief memoir, was born at Pomeroy, Ohio, in the year 1845. He came to this State in youth, and was reared with his father in the hotel business. He is a resident of Princeton, and engaged in farming and lumbering.


Charles Gravel, Sr.
SOURCE: History of Morrison and Todd Counties Minnesota by Clara K. Fuller, Volume II, 1915, B. F. Bowen & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. Transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman.

Perhaps very few men have had a larger part in the development of the great Northwest than the venerable Charles Gravel, Sr., now a resident of Onamia, Millelacs county, Minnesota, but who is interested in the flour mill at Pierz, Minnesota. Mr. Gravel is a native of Montreal, Canada, born on December 13, 1844.

Charles Gravel, Sr., was educated in the public schools of Canada and lived in the Dominion of Canada until twenty-one years old, having learned the carpenter trade under the direction of his father, who taught the trade to all of his seven sons. When Mr. Gravel was twenty-one years old he removed to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, where he worked in a railroad shop for six months. He then worked as a carpenter for the government for two years at Leach Lake, Minnesota, after which, in partnership with a Mr. Lee, father of Hon. William E. Lee, of Long Prairie, Minnesota, he built a saw-mill at Red Lake, Minnesota. He then returned to Little Falls and shortly afterwards to Long Prairie, Minnesota, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. After building a house and otherwise improving the land, he sold this farm, returned to Little Falls and operated a drug store, a general mercantile store and built houses under contract until 1870.

In 1870 Charles Gravel, Sr., established himself at Brainerd, Minnesota, where he took contracts for building the culverts and bridges for the Northern Pacific railroad. During the next two years he was engaged in building the culverts and bridges from Brainerd to Fargo, North Dakota. With Brainerd as headquarters he then supplied the Northern Pacific railroad with ties and timber under a contract lasting two years. Upon leaving Brainerd he removed to Little Falls, where he received a contract for carrying the mail between St. Cloud and Brainerd, Minnesota, operating a stage line until the Northern Pacific railway was completed in 1876. In partnership with F. X. Goulet, Mr. Gravel then constructed a flour-mill at Gravelville, a town named for him. In this mill the old stone process of milling was employed. Later Mr. Gravel was engaged in the lumber business, building a saw-mill, which he operated for eight or ten years. In 1883 he substituted the modern roller system in his flour-mill and provided for a mill with one hundred barrels capacity. This mill was operated until the spring of 1905, when he sold out and completed the construction of a mill at Pierz, beginning operations on October 12, 1905, with a capacity of one hundred and twenty-five barrels. Charles E. Gravel, a son, was taken into the business as manager and partner.

Several years ago Mr. Gravel removed from Little Falls to Onamia, Minnesota, and in partnership with C. B. Buckman and a man by the name of McGee, engaged in the lumber and mercantile business. Later the partnership was changed to Gravel & Robinson, but the company was operated as the Onamia Lumber and Mercantile Company. In 1913 Mr. Gravel purchased the interest of Mr. Robinson in the business, and took into the business with him his two sons, F. H. and E. A. Gravel, who now operate it.

Charles Gravel, Sr., is now a man past seventy years, but is remarkably well preserved for one of that age. His active life seems to have been good for him, and he is now able to walk faster and farther than most men of fifty, or even less. Although not at present a resident of Morrison county, he is very well known here for what he has done to promote the commercial development of this section of Minnesota. Essentially, Charles Gravel, Sr., belongs to the era of pioneer development, but unlike some of the men with whom he has been associated in this great work, he has lived to see the slow fruition of the many things for which he has striven in the upbuilding of this great commonwealth.


Albion P. Harmon
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Albion P. Harmon was born in Foxcroft, Maine, on the 17th of April, 1832. He was raised on a farm, and at the age of sixteen years, went to learn the slater's trade, which was his occupation for a number of years. In 1859, he went to California, and was engaged in lumbering and mining there and in Nevada, until 1862, when he returned to his native State. After farming there for ten years, he came to Princeton and has lived here ever since. He has been Deputy Sheriff of Mille Lacs county for the last two years.


John C. Hatch
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
John C. Hatch is a native of Newcastle, Maine, and was born on the 5th of October, 1828. He learned the trade of ship-carpenter when a young man, and followed that occupation until 1855, when he came to Minnesota and located in what is now the town of Milo, about ten miles northwest of Princeton, being one of the first three settlers in that town. Three years later he came to Princeton, and was employed at the carpenter trade here for seven years, after which he took a homestead and followed the plow for five years. Then, after a four years further sojourn in Princeton, he removed to Anoka, but in 1877, again returned to Princeton, where he is now engaged in the carpenter business. Mr. Hatch was married on the 25th of June, 1854, to Miss Martha A. Hilton, of Jefferson, Maine. They have four children.


Floyd H. Hatcher
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Floyd H. Hatcher dates his birth in Virginia, on the 10th of September, 1835. He came to Iowa in 1853, and after farming there for three years; came to Minnesota and settled at St. Peter. After a residence of four years in that locality, during which he was engaged in farming and teaming, he came to Princeton and took a homestead on section five. He removed to Blue Hill, Sherburne county, five years later, but soon returned to his present residence on section twenty.


Jonas R. Hill
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Jonas R. Hill was born in New Brunswick in 1830. He came to the state of Maine when twelve years old, but returned to his native Province at the age of nineteen, and was lumbering and farming for four years. He came to Minnesota in 1853, and settled in Langola, Benton county, where he lived until 1861, when he enlisted in the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, serving three years. He returned to Princeton in 1864, and has followed lumbering most of the time since. Mr. Hill owns a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres, about two miles east of the village.


William Hoare
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Friday, June 22, 1877; submitted by Jim Dezotell

Mr. William Hoare intends leaving for Oregon, next week.


Wm. Hofferbert
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, April 13, 1916; submitted by Jim Dezotell

Wm. Hofferbert has been appointed rural letter carrier to fill the vacancy on route 4. Anson Kelley has been carrying this route on a temporary appointment. Mr. Hofferbert will begin his duties on April 17.


Mrs. Thos. Horan
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, August 24, 1905; submitted by Jim Dezotell

Mrs. Horan's Services Appreciated
A jolly party of Rebekahs composed of Mrs. Wm. Trumbull, Mrs. Elmer Gardiner, Mrs. Wm. Carlson, Mrs. C. W. Wills, Mrs. L. L. Hudson and Mrs. Elmer made a trip to Princeton yesterday for the purpose of presenting Mrs. Thos. Horan, formerly of this place, with a Past Grand pin as a token of appreciation from the order. Mrs. Horan was a prominent member of the order here, and the presentation is said to have been a very pleasant occasion. - Mille Lacs County Times, Aug. 17


Arthur F. Howard
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Arthur F. Howard is a native of Brownville, Piscataquis county, Maine, and was born in the year 1847. He came to Princeton in 1865, and has been engaged in the lumber business in this locality nearly ever since. During the years 1872-73, he was in California, also engaged in lumbering. His present field of operations is about thirty miles up the east branch of Rum river. Mr. Howard takes quite an interest in public affairs, and is serving his third term as Sheriff of the county.


Nelson E. Jesmer
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Nelson E. Jesmer was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, on the 25th of May, 1849. He came to Princeton in 1866, and was employed on a farm when not attending school, for about four years. He then engaged as clerk in the store of H. B. Cowles, and after an experience of four years behind the counter, opened a general store on his own account, which he now conducts, doing an annual business of $30,000.


Arthur & Oscar Johnson
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, March 2, 1905; submitted by Jim Dezotell

Killed a Bear
Oscar and Arthur Johnson has an exciting adventure Monday while hunting in the woods north of Bock. They had been occupying the old Young logging camps for several days, and on Monday they discovered that a large black bear had crawled into a hollow log near the road. Although their only weapon was a shot gun, they drove the animal out of the log and succeeded in killing him. The carcass was brought to Milaca and placed in Wm. Peterson's meat market, and now bear steaks are the order of the day in many Milaca homes. - Milaca Times.


C. T. Johnson
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, June 21, 1902; submitted by Jim Dezotell

New Germany
C. T. Johnson, census enumerator, has been around here lately collecting about a bushel of statistics from the head of every family.


Alanson Jones
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Alanson Jones dates his birth in Wyoming county, New York, on the 16th of November, 1827. When he was a boy, the family removed to Cattaraugus county, where the subject of our sketch grew to manhood. In 1864, he enlisted in the One hundred and eighty-eighth New York Volunteer Infantry, served about one year, and was present at the surrender of General Lee. On being discharged, he returned to New York State and carried on the old farm until coming to Minnesota in 1868. He came at once to Clear Lake, and the following year, selected his present farm on section twenty, situated on the banks of Jones' Lake.


Charles Keith
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotell

Keith, Charles, attorney, banker; born at Farmington, Me., March 21, 1851; son of Leonard and Catherine P. (Stewart) Keith; educated in common schools and at Farmington Academy. Came to Princeton, Minn., Jan. 13, 1873; judge probate court, Mille Lacs Co., 1876-86; interested in logging on Rum river until 1894; engaged in practice of law since 1889, and in banking since 1887. Officer of First National Bank, Foley, Farmers State Bank, Milaca, First National Bank, Princeton, First National Bank, Cambridge, First National Bank, Mora, all of Minnesota. Democrat. Member Sons of American Revolution. Address: Princeton, Minn.


Robert H. King
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotall

King, Robert H., real estate; born at Spencer Brook, Minn., Aug. 8, 1876; son of William and Ellen (Miller) King; raised on a farm and educated in public schools, Spencer Brook and high school, Elk River. Has been engaged in real estate and loan business since 1901. Also clerk of district court Mille Lacs Co., 1905-1909. Republican. Member I.O.O.F. Unmarried. Recreation: Traveling. Address: Princeton, Minn.


Peter Kuhrke
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Peter Kuhrke was born in Prussia on the 18th of December, 1820. He was engaged in the manufacture of furniture, and carpenter work in his native country. In 1865, he came to America, and soon after, settled in this township, where he owns a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres. He was married in 1851, to Miss Louisa Gerth, who has borne him six children, five of whom are living. The eldest daughter is the wife of Mr. Wilhelm, of St. Paul, and the others reside at home.


Charles E. Leonard
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Charles E. Leonard, one of Minnesota's earliest pioneers, was born in Worthington, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, on the 25th of February, 1810. His father died when he was but four years old, and his mother supported herself and two children until 1817, by teaching school. She then married Alpheus Nichols, who removed to Rodman, Jefferson county, New York, then a new and sparsely settled country. When fourteen years of age, Charles went to live with a widowed sister of his step-father, and aided by her son, who was four years his junior, carried on her farm until he was twenty-one years of age. The lady then gave him one hundred dollars in cash, and sufficient clothing to last three years. He then went to Louisville, New York, and hired to Judge I. W. Bostwick, a lawyer who carried on a large farm, to take charge of it for one hundred and thirty-two dollars per year, out of which he was enabled to save one hundred and ten dollars. Remained in his employ two years, and then rented the farm, but gave it up soon after. He next conducted a farm of his own for three years, but finding that his health had been injured by hard labor, gave up farming. He next run a hotel at Depauville, but continued poor health obliged him to give it up also. Leaving his family with his mother, Mr. Leonard started west, and in 1846, engaged in mercantile pursuits in Hancock county, Illinois, his family following him the next spring. Finding the climate still unfavorable to health, he again sought a home, further north. He embarked on the steamer Highland Mary, and came to Stillwater, which he found to be a very desirable place, and began making preparations to stay, and opened a store in a building rented of Dr. Carli. In the latter part of December, he received a letter from his wife, saying their little girl was very sick and not expected to live. Locking up the store, and giving the key to Dr. Carli, in the bitter cold winter he started on foot for Illinois. After much suffering he reached his family a few days before his child died, having traveled over three hundred miles, sleeping at night on the snow covered ground. In the spring of 1848, he brought his family to their new home, to find that in his absence, his property had been almost entirely destroyed by fire. He then bought a set of carpenter's tools, and went to work at two dollars per day, meanwhile building a house for himself, by working mornings and evenings. Mr. Leonard, as Sheriff of St. Croix county, opened the first court in Stillwater, Judges Goodrich and Cooper presiding. In 1849, he moved to St. Anthony, was Territorial Treasurer from 1854, to 1857, and was a member of the constitutional Convention in the latter year. He then removed to Point Douglas and built the Leonard House, which he kept until 1862, and enlisted in the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers, and was among the first to go to the relief of Fort Ridgely, remaining in the service fifteen months. He then returned to Point Douglas, sold his hotel, and erected a fine residence which was his home until 1877. Then went to Sioux City, Iowa, but after two years, returned to Minnesota and settled in Isanti county, and in September, 1880, came to his present home in Princeton. Mr. Leonard is Justice of the Peace in this village, an office that he has held almost continuously since coming to the Territory. He was married on the 1st of January, 1835, to Miss Catharine Sendes, of Louisville, New York. They have had three sons and one daughter; James E. and George Y., are living.


George D. Loring
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
George D. Loring was born in Yarmouth, Maine, on the 25th of May, 1835. His father was a carpenter, and with him George learned the trade. He came to Anoka, Minnesota, when twenty years old, and thence, one year later, to Spencer Brook, Isanti county. He followed farming there until 1863, when he enlisted in the Second Minnesota Cavalry, serving two years and one month. Returning from the army, he came to Princeton and engaged in the lumber business, which he still continues; his field of labor being on the Rum river, about thirty-five miles north of Princeton. In 1880, Mr. Loring formed a partnership with H. C. Head, and under the firm name of Head & Loring, engaged in the mercantile business. The firm do a business of about $20,000 annually.


George Mahoney
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
George Mahoney was born in Atkinson, Maine, on the 8th of April, 1823. He was reared to agricultural pursuits, which he followed till 1852, when he removed to Iowa and engaged in the hotel and mercantile business. Since 1874, Mr. Mahoney has been a resident of Princeton, where he owns a billiard hall.


Michael Mahoney
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Michael Mahoney was born in Ireland, in 1845. He came to America when eleven years of age, and resided in New York City till 1861, since which time he has lived in Princeton. During the first six years of his residence here, he was employed on farms and in the lumber woods, but since 1867, has owned a farm in section thirty-one, on which he still lives.


John McMinn
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
John McMinn, a native of Ireland, was born in 1830. He came to America in 1846, worked at the blacksmith trade in Ogdensburg, New York, until 1861, when he enlisted in the One hundred and forty-second New York Volunteer Infantry, serving eighteen months. After his discharge, he returned to New York, and was employed at black-smithing till 1865. Then came to Princeton, and for several years was engaged at his trade. In 1873, Mr. McMinn purchased a farm in section nineteen, and now owns about seven hundred acres in that locality.


Isaiah S. Mudgett
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Isaiah S. Mudgett is a native of Penobscot county, Maine, where his birth occurred June 7th, 1839. After receiving a liberal education at Enfield, in his native State, he came to Point Douglass, Minnesota, arriving in October, 1858. In 1865, he came to Princeton, and the same year was elected Auditor of Mille Lacs county, which office he has since held, except four years, from 1870 to 1874.


Robert M. Neely
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Robert M. Neely was born in Washington county, Indiana, on the 12th of April, 1832. He lived on a farm until moving to Marion, Iowa, where he engaged in the mercantile business, following it for five years. Then, with a Government surveying party, was in Minnesota and Dakota for six years. In 1858, he returned to Iowa, and resided on a farm in Muscatine, till 1870, when he came to Princeton. For two years Mr. Neely was engaged in the milling business, but since then, in company with Thomas H. Caley, has been dealing in hardware and agricultural implements. They have a fine store 28x60 feet, a wareroom for agricultural implements 28x70 feet, and carry a stock of $15,000, doing a business of $100,000 annually.


Herman Neuman
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Herman Neuman is a native of Germany, but came to America when a child. He was a resident of Iowa, first living in Clinton, where he learned the blacksmith trade, then in Decorah until coming to Minnesota in 1878. His first two years in this State were spent in Minneapolis, then came to Princeton, where he has since conducted a general blacksmith shop.


George Henry Newbert
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotell

Newbert, George Henry, banking; born at Bethel, Minn., July 27, 1872; son of Henry and Augusta Newbert; educated in common schools at Princeton, Minn. Began active career at 17 years of age as teller and bookkeeper of the First National Bank of Princeton, 1889; moved to Mora, Minn., 1894, and organized the Kanabec County Bank, now the First National Bank, and has acted as its cashier since the organization; director of the Sandstone State Bank and the Times Printing and Publishing Co.; member Mora board of education; village treasurer. Republican. Member Masonic order, Shrine, I.O.O.F., Knights of Pythias, A.O.U.W.M.W.A. Married, Sept. 1903, to Miss Juanita Thompson, of Erhard, Minn. Club: Commercial (Minneapolis) Address: Mora, Minn.


Richard B. Newton
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Richard B. Newton, a native of England, was born in the year 1826. He learned the machinist trade, at which he worked till coming to America in 1867. Came directly to Minnesota, locating on a farm in Isanti county. In 1871, he came to Princeton and has since been engaged in the butcher business, in connection with which, in October, 1880, he opened a general merchandise store, and carries a stock of $3,500.


J. W. Nokes
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
J. W. Nokes was born in Lake county, Illinois on the 2d of January, 1857. He is a son of Rufus Nokes, who came to Princeton in 1869. The subject of this sketch owns a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in section six, in Wyanette, Isanti county, on which he has lived since 1878.


Erick & Mary E. Norquist
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, June 21, 1902; submitted by Jim Dezotell

Judge Searle has signed the decree divorcing Mary E. Norquist from her husband, Erick.

The parties reside at Milaca, although one of the children is temporarily in St. Cloud.

They were married in 1889 at Sauk Centre and have three children. In 1899, it is alleged, the husband began a course of cruel and inhuman treatment. He is a millwright and in court it was agreed that he should have the care of one child, she the remaining two and that he should have a part of the household furniture. She takes the homestead at Milaca. - St. Cloud Journal


Sterling H. Olsen
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotell

Olsen, Sterling H., physician; born at Austin, Minn., April 6, 1878; son of Severin C. and Mina Olsen; educated at Austin High School, graduating, 1896; College of Medicine and Surgery, University of Minnesota, graduating degree of M.D., 1901. Has been engaged in practice since June, 1901. Member Minnesota State Medical Association. Republican. Lutheran. Member Masonic order, Modern Maccabees, Modern Samaritans, Sigma Chi fraternity. Unmarried. Address: Milaca, Minn.


Caleb J. Pinkham
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Caleb J. Pinkham, a native of the town of Munson, Ohio, was born on the 10th of July, 1843. When he was a child the family removed to Wisconsin, where our subject remained till 1861, when he enlisted in the Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, serving till the close of the war. Came to Princeton in 1867, and located a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in section thirty, which has since been his home.


Addison G. Plummer
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Addison G. Plummer was born in the year 1830, in Montgomery county, Virginia, In 1862, he removed to Illinois, and in the spring of the following year, enlisted in the Nineteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; was discharged at the end of his term of service, (three years) and re-enlisted in Battery B, First Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving till the close of the war. Mr. Plummer came to Princeton in 1868, and has since devoted his time to various occupations.


Leonard Pratt
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Leonard Pratt is a native of Foxcroft, Piscataquis county, Maine, born on the 13th of January, 1825. He resided on a farm till eighteen years of age, then for thirteen years engaged in the lumber business and exploring pine lands. Since 1856, Mr. Pratt has made his home in Princeton and devoted his time to exploring and surveying pine lands, having traveled over a large portion of this section of the country.


Charles H. Rines
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Charles H. Rines, one of the early settlers of this region, was born in Maine, on the 1st of December, 1842. His parents came to Princeton in 1856, and on the breaking out of the war, our subject enlisted in the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. After serving three years he returned to Princeton, and when twenty-five years of age, opened a general mercantile establishment, which he has since continued. He has also been in the lumber business for the past six years, with Leonard Pratt as partner. During the season they employ about fifty men.


Joseph A. Ross
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Joseph A. Ross is a native of Jefferson, Maine, his birth dating the 22d of September, 1829. He received his education at the Waterville College, from which he graduated in 1856, and has since devoted the greater portion of his time to teaching school. Came to Minnesota in 1869, was admitted to the Bar in 1876, and has since divided his time between the practice of law and school teaching.


Newell A. Ross
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Newell A. Ross was bom on the 16th of January, 1845, spending his early life on a farm. In 1864, he sailed in. a merchantman, and spent three years on the sea. On his return, he worked two years in the Portsmouth navy-yard, in Kittery, Maine. Then came to Princeton, and for seven years was employed at the carpenter trade. In 1876, Mr. Ross was elected Register of Deeds, and the following year Postmaster, and has held both offices ever since.


Samuel Ross
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Hon. Samuel Ross, deceased, was born near Fairfield, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, on the 22d of August, 1812. He was educated at the common schools and at the Western Reserve College, Ohio, but on account of ill health did not graduate from the latter institution. He came west soon after leaving college, and engaged in teaching school in Illinois. In 1839, removed to Marion, Linn county, Iowa, where he acquired considerable property, and married Miss Mary Vaughn on the 12th of December, 1841. Two daughters were born to them; Myra, the elder, died in early girlhood; and Olive, now Mrs. A. P. Baker, resides in Princeton. Some time after his marriage, Mr. Ross moved to Hazel Green, Wisconsin. About 1846, he returned to Marion, where the death of his wife occurred in 1851. The following year he engaged in buying cattle and horses in Iowa, and selling them in Minnesota. He soon after settled in St. Anthony, (now East Minneapolis) and in 1855 came to Princeton and purchased from Albert B. Damon his squatter's right to the land now comprising a part of the town site of Princeton. The following year (1856 ) he, in company with John S. Prince, Dorilius Morrison, Richard Chute, and James W. Gillam, platted and laid out the town. Although others had kept "stopping places," Mr. Ross was the first to open a hotel in this county, and continued in this business until his death. Until 1869, he was in the old Princeton House, a large log hotel substantially built, sided up and painted ; but in the latter year, he completed the North Star Hotel, a large three story frame building, with thirty sleeping rooms. It was Mr. Ross who built and operated the first mill, and blacksmith shop in this county. He also run an express between Princeton and St. Anthony for the convenience of passengers, and carried the first mails. In 1859, he was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Justice, of Marion, Iowa, who survives him. Mr. Ross was an active business man, and upon the organization of Mille Lac county in 1860, was appointed by Gov. Ramsey, Judge of Probate. He also held other official positions, always acceptably, and in 1868, represented this district in the State Legislature. Early in life he was a prominent anti-slavery man, even when to be an abolitionist was to be unpopular with the clergy. Mr. Ross was an early advocate of total abstinence, and foremost in church matters. He was one of the founders of the first Congregational church at Marion, Iowa, and also at St. Anthony and Princeton, the one at St. Anthony being (it is thought) the first of that denomination in this State. His health was never the best, but his mind was active, and before it became impaired, he was distinguished in the localities in which he lived as a public debater, and was a man of quite decided literary tastes. About 1873, he suffered a stroke of paralysis, since which time his faculties gradually failed, resulting in softening of the brain, causing his death on the 9th of October, 1881.


John T. D. Sadley
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
John T. D. Sadley was born in the year 1834, in England, where he was reared to Agricultural pursuits. Came to America in 1852, residing three years in Ohio, then to Minnesota in 1856, locating a farm of three hundred and twenty acres in Becker, Sherburne county, which he still owns. Since 1874, Mr. Sadley has been a resident of Princeton, having in that year purchased the flouring mill of B. Soule, which he still operates. He also owns a mill about a mile and a half up the west branch of Rum river.


Gilbert L. Sanford
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Gilbert L. Sanford was born on the 4th of March, 1833, in Livingston county. New York, where he remained on his father's farm till 1854. Then was engaged on neighboring farms for a time, after which he learned the carpenter trade. Came to Mille Lac county in 1859, and pre-empted a farm on which he has made great improvements and now resides.


Reed E. Sanford
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Reed E. Sanford is a native of Livingston county, New York, born in the year 1844. At the age of fourteen years, he removed to Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in farming until he enlisted in the Second United States Cavalry, and after a service of three years returned to Pennsylvania. Came to Princeton in 1870, and owns a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in section nineteen, which is his home.


Mrs. N. E. Sollen
The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) Thursday, March 30, 1905; submitted by Jim Dezotell

Isle
Mrs. N. E. Sollen was called away Wednesday by the sad news that he mother was ill.

Since then we have learned that her mother passed away before she arrived. We wish to extend our sympathy.


Benjamin Soule
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Benjamin Soule was born on the 16th of March, 1820, in Piscataquis county, Maine, where he was reared, and when old enough, became engaged in the lumber business. In 1854, came to Minnesota, remained three years in St. Anthony, then to Princeton. In 1867, he built a steam saw-mill, with a thirty horse-power engine and a capacity for cutting 10,000 feet per day. This mill was operated till May, 1881, when it was torn down and a larger one built, the latter being situated about eighty rods below the junction of the east and west branches of the river, and is noticed elsewhere. Mr. Soule also built a flouring mill in 1870, which he operated till June, 1874, and sold to J. T. D. Sadley, the present owner. Our subject has served as County Attorney several years, since his residence in this town.


Smith N. Soule
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Smith N. Soule, son of Benjamin Saule, was born in Brownville, Maine, on the 22d of February, 1852. He has resided with his parents most of his life and for the past eight years has been in company with his father in the lumber and mill business.


Moses A. Tibbetts
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Moses A. Tibbetts is a native of New Sharon, Maine, born in the year 1828. He was engaged in the lumber business in his native place, till coming to St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1855, making it his home ten years. Came from the latter place to Princeton, where he resides three months of the year; the balance being spent about twenty-five miles up the east branch of the Rum river, where, for the past six years, he has kept a stopping place. Mr. Tibbetts is also engaged in the lumber business sending a crew of men in the woods every winter. Source: History of the upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s. Almon R. Tobey was born in Somerville, Maine, on the 12th of October, 1846. When sixteen years of age, he enlisted in the Ninth Maine Volunteer Infantry, serving two years and eleven months. Came to Minnesota in 1868, and after living in Hutchinson and Henderson each one year, came to Princeton, and engaged in the jewelry business, which he still follows. Since 1873, he has operated a photograph parlor in connection with the above business.


Rolleff Vaaler
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotall

Vaaler, Rolleff, lawyer; born in Columbia Co., Wis., Oct. 5, 1862; son of Rolleff J. and Anlog Vaaler; educated in common schools; private parochial school (Lutheran); College of Law, University of Minnesota. Married at Granite Falls, Minn., June 14, 1899, to Miss Lavina Dockstader. Came to Minnesota, 1883; taught school in Yellow Medicine County, two years; was employed as salesman at Granite Falls, 1885-92; completed legal studies, 1894, and was admitted to practice, June, 1895; practiced at Echo, Minn., until 1903, Minneapolis, 1903-05, and has been engaged in practice at Milaca since July, 1905. Republican. Presbyterian. Recreation: Traveling. Address: Milaca, Minn.

Byron M. Van Alstein
The Book of Minnesotans - A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of the State of Minnesota
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis (Chicago - 1907) submitted by Jim Dezotall

Van Alstein, Byron M., probate judge Mille Lacs Co.; born at Springfield, O., Jan. 19, 1831; son of John H. M., and Mary (Gardiner) Van Alstein; educated at Dalhousie Academy and Normal School, Toronto, Can. Came to Minnesota, 1855; engaged in retail sale and manufacture of boots and shoes, at Minneapolis, 1857-68; removed to Pacific Coast and was in business at Sacramento, Calif., 1868-78; returned to Minnesota and was identified with general merchandise business at Princeton, 1878-89. Republican. Was county auditor Mille Lacs Co., 1885-97; deputy county auditor, 1897-99; has been probate judge of the county since 1899 (reelected Nov., 1906). Was member Mounted Rangers, Indian outbreak, Minn., 1862; 1st lieut. Sarsfield Guard, Sacramento, Cala. Spiritualist. Member Masonic order and I.O.O.F. Married at Addison, Mich., Jan. 21, 1853, to Laura E. Stimson. Recreation: Cultivation of flowers, fruits and gardening. Address: Princeton, Minn.


S. F. Woods
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
S. F. Woods was born in Waldo county, Maine, on the 29th of May, 1838. Came with his parents to Anoka, Minnesota, about 1855 or '56, and was engaged in lumbering until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the Second Minnesota Light Artillery, serving three years. In 1867, he located his present farm, and has lived here ever since. Mr. Woods was married in 1862, to Miss Lucy Tilton, of Anoka county, who died in 1869, leaving three children.


Alexander L. Van Wormer
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Alexander L. Van Wormer was born in 1827, in the state of New York, where he was reared on a farm, and afterward followed the same occupation in Illinois and Howard county, Iowa. Came to Princeton in 1873, and took a claim in section nine, but resides in the village most of the time. He is engaged in teaming from Elk River to Princeton, and spends the winter months in the pineries. Mr. Van Wormer also owns a farm in Traverse county.


Isaac W. Veale
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Isaac W. Veale is a son of Richard P. Veale, who came to Princeton in 1866, located a farm in section eleven and died a few months after. Our subject was born in Indiana, in the year 1851. He devotes the summer months to the improvement of the farm located by his father, and spends the winters in the lumber woods.


Benjamin F. Whitney
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Benjamin F. Whitney is a native of Allegany county, New York, his birth dating the 24th of December, 1836. He learned the carpenter trade, at which he worked in his native State till 1855, and removed to Illinois. Came to Princeton in the spring of the following year, and carried on the old log tavern during the summer. In the fall, took a claim in section thirty-four, where he resided three years; then moved one and a half miles west of the village, and a year later, to the village, still carrying on both farms. In 1862, he removed to Hasting, worked at his trade two years, then enlisted in the Second Minnesota Cavalry, serving till the close of the war. After receiving his discharge, he returned to Princeton and has lived here ever since. In 1874, Mr. Whitney built a feed mill, and also owns a wagon shop. His younger son, Elmer E., is a partner in the latter business; and the elder son, Harley W., operates the feed mill. Our subject has filled several county and town offices, and is now Chairman of the board of County Commissioners.


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