Finding Ancestors 
 
wherever their trails led with Genealogy Trails History Group

Stevens County, Minnesota

 


Obituaries


George Braune
Source: Duluth News-Tribune (Duluth, MN) Tuesday, 22 July 1884; transcribed by FoFG mz

JAMESTOWN, Dak., July 21. - It has been learned that Geo. Braune, pop manufacturer of this place, committed suicide by taking morwhine, at a hotel in Morris, Minn., a few days ago. None here knew where he had gone till his dead body was identified there by a traveling man and news sent here. He had registered under another name and from Castleton, Dak. He was about sixty years old and not married. No relatives of his are known. He was a German, of good education, industrious and regarded as honest. He was hospital steward at Fort Steward here from 1873 to 1876. He had been here eleven years. No cause is known.


Chloe Butler
Source: Salt Lake Tribune (UT) April 7, 1907; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

WOMAN DIES IN 106TH YEAR
The remains of Chloe Butler, who died at her home in North Dakota a few days ago, were taken to Alberta, Minn., for burial and laid beside those of a son in the cemetery west of the city. Mrs. Butler was a colored woman and was born in Lewis county, West Virginia, in 1801, and was over 106 years old when she passed away. She and her family were sold just before the War of the rebellion to settle a bankrupt estate, but later Mrs. Butler was returned to her former owner and she came North with him and his family, remaining with them until they died. After the close of the war the rest of her family came North, and one son, Albert Ratliff, resides in Albert Lea. Another son, W. H. Butler, lived there many years, but later removed to St. Paul, where he died several years ago at an advance age.


Civis Carter
Source: Evening Times-Republican (Marshalltown, IA) December 3, 1918; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

FORMER RESIDENT DEAD.
Word received by the Times-Republican tells of the death of Mrs. John Carter at her home in Sherwood, N. D., following a brief illness from bronchitis and dropsy. Mrs. Carter had not been well for several months due to injuries received when she was struck and knocked down by an automobile.

Mrs. Carter was born Civis Adams and was the daughter of Benjamin and Hannah Adams. She was a native of Grant county, Indiana, where she was born May 30, 1852. She was married to John Carter March 17, 1872, in this county where she made her home for several years. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Carter, four of whom died in infancy. Besides her husband, Mrs. Carter leaves seven children. They are Mrs. H. E. Elgin, Fort Des Moines; W. F. and G. E. Carter of Sherwood, N. D.; Mrs. Loretta M. Gay and C. E. Carter, Eau Clair, Wis.; Mrs. Evalina Runion, of Chokio, Minn.; and John O. Carter who is in France. A brother and two sisters also survive in the persons of Timothy Adams, of Braham, Minn.; Mr. E. A. Howell, of Jennings, Kan.; and Mrs. S. J. Pemberton, of Whittier, Cal.


Mrs. Benjamin Dalgarne
Source: Duluth News-Tribune (Duluth, MN) Saturday, 18 Dec. 1920; transcribed by FoFG mz

MORRIS, Minn., Dec. 17. - Mrs. Benjamin Dalgarne, wife of a building contractor, was burned to death in her home here today, when a fire, supposedly originating from a gasoline explosion, partly consumed the structure.

It is thought gasoline with which Mrs. Dalgarne was cleaning a dress, became ignited, with the resultant explosion, trapping her in the kitchen. Her body was found near the kitchen door.


Otto Donstreich
Source: Evening Times (Grand Forks, ND) Monday, 13 Apr. 1908; transcribed by FoFG mz

Williston, N.D., April 13 - Otto Donstreich, at the head of the clothing department of the Bruegger stores for some years, died Sunday morning of pneumonia and complications following a sickness of several weeks standing. He was 26 years old on the day of his death. There were funeral services under Pythian auspices Sunday afternoon and the body was taken to the home of the deceased at Morris, Minn.


Patrick Feeley
Source: Minneapolis Journal (Minneapolis, MN) Saturday, 5 Nov. 1898; transcribed by FoFG mz

Morris, Minn., Nov. 5. - Patrick Feeley, who has resided in this county for many years, has died from an attack of paralysis that he suffered from last week.


Anna Huey
Source: Aberdeen Weekly News (Aberdeen, SD) Thursday, 3 Nov. 1921; transcribed by FoFG mz

Mrs. Anna Huey of Aberdeen, age 60 years and 9 months and for twenty-five years a resident of Aberdeen, passed away Tuesday morning.

Mrs. Huey was born in Canada in 1861 and was united in marriage to J. N. Huey on January 2, 1881, at Morris, Minn.

She is survived by two daughters, Florence Huey and Mrs. O. P. Berg of Aberdeen, and a sister, Mrs. James Seiger of St. Paul Park, Minn.

Funeral service will be held from the Christian church, Thursday at 1 P.M. Burial will be at Bath.

The Rev. Leland W. Porter of the Christian church, will officiate.


William Hyilstad
Source: Duluth News-Tribune (Duluth, MN) Friday, 29 Apr. 1910; transcribed by FoFG mz

MORRIS, Minn., April 28. - William Hyilstad, a farmer, living about 10 miles north of Morris, committed suicide this morning by drinking carbolic acid. A widow and six small children survive. He moved here a few months ago from Iowa.


Carland and Olof Johnson
Source: Rock Island Argus (Rock Island, IL) November 20, 1907; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

TWO BOYS DROWN WHILE SHOOTING.
Alberta, Minn., Nov. 20. - Carland and Olof Johnson, aged 12 and 19 respectively, were drowned yesterday while shooting ducks on the ice of Artichoke lake. [note: other articles list the younger boy as Cal or Carl]


Thomas H. Maguire
Source: Duluth News-Tribune (Duluth, MN) Wednesday, 3 Apr. 1918; transcribed by FoFG mz

MORRIS, April 2. - Thomas H. Maguire, aged 67, died this morning at his home here. He had been a resident of Stevens county for many years and was identified with the advancement of Morris as a farming community and with the growth of the town of Morris. He was treasurer of the Stevens County Farm Loan association and was a thirty-second degree Mason.

He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Frank E. Pierce, 4602 Jay street and Mrs. Albert F. Welles, 911 London road, Duluth.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.


Alex. Martin
Source: The Princeton Union (Princeton, MN) - Thursday, July 25, 1901; transcribed by Jim Dezotell

Alex. Martin, at one time a resident of this section, died last Sunday at Morris. His body was brought here for burial Tuesday.

Mr. Martin came to Minnesota in the territorial days. He was born in Scotland 72 years ago, and first emigrated to Prince Edwards island, coming from there to the then Territory of Minnesota. He was a veteran of the civil war, and for twenty years was sheriff of Isanti county. He also served the county as probate judge for a number of years.

He was converted at the age of twenty-seven, and joining the M.E. Church and Ministry. He was appointed as Pastor to Princeton, Rockford and Cambridge. At the close of his Cambridge pastorate retired from active service, but remained a local preacher to the end of his life.

His wife, two sons, and three daughters survive him. He died in triumph in the faith of the Gospel he preached to other men.


Katie Perham
Source: The Saint Paul Globe (MN) March 3, 1901; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

DEATHS.
Katie Pirham, Alberta, Minn., 19 yrs.


Dick Smith
Source: Jackson Citizen (Jackson, MI) Tuesday, February 6, 1883; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

Uncle Dick Smith has lived a bachelor's life on a homestead in the town of Alberta, Minn., about twenty-two miles from Sauk Rapids. A week ago last Friday he returned home after walking a long distance through the cold, put his stock in the barn, and went into the house to kindle a fire, but was unable to do so, and took to the bed. Being missed for several days by his neighbors, two Polanders went to his house last Wednesday, and upon approaching, saw Smith wandering around eating snow. They took him into the house, built a fire, and cooked as much as the almost famished man would eat. Mr. Smith was insensible. The men did not discover that he was frozen. His legs were black from the knees down, and on taking off his boots, one toe dropped off. On going to the barn, an ox was found dead from starvation, and the remainder were nearly dead. Smith was taken to Sauk Rapids, but died soon after reaching there.


Robert R. Smith
Source: Omaha World Herald (Omaha, NE) Saturday, February 23, 1946; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

Services:
For Robert R. Smith, 87, at Laurel. Survivors: Wife, Maude; daughters, Mrs. George Hughes of Wayne and Mrs. Chris Pedersen of Alberta, Minn.; sons George L. of Herman, Minn.; Hartford of Rogue River, Ore.; W. Dean, James M. and R. Ren of Yankton, S. D.


William Sontag
Source: Colorado Springs Gazette (Colorado Springs, CO) Tuesday, January 9, 1917; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

William Sontag, 43, died at a sanatorium yesterday. He was brought to this city early Sunday from his home in Alberta, Minn., where the body was sent last night. He is survived by his wife and eight children.


Caroline Wernsing
Source: The Decatur Herald (IL) July 14, 1917; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

HARVEL WOMAN, 79, DIES IN HER HOME.
Taylorville, July 14. - Mrs. Caroline Wernsing, 79, died Thursday in her home in Harvel. Funeral services will be conducted Saturday morning at 10 o'clock in the North Lutheran church in Harvel, Rev. Mr. Penekamp officiating. Burial will be made in the Harvel cemetery.

The deceased was a native of Germany and was the widow of the late Bernhardt Wernsing. Surviving the deceased are the following children: Mrs. Chris Wagahoft of Morrisonville; Herman, Fred and Ed Wernsing all of Harvel; Mrs. John Frederick of Alberta, Minn., and Henry Wernsing of Chokio, Minn. One brother and one sister also survive.


Woolard Whitten
Source: The Decatur Herald (IL) September 10, 1922; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

MAN KNOWN IN FILLMORE DIES.
Fillmore, Sept. 9 - Woolard Whitten, formerly a resident of Fillmore, died in his home in Chokio, Minn., Sept. 3.

He was the son of Frank and Belle Whitten and was born in Boot Hill in 1881. In 1904 he married Miss Hester Gates of Fillmore and to this union one child was born. Frances Dwight, who survives with the mother.

He leaves his wife and child, his father, Frank Whitten, one sister, Elsie, at home, and the following brothers, Lee of Nokomis, Henry and Cress of Fillmore.

The funeral was held in the Lutheran church Thursday at 10 a.m., Rev. Mr. Cunningham officiating.


Edgar H. Windom
Source: Duluth News-Tribune (Duluth, MN) Tuesday, 5 Oct. 1920; transcribed by FoFG mz

Edgar H. Windom, general claim agent for the United States Steel corporation, with offices in the Wolvin building, and widely known in business circles throughout the city, died at midnight last night while at Morris, Minn. He had gone duck hunting with Ward Ames and C. A. Wilson, both of this city. Death was due to heart disease.

Mr. Windom, whose residence was at 2128 East Superior street, is survived by his wife and, as far as could be ascertained, one brother, former Judge W. L. Windom. The body is being brought to Duluth for internment.


Fred Winter
Source: The Minneapolis Journal (MN) April 12, 1906; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman
DRANK POISON BY MISTAKE
Minnesota Farmer Gets Bottles Mixed, with Fatal Results.

CHOKIO, MINN. - Fred Winter, a prominent farmer of Stearns, while in town yesterday purchased a bottle of alcohol and a bottle of carbolic acid. On his way home last night he in some way got the bottles mixed and drank the poisonous acid, supposing it to be the liquor. His son, who was with him, hurried him home and then went to town for medical aid. Dr. Thomas responded, but was unable to save his patient, who died a few hours later.


Leslie Yarger
Source: Aberdeen American (Aberdeen, SD) Saturday, May 24, 1913; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman

DEAD MUTES VICTIMS OF A MURDERER?
All Evidences in Case of Men Found Dead at Big Stone Shows They Were Not Killed By Train.

WOUNDS SHOW DEATH WAS AT HUMAN HANDS.
Money, Jewelry and Watches Missing From Bodies of Both Men When Found.

William Messner, aged 28, whose home is at Castleton, Minn., and Leslie Yarger of Alberta, Minn., both deaf mutes, were foully murdered Thursday night near Big Stone.

The evidence would tend to prove that the men were murdered, robbed and the lifeless body of one placed on the track. Either the steep grade or the bearness of the approaching train seems to have prevented the other body from being placed by the side of his comrade.

Leslie Yarger was a harness and shoe maker of Alberta and had on his person when found a ticket from Groton to Bird Island, Minn. He had considerable money when last seen alive but this was gone except one pocketbook which contained $5. Another pocketbook which contained the rest of his money was missing.

William Messner was employed by the Milwaukee on one of their surveying gangs. He is known to have had $90 and a gold watch on his person but when his lifeless body was found these were missing and his pockets turned inside out.

The body of Yarger was found at 11 o'clock Thursday night. The train which ran over his body cut him in two just below the shoulders. On his right side was a deep knife wound which could not have been inflicted by the train. When his body was brought into town his feet were tied together but it was shown at the inquest that this was done by one of the men who found him although he could give no reason for doing so. The body of Messner was found at the foot of a steep grade and was laying 40 feet from the track. The remains showed no effect of having been run over or struck by the train, but there was a deep wound on the head inflicted by some heavy, blunt instrument.

A coroner's inquest was held last night at Milbank but the coroner returned an open verdict, naming no cause of their death and giving no opinion as to whether it was an accident or a murder, not as to whom committed the crime.



HOME
Genealogy Trails History Group
Copyright ©Genealogy Trails