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Wilkinson County, MS

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Robins, Thomas W.
 
THOMAS W. ROBINS, postoffice at Woodland, East Feliciana parish, La., is a prominent planter, and one of the most highly respected citizens of this parish, of which he is a native. He was born in 1823, a son of Thomas J. and Mary (Winter) Robins, natives respectively of Georgia and South Carolina. The grandfather of our subject, Thomas Robins, was born, reared and died in Georgia. The father of our subject was the eldest of five children, and was born July 24, 1794. At the age of eighteen he left his native state, coming through the Indian country to Mississippi, where he settled in Wilkinson county. Later he came to Louisiana on horse-back, where he was married to the mother of our subject. He finally settled in this parish, where he was soon elected sheriff, which office he filled for four terms. While in this office he made quite a snug sum of money, which was lost just before his term of office expired, by a fire in the courthouse, which destroyed all his books, and money to the value of some $100,000. Soon after this great loss he was taken sick and died, his loss, no doubt, having a great deal to do with his sudden death, which occurred January 9, 1843. He took a very prominent part in the affairs of the democratic party. He took much interest and great delight in the Masonic order, of which he was a Master Mason. He was held in high regard by this order, for which he did a vast amount of work. The mother of our subject, Mary (Winter) Robins, came with her parents to Louisiana when a child. She was born February 27, 1799, and was the daughter of James and Jeanette (Scott) Winter. Her parents took flatboats at some point in Virginia, floating down the rivers to Bayou Sara, cutting their way through the cane to the place of settlement. Her parents were married May 20, 1820, and settled northwest of Clinton, which place became their home until their deaths. Mrs. Robins died October 19, 1843, some months after her husband. To this union there were born six children, two of whom are now living, the subject of this notice and one sister, Martha, the wife of Allan Cook, and both live in this parish. Those deceased are John J., who left a family consisting of a wife and two children; Winter was unmarried and died soon after reaching manhood; Henry S. died in Nashville, Tenn., of the measles, having been a member of the First Louisiana Cavalry regiment, confederate army, and at the time of his death left a wife (now deceased) and one child, Sarah, who was the wife of George Chapman, and lived at St. Landry parish, where she died, leaving her husband and one child, both of whom are now deceased. Our subject was reared on the home place of his parents. His advantages for an education were limited, owing to his having to work much of his time on the farm. When a young man he commenced life on his own account by farming near the home of his father. He was married to Miss Jane Pollard, of this parish, daughter of James and Jane (McNeely) Pollard, natives of Louisiana. Ten months after her marriage she died, October 9, 1843. Mr. Robins married Miss Margaret B. Maxwell, who was born in 1826, a daughter of William C. and Martha M. (Dunn) Maxwell. Her parents were natives of South Carolina, but were taken to Amite county, Miss., when they were children. William C. Maxwell was born in 1787, and his wife was born in 1801. They were married in 1819 in Amite county, where they lived until his death in 1843, when she came to Louisiana, dying here in 1861, at the home of our subject. She was a very active member of the Presbyterian church. To them were born ten children, four of whom are still living - two sons and two daughters: Martha G., the widow of C.C. Cain, who lives in Clinton; Franklin C. resides in Amite county, Miss.; William C. lives in this parish. Mrs. Robins is the eldest of the children living, and was reared in Amite county, Miss., where she was educated. To Mr. and Mrs. Robins have been born three children, named as follows: John M., who is married and lives in this parish, engaged in planting; William Alexander is also a planter in this parish, and is married; Mary J. is the wife of William C. Kent, by whom she is the mother of nine children. She also is a resident of this parish. In addition to the family of his own, Mr. Robins has reared and educated the children of C.C. Cain. Mr. Cain, who had settled in Arkansas, died during the war, and on his dying bed asked Mr. Robins to care for his family of children. This family consisted of the following: W.A. Cain, now of the firm of Knox & Cain, of Clinton; Florence, the wife of W.F. Wood, of this parish; S.P. Cain, of Pointe Coupee parish; Lelia is the wife of C.G. Steadman, and lives in this parish; Eugenia is the wife of L.R. Hanks; James lives in Avoyelles parish, La.; Lou is unmarried and lives with her mother in Clinton, and is an estimable young lady. Mr. Robins has reared and educated this large family, doing as well for them as he would for his own. He also reared Mr. A.T. Norwood, now a young man who is married and assists on the plantation. His parents died when he was an infant, and to Mr. Robins he owes his place in life. Willie Marshall was also one of the fortunate orphans who found a home with this worthy gentleman. Mr. Robins reared and educated him until he became an exceedingly useful young man. At the time of his death he was a conductor on the I.C. railroad, at Magnolia, and while stepping from a car to the ground, he slipped and fell beneath the wheels, dying the following day. In 1862 our subject enlisted in the confederate cause in the Second Battalion of Louisiana cavalry, with which he served until the close of the war. He surrendered with the army of General Forrest, having been with him during the last few months of the war. The last year of the struggle he held the rank of a second lieutenant, and did skirmish duty. At the close of the war he returned home and pursued his planting. In April, 1877, he was elected sheriff of this parish for two years, and has served on the police jury. In politics he is a democrat and is always alive to the interests of the party and the people. He enjoys a pleasant home surrounded by every comfort, which is situated in a beautiful grove of magnolias, beech, cedar, oak and holly trees. He has lived here since 1855, and owns about 400 acres of choice land, which is well improved. He and his estimable wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. Robins is a royal arch Mason. He is held in the highest regard in the community in which he lives, for which he has done as much as any one man of the parish.
[Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Louisiana; Chicago; The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1892; transcribed by Kim Mohler]
Added 19 Feb 2017

Semple, Robert
 
The career of a lawyer is a succession of contests, and the successes made in the legal profession are probably more than in any other calling in life examples of the "survival of the fittest." To become distinguished at the bar requires not only capacity, but also sound judgment and persevering industry, and these qualifications are admirably combined in Judge Semple.
He was born in Wilkinson county, Miss., November 5, 1850, the fifth of ten children born to the second marriage of Robert Semple, whose father was an officer in the United States army holding his commission from President Washington. His father emigrated from Scotland about 1755, and settled in Cumberland county, Penn., where during the war of the Revolution he was sheriff. He was descended from the Kirk house branch of the noble Scottish family of Semple, who for over 600 years were barons of wealth and power in the west of Scotland in the barony of Renfrew, and held large possessions in the counties of Lenark and Ayr. His mother was Francina Rosalthe Wade, daughter of Judge William Custer Wade, of St. Francisville, La., and his wife Olivia Lane.
Judge Robert Semple graduated from the Virginia military institute in 1869, after which he took the degree of B.L. in Washington and Lee university, of Lexington, Va., being admitted to practice in Wilkinson county, Miss., in 1870. Soon after this he moved to northern Louisiana, where he began practicing law, after which he removed to Harrisonburg, where he remained two years. He next came to Pointe Coupee parish, and entered into partnership in the practice of his profession with Judge Yoist. He was elected a member of the police jury in 1877 and also served as president of the police jury for two terms. In 1879 he was elected district attorney of the district composed of the parishes of Pointe Coupee and West Feliciana, in which capacity he served with distinction for four years. In 1888 he was elected district judge of the Fifteenth judicial district, being the only democratic judge elected since the war.
He is the owner of an excellent plantation of 240 acres on the Mississippi river, on which he is now residing. The Judge is exceedingly kind hearted and humane, and in all his decisions leans toward those who need aid and sympathy and are deserving. He is shrewd and quick in grasping points of law and his decisions are usually ready to be given when the arguments are finished. He is careful in the preparation of his cases, and has the ability to present them in a concise, logical and forcible manner. He is an intelligent and interesting conversationalist and is prepossessing in personal appearance.
He was married in 1872 to Miss Sarah L. Burruss, a daughter of Hon. John W. Burruss of Wilkinson county, Miss., and his wife, Sarah H. McGehee, daughter of George Edward McGehee, and to their union the following children were born: Robert, Sarah B., Catherine B., Mary B. and John B. The mother of these children is deceased. Judge Semple is a member of the A.F. & A.M. In religion, a firm believer in the tenets of the Episcopal church, and in politics a democrat. He has not remarried and resides with his beautiful and intelligent family at his home on the banks of the Mississippi river in the parish of Pointe Coupee, state of Louisiana.
[Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Louisiana; Chicago; The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1892; transcribed by Kim Mohler]
Added 19 Feb 2017

Stewart, William N.
 
W.N. STEWART, M.D., is a well-known physician and planter of West Feliciana parish. He is a native of Mississippi and was born in Hinds county, May 16, 1853.
He is a son of James D., a native of Wilkinson county, and Amanda (Yerger) Stewart, a native of Warren county, Miss. The mother of our subject is now deceased and his father is a resident of Jackson, Miss. James D. Stewart is an influential and well-known citizen of the last-named place. He is of Scotch descent, his paternal great-grandfather, James Stewart, having been a fugitive from Scotland to South Carolina in 1745.
After residing for some time in that state he removed to Tennessee, of which state he was one of the first settlers, and did his full share in the development of the section in which he lived. His son James was born on his plantation in Tennessee, was there reared and educated and followed the calling of his father, being a planter for the most part of his life. His efforts were rewarded by substantial success, and his latter days were spent in the enjoyment of a comfortable competency.
He died while on a visit to his sons in Mississippi, about the year 1856. His son, William, the father of James D. Stewart, was also born in Tennessee, but about 1805 he came to Mississippi, and, like his father, became a planter. He became very wealthy, and died in 1835.
Col. James D. Stewart was born in Mississippi in 1824 and was educated in the University of Virginia, graduating from this institution in 1844, after which he began the study of law at Cambridge. Upon returning to Mississippi, he began the battle of life as a planter of Wilkinson county, and in 1850 was married to Miss Amanda Yerger, a daughter of George S. Yerger, and about 1852 moved to Hinds county. Three years later he took up his abode in Jackson and practiced law for some time. In 1863 he entered the confederate army as chief of ordnance for Mississippi, receiving his appointment from the governor, and held this position until the close of the war. He is a veteran of the Mexican war also, having served during the conflict in Company B, Jefferson Davis' regiment.
Although the Colonel has never been an officer seeker, yet he has been prominent in the affairs of his section, and the people of Wilkinson county early showed their appreciation of his ability by electing him to the lower house of the state legislature, in which body he was an active member during 1849. In 1879 he was elected to the state senate from Hinds county, discharging his duties in 1880, and during that year he introduced bills which became laws, one being an act to prevent prize fighting, and another for the prevention of cruelty to animals, both of which were wise and humane measures. In 1878 he was elected president of the Howard association, soon after the organization of that society, and was one of its most useful members during the yellow-fever epidemic of 1878. In 1885 he was appointed registrar of the United States land office at Jackson, which position he ably filled for four years.
He is the father of nine children, five of whom are living: George Yerger, a druggist; William N., our subject; Nolan, who was physician for the Indians of Arizona, having received his appointment from the government and is now assistant physician of the insane asylum at Jackson, Miss., and Ida, who is the wife of Percy Lemly, of Jackson; Warren was assassinated at Arcola, Washington county, Miss., in 1889; Fulton died in 1879; Amanda is with her father in Jackson; two sons died in infancy. Colonel Stewart lives in a beautiful residence on Fortification street in Jackson, Miss., and although he has reached the allotted age of three-score years and ten, he shows little of the ravages of time and is remarkably well preserved.

W.N. Stewart, our subject, was reared in Jackson, Miss., and educated in the common schools, and when old enough attended at New Orleans and later a medical school in Louisville, Ky., where he graduated in 1876. He commenced the practice of his profession in Jackson, La., where he remained for two years. At the end of that time he came to West Feliciana parish and settled in the Tunica Hills settlement, where he engaged in the practice of medicine and in planting. He owns a fine tract of land near Row Landing.
Dr. Stewart was married to Miss Ida Heath, the daughter of John T. and Harriet L. (Perkins) Heath, natives of Louisiana. John T. Heath is now deceased, and was a man of considerable learning, having graduated with the highest honors of his class when but seventeen years of age, at Centenary college, and was an attorney. He was in the same class with Judges Kilbourne and Keman and Rev. C.G. Andrews, D.D., and other noted graduates of this college. He died at the early age of thirty. Though so young, there was no lawyer of north Louisiana who had a larger practice, or whose legal opinions were more valued, and had he lived he would have undoubtedly stood in the foremost rank of his profession. His death occurred at Shreveport.
His paternal ancestors were of English descent, having removed from England to Virginia some time during 1700 and something. His grandfather, Thomas Heath, was adopted at an early age by a wealthy old bachelor, Uncle Ethel Heath, of South Carolina, and there made his home. His father, J.T. Heath, Sr., upon coming of age removed with his slaves to St. Landry parish, La., purchased a plantation, and there lived until the time of his death.
The wife of Dr. Stewart was reared in East Feliciana parish and at Shreveport, La., and was educated at Silliman Collegiate institute, of Clinton, La. She was the eldest child in a family of seven, of whom four are living: Thomas W. Heath is a merchant at Pattersonville, La.; Sally N. is the wife of George Petrie, of Baldwin, La.; Anna McW. Is the wife of S.L. McBee, of East Feliciana parish; Dr. John P. died in this parish in 1878, of yellow fever (after the epidemic his name was found on the roll of honor in all the medical journals of the United States, and none more worthy, for though the only physician in his section, and almost an entire stranger, he gave his life for those who scarcely knew him); Henry P. died in East Feliciana parish in 1891; and Mary died at the age of five years.
To Dr. and Mrs. Stewart have been born two daughters: Amanda and Irene. The Doctor is a member of the Episcopal church, and his wife is connected with the Baptist church. Our subject is strongly opposed to the lottery company, and is president of the league for the Seventh and Eighth wards. He affiliates with the democratic party. Most of his time is devoted to the practice of his profession and he is regarded as one of the leading physicians of his vicinity. He is the medical examiner for the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance company, of California. Socially, he is a member of the Masonic lodge.
[Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Louisiana; Chicago; The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1892; transcribed by Kim Mohler]
Added 19 Feb 2017

West, Douglas
 
MAJ. DOUGLAS WEST was born on the plantation belonging to his father in Wilkinson county, Miss., in 1826, and when he had attained the age of fifteen years he was sent to the Jefferson Military college at Washington, Miss., which, at that time, was conducted by Major Holbrook, of the United States army, who succeeded Captain Partridge, who first gave it its military character. Several years were spent in that institution but he left before graduating and entered upon the study of law in the town of Woodville, at the same time acting as deputy clerk in the office of the clerk of the circuit court.
In 1846, while so employed, he enlisted in Capt. D.N. Cooper's company of the First regiment of Mississippi rifles, commanded by Colonel Jefferson Davis, and served with this brilliant command in its different engagements. Upon his return home he resumed his legal studies and graduated from the University of Louisville in the class of 1850. Prior to entering upon his professional career, he became an employee of H.R.W. Hill, who was a very wealthy and distinguished merchant of the Southwest, and remained in his counting house until he was thoroughly conversant with the details of the business.
The field of mercantile endeavor offered a broad and lucrative opening and he abandoned the profession of law to embark in cotton factoring and was successively interested in the firms of Miles, Adams & Co., and West & Villere. In 1861 his earnest attention was turned to the threatening attitude of political affairs and he was strongly opposed to separate state secession, but after that ordinance had been passed, he saw but one path of honor open to him and he immediately began to devote his energies to the defense of this section. He was appointed by Gov. T.O. Moore as captain of the First regiment of Louisiana infantry under Colonel Gladden, and he at once joined his command at Pensacola and was placed in charge of one of the heavy land batteries at the navy yard. He participated in the bombardment of that place January 1, 1862, and was soon after transferred to the army of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, which he joined at Corinth, and while leading his company early in the day at Shiloh, was wounded. In this memorable struggle, all the commissioned officers and forty non-commissioned officers and privates were killed or wounded. He was brought to New Orleans by the distinguished surgeon, Dr. Warren Stone, who operated on his wound the day that Admiral Farragut steamed in front of the city, and a few hours later he was driven in a carriage to Kenner, where he took the last train that left the city after the arrival of the Admiral. After a brief respite at his father's home in Mississippi, he rejoined his command and was with it during all the famous marches, skirmishes, battles and retreats, viz.: Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Perryville, Chickamauga (where he was again wounded), Missionary Ridge and others. After the battle of Murfreesboro, he was detailed by General Bragg, and made assistant brigadier-inspector under General Deas.
After Lieutenant-General Polk was placed in command of the department of Mississippi, Alabama and east Louisiana, he applied to the war department for his assignment, and was made an assistant adjutant-general. Efficient service was rendered, and during the period of his service, civil government had almost ceased to be administered. When General Johnston became pressed by the movements of General Sherman at Rocky Face Gap, Ga., May 7, 1864, President Davis directed General Polk to order all the troops that could be spared from the garrisons of Mobile, Vicksburg, etc., to be sent to General Johnston, and that he should go in person and command the troops known as the Army of the Mississippi, and Major West accompanied the General as adjutant-general. After the departure of Col. Thomas M. Jack (chief of staff) to the trans-Mississippi, he became chief adjutant-general until the fall of his noble chief at Lost Mountain. He later served as adjutant-general to Generals Loring and A.P. Stewart, until relieved the war department at the close of the Georgia campaign, and ordered on special duty in Mississippi and Louisiana. At the close of the war he returned to New Orleans and in a modest way started to re-establish himself as a cotton factor and by good management succeeded in building up a good business. Being ambitious to restore the ruined sugar and cotton estates owned in his family for half a century, he embarrassed his firm, and the successive failure of crops rendered it impossible for him to be reimbursed, and he again succumbed to the inevitable. He then became the trusted agent of a large British insurance company, and entered upon his duties with zeal and energy, in 1868, and was soon doing a profitable business. His new occupation so pleased him that he continued it and is now at the head of one of the oldest and largest agencies in the city. Major West is an active member of the Fire Underwriters' association, and has for some years been chairman of their legislative committee and member of the committee on cotton presses. For years, and up to the time of its withdrawal from the United States, the Southern department of the Royal Canadian Insurance company was in Major West's hands, and the management of this branch was such as to place him in the front rank of underwriters. In 1854 Major West was married to a daughter of the Hon. F.D. Conrad of East Baton Rouge, La., but was called upon to mourn her death in 1857. She left a daughter who survived her only a short time. Major West has never remarried, but has devoted himself to the maintenance and education of the daughters of his sister, Mrs. Dr. Murdock, who were left orphans by the death of both parents in 1870. The Major is a descendant on his father's side, of the de la Warr Wests, who for faithful service to the crown were awarded large grants of land in Virginia. One of his ancestors, Thomas, was lord high admiral of the seas and two of the name were governors of Virginia. On his mother's side he is descended from the Scotts, his maternal great-grandfather being the grandfather of Sir Walter Scott, commonly known as "Auld Beardie." The Scotts having immigrated to America and settled the town of Dumfries, Va., his grandfather, Chichester Chinn was sent at an early age to Edinburgh and was a classmate of his cousins, Walter and Thomas Scott. His maiden aunts who had adopted him bought him an ensign's commission in the British navy and he served in the war between France and England; was captured, paroled, came to Virginia and resigned his commission, for which he was disinherited by his patriotic aunts. He married Miss Susan Withers; immigrated to Kentucky, and represented the counties of Harrison and Bourbon in the state senate for many years. In 1783 a few Virginians settled near Natchez. Knowing of the mild government of the Spaniards and convinced of the fact that the people who had driven enemies from the Atlantic coast would soon possess the land to the Pacific coast, these settlers came as the pioneers of a commercial civilization. Among them were the Wests. The name of Cato West is prominently identified with the history of Mississippi territory. He first refused a commission of colonel from Governor Sargent, as he could not agree with the governing ideas of that particular public servant. In 1799 he is found opposing the blue laws of Sargent. In January, 1800, his petition denouncing Governor Sargent and the arbitrary laws of which the Governor was the author, was presented to the congress of the United States. The house adopted a bill in accordance with the petition on March 10, 1800. On May 14 a committee was appointed to consider the petition and the charges against the Governor of maladministration; but the report of the committee, presented March 3, 1801, recommended the cessation of proceedings. The West party nevertheless, carried all points, for on April 3, the Governor left for Boston, never to return. His secretary, John Steele, a chronic invalid was, through charity, allowed to hold the position of secretary of the territory for eighteen months after his commission expired (May 6, 1802). Cato West, who fought the people's battle, was appointed secretary, and subsequently, when Claiborne was commissioned governor of Orleans territory, Colonel West succeeded him as governor of Mississippi. In 1817 he was delegate from Jefferson county in the convention to form the state of Mississippi and up to the period of his death was the guard of that commonwealth. The sons of Col. Cato West were sent to Virginia to be educated and as they married he settled them on plantations in Mississippi and Louisiana. The father of the subject of this sketch settled in West Feliciana parish, La., near Laurel Hill in the canebrake in 1810, and when the British threatened New Orleans in 1814-15, joined Jackson's army, and, in the absence of his captain (Chance), he commanded his company in the affair of January 8. He died in 1866, after a long and honorable career, leaving a large family of whom only three survive.
[Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Louisiana; Chicago; The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1892; transcribed by Kim Mohler]
Added 19 Feb 2017

Williams, H. M.
 
H.M. WILLIAMS is a well-known planter of Louisiana, but was born in Mississippi in 1845 and when eight years of age came to Louisiana with his parents. His father, B.H. Williams, was born in Ohio and in a very early day moved to Wilkinson county, Miss. In 1850 he was taken with the gold fever and after fifteen years spent in the West, returned to his old home, where he died two years later. H.M. Williams was an attendant of a private school until fifteen years of age, but the war coming up about this time he left school to enlist in the confederate service, becoming a member of Company E, First Louisiana cavalry, and was a participant in many engagements in Tennessee and Kentucky, among which may be mentioned the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Perryville, Chattanooga and Richmond. While with Scott's command in the last mentioned engagement he received a slight wound. He served for a time as courier on Scott's staff. His last service was on the Naval expedition on Lake Maripan with Holmes. After the war he returned to Louisiana and engaged in farming, and although commencing on very limited means he has succeeded reasonably well and is now the owner of two plantations, embracing 720 acres, one-half of which is under cultivation. He handles eighty bales of cotton yearly, and he is continually improving his place and thus adds not only to its beauty but to its value. He is industrious and honorable and as what he now has has been earned through his own efforts, his career is deserving of emulation. In 1866 he was married to Miss Lida Stockton Austin, a native of Pennsylvania, but was called upon to mourn her death in 1876, their union having resulted in the birth of one son, Hunter, who has been an attendant of the University of Louisiana. In 1890 he took for his second wife, Miss Fannie L. Haralson of Louisiana. They are Episcopalians.
[Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Louisiana; Chicago; The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1892; transcribed by Kim Mohler]
Added 19 Feb 2017

BEAUMONT, Mrs. Betty Bentley
 
BEAUMONT, Mrs. Betty Bentley, author and merchant, born in Lancastershire, England, 9th August, 1828. She was the only child of Joseph Bentley, the great educational reformer of England. Mr. Bentley organized and conducted a society for “the promotion of the education of the people,” and wrote and published thirty-three books to improve the methods of education but he presents another example of the neglect, by public benefactors, of those bound to them by the closest ties of nature. He allowed his child to acquire only the elements of an education, and took her from school in her tenth year and employed her in his business to copy his manuscripts, correct proof and attend lectures. The independent spirit of the little girl was roused by a strange act on the part of her father. He showed her a summing up of the expenses she had been to him in the ten years of her life. To a child it seemed a large amount, and having set her young brain to devise some plan by which she might support herself so as to be of no further expense to her father, she surreptitiously learned the milliners' trade. She loved her books, and her propensity for learning was exceptional, but her opportunity for study was extremely limited. At a very early age she was married to Edward Beaumont, and came to America seven years after her marriage. They lived in Philadelphia for five years and, on account of Mr. Beaumont's feeble health, removed to the South, going to Woodville, Miss. The coming on of the Civil War and the state of feeling in a southern town toward suspected abolitionists are most interestingly described in Mrs. Beaumont's "Twelve Years of My Life." (Philadelphia, 1887). The failing health of her husband and the needs of a family of seven children called forth her inherent energy, and she promptly began what she felt herself qualified to carry on to success, and became one of the leading merchants of the town. Her varied experiences during a period of historical interest are given in "A Business Woman's Journal" (Philadelphia, 1888). That book graphically explains the financial state of the cotton-growing region of the South during the years immediately succeeding the Civil War, the confusion consequent upon the transition from the credit system to a cash basis, and the condition of the suddenly freed blacks. Mrs. Beaumont's books are valuable because they have photographed a period that quickly passed. Her style is simple and unpretending. She is one of the hard-working business women of to-day. She has shown independence of spirit, self-sacrificing courage and remarkable tenacity of purpose. She has a kind and sympathizing heart, and a nature susceptible to every gentle and elevating influence.
[American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume 1, Publ. 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow]
Added 24 May2013

BAKER, Mrs. Julie Wetherill
 
BAKER, Mrs. Julie Wetherill, author, born in Woodville, Miss., in 1858. Her birthplace was the home of her distinguished grandfather, Cotesworth Pinckney Smith, chief-justice of the State of Mississippi. Born in Mississippi and reared partlv in that State, and partly in Philadelphia, Pa., the home of her Quaker ancestor, Samuel Wetherill, she shows in her writings the dual influence of her early surroundings. Ten years ago she became the wife of Marion A. Baker, literary editor of the New Orleans "Times-Democrat." Mrs. Baker is not only a literary authority in New Orleans, but is a general favorite in its most refined circles.
[American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume 1, Publ. 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow]
Added 24 May2013

DAVIS, Joseph R
 
Joseph R. Davis, was born in Wilkinson county, Miss., Jan. 12, 1825, a son of Isaac Davis, (an elder brother of Jefferson Davis), who came to Mississippi in 1810, served as an officer in the war of 1812-15 and later was a planter at Davis Bend. Joseph R. Davis spent his boyhood days in Madison county, received a preparatory education at Nashville, and was graduated at Miami university, Ohio. He began the practice of law in 1857 and left it in the spring of 1861, when he resigned a seat in the legislature to go to Pensacola as captain of a Madison county company of volunteers. At the organization of the 10th regiment at Pensacola he was elected lieutenant-colonel. In August, 1861, he was commissioned colonel on the staff of President Davis, and he was on inspection duty throughout the South until commissioned brigadier-general and given a command of a brigade of Mississippi troops in 1862, in the Army of Northern Virginia, (q. v.) After the war he returned to Mississippi, and practiced law until his death at Biloxi, Sept. 15, 1896.
[Encyclopedia of Mississippi History: Comprising Sketches , Volume 1 edited by Dunbar Rowland, 1907]
Added 4 Apr 2013

BAKER, Mrs. Julie Wetherill, author, born in Woodville, Miss., in 1858. Her birthplace was the home of her distinguished grandfather, Cotesworth Pinckney Smith, chief-justice of the State of Mississippi. Born in Mississippi and reared partlv in that State, and partly in Philadelphia, Pa., the home of her Quaker ancestor, Samuel Wetherill, she shows in her writings the dual influence of her early surroundings. Ten years ago she became the wife of Marion A. Baker, literary editor of the New Orleans "Times-Democrat." Mrs. Baker is not only a literary authority in New Orleans, but is a general favorite in its most refined circles.
(American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume 1, Publ. 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)


BEAUMONT, Mrs. Betty Bentley, author and merchant, born in Lancastershire, England, 9th August, 1828. She was the only child of Joseph Bentley, the great educational reformer of England. Mr. Bentley organized and conducted a society for the promotion of the education of the people, and wrote and published thirty-three books to improve the methods of education but he presents another example of the neglect, by public benefactors, of those bound to them by the closest ties of nature. He allowed his child to acquire only the elements of an education, and took her from school in her tenth year and employed her in his business to copy his manuscripts, correct proof and attend lectures. The independent spirit of the little girl was roused by a strange act on the part of her father. He showed her a summing up of the expenses she had been to him in the ten years of her life. To a child it seemed a large amount, and having set her young brain to devise some plan by which she might support herself so as to be of no further expense to her father, she surreptitiously learned the milliners' trade. She loved her books, and her propensity for learning was exceptional, but her opportunity for study was extremely limited. At a very early age she was married to Edward Beaumont, and came to America seven years after her marriage. They lived in Philadelphia for five years and, on account of Mr. Beaumont's feeble health, removed to the South, going to Woodville, Miss. The coming on of the Civil War and the state of feeling in a southern town toward suspected abolitionists are most interestingly described in Mrs. Beaumont's "Twelve Years of My Life." (Philadelphia, 1887). The failing health of her husband and the needs of a family of seven children called forth her inherent energy, and she promptly began what she felt herself qualified to carry on to success, and became one of the leading merchants of the town. Her varied experiences during a period of historical interest are given in "A Business Woman's Journal" (Philadelphia, 1888). That book graphically explains the financial state of the cotton-growing region of the South during the years immediately succeeding the Civil War, the confusion consequent upon the transition from the credit system to a cash basis, and the condition of the suddenly freed blacks. Mrs. Beaumont's books are valuable because they have photographed a period that quickly passed. Her style is simple and unpretending. She is one of the hard-working business women of to-day. She has shown independence of spirit, self-sacrificing courage and remarkable tenacity of purpose. She has a kind and sympathizing heart, and a nature susceptible to every gentle and elevating influence.
(American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume 1, Publ. 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)

 





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