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Sherburne County, Minnesota

 


Biographies




C. H. Aiken
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
C. H. Aiken, whose birthplace is in Delaware county, New York, was born on the 26th of December, 1826. He was raised on his father's farm until twenty years old, then was employed at carpenter work until 1855, when he came west and settled on a farm in St. Croix county, Wisconsin. After remaining on this farm for twenty- three years, he engaged in the hotel business, but discontinued that after one year, and traveled in Iowa as a salesman, until 1881, when he settled in Clear Lake township. Mr. Aikin was married on the 15th of March, 1855, to Miss Catharine Lockwood, of Ulster county, New York. They have two children.


Almyra Adams Hill Bailey
Source: Excerpts from "Our Gray Family History" compiled and written by Roger Ripley, December 2014 - rlripley@maqs.net.

Almyra Adams Hill was the seventh child and the fifth daughter born to Joseph Paine Hill and Mary J Gray. She was known as "Myra" to her family and friends. She was born in Milo, Piscataquis County, Maine on May 22, 1856.

On the June 22, 1860 Federal census, Myra is with her parents and all seven siblings in Brownsville, Piscataquis County, Maine. Her father was listed as a blacksmith there. By 1867, the family - all except the youngest child, Minnie, who had died as a young child, made the long trip from Maine to Minnesota. They traveled by covered wagon pulled by oxen. They are listed on the July 16, 1870 Federal census in Elk River, Sherburne County, Minnesota On the May 1, 1875 Minnesota State census, the family is at this same location with household members that include, Myra, her parents, and siblings Abbie, George, Charles, Lucy, and Lucy's daughter, Edith. In the next few years, Myra and several of her siblings attended St Cloud Normal School to become teachers. Myra taught school for several years and she is found on the June 14, 1880 Federal census living in Livonia Township, Sherburne County, Minnesota. She is listed as a teacher on that census, as are her sisters - Abbie and Anna. Myra's mother had died the year before in 1879.

She likely taught school the next few years and lived with her father and some of her siblings until she met her eventual husband. On June 2, 1888, Myra married Charles Asher Bailey (7/12/1852 - 7/23/1933) in Sherburne County, Minnesota. He was from Michigan, and was a farmer.

They had two children over the next few years with the birth of their son, Bernard Hill Bailey born on May 3, 1889 and their daughter, Helen E Bailey, born on March 24, 1891. During this time, Myra's father was living with them at Elk River, Minnesota.

On the June 13, 1900 Federal census, Myra and her husband are at Elk River, Minnesota with their two children. Charles is said to be a farmer. The same family members and location are on the June 21, 1905 Minnesota State census.

During the next few years, the family made a big move west to Montana. In May of 1910, they are located at Ravalli, Montana. Myra and her husband, Charles, are there with their two children. Charles is listed as a farmer. A neighbor on the same census is Dale Everett Felix (who later married Myra's niece, Mildred Elizabeth Hill, in 1916).

By January 5, 1920, the family is back in Minnesota again in Big Lake Township, Sherburne County, Minnesota. Myra is with her husband, Charles (a farmer), and their two grown children that are both single. Son Bernard, age 30, is also listed as a farmer.

Then another major move took place for the family over the next few years as we find them west in California. On the April 16, 1930 Federal census, the family is in Escandido, San Diego County, California. Myra is with her husband, and son Bernard (age 40) and daughter Helen (age 38). Both children are still single. Bernard is working as laborer on a farm.

Two years later, Myra Adams Hill Bailey died on October 1, 1932 at age 76 in Los Angeles County, California. We have not found a burial location at this time. Myra's husband, Charles Asher Bailey, died on June 23, 1933 at age 81 in Los Angeles County, California.


F. Eugene Baldwin
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
F. Eugene Baldwin was born in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, on the 7th of March, 1825. His boyhood was spent attending school until 1838, when the family removed to St. Clair county, Illinois. He soon commenced to attend McHenry College, and later, Illinois College, graduating from the latter institution in 1846. Then studied law in the office of Judge Lyman Trumbull, and was admitted to the Bar in 1847. The same fall, he went to Boston, where he continued his law studies, and was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar. He went to California, with thousands of others in 1849, and was engaged in mining for some time. Returning to St. Clair county, Illinois, in 1851, he engaged in farming there, which he followed until 1855. Then came to Minnesota, and after remaining in St. Anthony some time, removed to the farm on which he now lives. In 1872, he removed to Minneapolis, but returned to his farm in 1879, and has resided here since. Mr. Baldwin has taken a prominent part in public affairs since coming to Sherburne county. He has served two terms as County Attorney, was a member of the State Senate in 1859 and '60, and Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, besides filling other offices of responsibility. The town of Baldwin, in this county, is named in his honor. Mr. Baldwin was married on the 2d of September, 1851, to Miss Elizabeth Wilkinson, They have ten children, six of whom are living.


Elizabeth Hedge Hill Bailey
Source: Excerpts from "Our Gray Family History" compiled and written by Roger Ripley, December 2014 - rlripley@maqs.net.

Elizabeth Hedge Hill or "Lizzie", as she was often called, was the oldest child born to Joseph Paine Hill and Mary J Gray. She was born on April 25, 1846 in Williamsburg, Piscataquis County, Maine. Her middle name "Hedge" was the surname of her father's maternal grandmother.

She was with her parents and siblings in 1850 in Williamsburg and in 1860 in Brownsville, both in Piscataquis County, Maine. The family moved to Sherburne County, Minnesota to the Elk River area in 1867. Likely, later that year, Elizabeth attended St Cloud Normal to become a teacher.

On November 25, 1868, Elizabeth married Orville Bailey (5/20/1844 Michigan - 2/5/1888 Minnesota). He was the son of Charles Alvin Bailey and Louisa Bliss Bailey. At the age of 14, he managed to enlist in the Civil War as part of the Michigan Engineer Company. He served as a cook.

From family records, we learn that Orville and Elizabeth (Hill) Bailey had twins that, and they were born probably sometime in 1869. On May 13, 1870, their son Ernest Gray Bailey was born. The family is found located in Big Lake Township in Sherburne County, Minnesota on the July 16, 1870 Federal census. Orville is said to be a farmer and Elizabeth is a housekeeper, and they have son, Ernest, with them as a baby.

On January 25, 1873, son Albert Chester "Chet" Bailey was born at Bailey Station in Sherburne County, Minnesota. On November 27, 1875, son John Delbert Bailey was born in the Meadowvale area in Livonia, Sherburne County, Minnesota. During this time frame, Elizabeth taught school in a log schoolhouse and also was a dressmaker.

On June 9, 1877, daughter Daisy May Bailey was born - also in the Meadowvale area.

At some point prior to 1880, the family moved to Anoka, Minnesota as we find them on the June 18, 1880 Federal census in Anoka, where Orville is listed as a grocer there. In the household with him are Elizabeth and children - Ernest, Albert, and May. During the next year, daughter Elizabeth Hill Bailey was born at Anoka, Minnesota on April 2, 1881.

The family moved from Anoka to Fergus Falls, Minnesota during the next year - where they operated a restaurant near the railroad center. Undoubtedly, this allowed Orville to utilize his cooking talent he gained during his Civil War service. While at Fergus Falls, daughter Prudence Bailey was born on December 16, 1883.

Tragedy struck the family in 1888. Orville Bailey was working in the woods near Princeton, Minnesota. A severe winter storm came up and he walked home in the storm. He caught pneumonia and died on February 5, 1888 at age 44. He was buried at the Meadowvale Cemetery in Livonia, Sherburne County, Minnesota.

The next ten years had to be very challenging for Elizabeth and her family. All of the children were still home at this time with her. Fortunately, her sons were old enough to work on the farm and help support the family. At some point, Elizabeth's Uncle John H Gray gave his cabin to her during this stretch.

On the June 15, 1900 Federal census, Elizabeth is listed as a "widow" and a farmer - along with children - Ernest, Albert, Elizabeth, and Prudence. Additionally, her father, Joseph Paine Hill was in the household and probably was still good help on the farm - even at his age.

Likely, Elizabeth moved to Minneapolis after her father died in 1908. We find her in 1909 at 3918 N 6th in Minneapolis. Her daughters, Elizabeth and Prudence are with her. They are still in Minneapolis in 1911, but at 3906 Lyndale Avenue N then. We find them at that address at least until 1915.

Sometime after 1915 and prior to 1920, she moved back to Sherburne County, Minnesota. We find Elizabeth on the February 6, 1930 Federal census as a "retired farmer". In the household are daughters, Elizabeth and Prudence. Additionally, there is Louise C Bailey. She is said to be four years of age and a daughter. We know this is not correct, and have not found the connection to Elizabeth or one of her daughters for sure.

On July 1, 1921, Elizabeth Hedge Hill Bailey died of cancer in Livonia in the Meadowvale area of Sherburne County, Minnesota. She was buried at Meadowvale Cemetery next to her husband, Orville Bailey. She was 75 years old at the time of her death.


J. F. Bean
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
J. F. Bean, one of the first settlers of Livonia township, was born in Rockingham county, New Hampshire, in July, 1824. From the age of five to twenty-one years, he attended school and assisted his father on the farm and in the mill, after which, he taught school a couple of years. When about twenty-four years old, he set out for the West, and located in Wisconsin, where he remained until coming to Minnesota in 1852. He first settled at Elk River and improved a farm about two miles east of the town, but in 1856, came to the farm on which he now lives; at that time there were no improvements of any kind in this township. Was appointed Postmaster of Lake Fremont post-office in 1865, and still holds the position. Mr. Bean was married on the 15th of January, 1850, to Miss Betsy Harvey, of Maine. Of three children born to them, two are living.


A. D. Boyington
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
A. D. Boyington, one of the pioneers of this township, is a native of New York State, born on the 8th of April, 1833. He resided with his parents, in his native State, until 1854, when they came to Minnesota, and settled on section twenty-nine, Clear Lake township, the subject of our sketch following, the same fall, and taking a farm adjoining that of his father. His grounds are among the most attractive in this section of country, the beauty of the scenery being enhanced by a very pretty little lake near his residence. Mr. Boyington was married on the 26th of April, 1860, to Miss Zanett Wilber. Of four children born to them, three are living.


Edward Castle
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Edward Castle dates his birth at Holmfrith, England, in the year 1832. He was reared to agricultural pursuits, and also learned the trade of weaver and spinner, when quite young. He came to America in 1863, and after a stay of four years in New York State, went to Indiana and remained five years; up to this time, since coming to America, he had been employed at his trade, that of woolen weaver. Then came to Minnesota and settled on his present farm. Mr. Castle has been Chairman of the board of Supervisors, besides holding other important local offices in Clear Lake township. He was married on the 28th of February, 1875, to Miss Nancy Booth, who died on the 13th of July, 1875. Of six children born to them, five are living.


A. J. Craig
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
A. J. Craig was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on the 9th of February, 1842. His home was beneath the parental roof until about eighteen years of age, when he came to Minnesota, and after one year's stay at St. Anthony, went to Stillwater and engaged in logging and lumbering until 1867. Then came to Sherburne county and was employed for a number of years on Rum river, but in 1875, settled on his present farm. Mr. Craig is Chairman of the board of Supervisors and has held a number of other local offices. He was married on the 12th of April, 1867, to Hattie Whitney. Of four children born to them, three are living.


William N. M. Crawford
Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Liz Dellinger 
CRAWFORD William N M. Minneapolis.  Res 102 Arthur av S E, office 616 Guaranty Loan bldg.  Lawyer.  Born April 20, 1872 in Becker, Sherburne county Minn, son of Joseph M and Mary J (McAllister) Crawford.  Married Sept 25, 1901 to Jennie Gronnerud.  Graduated from Monticello high School 1894; law dept U of M, LL B 1901.  Ins solicitor and collector for Metropolitan Life Ins co 1901-02; for Minneapolis Electric Co 4 months; has practiced law in Minneapolis 1903 to date.  Served 5 years in Battery B 1st Artillery M N G taking part in the Indian campaign of 1898.  Pres and atty for Crawford, Stewart Co; for the Continental Debenture co; atty for Mower-Oberg Health Food Co and Lake City Realty Co.


Lucy Gray Hill Daggett
Source: Excerpts from "Our Gray Family History" compiled and written by Roger Ripley, December 2014 - rlripley@maqs.net.

Lucy Gray Hill was the second child and second daughter born to Joseph Paine Hill and Mary J Gray. She was born in Williamsburg, Piscataquis County, Maine on October 5, 1847. She was given her mother's maiden name as her middle name and may have been named after her mother's sister, Lucy.

On the 1850 Federal census, she would have been with her parents and siblings in Williamsburg in Piscataquis County, Maine on their farm there. She would have been with them also in 1860 at Brownsville, Maine, where her father was a blacksmith.

She would have made the adventurous trip by covered wagon pulled by oxen to journey from Maine to Minnesota in 1867. At some point after, she met a young farmer in Sherburne County and married him on January 10, 1870. He was Augustus L Daggett, who was born in Quincy, Michigan and came to Big Lake Township to settle. On the July 16, 1870 Federal census, we find Lucy with her husband, Augustus (a farmer). Also in the household is her husband's brother, Edward A Daggett, a couple years younger than he. Their real estate has a value of $1500. Living not far from them is Lucy's older sister, Elizabeth, and her husband, Orville Bailey.

Later that year, their first child was born - a daughter named Edith Lucy Daggett, who was born on December 27, 1870. A second daughter was born on October 3, 1872. We find no record of this daughter, but assume she may have died shortly after birth or in the first year or two as we find no records on her after that.

This had to be a difficult time for Lucy as on April 12, 1874, her husband died at age 27. We have not found any record as to the cause of his death. He was buried in Bailey Station Cemetery in Sherburne County, Minnesota. After the death of her husband and second daughter, Lucy moved back in with her parents and siblings still at home. Then in 1879, her mother passed away as well. She, undoubtedly, was very helpful to her father at this time to help with household chores previously done by her mother.

On the 1880 Federal census, she is living in Livonia, Sherburne County, Minnesota with her father, several siblings, her daughter Edith, and Uncle John H Gray. She likely stayed with her father the next number of years until she remarried on June 3, 1891 to Waldo Joselyn - a widower with several children. She was 43 and he was 56 years old. So Lucy took her daughter, Lucy, and joined her new husband's family in Marengo, McHenry County, Illinois.

We find them in the city of Marengo on June 12, 1900 on the 1900 Federal census. In the household are Lucy, her husband Waldo, her daughter Edith, and his daughter, Edith. This census record does confirm that Lucy had given birth to two children and only one (Edith) is now living.

Sometime in 1909, Lucy died in Marengo, McHenry County, Illionis. She was buried in Marengo City Cemetery there. Her husband, Waldo Joselyn, died two years later and is buried near her there as well.

As for Lucy's only living daughter, Edith Lucy Daggett, she ended up moving to the Chicago area and worked there as a maid for a number of years. She never married and had no children. She died at the age of 49 on August 16, 1920 Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.


Arthur Newman Dare
Source: Progressive men of Minnesota. Published by The Minneapolis Journal (1897) submitted by Diana Heser Morse

Arthur Newman Dare, the editor and publisher of the Elk River, Minnesota, "Star News," is a man whose success, achieved in newspaper publication, has been due entirely to his own unaided efforts. He was born in Jordan, Onondaga County, New York, May 25, 1850. His father, Alfred Dare, was a miller in moderate circumstances. He was a native of Wales and came to this country in 1838, when but twenty years of age. He died in 1888. Mary Matilda Allen (Dare), the mother of the subject of this sketch, was born in Vermont, in humble circumstances. The subject of this sketch had only the advantages of a common school education, with a short attendance at the village academy of his native town. He came to Minnesota with his parents in 1867, locating in Minneapolis. Here he entered the printing office of the Minneapolis Tribune, learning the trade of printer. He worked at his trade for three or four years in the Tribune office until a desire for travel took hold of him. He embarked as a sailor on a whaling ship from New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1872, and was gone two and a half years. During this time he had many exciting adventures in New Zealand and the Pacific Ocean. On his way home he made a trip through England. Coming back to Minnesota he settled at Elk River and commenced working at his old trade. He was made local editor of the Elk River "Star," and a year later bought a half interest in this paper. The following year he bought the "Star" outright. In 1881 he bought the Elk River "News" and consolidated the two papers as the "Star-News." This paper Mr. Dare has edited and published since that time. He has built up and paying circulation, and established for his paper a good reputation, so that locally it exerts a large influence. Mr. Dare is a Republican in politics. He has no ambition politically, though he has always taken active interest in the welfare of his party. He has been Chairman of the County Republican Committee continuously for fifteen years, and in 1894 was elected to the State Legislature, though the nomination for this latter office came unsought. He was re-elected in 1896. He has for thirteen years been a member of Sherburn Lodge, A.F. & A.M. In 1879 he was married to Susan May Albee. Mr. and Mrs. Dare have three children, Daphne, Susan and Laurence.


Daniel Frye
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Daniel Frye dates his birth in Kennebec county, Maine, on the 23d of July, 1843. When twenty years old, he went to Lynn, Massachusetts, and was employed in a shoe factory about three years. He then spent two years as a sailor, after which, he came west and has since been a resident of Clear Lake township, buying and settling on his present farm in 1869. Mr. Frye has held a number of responsible local offices, and is the present efficient Town Clerk. He was married on the 10th of January, 1866, to Miss Lavinia K. Davis, They have had seven children, but five of whom are living.


W. J. Harrington
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
W. J. Harrington, whose birthplace is in Montgomery county, New York, was born on the 7th of November, 1825. When but a child, his father died, and at the age of twelve years, he removed with his mother to Ohio, and soon after commenced working on the neighboring farms, remaining in the State six years. He then removed with his mother to Indiana, and purchased a small farm, which he carried on until coming to Minnesota in 1861. He settled in Sherburne county, but on the breaking out of the Sioux Massacre, enlisted in Company C, of the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers, and served thirteen months. Returned to Indiana in 1864, and two years later, again came to Minnesota and settled in Isanti county, where he lived ten years, and came to his present farm in 1876. Mr. Harrington was married in 1862, to Miss Annie V. Stevenson. They have had five children, four of whom are living.


William H. Houlton
Source: Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. (Publ. 1907) Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Houlton, William H, Elk River. Real estate and banking. Born March 29, 1840 in Houlton Me, son of Samuel and Sarah (Kendall) Houlton. Married March 3, 1870 to Miss Freddie Lewis. Educated in common schools Monticello Minn 1856-60. First employed by Croswell Bros Monticello 1861; in partnership with brother H Houlton in mercantile business and member firm of Houlton & Nickerson sawmill 1865-73; flour mnfr under firm name Mills & Houlton 1873-87; manufacturer pine lumber 1887-1902. Pres Bank of Elk River 1885-99; pres Houlton’s Bank of Elk River 1902 to date. Interested in farming and stock raising 1887 to date. Supt Minn State Reformatory 1896-1900. Served in Civil War and during Sioux outbreak in 8th Minn Vol Regt 1862-65. Register of deeds Wright county 1865; treas Sherburne county 1870-74; state senator 1879-86; author of History of 8th Minn Regt published by state in History of Minnesota in Civil and Indian Wars. Member Masonic fraternity and G A R.


E. F. Hurd
Source: History of the upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
E. F. Hurd, one of the pioneers of Clear Lake, was born at Newfield, Maine, on the 2d of May, 1829. His parents died when he was quite young, and he went to live with an uncle, attending school and working on the farm until seventeen years of age, when he began to learn the carpenter's trade at Bangor, remaining there until 1855. He then came to Minnesota and located the farm on which he now lives, but spent the greater portion of his time until 1860, working at his trade in Minneapolis, and since then, has devoted his time chiefly to the improvement of his farm, with only an occasional return to his trade. Mr. Hurd has been County Commissioner, two terms, and held other important offices. He was married on the 7th of August, 1854, to Miss Fannie A. Macomber, of Bangor, Maine. One son, James Franklin, is living, and one is deceased, whose name was George.


James Iliff
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
James Iliff was born in Preble county, Ohio, on the 6th of August, 1824. When ten years old, he went with his parents to Indiana, his father moving the first family to the site of the present city of Wabash, in that State, in 1834. The subject of our sketch remained in the Hoosier State, farming and dealing in live stock, until coming to Minnesota in 1853. After a stay of two years in St. Anthony, he went to what is now Spencer Erook township, Isanti county, and was the first permanent settler in that county, which was his home until coming to the present farm in Livonia, in 1880. Mr. Iliff was married on the 21st of May, 1854, to Miss Margaret Spencer. Of ten children born to them, but five are living.


Drayton Jones
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Drayton Jones dates his birth in Wyoming county. New York, on the 2d of April, 1824. In 1841, removed with the family to Cattaraugus county, where he grew to manhood. When he was twenty-one years old, went to work in a saw-mill, remaining there one year and a half, and afterwards carried on his father's farm until 1865. He then came to Minnesota and located in the eastern part of Clear Lake township, but in 1868, removed to his present farm, and, with the exception of three years' absence, has resided here ever since. Mr. Jones was married on the 25th of October, 1848, to Miss Sarah Thorp. They have had five children, three of whom are living.


Dennis A. Kaliher
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Dennis A. Kaliher is a native of Dunkirk, New York, and was born on the 5th of August, 1852. His father was engaged in railroad construction, and as he worked his way west, brought his family with him, and settled on a farm near Elk River, in 1859. After a four years' stay there, he removed to the north part of Sherburne county, residing there until 1873, when he removed to his present farm in Livonia township. Mr, Kaliher was married on the 1st of July, 1873, to Miss Jennie Larkins. They have four children.


Alfred Markham
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Alfred Markham, a brother of the subjects of the two preceding brief sketches, was born in Clearwater, Wright county, on the 20th of August, 1857, being one of the first white children born in the town. During his boyhood, he received such education as the public schools of his native place afforded, residing with his parents until 1876, when he settled on his present farm, in Clear Lake township. He was married on the 6th of October, 1876, to Miss Velonia Jones. They have one child, named Gracie E.


H. Markham
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
H. Markham is also a native of McHenry county, Illinois, and was born on the 15th of December, 1839. His parents removed to Minnesota in 1854, and selected their residence as mentioned in the preceding sketch. In 1857, the family removed to Cannon Falls, Goodhue county, but did not remain long, returning to their former farm in Wright county. In 1862, the subject of our sketch enlisted in Company E, of Eighth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, serving three years. Returning from the army, Mr. Markham resided with his parents until 1874, when he removed to the farm on which he now lives. He was united in marriage with Miss Emma M. White, on the 11th of October, 1876. They have one child, named Ada B.


Russell Markham
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Russell Markham dates his birth in McHenry county, Illinois, on the 3d of January, 1851. In 1854, the family came to Minnesota, and settled in Clearwater township, Wright county, where his parents still reside. In 1870, he obtained a situation with the corps of engineers then surveying for the Northern Pacific Railroad, continuing in that employment for three years, after which he spent four years in St. Cloud and Sauk Rapids. He settled on his present farm in 1877, and has since given his whole attention to its improvement. Mr. Markham was married on the 20th of December, 1874, to Miss Cora M. Benson, of Clearwater, Minnesota. Four children gather around the family board.


R. M. Mayo
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
R. M. Mayo dates his birth in Waldo county, Maine, on the 9th of May, 1833. He was reared in his native State, and engaged in lumbering until coming to Minnesota in 1855. Followed his former occupation here until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company E, of the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. Served with some distinction until wounded, near Fairfax Court House, after which he was compelled to lay in the hospital for months, and finally was discharged for disability on account of his wounds. He then returned to his native State and remained until 1866, when he settled on his present farm in Livonia. Mr. Mayo was united in marriage with Addie E. Burroughs, on the 24th of January, 1876.


Samuel C. Milliman
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Samuel C. Milliman was born in what is now the city of Anoka, Anoka county, Minnesota, on the 19th of March, 1854, and was the first white boy born in that township. He was raised in his native town until about twenty years of age, when he removed with his parents to Sanford, Isanti county, making his father's house his home, being engaged in logging and lumbering. In 1875, he went to Colorado, and was employed in the mines a portion of two years. Returned to Isanti county in 1877, and in 1879, settled on his present farm. Mr. Milliman's wife was Miss Millie A. Wilber, the marriage taking place on the 1st of March, 1879.


William Noot
Source: Saint Paul Daily Globe (Saint Paul, MN) November 23, 1884; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

PEN PICTURES OF ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA.
By T. M. Newson
Article XL.
William Noot

Among the many earnest Democrats with whom we met on our first arrival in St. Paul, I the year 1853,-the territory was then Democratic-none were more enthusiastic or more warmly devoted to their party, than William Noot and "Little Jack Morgan," the latter well known by the old settlers, as the Ohio Democratic politician. Noot and Jack were inseparable. They agreed on party issues; never faltered in their devotion to the memory of Andrew Jackson, and socially were hale fellows well met. Poor Jack! How often he tried to convince us that we were wrong in our devotion to the cause of the slave, and how often he regretted that one he so esteemed, should be misled by fanatical ideas. Unfortunately he did not live to see the results of the great rebellion, but died in early life, fully impressed with the belief that the Democratic party was the only pure and great and grand party which could save this country from destruction. Jack came to St. Paul sometime in 1852 or 1853, and of whom we shall have more to say. Mr. Noot we lost sight of for years, and supposed he was dead, when a mere accident found him alive and well, living at a serene old age in the town of Big Lake, Sherburne county, Minnesota.

WHEN AND WHERE BORN.
He was born in Wesel, on the Rhine, Prussia, in the year 1811; removed to Missouri in 1844; engaged in farming; married Nancy Merchant in 1845; came to St. Paul in 1847; remained here a short time, when he made a claim one mile above the mouth of Rum river, including the big island, but was driven off when the Winnebagoes were removed to Blue Earth county, they having a high old spree over his scoota-wa-boo, which they found, and which event Mr. Noot thus describes:

WHOOPING IT UP!
He had two barrels of whisky at this time, which he had sold to the Indian traders, and had it hid, according to instruction in a corn crib, but the Indians found it out, and then there was a lively tussel. They took every pot and pan he had, and even emptied his powder keg and filled that with whisky, and removed these vessels to where they camped that night, which was about three quarters of a mile from Noot's house. Himself and wife and little son then went to Mr. Folsom's at the mouth of Rum river, but there was no sleep. The Indians were very liberal with their whisky, and fortunately they were very good natured, so Noot and his family escaped with their lives.

Mr. Noot then bought a claim near St. Paul, sold it, and took another claim on the Fort Snelling reservation, in Reserve township. He served two terms in the territorial house of representatives, and translated the first message of Gov. Ramsey into German; voted for Abe Lincoln, but after the death of that good man he went back to his old love, the Democratic party. He enlisted in the Second Minnesota regiment and served his adopted country, and though not rich, he has been blessed with eleven children, and resides where he has made it his home for the past twenty years. One son is dead, three others and one daughter are married, and this veritable Noot, to our memory of thirty-one years ago, still lives at the advanced age of seventy-three, dreaming over again the pleasant times he had with little Jack Morgan and the good, old Democratic party of over a quarter of a century ago, having been a resident of Minnesota for about thirty-seven years.


Sereno N. Putnam
Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Syndi Phillips

SERENO N. PUTNAM, register of deeds of Eddy county, is one of the early settlers of that region, and has been identified with the development and advancement of Eddy county. He is a gentleman of Broad mind and well educated, and is entitled to a foremost place amount the promoters of business matters. He has varied financial interest in agricultural lines, and is one of the substantial men in his community.
Our subject was born in Sherburne county, Minnesota, in March, 1861. His father, Henry P. (?) Putnam, was a farmer and merchant in Minnesota. Our subject is a descendant of a brother of Israel Putnam, of Revolutionary fame. The mother of our subject, whose maiden name was Caroline Newton, was of English descent, and the family settled in America in colonial times.
Our subject was the second in a family of five children, and was raised on a farm in his native state. He attended the country schools and also the Normal School at St. Cloud, Minnesota, and graduated from that institution in 1880. He began teaching school at the age of sixteen years, and followed that vocation most of the time for about five years, and in 1883 came to Eddy county, North Dakota. He entered claim to government land near Tiffany and began farming. He erected a 6x8 feet shanty an lived alone and followed farming with oxen. He continued farming until 1886, when he was elected county superintendent of schools, and was re-elected at the expiration of his term. He had his office on his farm, and served in that capacity two terms. He attended the department of law at the State University of Minnesota during the winter of 1890-91, after which he followed teaching a short time, and in the fall of 1894 was elected county register of deeds of Eddy county. He was re-elected in 1896, and again in 1898, and is now serving his third term in that position. He is an efficient officer, and enjoys popularity.
Our subject was married in 1888 to Miss Grace Brown, a native of New York. Mrs. Putnam is a lady of good education, and is a graduate of the Mayville Normal Schools of North Dakota. She taught school in North Dakota several terms, and her father was one of the early settlers of that state and was a farmer by occupation. Mr.Putnam is a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge and of the Masonic fraternity. He is a man who keeps abreast of the times on all important issues, and takes an active interest in the welfare of his community, and is deservedly held in high esteem by his fellowmen. In political faith he is a Republican, and stands firmly for the principles of his party.

Another Source:
Source: North Dakota Blue Book, 1913 Legislative Manual, Published under the direction of Thomas Hall, Secretary of State, 1913. Submitted by Linda R.

S. N. PUTNAM. (New Rockford), of the thirty-second legislative district, was born March 28, 1861, at Big Lake, Minn. He is a graduate of the State Normal School. St. Cloud. Minn., and took a special course in the law department of the University of Minnesota. Came to North Dakota in 1883. Held the position of county superintendent for two years, of register of deeds for six years in Eddy County. Was elected as a member of the house in 1906 and 1908. and was elected to his present position in 1912 as a progressive republican. He is married. Came to the state as a school teacher, engaged in the business of abstractor for eight years, and has engaged in farming, having a large acreage of land.


Benjamin N. Spencer
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Benjamin N. Spencer, deceased, was born in Pennsylvania, on the 30th of April, 1806. When a child, he removed with his parents to Ohio, where he grew to manhood, and at the age of twenty-two years, went to Indiana, where he was engaged in farming, and also worked at the carpenters trade. About 1854, he came to Minnesota, and lived in St. Anthony for a time, after which he went to Isanti county, and was engaged in farming for three years. In 1864, he came to the farm in Livonia township, where he resided until his death, which occurred on the 17th of March, 1881. Mr. Spencer was highly respected by those who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. He filled the office of Judge of Probate of Sherburne county, for two terms. His wife was Mrs. Sarah J. Thompson, a native of Tompkins county. New York, and a resident of Minnesota since 1849. She still resides on the old homestead.


John Stretch
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
John Stretch is a native of Upper Canada, and was born on the 4th of February, 1837. He was raised on his father's farm, which was his home until 1863. Then came to the state of Michigan, and was employed in a saw-mill about a year and a half, after which he came to Minnesota, and settled on his present farm. He was married on the 2d of January, 1863, to Miss Jane McCollum. Five children are the result of this union.


Edgar White
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Edgar White was born in Franklin county, New York, on the 16th of July, 1839. When he was about eight years old, the family removed to Illinois, where Edgar grew to manhood. At the age of twenty-one years, he took his father's farm, and carried it on, his parents living with him until coming to his present home in 1872. Since coming to Clear Lake, Mr. White has been closely identified with the progress of the town, and has held the office of Supervisor and Assessor. He was married on the 29th of June, 1865, to Miss Emma Thurston, of Pennsylvania; they have five children.


Frank Thurston White
Source: Progressive Men of Minnesota, (Shutter, Marion Daniel, 1853–ed.) Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Journal (1897) transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Frank Thurston White – Sherburne County, Minnesota, has for its attorney a young man who has carried on a very vigorous contest for existence and success. The energy which he has displayed, even if it were not coupled with more than ordinary ability, must insure results out of the ordinary. Frank Thurston White was born April 9, 1866, at East Burlington, Kane County, Illinois, the son of Edgar and Emma C. Thurston White. His parents were farmers of moderate means. Mr. White is descended on his father's side from good old New England stock, his great-grandfather, James White, having been an orderly sergeant in the Continental army, and one of the "Green Mountain Boys." On his mother's side the family were residents of Ohio and Pennsylvania, since the early settlement of that country. Mr. White was brought to Minnesota by his parents when six years of age, coming overland in an emigrant wagon and arriving in May 1872. The family settled upon a farm near the Big Bend, in the town of Clear Lake. In those days game was abundant, and the first money earned by Frank was for furs caught by trapping. It was necessary for him to assist his father on the farm as soon as he was old enough to do so, and his education was gained under difficulties, in the public schools at Clear Lake and Clearwater, Minnesota; at Creston, Illinois, where he acted as a janitor of the high school in order to pay tuition; in the high school at Monticello, and in the spare hours which he was able to snatch from his other work at home. On leaving the high school at Monticello, Mr. White began the study of law with J. W. Perkins, in Minneapolis. After a few months he returned to assist his father on the farm. Returning to Minneapolis in a short time he was employed in the office of Hector Baxter, E. S. Gaylord, and other attorneys, assisting part of the time in the care of the law library. During this period he worked at the noon hour in a restaurant and carried the morning newspapers. Fie taught the village school at Clear Lake during the winter of 1888 and 1889, and immediately thereafter went to California, where he was employed in the sugar factory of Claus Spreckles. He returned to Minneapolis in 1891, resuming the study of law and took lectures in the night class at the University. In the winter of 1892 and 1893 he taught school in the Cater district in the town of Haven, and during the spring of 1893 he taught school in his home district and managed his father's farm. The fall of that year he resumed his course at the law school, taking day and evening lectures, and completed his legal studies June 7, 1894. The following day he was admitted to the bar on motion of Dean William Pattee, and was ready to open an office. His financial condition, however, was such that he was not able to do so, and he returned to the farm for a short time. It was during this visit to his home that he was nominated by the Republicans of Sherburne County for county attorney. He was opposed by the party bosses and by a combination between the Democrats and Populists, but he made a vigorous canvass and was elected by the narrow margin of seven votes. Mr. White has conducted the office with ability and to the satisfaction of the public. He is, as already slated, a Republican. He is a member of the Knights of Maccabees, the Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He joined the state militia in the summer of 1887 and was a member of Company B, First regiment, about two and a half years. He has never married.


H. T. White
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
H. T. White was born in Clinton county, New York, residing with his parents until seventeen years of age, when he went to work in an iron foundry at Wellington, and was employed there three years. In 1848, he went to Illinois and settled on a farm in DeKalb county, where he lived until coming to his present farm in 1873. Mr. White is one of the representative men of Clear Lake, having held nearly every town office since coming here. Mrs. White's maiden name was Almira Woolsey. They have four children; Emma M., Adah A., Wilber G., and Charles E.


Edward L. Whitney
Source: History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1881. Transcribed by the Alberti’s.
Edward L. Whitney, whose birthplace is in the state of Maine, was born on the 15th of September, 1851. When but a child, his parents came to Minnesota and settled in Anoka, but after a two year's stay, removed to Oak Grove township, in the same county, and in 1865, came to Livonia, where the family has since lived. Mr. Whitney resided with his parents until removing to his present farm in 1879. He was married on the 20th of June, 1876, to Miss Sarah Lougee. They have two children.


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