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Creeks & Rivers of Clarke County

 
[Submitted by Debora Reese]

Archusa Creek - Rises in Beat 1 and flows south to join the Chickasawhay River.  Seale cites Halbert (sic) that the name derived from Choctaw ha-cha "river and osi "little" - Little River.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Bean River Branch - Rises in Lauderdale county: flows south into Clarke County, into Hurricane Creek near Buckatunna church.  According to local legends, the name was applied by the Indians.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Bogue Falia Creek (Bogue Flower Creek) - From Choctaw: Bok or bog "River" and faliala "long".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Bogue Homa Creek - Lies in Beat 2, and flows into Shubuta Creek.  The word came from Choctaw bok homma "red creek".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Bolingchessa Creek - Seale gives "Bolingchessa" as a corruption of Choctaw baluchi asha; "place where there are stripes of Hickory Bark."  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Bostic Branch - Rises near Stonewall and flows south into Chickasawhay River.  Named for John Bostick, who owned the land in this section in 1836.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Buckatunna Creek - As early as 1732, the creek was included on a map by the Frenchman du Roullet.  The meaning, according to Linceum, is Choctaw: bok "creek" a locative "there", tana "to weave" - that is "a creek where there is weaving" (of cane, splits into basket.)  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Buckley's Springs - 1-1/2 miles south of Enterprise 200 yards off the road to the left.  100 yards from the Chickasawhay River.  The waters of the spring have high medical value and have been popular as drinking water since their discovery.  Have always been owned by Buckley family.  Was once a social center and was used for a camp site during the Civil War.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Castaffey Creek - According to Seale, "the name is probably from Choctaw, Kashti "fleas" and taffa "summer", unless the second element is ofi "dog" in which the composite would be rendered "dog fleas".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Cedar Creek - A creek that rises in Beat 5, and flows into Buckatunna Creek.  According to local tradition, many cedars grew along the stream.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Cedar Creek - A creek in Beat 1 heads in and flows southeast into Archusa Creek.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Chickasawhay River - as early as 1732 marked Tchikachae.  Danville.  The first element is of course chickasaw "the people" and the second , aha "potato".  Further reading has indicated that the Indians who lived on the river, giving it its name, were possibly unique among Choctaw tribes in that they were "potato eating people".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Chicwillisaw Creek - (Seale op. cit.) Choctaw, chuckillissa "deserted house" from chucka "house" and lissa "to desert".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Chinkapin Creek - The name may be a corruption of yankapin, which according to Seale, signifies "creeked root" and is the name for "the long nodose root-stock of the water chinkuapin."  The root of the water chinquapin was commonly used as a food among the Indians.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Chunky River - many Choctaws hold that this names signifies the location of a place where the Indian stick-ball of Chunky was played.  However, in 1880, Chunkey's Station is mentioned, and some Choctaws think Chunki means "Bee Martin" an Indian chief.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Eucutta Creek - The origin of thename Eucutta is clearly Choctaw: yuka atta "slave born".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Greasy Creek - Rises in Beat 4, east part of county.  Flows south into Rocky Creek.  According to Josh Dunnam (in 1940) the legend concerning the naming of the creek is that many years before the Civil War, great, great, Granny Gunn was coming from Alabama in an ox wagon.  As she crossed the creek, the water, which was high, got into the wagon and floated the goard containing her lard into the creek, and she said "Lordy Lord, this creek will be greasy as long as the world stands."  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Hanging Moss Creek - In Beat 5, southeast part of County.  Flows into Wayne County.  Local legend attributes name to the Indians.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Hollicar Creek - L. O. Combly, Choctaw Indian, gave the meaning as "sacred place" in 1940.  S. W. part of County.  Rises in Jasper County and flows into Shubuta Creek near Nancy.  (extracts taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Hurricane Branch - In Beat 2.  Rises at Harvey Brake, flows east and empties into Shubuta Creek near the old Wilson place.  Ellen Evans, a Negro woman 100 years old (in 1940) told Mr. Duke (when he was a young man) that a cyclone came through about 1817 or 1818 and followed the branch.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Little Oak Tuppa Creek - L. O. Combly, Choctaw Indian (1940) said the word tuppa is Choctaw meaning "beloved".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Long Creek - A creek which comes from Lauderdale County and runs into East central part of the county and flows into Buckatunna Creek in Beat 4.  It is named for its length.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Luke Fluffer Creek - Luke fluffer is a corruption of Choctaw lukfapa (lufki "clay dirt" plus apa "to eat") which can be described as a salt lick - a place where cattle and deer eat the dirt and the salt.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Mayerhoff Springs - A former resort in Beat 3.  Named for Charles T. Mayerhoff, a German, who settled this section in the early 1830's.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Mingo Creek - Choctaw and Chickasaw: minko chief.  It serves among the tribes as the wquivalent of the English "his majesty", or "his excellency" (sic).  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Oak Hola Creek - The name is commonly thought to be Choctaw, oka hullo, or "beloved water".  Referred to as early as 1730 by du Lusser.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Oak Pearl Creek - Rises in Jasper County; flows for several miles in Beat 2, Clarke County, and empties into Chaslaffa Creek just below Barnett.  Named by the Indians.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Oak Tuppa Creek - (Seale) From Choctaw oktapi "dam of water".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Okatibbee Creek - First reference in 1732, Danville.  Choctaw okti "ice" and abeha "therein".  Ice therein.   (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Pachuta Creek - Corruption of Choctaw:  pochi "pigeons ai "there" atta "to live".  "Pigeons roost there"  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Peachtree Creek - Rises near Mt. Rose Church, flows northeast into Archusa Creek.  Many wild peach trees near course of stream.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Poclechetto Creek - Choctaw pokoli "ten" chito "big.  Big tenth creek.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Shubuta Creek - Seale: Shubuta is Choctaw shoboti "smoky".  It does not mean "sour meal" as some have reported.  To speak of bad smelling meal, a choctaw would bota shua.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Souinlovie Creek - Early reference: 1732, Canville.  Choctaw: hassanlowaha, a corruption of the words hasunlouie asha "bullfrogs are there".  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

Talla Vogue Creek - First reference: Romans in 1771: corruption of Choctaw tala bok "palmetto creek.  (extract taken from the Clarke County Tribune, December 22, 1983)

 


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