Biographies  G-H

 

DANIEL C GILBERT

[Source: Annual obituary notices of eminent people of the United States in 1858--Submitted by Linda Blue Dietz]

Gilbert, Daniel C., Esq. Vidalia, Miss., Oct. 22, te. 25, at the residence of Lewis Pipes, in Adams Co., near Natchez, a member of the Louisiana bar. Mr. G. was born at the family residence in Concordia Parish, April 2, 1833, and was consequently in his 26th year. Classicallv educated, he completed his law studies at the university of Louisiana, was admitted to the b-ir in Concordia, opened a law office at Vidalia, and had been just nominated to the office of recorder of the parish. He was a young gentleman of decided character, of great moral firmness and unswerving integrity; warm and genial in his associations and friendships ; true as steel to his word and principles, and a firm and consistent democrat in political faith. But the crowning glory or his character was love and reverence to his widowed mother, and a more than paternal care and oversight ^extended to his younger brothers, now in a course of collegiate education. The oldest son, he assumed the duties of guardian and head of the family immediately after the death of his lamented father, who was an eminent Louisiana planter.

Added 5 Sep 2013

 

CHARLES A. GALLOWAY

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 149)

Born in Madison County, Miss., February 13th, 1888.  His parents were Dr. Charles and Ida Louella Galloway. He moved to Natchitoches Parish, La., at the age of 11.

In 1905 Mr. Galloway moved to Mississippi City, Miss.  His education was had at Millsaps College, Jackson, and Soule College, New Orleans.

In 1912 he married Miss Bessie Rush of Kemper County, Mississippi.

In 1911 he entered the insurance profession connecting himself with Life and Casualty Insurance Co., of Tenn.  In 1913 he was promoted to District Manager which position he had held for the past 23 years.

 

JAMES FORD GALLOWAY

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 150)

The son of the late James B. Galloway and Lucy Ford Galloway; was born in Canton, Miss. He graduated from College in Jackson, Miss., in 1900. He then practiced his profession of Civil Engineering for fourteen years. He then studied law, was admitted to the Mississippi Bar, 1914.  He is a member of the American Bar Association, Mississippi Bar Association, and Harrison County Bar Association, authorized to practice in all courts of the state of Mississippi and the Federal Courts.

In 1920 he married Mrs. Kate Macpherson Vallier of New Orleans, La.

James Galloway has practiced the professions of Engineering and law in Harrison County for about thirty years.  His office is in the Gardnier Building, Gulfport, Miss., and he resides in Pass Christian, Miss.

He has been prominent in public affairs and especially those affecting the administration of the government, local and state.

 

HANUN GARDNER

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 151)

Hanun Gardner was born in Shannon, Lee County, Mississippi, on February 17th, 1877, being a son of Meredith Thomas Gardner and Flora Isabella Buchanan Gardner. He obtained his degree in the Law Department of Central University, Richmond, Kentucky, in June, 1900, which institution was a year later merged with Center College at Danville, Kentucky.

He practiced for one year in Jackson, Kentucky, and moved to Gulfport, Mississippi, in December, 1901, and began the practice of law as a partner with Judge J. I.. Ballenger.  He' was elected city attorney of Gulfport in 1902, and served in that capacity for four or five years, when he resigned

On April 27th, 1914, Mr. Gardner married as Maude Winchester Harris, a daughter of Alexander C. Rucker, a prominent attorney of Louisville, Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner have three sons, namely Hanun Buchanan Gardner, age twenty, Thomas Meredith Gardner, age seventeen, and John McQueen Gardner, age fifteen.

 

JUDGE VIRGIL A . GRIFFITH

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 152)

Judge Griffith was born in Lawrence County, Mississippi, where his boyhood days were spent. His parents were not surrounded by much of this world's goods. He studied law and graduated in 1897 and moved to Biloxi, where he practiced for a time. He then moved to Gulfport and entered the firm of Bowers, Neville, and Griffith.

In 1920 he was elected Judge of the Chancery Court of the. 8th District in which position he gave entire satisfaction.  At the expiration of his term he was appointed, with J. W. Stevens and C. L. Crum, as a committee to revise the Court Laws of the State.

In 1928 he was elected one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Mississippi and has succeeded himself, being reelected in 1932.

In 1903 he married Miss Florence Neville, daughter of Judge Jas. H. Neville, by whom he has three children, two girls and one son, Jas. H. Neville Griffith.

After his election to the Supreme Court bench he moved to Jackson where the duties of office required his constant presence, but retained his home in Gulfport where he spends all of his vacations.

Judge Griffith is a man of small stature, but large brain, and is the kind of man who never turns his back on friend or foe.

 

WILL F. HARDTNER

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 153)

Son of Rudolph Henry Hardtner and Barbara Kipp.  Was born in Alexandria, Louisiana, August 7th, 1877.

Coming to the coast from New Orleans in 1900, he settled in Long Beach, thence moved to Gulfport where he engaged in the mercantile and bottling business, and now has a service station on 25th Avenue.

Mr. Hardtner had no children of his own so adopted two, Rudolph, a son; and Annie, a daughter. He married Miss Clara Elizabeth Burril of Gulfport.

 

BYRON PATRICK HARRISON

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 153)

Byron Patrick Harrison was born in Crystal Springs, Mississippi, on August 29th, 1881; was educated in the public schools of that city and in Louisiana State University; was married in January, 1905 to Mary Edwina McInnis, of Leakesville, Mississippi, and they have three children.

He was elected District Attorney and served in that capacity for six years, resigning in September 1910 to accept a commission to the 62nd Congress, and was elected to the 62nd, 63rd, 64th, and 65th Congress. In 1918 he was elected to the United States Senate which office he still holds, his present term extending to 1937.

 

DR. J. J. HARRY

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 154)

Dr. J. J. Harry, son of J. F. Harry and Margaret Ann Britton, was born May 6th, 1855, in Jasper County, attending school and graduating in medicine at Tulane in 1878.

Moving to the Coast he located in Ocean Springs in 1878 during yellow fever epidemic, later moved to Handsboro, where he married Miss Mollie Lienhard, by whom there were 5 children, two dying in infancy. Nona married Dr. C. A. McWilliams, they have two daughters; Jason has two sons, and Emma married Dr. Norris, and has one son.

Dr. Harry was instrumental in establishing Gulf Coast Military Academy and Gulf Park College.

 

JOHN JASON HARRY, JR.

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 154)

Jason Harry (Jay-Jay), the son of Dr. J. J. Harry and Mrs. Mollie Lienhard Harry, was born in Handsboro, February 22nd, 1896.

After leaving school he was a student at Gulf Coast Military Academy, where he graduated. When the United States entered the World War he joined the Army. When he obtained his discharge, he was employed in the First National Bank of Gulfport.

After the close of the bank he obtained the agency for the Chevrolet automobile and at this time is Gulfport agent for this company and located on 25th Avenue. He is married and has two children, both boys.

 

ELLIOTT HENDERSON

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 155)

Was born at Woodville, Mississippi, in 1833, was the son of U. S. Senator John Henderson who was a large land holder and owner of Henderson Point.

Elliott at his fatherís death inherited all lands of Hendersonís Point, which he owned until his death in 1913, at 80 years of age. He gave all of these lands to his wifeís nephews, Hewes Brothers, of Gulfport, he having married Miss Fannie Hewes who died August 29th, 1913. She was a sister of Fred S. Hewes who served the County as Clerk more than 38 years.

His father, John Henderson, Sr., donated the lands upon which the Episcopal Church was built and also gave land for the Live Oak Cemetery to the church.

He served I-farrison County as State Senator and Representative on several occasions.

Hewes Brothers sold the lands of Henderson Point about 1925, to a company who drained and subdivided the land into what is known as Pass Christian Isles.

Most of the Hewes brothers are still living in Gulfport.

Elliott Henderson was a lawyer by profession and a gentleman of the Old School. The Hendersonís had no children.

 

FRED SEARLE HEWES

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 156)

Frederick Searle Hewes, son of William Gardner Hewes, and Maria Searle, was born in New Orleans, La., in 1830.  In about 1833, the family moved to Pass Christian, Mississippi, to their summer home which is now the residence of Mrs. M. Y. Hill. In 1849, he went to California; on his return, he went into business with his father in New Orleans.

In 1856 he married Miss Cora Stewart Newton. When the War came on in 1861, he joined the Confederate Army, serving out the four years as a member of Company ďH,Ē Third Mississippi Regiment. After the War he established a lumber mill at Bayou Canada, where he remained until 1875, when he was elected County Clerk, and moved to Mississippi City.

His wife died in 1883, there were eleven children. His second marriage was to Mrs. Fannie M. Laun, daughter of General Witt Adams. They had six children. Mr. Hewes died in Gulfport, Mississippi, December 15th, 1913. He was 83 years and seven months old.

 

GASTON HENDERSON HEWES

(Extract from "History of Harrison County, Mississippi", written by John H. Lang, published by Dixie Press, 1935, page 156)

Born at Gulfport, March 19th, 1902, is a high school graduate, and holds his B. A. and law degrees from the University of Mississippi in the class of 1925. Is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. P. Hewes, a member of the well-known Hewes family of the Coast.

In November 1927, he married Miss Julia Elizabeth Smith. They have no children.

Mr. Hewes is a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, a Mason, Knight of Pythias, and Elk.

In January, 1932 he was elected county prosecuting attorney, which position he still holds.

 

This page last updated on -- 6 Sep 2013

 

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