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Stearns County Minnesota 
Genealogy and History



Local People


A. J. Cleveland
Source: Emporia Gazette (Emporia, KS) Tuesday, November 8, 1904; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

DIVISION FOREMAN RESIGNS.
Division Foreman A. J. Cleveland, of the Cottonwood division, between Emporia and Newton, has resigned his office here and will go to Melrose, Minn., where he will work for the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. Mr. Cleveland came here from Wisconsin about a year ago as successor of A. P. Goodhue. It is not yet know who will succeed him as division foreman here.


W. T. Collins
Source: The St. Cloud Journal (MN) Dec. 26, 1867, page 3; submitted by Robin Line.
Gone To Washington.-On Sabbath last Dr. W.T. Collins started for Washington to enter upon his duties as Assistant Doorkeeper to the House of Representatives, quite a lucrative position. The Dr. will be absent about two months.


John Cooper
Source: The Duluth Herald, Saturday Evening, Oct. 22, 1910.

Hauls cream in Auto
Sauk Center, Minn., Oct. 22 - (Special to The Herald) John Cooper, a farmer living at Little Sauk, north of here, is hauling his cream to the creamery in an auto and says the method is both profitable and expeditious. With an auto he can make the round trip to the creamery in an hour and a half, while with a team it required three-quarters of the day to make the trip.


George B. Dodd

C. M. Truesdell
Source: History of Stearns County, Minnesota, Volume 1, by William Bell Mitchell, Chicago, 1915; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Drs. George B. Dodd and C. M. Truesdell came to St. Cloud from River Falls, Wis., in 1887. They dissolved partnership in 1888. Dr. Dodd assumed his partnerís practice and continued for a while in the same office, but left St. Cloud during the same year.


Joseph Fadden
[Source: The Hastings Conserver (MN) Tuesday, November 6, 1866; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]
STEARNS COUNTY.
From The St. Cloud Journal, 1st.
Joseph Fadden, living on the east side of the river, has just gathered from one and a half acres of ground five hundred and fifty bushels of rutabagas. We can believe this, as we got several bushels of them and took them by the count, seven for a big half bushel.


Anthony Faucett
[Source: The St. Cloud Journal (MN) Dec. 19, 1867, page 3; submitted by Robin Line]
That Saw Blade.-Anthony Faucett desires us to state that the fellow who stole his saw blade can have the frame by calling at Weary's wagon-shop. Any creature mean enough to steal "Uncle Anthony's" saw is beyond redemption.


Anthony Faucett
[Source: The St. Cloud Journal (MN) Dec. 19, 1867, page 3; submitted by Robin Line]
That Saw Blade.-Anthony Faucett desires us to state that the fellow who stole his saw blade can have the frame by calling at Weary's wagon-shop. Any creature mean enough to steal "Uncle Anthony's" saw is beyond redemption.


L. W. Harding
Source: Minneapolis Journal (Minneapolis, MN) Thursday, May 21, 1896; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
Norwesters.
Melrose, Minn.-L. W. Harding, a sign painter, drunk several days, attempted suicide this afternoon by strychnine.


Scott Hill
[Source: Evansville Courier and Press (IN) Saturday, March 15, 1890; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]

SCOTT HILL, a negro who has a farm at Maine Prairie, Stearns county, Minnesota claims that he is the victim of a "race war" on a small scale, and that his home, which was burned some time ago was set on fire by his neighbors.


J. J. Salfinger
- - - [Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review, Volume 37, 1898, transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]
Minneapolis and St. Paul.
J. J. Salfinger, Melrose, Minn., last week moved into new and larger quarters.

- - - [Source: Hillsboro Independent (OR) May 3, 1907, submitted by Mary Kay Krogman]
Seven years ago the wife of J. J. Salfinger, of Melrose, Minnesota, died, and she was buried in the cemetery near that city. Last week her husband had the body removed to another lot. The body was found to have turned to solid stone, and it took eight men to raise it from the grave. The features were as natural as when interred excepting a part of the nose had disappeared. The body was perfect.


Shaw-vosh-king
[Source: Mower County Transcript (Austin, MN) November 18, 1869; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]

The St. Cloud Journal learns from C. A. Gilman, Register of the land office that on Wednesday last, Mr. Shaw-vosh-kong, chief of the Lille Lac band of Chippewa Indians, came to the land office and took a homestead. [sic.] He has already a section of land, where their village was, near the mouth of Leech Lake, deeded him by the President. He wanted more land, and had the money to buy it, but as that portion is still unsurveyed, it was not in the market. He has lived there for over thirty years, and does not like to leave. He spoke no English but acted through an interpreter, and was the first full blooded Indian who ever took a homestead here. He was well dressed and seemed highly pleased with the homestead operation.


Andrew J. Smith
Source: Warren Sheaf (Jan. 5, 1881) submitted by fofg mb
Andrew J. Smith of Sauk Centre, shipped 3,000 lbs of venison to Cincinnati.


N. G. Weyrens
Source: The Duluth Herald (MN), Wednesday Evening, Oct. 26, 1910.
Minnesota Briefs. St. Cloud - A horse belonging to N. G. Weyrens, who lives on the St. Augusta road two miles south of the city, was shot and killed by a crowd of boy hunters Sunday afternoon. The bullet from a 22-caliber rifle entered the abdomen of the animal, which died soon after. The horse was valued at $150.



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