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Watonwan County, MN
Genealogy and History


Biographies


Source: "Cottonwood and Watonwan Counties, Minnesota, Their People, Industries and Institutions With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families", Volume II : 1916; by John A. Brown; pub. by B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc.

Transcribed by Vicki Hartman


Jackson, Samuel
Page 431

Samuel Jackson, the subject of this sketch, belongs to one of the sturdy Norwegian families who emigrated to this country in the years following the Civil War, and who have contributed so large a part to the development of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and other northwestern states. Mr. Jackson was born in Norway, October 16, 1873, a son of Jacob S. Ekren and Kari (Nyhus) Jackson, both natives of Lesje, Gudbrandsdalen, Norway. Jacob S. Ekren came to America in 1879 and settled on a farm in Chippewa county, Wisconsin, but did not live long after establishing himself a home there. He died in 1881. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Ekren moved to Dover, Baron county, Wisconsin, and a few years after married her second husband, P. Murstad, of that place. She was the mother of four children by her first husband; Samuel, subject of this sketch; Mary, Peter and Julia.

The year after his father's death Samuel Jackson came to St. James to make his home with Gilbert Swensen. While here he attended the public schools of St. James for about two years. He then returned to Chetek, Barron county, Wisconsin, where he made his home with his parents. In 1895 he returned to St. James, Watonwan county, where he entered the employ of G. Swensen & Bro. in a general store, where he continued work until 1908. From 1909 to 1914 he served as deputy county auditor. In 1914 he was elected to the office of county treasurer of Watonwan county, which office he now holds.

In 1889 Mr. Jackson was united in marriage to Bertha Dalager, daughter of Ole and Ingeborg Dalager, both natives of Valders, Norway, and who had settled on a farm near Austin, Mower county, Minnesota. To this union four children have been born: Evelyn C., Iva J., Alba R., and Oliver S. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson are members of the Lutheran church.




Jacobsen, Lars O.
Page 469-470

Lars O. Jacobsen, well-known stock shipper at Butterfield and one of the most progressive and up-to-date farmers of Watonwan county, owner of a fine farm east of St. James, in Rosendale township, now operated by his eldest son. George T. Jacobsen, is a native of Norway, but has been a resident of this country since he was twenty-one years of age. He was born on a farm in Helle, September 14, 1861, son of Ole and Gertrude Jacobsen, the father of whom died in 1865, leaving four children, Jacob, Lars O., Cecelia and Abraham, all of whom are still living. Ole Jacobsen married, secondly, Matsey Noriedi and to that .union four children also were born, Gertrude, Sjore, Peter and Soren, all of whom are living. Ole Jacobsen spent all his life in his native land and lived to be eighty-two years of age.

Lars O. Jacobsen grew up on the paternal farm in Norway and received careful schooling. In the spring of 1883, he then being twenty-one years of age, he came to the United States and proceeded on out to Minnesota, arriving at Madelia in May of that year. The first year after his arrival here he spent with his uncle, Abraham Jacobsen, who is still living in the village of Grogan, and then for two summers was engaged working on the railroad section. He then began working as a railroad contractor and for several years was quite successfully engaged in that line, he afterward taking up farming, at first renting, but presently buying a farm of one hundred and eighty acres near Grogan, in Rosendale township, which he sold to advantage two years later and then bought the farm in section 18 of that same township, east of St. James, which he still owns, and there he made his home for twenty-two years, becoming a very successful farmer. In 1914 he retired from the farm, bought a desirable tract of thirteen acres adjoining the town of Butterfield on the east, built a fine house there and has since made his home there, giving his chief attention to his extensive stock-shipping interests, his eldest son, George T. Jacobsen, managing the farm. For years Mr. Jacobsen has given serious attention to the breeding of purebred Hereford stock and he and his son have a fine herd of Herefords on the farm. Their farming operations are carried on in accordance with modern methods and their place is regarded as one of the best-kept and most profitably cultivated farm in that part of the county. Mr. Jacobsen is a Republican and for six years served as treasurer of Rosendale township.

In June, 1894, Lars O. Jacobson was united in marriage to Mary Olson, who was born in Norway in 1863, daughter of Thron and Nicholina Olson, who came to Minnesota in 1872 and settled on a farm near Madelia, later moving to St. James, where Thron Olson died in 1891, at the age of seventy-three years, his widow surviving him until in June, 1913, she being eighty-three years of age at the time of her death. Thron Olson and wife had two children, Mrs. Jacobsen having an elder brother, Ole Olson. To Mr. and Mrs. Jacobsen seven children have been born, George T., Arthur, Xorwell, Mabel, Obert, Lillian and Gladys, all of whom are living save Arthur, who died at the age of six months. Mr. and Mrs. Jacobsen are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take an earnest interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in all local good works, ever concerned in movements having to do with the promotion of the community interest.




Jacobson, Abraham
Page 256-258

Abraham Jacobson, a well-known retired pioneer farmer of Rosendale township, Watonwan county, now living in the village of Grogan, is a died in their native land and when he was twenty-two years old, in 1866, native of the kingdom of Norway, born on September 8, 1844. His parents he came to the United States and for a year made his home with his uncle, Seur Olson, a farmer, of Lee county, Iowa. The next year, 1867, he moved to Minnesota and was married near Madelia, joining the steady tide of emigration that then was rapidly filling this section of the state.

Upon coming out here on September 3, 1867, Abraham Jacobson home-steaded a tract of eighty acres in section 10, Rosendale township, Watonwan county, bought an adjoining "eighty" of government land and an additional " eighty" of railroad land and there established his home. He erected substantial buildings on the place, planted a fine grove of trees and quickly had the farm in an excellent state of cultivation, early becoming recognized as one of the leading farmers of that section of the county. As the years passed Mr. Jacobson continued to improve his place until he had one of the best farms in the county. In addition to his holdings there he some years ago bought a farm of one hundred and seventy-nine acres adjoining the village of Grogan and is also the owner of a pleasant home and four lots in the village of Grogan. In 1914 Mr. Jacobson sold his old home place on contract, though he still holds the deed, and on November 29, 1915, he and his family moved to their home in Grogan, where they now live and where they are very comfortably situated. Mr. Jacobson is a Republican and for many years has given his close attention to the civic affairs of his home township, for twenty-one years having been a member of the township board and in other ways active in promoting the best interests of his community.

Abraham Jacobson has been twice married. It was on August 25, 1867, in Madelia, Minnesota, that he was united in marriage to Anna Malena Larson, born in Norway, whose parents died in their native land. To this union there was no issue. Mrs. Anna M. Jacobson died in 1893 at her home in Rosendale township and is buried in the cemetery nearby the Norwegian Lutheran church in that neighborhood.

On August 14, 1911, Mr. Jacobson married, secondly, Anna Sorenson, who was born in the neighboring county of Blue Earth, daughter of Lars and Thora (Shaw) Sorenson, the former a native of Denmark, born in 1853, and the latter, of Norway, born in 1860, who are now living at St. James, which has been their home for the past twenty years. Lars Sorenson was but eleven years of age when he came to the United States with his parents, the family becoming early settlers in Blue Earth county, this state, where he grew to manhood and where he married. After farming in that county for some time he moved to Freeborn county and after residing in that county for some years moved to Watonwan county and was there engaged in farming until his retirement from the farm and removal to St. James. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church and their children were reared in that faith. There were nine of these children, of whom Mrs. Jacobson was the first-born, the others being Martin, Clara, Edward, Oscar, Marie, Arthur, Lavina and Edith, of whom Edward, Oscar and Marie, besides Mrs. Jacobson, now survive. To Abraham and Anna (Sorenson) Jacobson two children have been born. Martha Lavina, born on April 21, 1912, and Arnold James, September 23, 1913. Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson take an earnest interest in the general good works of the community in which they live and are looked upon as among the leaders thereabout in measures designed to advance the common welfare. They are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take an active interest in church work. Mrs. Anna (Sorenson) Jacobson was first married to a Mr. Newham, to which union were born two children, Leslie Willard and Milford Clayton, now living with the mother and attending school.




Jacobson, Gunder
Page 436-437

Gunder Jacobson was born in Norway, January 30, 1860. He was a son of Jacob Olsen, and Ingeborg (Gunderson) Jacobson, both natives of Norway. His father came to America in 1887 and settled among others of his countrymen in Riverdale township, Watonwan county, Minnesota, where he lived until about 1905, when he retired and removed to Madelia. He was the father of three children: Gunder, Ole and Jorgine. He was a member of the Norwegian church, and was a Republican in politics.

Gunder Jacobson received his education in Norway, and as a young man worked in a factory. He preceded his father in coming to America about five years. In 1882 he came to Madelia, Watonwan county, where he was employed as a clerk in the store of Bisbee & Olson for about five years. The second winter after coming to this state he attended school in Minneapolis, in order to acquire a better knowledge of the English language. In 1890, in partnership with Kyorlang Brothers, he opened up a general merchandise store in Madelia, and continued with this firm until 1897. In that year he sold his interest and went in partnership with S. Larson in another general merchandise store in Madelia. This partnership continued until 1902 when Mr. Jacobson sold his interest and started another store of the same line in partnership with Mr. Newgarll. In 1909 he again sold out and for about three years thereafter he was in the employ of M. Olson, in Madelia. In 1912 he came to LaSalle and took a position as secretary and manager of the Watonwan County Co-operative Company's general merchandise store, where he is at present engaged.

In 1884 Mr. Jacobson was united in marriage with Lena M. Anderson. To this union nine children were born : Peter, deceased ; Julia, John, Arthur, Mabel, Ralph, Lawrentz, Ruth and Helen.

Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. Politically, he is a Republican. While residing at Madelia, he was for six years a member of the village council.




Jensen, Jens C.
Page 321-323

Jens C. Jensen, one of the best-known and most prosperous farmers of Rosendale township, Watonwan county, proprietor of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres in that township, chairman of the board of supervisors of that township and in other ways actively identified with the civic interests of his home neighborhood, is a native son of Watonwan county, born on the farm on which he now makes his home, and has lived there all his life. He was born on October 11, 1868, son of Notto and Lena Jensen, both natives of Norway, the former of whom, an honored veteran of the Civil War, was the first settler in that wide strip of now thickly settled territory lying between Madelia and Jackson, this state.

Notto Jensen was born in Norway in 1835 and when eighteen years of age, in 1853, came to the United States, locating in Wisconsin. He was married at Butternut Valley, Brown county, after the Civil War, to Lena Erickson, daughter of Christian and Mary Erickson, who had come to this country and settled in Wisconsin in 1846. For some time Notto Jensen farmed in Wisconsin and then came into Minnesota and was living in this state when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted in Company I, Sixth Regiment, Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and served with that command until the close of the war. His location in Watonwan county was made before the passage of the homestead laws and he pre-empted the quarter of a section where his son, Jens C, now lives, in Rosendale township. He later homesteaded a tract of eighty acres in section 12, to which he presently added an adjoining "eighty," and early came to be regarded as one of the most substantial farmers in that part of the county. Later he bought a farm of two hundred and seven acres in the vicinity of Madelia, selling his two quarter sections further south to his two elder sons, Jens C. and Martin L., and thereafter made his home on the farm near Madelia, where he spent the rest of his life. Notto Jensen not only was a good farmer, but he was a good citizen and took an active part in local civic affairs. He was a Democrat and for years served his community as a member of the school board and as a member of the township board. His wife died in 1896 and he survived until 1902. They were members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and their children were reared in that faith. There were nine of these children, of whom Jens C. was the first born, the others being Martin L., Mary J., Ole I., Albert T., George Henry, Willie J., Anna Louise and Walter A., all of whom are living save Anna Louise.

Jens Jensen was reared on the paternal farm in Rosendale township and from early boyhood was a valuable assistant to his father in the work of developing the same. He supplemented his schooling in the district school by a course in the Mankato Normal school and for some years taught school during the winters, continuing his work on the farm during the summers. He married in 1893 and after coming into possession of the old home farm began to make important improvements on the same. In 1909 he built a new barn, thirty-six by eighty, and in 1911 put up a capacious silo. In 1914 he erected a new dwelling house and he and his family are now comfortably situated. In addition to his general farming, Mr. Jensen has given considerable attention to the raising of fine live stock and has done very well. Mr. Jensen is a Democrat and for years has been a member of the township board, of which board he is now the chairman. He also has done good service as a member of the school board and in other ways has contributed of his time and his energies to the public service. It was in 1893 that Jens C. Jensen was united in marriage to Lena Jorgenson, who also was born in Rosendale township, in 1867, daughter of Ole and Karen Jorgenson, natives of Norway, who were the first homesteaders in the territory between Madelia and Jackson, having settled in what is now Rosendale township not long after Notto Jensen had preempted his claim in that section. Ole Jorgenson was a good farmer and a man of substance, an influence for good in his neighborhood. He died in 1892, and his widow survived until 1902. They were the parents of nine children, of whom Mrs. Jensen was the eighth in order of birth, the others being Knute, George O., Mary, Lizzie, Ida, Anna, Amelia and Matilda, all of whom are living except Amelia. To Mr. and Mrs. Jensen four children have been born, namely: Grace F., who was born on June 6, 1894; Elmer. C, November 29, 1896; Edna L., December 23, 1899, and Vernon L., September 10, 1912. The Jensens are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take a warm interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in all local good works.




Johnson, Albert E.
Page 134-135

Albert E. Johnson, a well-known and substantial farmer of Madelia township, Watonwan county, who is also the owner of a farm in the neighboring county of Blue Earth, is a native son of Watonwan county and has lived there all his life. He was born on the old homestead farm on which he still makes his home, November 1, 1867, son of Erick and Hansine (Iverson) Johnson, natives of the kingdom of Norway, who came to the United States after their marriage and settled in the vicinity of Leland, Illinois, where they were engaged in farming until 1864, in which year they came to Minnesota and settled in Watonwan county, thus having been among the earliest settlers of this part of the state. Erick Johnson homesteaded eighty acres in section 12, of Madelia township, and there established his home. He was an excellent farmer and it was not long until he was reckoned as among the most substantial farmers of that part of the county. As he prospered he added to his holdings until he became the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and twenty-three acres and there he spent the remainder of his days, his death occurring in 1893. His widow, who still survives him, has always continued to make her home on the old homestead and is still living there, the subject of this sketch also making his home at the same place, where he has lived all his life. Erick Johnson and his wife were the parents of nine children, John, Eddie, Albert, Henry, George, Willis, Clarence and Josipha.

Albert E. Johnson was reared on the paternal homestead place, receiving his education in the district school in that neighborhood, and after his school days continued to make his home there, a valuable assistant to the labors of developing and improving the farm. He married Josie May Bundy, who died some years later, leaving two children, Helen and Elma. Mr. Johnson then married Mary Kroeger. In addition to his management of one hundred and fifty-two acres of his father's estate, Mr. Johnson is also engaged in the cultivation of a farm of one hundred and twelve acres which he owns over the line in Blue Earth county, and is doing very well, being recognized as one of the substantial farmers of his neighborhood. He is a Republican and gives a good citizen's attention to local political affairs. He was reared in the faith of the Lutheran church and he and his wife are members of that church, taking a proper interest in all neighborhood good works. Mr. Johnson is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and of the Ancient Order of Yeomen and takes a warm interest in the affairs of both of these organizations




Kabrick, Dr. O. A.
Page 410-411

O. A. Kabrick was born in Plainville, Illinois, November 9, 1880. He is a son of J. C. Kabrick, born in West Virginia, and Mary E. (Badgley) Kabrick, who was born in Barry, Illinois.

J. C. Kabrick, when a young man, went to Adams county, Illinois, and engaged in farming, and followed that occupation in Adams county during the rest of his life. He was the father of six children: Cora B., Albert P., Lucy V. David, who died young; O. A., the subject of this sketch, and Mary E.

The subject of this sketch was educated in elementary branches in Adams county, Illinois. Later he attended a normal college at Bushnell and Macomb, Illinois, and afterward was engaged in teaching for one winter. In 1902 he entered a medical college at Keokuk, Iowa, and took a four-years course in that institution, graduating in 1906. He began the practice of his profession in Butterfield, May, 1906, remaining at that place for about two years and a half. In November, 1908, he came to Odin and has since continued his practice here. In August, 1913, he was appointed postmaster of Odin.

On June 17, 1908, Doctor Kabrick and Clara E. (Boud) were united in marriage. Mrs. Kabrick is a daughter of Edwin L. and Elizabeth (Booth) Boud of Keokuk, Iowa. Clayton E. is their only child. Politically, Doctor Kabrick is an independent; fraternally, he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and with the Modern Woodmen of America.




Klaras, Fred H.
Page 385-386

The wanderlust, like a siren, calls to every youth to forsake his ancestral hills and halls and go out in quest of a better country. Many have heeded the summons to their advantage. In such a state as Minnesota the young man is fortunate who has the sagacity to remain at home. Fred H. Klaras, proprietor of the bottling works at St. James, Watonwan county, has remained within the boundaries of his native state, and is now well established in business.

Mr. Klaras was born in Scott county, Minnesota, June 10, 1874. He is a son of Christopher and Katherine (Schmellen) Klaras, both natives of Germany, in which country they spent their earlier years, but finally immigrated to the United States and located in Scott county, Minnesota, where they remained until 1876, when they removed to St. James, Watonwan county, and here established the permanent home of the family. The mother died here about 1886, but the father is still living, now retired, but for many years he was employed in the local roundhouse, in fact, most of his life has been spent in railroad service. His family consists of the following children: Matthew, Nicholas, Fred H., Lena, Gertrude, and Mary.

Fred H. Klaras received his education in the schools of St. James, his parents removing with him here when he was two years old. When starting out in life for himself he worked about one and one-half years for Joseph J. Sperl in the bottling works at St. James; then, having learned the various details of this business, he bought out his employer and has since operated the plant with gratifying results, enlarging the business from time to time, until it has reached large proportions. His plant is well equipped with up-to-date appliances and his products find a ready market. He built his present plant, which is located just south of St. James on the eastern outskirts, in 1901. It was formerly within the city limits. He manufactures all kinds of temperance beverages and his plant is known as the St. James Bottling Works. As a side line he is agent for Maxwell and Jeffery automobiles.

Mr. Klaras was married in June, 1899, to Margaret Zender, and their union has resulted in the birth of the following children : Leona, Virginia, Francis, Lucenia, Angella, Andrew, Regis, and Frederick, Jr. Mr. Klaras and family are members of the Catholic church and he is affiliated with the Foresters.




Klocow, Frank D.
Page 173-174

Frank W. Klocow, cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Ormsby, Watonwan county, was born in Hardin county, Iowa, in 1873, and is a son of Frederick Klocow, who devoted his active life to farming, but is now living retired at Iowa Falls, Iowa.

Frank D. Klocow grew to manhood on the home farm, where he worked when a boy, and he received his education in the common schools, the first to be established in his native community, and later attended a private school at Ackley, Iowa, taught by Prof. G. A. Graves. He also studied at Elsworth College at Iowa Falls. He started out in life for himself as a farm hand, later worked one year making brick at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In October, 1899, he came to Ormsby, Minnesota, before the railroad was built through Watonwan county, and here he engaged in the lumber business, under the firm name of the Ormsby Lumber Company, which he operated four years. He continued to be interested in this field of endeavor until 1911. In 1901 he helped organize the Farmers State Bank at Ormsby, in which he has since been a stockholder, and in October, 1903, became cashier of this institution, which position he has since held to the satisfaction of all concerned ; in fact, has done much toward the general success of the bank all along the line. When he first started in the lumber business at Ormsby he had a partner, Samuel Farver, an uncle, who died, whereupon Henry Klocow, brother of Frank D., succeeded Mr. Farver and the Klocow brothers carried on the business with ever-increasing success, retaining the old firm name and selling out in 1911.

Frank D. Klocow was married in 1905 to Ida Magnus, of Galena township, Martin county, where she spent her girlhood and was educated. She is a daughter of Peter and Julia Magnus, who located in that vicinity among the pioneers about forty years ago. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Klocow, namely: Fred, Myrtle, Howard and Oliver. Fred, Myrtle and Howard are attending public school at Ormsby.




Laingen, Thorsten P.
Page 298-300

One of the prominent families that have come to Watonwan county from Norway and here found good opportunities and a comfortable homes and at the same time benefited the locality through their splendid citizenship is the Laingens, a well known representative of which family is Thorston P. Laingen, who, together with his son, Palmer, has the management of the bank at Odin.

Mr. Laingen was born in Norway, August 20, 1862, and is a son of Paul and Elsie (Andvord) Laingen, both natives of Lom, Gudbrandsdalen, Norway, where they grew up and were married. They came to America in 1870, locating on a homestead five miles south of Mountain Lake, Cottonwood county, on eighty acres, on which they lived until 1876, when they sold out and bought one hundred and sixty acres, about one mile south of the original place. There the death of the mother occurred in 1893. The father remained with his son Knudt and his family there until 1900, when Knudt died. In 1901 they sold the farm and bought another two miles west of Odin in Watonwan county, where the father died February 18, 1909, at seventy-eight years old. To these parents four children were born, namely : Lars, Knudt. T. P., and Thora. This family always affiliated with the Norwegian Lutheran church.

Thorsten P. Laingen grew up on the home farm. He was eight years old when his parents brought him to America. He received a limited education cation in the public schools, which was held a week at a time in the different sod houses of the first settlers in this locality. In 1886 he was united in marriage to Julia Leverson. He at once rented eighty acres in Martin county. He had a team which his uncle at Crystal Lake had given him in payment for two years work on his farm. When Thorsten P. left home his father gave him two cows. His wife had also been given a cow by her parents. The first summer he met with a severe blow through the death of one of his horses. In fact, he found it hard sledding the first few years.

The second year he rented a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, and soon thereafter bought eighty acres of school land for which he paid seven dollars and fifty cents per acre. He remained on the one hundred and sixty acres four years, during which time he also worked his eighty, on which he built a home at the end of four years, and after living in it three weeks was burned out. By the assistance of friends and neighbors he soon rebuilt and lived there twelve years, and although bad luck continued to assail him, a number of good horses dying, among other things, he prospered and added to his holdings until he had accumulated two hundred acres. In 1902 he purchased the William Olson farm of two hundred acres, which joins the village of Odin on the west and south, and the following year sold the old farm and removed to it, remaining there from 1903 to 1911, when he moved into the village of Odin and, together with his son Palmer, took charge of the Odin State Bank. In 1913 he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Martin county for which he paid seventy-one dollars per acre, which he sold a few weeks later for eighty dollars per acre, then purchased the old Martin Agge farm in Odin township, Watonwan county, which place consists of two hundred and forty acres, for which he paid eighty-four dollars per acre, and this place he still owns, also retains the old Olson farm at Odin. He has been very successful in a business way and is one of the substantial men of his town and county.

He was chairman of Odin township one term. He was president of the village council one year. He has been made executor for various estates, among them being the estates of Elling Olsen, John Halvorsen, Fletcher Sturdevant and Andrew Gilbertson. He has also been appointed guardian for various children. These facts indicate that he is held in high esteem by his neighbors, who place implicit confidence both in his ability and integrity. He has also handled much real estate for the local bank.

The parents of Mrs. Laingen were Herbrand and Carrie (Lande) Leverson, natives of Norway, from which country they came to Wisconsin with their parents when young and were married in that state, after which they moved to Moore county, Minnesota. About 1875 they moved to Jackson county, this state, where they spent the rest of their lives.

To Mr. and Mrs. Laingen eight children have been born and those now living are, Palmer T., Elma, Hulda, Carl and Melvin.

Palmer T. Laingen was born in Martin county, Minnesota, near the line between that county and Watonwan, July 24, 1888. He received his education in the public schools, then took a short commercial course in Mankato Commercial College. He spent his boyhood on the farm with his parents and assisted with the general work. He left the farm in April, 1909, to become assistant cashier of the bank at Odin, remaining in that position about one and one-half years, when he became cashier, which position he still holds, giving eminent satisfaction to the stockholders and the patrons of the bank. He is unmarried. He is now village treasurer. He belongs to the Norwegian United Lutheran church.




Lantz, John Albert
Page 486

John Albert Lantz, a successful farmer of Watonwan county, was born in Odin township on January 13, 1872, being the son of Carl Johan and Anna Sophia (Gustavson) Lantz.

Carl Johan Lantz was born in Sweden and came to the United States in 1868. Anna Sophia Lantz was also a native of Sweden and came to America in 1870. The young people met and later were married. Mr. Lantz first settled at Red Wing, where he worked on the railroad. During his first year in this country he, with three companions, walked from Red Wing to Odin township, where Mr. Lantz homesteaded eighty acres of land. He then returned afoot to his work on the railroad. This claim became his home and here he lived until his death on October 23, 1907. He was for a time township supervisor and assisted in the organization of the Kansas Lake Swedish church. To Carl and Anna Lantz were born the following children: John Albert, Charles E., Oscar Theodore, Emma Sophia, who died in 1892, and David Victor.

John Albert Lantz was educated in the early schools of the township and has always followed farming. He has one hundred and thirty acres and does general farming. In 1905 Mr. Lantz was married to Lillian Gustavson, the daughter of Nels and Ingeborg Gustavson, who located in Odin township in an early day. To this union one child, Emma Margaret, has been born. John A. Lantz became chairman of his township at the age of twenty-six and held the office, with the exception of three years, until he became township clerk. He is now a candidate for county commissioner.

The mother of John A. Lantz is living on the old homestead with her son Victor. This is the farm that was homesteaded in an early day by the father. Charles E. Lantz, a brother of John A., after graduating from Gustavus Adolphus College, at St. Peter, and later receiving the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Minnesota, is a college professor.




Larkin, Charles
Page 287-288

Charles Larkin, a successful farmer of Fieldon township, was born on February 4, 1875, in Blue Earth county, the son of Timothy and Catherine (Heren) Larkin.

Peter Heren, the maternal grandfather of Charles Larkin, was a native of Ireland and came to America late in life, after the death of his wife. His daughter, Catherine, the mother of the subject of this sketch came with him. They located for a time in Jersey City, New Jersey, after which they moved to Wisconsin and later to Watonwan county.

Timothy Larkin was a native of Ireland and came to the United States when fifteen years of age. He lived for a number of years in the east and there married to Catherine Keren, whose father, Peter Heren, after this made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Larkin. The family moved first to a farm in Wisconsin and later came to Blue Earth county, Minnesota. Thirty-five years ago, they purchased the farm of one hundred and sixty acres, where Charles Larkin now lives. He and his family were members of the Catholic church. Timothy Larkin died on September 19, 1901. Mrs. Larkin survived him until December 22, 1908.

To Timothy and Catherine Larkin were born the following children: John; Thomas; Edward; Gilbert and William, both deceased; Charles and Mary.

Charles Larkin was married on February 4, 1914, to Edith Rooney, of Blue Earth county, and the daughter of Thomas Rooney and wife, pioneers of that section.




Larson, Lauritz
Page 446-447

One of the successful farmers of Long Lake township, Watonwan county, who has tried to apply the most modern methods of tilling the soil is Lauritz Larson, who was born in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, June 21, 1867. He is a son of Hans and Karen (Buroson) Larson, both natives of Norway, where they resided until immigrating to America in 1855, locating in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, on government land, and there resided until 1870, then came to Watonwan county, Minnesota, buying the farm on which the subject of this sketch now resides, in Long Lake township, the father becoming owner of two hundred and eighty acres here on which he erected the buildings and made general improvements, and here he and his wife spent the rest of their lives, both dying on the farm in 1913. They were members of the Long Lake Norwegian Lutheran church. He was active in the affairs of the community and for some time held the office of township supervisor. His family consisted of six children, namely: Borea, Ole, Thorwald, Johanah, Anna and Lauritz.

The subject of this sketch grew up on the home farm and worked with his father when a boy. He received a common-school education. He has remained on the homestead and owns three hundred and sixty-seven acres of well improved and productive land. He has erected the present substantial and attractive buildings. He carries on general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale, making a specialty of breeding full-blood Jersey cattle and full-blood Clydesdale horses. His fine stock are greatly admired by all who see them.

Mr. Larson was married in 1892, to Sophia Olson, who was born in Sweden, from which country she came to America when young. She is a daughter of Ole Olson, who came to Watonwan county many years ago. He is now deceased. The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Larson: Henry, Carl, Ludwig, Otto, Amel, Alma, the latter being deceased; Ella, Anna, and Samuel.

Politically, Mr. Larson is independent. He has held the office of clerk of the school board in his district for the past twenty-two years and is still He is a member of the Long Lake Norwegian Lutheran church, in office. He has been chairman of the township board for nearly two years.




Leonard, E. I.
Page 405-406

E. I. Leonard, one of the prominent retired farmers, of Watonwan county, was born on October 17, 1850, in Marquette county, Wisconsin. He is the son of Ezra and Abigail (Seager) Leonard. Jonathan Leonard, the paternal grandfather of E. I. Leonard, was a native of Vermont and later settled in Marquette county, Wisconsin. The maternal grandfather, Julius Seager, was a native of a New England state and at an early date settled in Minnesota.

Ezra Leonard, was born and educated in the state of New York, where he grew to manhood and was married to Abigail Seager. He later became a resident of Marquette county, Wisconsin, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land and here he made his home until the time of his death, November, 1904. Mrs. Leonard died in 1908. To Ezra and Abigail Leonard was born the following children: Julia, deceased; Thomas, deceased; Susan, Julius, Amanda, deceased; Edward I., Charles, William, deceased; Laura, deceased; Ella and Sherman.

E. I. Leonard was married on June 7, 1873, to Nancy Seager, the daughter of Charles and Mary (Scoville) Seager. Mrs. Leonard was born on October 26, 1851, at West Salem, Wisconsin, the first white child born in LaCrosse county. To this union the following children were born: Maud, who married Charles Sherman, of South Branch, Minnesota; LeRoy, a doctor in Redwood, Minnesota, who married Agnes Peterson; Millie is the wife of William Skelton, a farmer near Redwood. Maud attended high school at Madelia and St. James, taught four years previous to her marriage; LeRoy, after high school, graduated with honors from the College of Osteopathy at Des Moines, Iowa; Millie attended Madelia high school and Winona Normal, and taught school seven years previous to marriage.

Julius Seager, the paternal grandfather of Nancy Leonard, was a prominent farmer of Wisconsin, where he died at an advanced age. Asa Scoville, the maternal grandfather, was ai native of Nova Scotia. He later devoted his life to farming in Wisconsin. Charles Seager, the father of Nancy Leonard, was born in Massachusetts, and when Nancy was twelve years of age came to Minnesota, where the family remained for nine years. He returned to Wisconsin for a short time and later settled in Waseca county, where he died in 1876. Mrs. Seager died in 1890.

E. I. Leonard resides in Madelia, living on a property that he purchased thirteen years ago. His farm of two hundred and forty acres, that he bought thirty years ago, is situated in section 25, Antrim township. All the improvements on the places were made by Mr. Leonard. He served his township as supervisor for two years and was for a number of years a director of the schools.

At the age of fifty-one, Ezra Leonard enlisted in the army and served for fourteen months, in the Civil War. His son Thomas served for three years and the son of Julius for five months, he having died of measles while in the service.




Leonard, H. P.
Page 252-253

H. P. Leonard, one of the successful farmers of Antrim township, was born at Rutland, Vermont, on February 2, 1862, being the son of E. P. and Almina (Whitmore) Leonard. Amos Whitmore, the maternal grandfather of H. P. Leonard, was born in the state of Vermont and lived all of his life in his native state. Jonathan Leonard, the paternal grandfather was a native of Vermont. He later settled in Marquette county, Wisconsin, where he died.

E. P. Leonard, the father of H. P., was a native of the state of New York, where he was born on January 16, 1829. In 1866 he engaged in farming in Wabasha county, Minnesota, where he remained for four years, after which he lived in Martin county, Minnesota, for one year. In 1871 he homesteaded eighty acres of land in Watonwan county, in section 20 of Antrim township. The family lived on this eighty acres for a number of years and endured the hardships of frontier life, including the seven years of grasshopper times, during which the father and eldest son went away and worked to earn a meager existence for the family. To the eighty acre tract he kept adding, until he had two hundred acres. During the last five years of his life he lived in Fairmont. Mrs. Leonard is still living there. To E. P. and Almina Leonard were born the following children: Alma, Byron, Brenice, Hiram P., Minnie, Luna, Edward, Mary and Winefred. The children are all living.

H. P. Leonard was married on October 13,. 1886, to Anna Dewar, the daughter of John Dewar and wife, of Lewisville, Minnesota. To this union two children were born: John, who married Bertha Ableman, and Beulah Jane is at home. Mr. Leonard is the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of land in section 20 and one hundred and sixty acres in section 30, Antrim township. He does general farming and feeds many cattle and hogs. The farm is well improved and in a high state of cultivation. The house and barn were built in 1898.

Mr. Leonard and family are members of the Christian church and take much interest in church and Sunday school work, Mr. Leonard being one of the elders in the church. Fraternally, Mr. Leonard is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. He takes much interest in township and county affairs. He is serving his second term on the township board, and has served on the school board for twenty-five years.




Lewis, James
Page 207-208

One of the most extensive and highly skilled general farmers of Watonwan county is James Lewis, who was born in Ontario, Canada, September 21, 1860. He is a son of Thomas and Ellen (Nelson) Lewis, both natives of Ireland, from which 'country they came to America when young, probably about the year 1850, and located in Ontario. The father learned the tailor's trade in his native land, which he did not follow after coming to Canada, turning his attention to farming instead. In 1869 he came to Watonwan county, Minnesota, locating on the present site of the village of Lewisville, homesteading eighty acres, and this he developed and continued to farm until his death. His family consisted of eight children, six sons and two daughters, namely : John, Robert, Richard, James, Thomas M., Nelson, Sarah M. and Mary E.

James Lewis grew up amid pioneer surroundings and when a boy helped his father start a new home on the wild prairie. He attended school a short time in Canada and went to the primitive sod school house in Watonwan county. He began life for himself as a farmer in Antrim township, and he now owns and operates a half section in the edge of the village of Lewisville. He has been very successful and has added to his original holdings until he owns a total of one thousand and forty acres in this part of Minnesota. He not only engages in general farming on an extensive scale, but for the past fifteen years he has handled live stock in large numbers annually.

Mr. Lewis was married in February, 1886, to Bertha I. Martin, who was born in Maine, from which state she came with her parents to Watonwan county when young. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis has resulted in the birth of ten children, as follow: Leslie E., deceased; Roy W. is farming in Antrim township; Verne E. is also farming in Antrim township; Percy E. is assistant cashier of the State Bank of Lewisville; Flossie I. is a student in the agricultural college at St. Paul; Clyde R., Hazel I. and Ina M. are all at home ; Ellen A. is deceased ; Edna R. is at home.




Lewis, Roy W.
Page 477-478

Roy W. Lewis, one of the prominent and successful young farmers of Watonwan county, was born on October 15, 1888, in Antrim township. He is the son of James and Bertha I. (Martin) Lewis.

Roy W. Lewis was educated) in the common schools of the county and attended the Agricultural school at St. Paul for fourteen months. He is progressive and successful in the practice of the modern methods of tilling the soil.

On March 13, 1912, Roy W. Lewis was united in marriage to Alice Goore, who was born in Blue Earth county, on February 25, 1891. Mrs. Lewis is the daughter of George and Sarah (Polk) Goore, both of whom are natives of England, and came to the United States and located in this section twenty-five years ago. George and Sarah Goore are the parents of the following children : William, Alice, Earl, Hazel, Alfred, Lena, Robert, Leona and Percy.

Charles O. Martin, the maternal grandfather of Roy W. Lewis, was born in Maine on September 21, 1834. He was the son of Samuel and Ann (Goss) Martin. John Martin, the grandfather of Charles O. Martin, was a farmer in Maine.

Samuel Martin and wife were the parents of the following children: James, Jane, Sarah and Charles O. Samuel Martin died on March 19, 1851, Mrs. Martin surviving some years and died at the age of eighty-three. Charles O. Martin received his education and grew to manhood in his native state of Maine. Here he was married to Dorcas Marston and to this union were born the following children : Ida, Bertha, the mother of Roy W. Lewis; Edgar and H. L. For thirty-six years Charles O. Martin bought stock, in the territory about Lewisville, where he lived. He has been supervisor of the township and has served on the school board. He gave the land for the location of school No. 8, Antrim township.

The home farm of Roy W. Lewis consists of one hundred and sixty acres of well improved and highly cultivated land. The large barn was built in 1911 and the modern house erected in 1915. The farm is situated two miles west of Lewisville in section 6, Antrim township.




Lindquist, August E.
Page 271-272

August E. Lindquist, one of the prominent citizens of Watonwan county, was born on September 26, 1879, being the son of Gustave and Augusta Lindquist. Gustave and Augusta Lindquist are natives of Sweden and came to the United States when young. They settled in Watonwan county some fifty years ago. When young people they met and later married. In early life Mr. Lindquist homesteaded eighty acres of land. Since that time he has added to the original tract considerable land and owns much property in St. James. He lives on the old homestead in Long Lake township, near the lake. To Gustave and Augusta Lindquist were born five children: Christine, the wife of Elof Erickson; Edward, Albert, Tillie, the wife of O. K. Haugen, and August E.

August E. Lindquist received his education in the public schools of his township and in the schools of St. James. After completing his education he worked on the farm and followed threshing for a time. He was later employed as a salesman and collector for a machine company for nine years. He has been a resident of St. James for about fifteen years. He is recognized as a man of much ability and has many friends. In 1908 he was elected sheriff of his county for two years, and was twice re-elected for a similar term, and in 1914 he was elected for a term of four years. His official life has been above criticism and his tenure of office is an index of his standing in the county, where he has spent his life.

In 1907 Mr. Lindquist was married to Edith Olson, of Watonwan county. To this union two children have been born; Ruth, born in 1911, and Donald, born in 1913. Mr. and Mrs. Lindquist are members of the Lutheran church.




Lindquist, Gustav
Page 452-453

The present generation owes a debt of gratitude to the old pioneers who braved the wilds and the Indians of Watonwan and adjoining counties, carved out homes in the wilderness and made this country what it is today. Gustav Lindquist, a venerable farmer of Long Lake township, is of this worthy band. During the half century that he has lived here he has noted great changes on every side and has been a useful and honored citizen. Mr. Lindquist was born in Sweden, March 25, 1839. He is a son of Johan and Marie Lindquist, both natives of Sweden, from which country they came to America in 1867, locating in Scandia, near Still water, Washington county, Minnesota, and there the mother died, the father's death occurring in Stillwater. They lived on land in Washington county, which their son Gustav had bought and given them. To these parents eight children were born, namely: Anna, Stina, Melisina, Gustav, Augustina, Carrie, Orin, and Andrew.

Gustav Lindquist grew to manhood in Sweden, where he attended school, and he immigrated to the United States in 1865. He located in Washington county, Minnesota, where he worked in a tannery and also in a sawmill for some time, later became a railroad contractor at Lake Crystal, being boss for two years of a construction gang, working from LeSueur to Lake Crystal, when the Omaha railroad was built through this part of the state. In 1869 he homesteaded eighty acres in section 10, Long Lake township, Watonwan county. He paid sixteen dollars for lumber with which to erect a shack, leaving him only six dollars with which to hire it hauled from Mankato to his claim. He lived in this rude dwelling for five years without any further expense on it. He has continued to reside on this land for a period of forty-seven years. He gradually improved his land and finally erected a large and substantial home and a number of convenient outbuildings, also added to his original holdings until he now owns over one section of excellent land, and is one of the leading general farmers and stock raisers in his township, making a specialty of raising full-blooded Percheron horses, keeping a fine stallion of this breed; also raises full-blooded Shorthorn cattle. He has owned four fine stallions since he first started in the business. He has done much to encourage better stock raising in his community. He owns a share in the farmers elevator at St. James, and has three valuable residences in St. James.

Mr. Lindquist was married in 1869, in Nicollet county, to Augusta Carlson, a native of Sweden, who came with her parents to Nicollet county, Minnesota, where they located. Five children, all living, have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lindquist, namely: Christine, born on November 26, 1869, is the wife of Elof Erickson; Edward J., February 14, 1872; C. Albert, May 25, 1874; Tilla E., February 19, 1877, is the wife of O. K. Hogen; August E., September 26, 1879.

Politically, Mr. Linquist is a Republican. He has never been very active in political matters, not caring for office. He belongs to the Kansas Lake Swedish Lutheran church.




Linscheid, Jacob J.
Page 218-219

Jacob J. Linscheid, one of the best-known and most progressive farmers of the Butterfield neighborhood, owner of a fine farm of two hundred and fifty-eight acres in Butterfield, for nearly seventeen years clerk of that township and in other ways actively identified with the interests of that part of Watonwan county, is a native of the kingdom of Austria, born on July 25, 1863, son of John and Elizabeth Linscheid, who came to Minnesota in 1881, arriving in Watonwan county on July 1, of that year.

Upon his arrival in Watonwan county, John Linscheid bought a quarter of a section of land in Butterfield township and there established his home, soon becoming one of the most substantial farmers in that part of the county. As he prospered in his farming operations he added to his holdings until he became the owner of two hundred and sixty acres of fine land. He was a Republican and took an active interest in local political affairs. His wife died in 1907, at the age of seventy-six years, and he afterwards retired to the village of Butterfield, where his death occurred in 1912, he then being seventy-eight years of age. He and his wife were earnest members of the Mennonite church and their children were reared in that faith. There were seven of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being John, Elizabeth, Rudolph, Robert, Edward and Wilhelmina, all of whom are living except Robert.

Jacob J. Linscheid was eighteen years old when he came to Minnesota with his parents in 1881 and he set himself to the work of farming, eventually becoming the owner of his present fine farm of two hundred and fifty eight acres in the vicinity of Butterfield, where he and his family are very comfortably and very pleasantly situated. From the very beginning of his farming operations, Mr. Linscheid adopted modern methods in the work of his farm and has developed one of the best farms in the county. The place is well improved, systematically tiled and well equipped for up-to-date farming, and its owner has long been recognized as one of the leading farmers of that part of the county. Mr. Linscheid is a Republican and for years has taken an active part in the civic affairs of his home township, for nearly seventeen years having been clerk of the township and in other ways doing what he can to advance the common interest thereabout.

In 1882, when nineteen years of age, Jacob J. Linscheid was united in marriage to Susanna Hubin, sister of the Rev. Daniel Hubin, of Butterfield, and to this union ten children have been born, Jacob, Lizzie, Rudolph, Marie (deceased), Marie, Herbert, Bertha, Robert, Elma and Ernest. Mr. and Mrs. Linscheid are active members of the Mennonite church and take a warm interest in all movements having to do with the general social uplift of the community in which they live, being among the leaders in all such movements thereabout.




Lobben, Jens L.
Page 432-433

One of the able and successful lawyers of Watonwan county is Jens L. Lobben, of St. James, who has been a leader of the local bar for a number of years and a conspicuous figure in the courts of this locality. He was born at Eker, Norway, August i, 1862. He is a son of Andres L. and Sophia (Stangeby) Lobben. The father was born at Eker, October 18, 1830, and the mother's birth occurred March 15, 1834. They grew to maturity in Norway and were married there, June 7, 1861, and in the spring of 1875 they set sail for the United States, locating in Jackson, Wisconsin. The father received a good education and became a minister in the Norwegian Lutheran Synod. For some time he preached in Jackson and Trempealeau county. He came to St. James, Minnesota, in 1879, and became pastor of the church of his denomination in Albion township, also of the church in Longlake township and Rosendale township, Watonwan county. He also preached in St. James and at a church in Odin township, and he owned a farm one mile from St. James, which claimed most of his attention. He finally retired from active life and died in St. James, July 26, 1904. His widow survived until January 23, 1908. To these parents the following children were born: Jens L., of this sketch; Lars is living; Olaf, deceased; Dorothy, deceased; Marie is living; Andres, deceased; Peter is living; Carl, deceased.

Jens L. Lobben attended the public schools and a private school in Norway. He was twelve years old when he accompanied the family to Jackson, Wisconsin, where he attended the public schools for some time; later he was a student in the Lutheran College at Decorah, Iowa, for about three years. He came to St. James in 1879, and worked as a clerk and at other jobs, attending school during the winter months, including one winter at Mankato. He began the study of law in the office of J. W. Seager, and was admitted to the bar on January 30, 1896, and soon thereafter began the practice of his profession in St. James. After about six months he formed a partnership with his preceptor, Mr. Seager, under the firm name of Seager & Lobben. This partnership lasted until 1902, when it was dissolved, and Mr. Lobben returned to the office he occupied during the first months of his practice and has remained here to the present time. He has built up a large and satisfactory clientage and has kept fully abreast of the times in all that pertains to his profession. He was city attorney of St. James for a period of nine years, and he was elected mayor in 1914. He has been a member of the board of education for four years. As a public servant he has discharged his duties in a manner that has reflected much credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. He belongs to the Lutheran church. He is prominent in fraternal circles, and is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Concordia Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, the Commandery, Knights Templar and Order of Eastern Star; also the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the Modern Woodmen of America.

Mr. Lobben was married in 1884, to Julia Andersen, of Linden, Brown county, Minnesota. She is a daughter of Hans Andersen, a farmer, who first came to Fillmore county, and later to Brown county, where his death occurred. His wife also died there. The village of Hanska was built on a part of the Andersen farm, Mr. Andersen having sold thirty acres for a townsite. To Mr. and Mrs. Andersen the following children were born : Anton lives in New Ulm; Dorothy married Frank J. Gove, of Boise, "Idaho, and she died about thirty years ago, leaving two children, William and Dorothy; Mads lives in New Ulm; Ellen is unmarried; Julia, wife of Mr. Lobben, is the youngest.

Mr. Lobben is a stockholder and director in the St. James Telephone Company. He owns land in Polk county, Minnesota. He is descended from an old and highly esteemed Norwegian family, which lived on the same farm in Norway for generations consecutively. His paternal grandfather was Lars Lobben, a son of Christian Lobben, who was a son of John Lobben.




Lundholm, Rev. Algot Theo.
Page 220-221

The Rev. Algot Theo. Lundholm, pastor of the East Sveadahl Swedish Lutheran church in Nelson township, Watonwan county, and of the church of the same denomination at St. James, with residence at East Svendahl, is a native of Sweden, but has been a resident of this country since he was eight years of age, most all of which time he has spent in Minnesota. He was born on March 21, 1875, son of Jonas Peter and Greta Lisa Lundholm, natives of Sweden, who left their farm there in 1883 and with their family came to the United States, proceeding directly to Minnesota and locating in Sibley county. Upon arriving there Jonas P. Lundholm bought a farm in the near vicinity of Winthrop and there established his home, becoming a substantial and influential farmer. In 1898 he retired from the farm and moved to Winthrop, where he spent his last days, his death occurring in 1913. His widow is still living at Winthrop. They were the parents of twelve children, nine of whom are still living, but Algot Theo. is the only one residing in this section of the state.

Upon completing the course in the public schools of Winthrop, A. T. Lundholm entered Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter and received his Bachelor of Arts degree from that institution in 1899. Having devoted his life to the gospel ministry, he then entered Aug.ustana Seminary at Rock Island, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 1902. In June of that year, at Ishpeming, Michigan, he was ordained to the ministry of the Swedish Lutheran church and in the same year accepted a call from the church of his faith at Aledo, Illinois, where he served as pastor until accepting his present pastorate in August, 1905. Since coming to this parish the Rev. A. T. Lundholm has done much to advance the various interests of the same, both in a spiritual and in a material way, and has done a good work both at East Sveadahl and at St. James, his parish comprising the churches of his faith at both points. His residence is at the former point and since locating there he has caused to be erected a fine new, modern parsonage, situated near the church, the latter of which is one of the finest country churches in Watonwan county, the church and the parsonage being surrounded by a beautiful lawn and the general appointments of both being in full keeping with modern demands.

The Rev. Mr. Lundholm has a flourishing parish and is constantly adding to it. He is a progressive, public-spirited citizen and takes a warm interest in general public affairs, being a potent factor in the general development of the community in which he labors so effectively. In the counsels of his church, Mr. Lundholm occupies a high place, and there are few ministers of his communion who have a wider acquaintance than he. For some time he has been president of the board of directors of Gustavus Adolphus College, his alma mater, and in that connection has done much for the promotion of the interests of the college and the general cause of education hereabout. In political views, Mr. Lundholm is inclined to be "independent," reserving his right to vote only for such men as he regards best fitted for public office, and in this way wields an influence for good in the local political field. On October 29, 1902, a few months after his ordination to the gospel ministry, the Rev. Algot Theo. Lundholm was united in marriage to Lydia Marie Olson, daughter of John Olson and wife, of Minneapolis, and to this union four children have been born, Einar Mauritz, Harald Theophilus, Brynolf Emanuel and Frydolp Nathanael. Mrs. Lundholm is a competent helpmeet to her husband in the exacting labors of his difficult field and both are held in the very highest esteem throughout the entire community.



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