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Elijah M. BaileyELIJAH M. BAILEY; The life story of this prominent citizen is that of a hard-working farmer, whose honest efforts have been crowned with success. It would be interesting even if it were not .unique as presenting the record of a repentant secessionist, who, after three years' arduous service for the "lost cause," risked his life in the final year of the war in defense of the Union, wearing the blue as proudly as he had worn the gray, and proving himself every inch a soldier, under both flags.
Elijah M. Bailey was born in Burke county, North Carolina, February 22, 1842. His father was Joel Bailey, a native of Virginia and a member of one of the old families of that state. The wife of Joel Bailey was a daughter of Peter Cirley, a native of North Carolina and of Irish ancestry. He was a soldier of the Revolution, one of those brave men, who, loving liberty more than life, saved for us and gave to us our country. In 1850 Joel Bailey and his wife came on a flatboat from Paducah, Kentucky (to which place they had traveled overland from North Carolina), by way of the Tennessee river, the Mississippi and the Ohio; and up the Missouri by steamboat to St. Joseph, Missouri. Here they lived for a short time then removed to Platte county, Missouri, and in 1855 to Lincoln township, Nodaway county, and settled on one hundred and sixty acres of government land. The wife, Nancy C. Bailey, a devout Methodist, died in 1864, in Andrew county, Missouri, at the age of sixty years. Joel Bailey, a lifelong farmer, died at the age of seventy years, at Leavenworth, Kansas. He was a Republican and a strong Union man from 1861. Joel and Nancy (Cirley) Bailey were the parents of : eleven children, eight sons and three daughters, viz.: Larkin, deceased; William Riley, deceased; Franklin, of Stone county, Missouri; James, a resident of Lincoln township, well known and respected, who served
in the Union army; Sally Spencer, deceased; Fidela, who died in childhood; Polly Sirena, deceased; Elijah Mitchell, the subject of this notice; Nancy Clarissa Blunt, of Oklahoma; and Bird and Joel, both dead.
Elijah M. Bailey was eight years of age when his parents came to Missouri and twelve when they settled in this county. Here he grew up amid the wild surroundings familiar to early settlers, no improvements of the modern civilization having been introduced then. His education was gained not from attending public school but from study at home, travel, observation and experience in the army. When the Civil war broke out he enlisted in the Confederate service, in the Third Missouri Cavalry. His company, B, was organized by T. J. McQuittie, who was the sheriff of Nodaway county, but resigned that office, organized this company and served as its captain. The company was in the engagements at Blue Mills and Lexington, Missouri, and other minor engagements in this state, and at Pea Ridge, Arkansas. It afterward took part in the first battle of Corinth and later started for Shiloh to engage in that battle, but did not arrive until too late. The command went down the Mississippi, and Mr. Bailey again fought at Farmington, and Holly Springs, Mississippi, and again at the second battle of Corinth. Then his command was at Port Gibson trying to head off General Grant, but, retreating, was fought back to Baker's creek (or Champion Hills) and was again in battle at Black River bridge. At the battle of Vicksburg, July 4, 1863, Mr. Bailey was taken prisoner and paroled.
In March, 1864, Mr. Bailey enlisted in the Union army, in Company F, Second Missouri Artillery, under Captain "Flying Dutchman," and was engaged in various skirmishes with guerrillas or bushwhackers and fought in two engagements against the Confederate troops. He was honorably discharged from the Union army on June 6, 1865, and is now receiving a pension from the United States government for his services.
Mr. Bailey returned to Nodaway county. Missouri, after his army experiences, and here he has since lived. He was married March 18, 1866, to Barbara A. Pruitt, of Elmo, who was born in Coles county, Illinois, and came to Missouri when six years of age. Her father, Irvm A. Pruitt, born in Indiana, was a well known early settler of Missouri, who came to Nodaway county in 1856 and resided here until his death at the age of forty-four years. Her mother was Polly (Dodson) Pruitt, born in Tennessee and reared in that state and Indiana. Mrs. Bailey's brother, John I. Pruitt, enlisted during the Civil war in the Third Missouri Cavalry and later his name was among those recorded as "missing;" and the fact that he has never since been heard of inclines his friends to believe that he was killed. Mrs. Pruitt, at the age of ninety, makes her home with her only surviving child, Mrs. Bailey, and is honored and respected by all who know her. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey are the parents of seven children, four of whom are living: Irvin A. Bailey, who married Emma Hall and resides in Lincoln township; Clarissa Lee, the wife of Charles H. Peery, of Lincoln township; Lola H., a member of her parents' household; and James Bird, in his twentieth year, who lives at home. Those lost by death were: Sarah Jane, their second child, who died at the age of seventeen months; William Franklin (or Stonewall), who was
the third born and died when twelve years old: and Nancy Ellen, their fifth child, who died aged eighteen months. Mrs. Bailey is a member of the Church of God.
Mr. Bailey has a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres, consisting of rich bottom land, hillside and timber. It is improved and equipped for general farming and stock-raising. Politically he is a Democrat, and is a wheel-horse of the party and a zealous worker for its success. He was the first Democratic constable elected in Nodaway county after the close of the Civil war, and was deputy sheriff of the county under Henry Toel and other sheriffs, and as such, in his official capacity, took part in the hanging of the notorious Talbert brothers at Maryville. In 1900 he was candidate before the convention for the office of sheriff but was defeated owing to unforeseen conditions. Mr. Bailey is a member of Lodge No. 329, Free and Accepted Masons, of Elmo. He is a man of fifty-eight years, but, notwithstanding the hard experiences of his army life, holds his age well. He is well known for his honesty, integrity and undaunted courage, and these qualities, together with his frank and cordial manner, have gained for him many friends among his fellow men.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

ALEXANDER HANSON BAILEY, is a heavy dealer in agricultural implements, furniture, stoves and general merchandise. He was the son of Marion L. and Harriett (Williams) Bailey, the former of East Tennessee, and was born in Greene County, East Tennessee, September 14, 1848. He was raised on a farm, attended the common schools, and for two years was a student at the Greenville College. He then taught school for three terms. In 1872, he came to this county with $150 in money, and rented a farm, which he conducted for six years. In 1875, he formed a partnership with J.M. Scammon, in the mercantile business in Phelps City, still having charge of the farm. Few firms have the confidence of the community to a greater degree, and very few deserve it more. They are accommodating and have succeeded in building up a large and profitable business. They are quite extensively interested in dealing in and shipping grain and stock. Mr. Bailey has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Carrie G.C. Reed, daughter of William and Eliza Reed, of East Tennessee. She died February 9, 1878. He was married again to Miss Mary A. Bartholomew, of this county, in November, 1879. They have two children, James A. Garfield, born November 8, 1880, and Sarah Roxey. In politics Mr. B. is a Republican, and religiously a Methodist.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM H. BAILEY; William H. Bailey, senior member of the firm of Bailey & George, hardware merchants of Hopkins, has resided in Nodaway county for a comparatively short time, the year of his arrival being 1894, but during Iris residence here he has gained a place among the most substantial citizens and his worth is well known.
Mr. Bailey was born in Knox county, Tennessee, January 29, 1855. His father, Miles Bailey, was born in the eastern portion of the same state and died in 1861, at the age of forty-eight years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Nancy Ewing, was also a native of eastern Tennessee and died in 1886, at the age of seventy-six, her birth having occurred in 1810. Little is known of the ancestral history of the family, save that the paternal grandfather of our subject was a Virginian. Miles Bailey was a farmer and spent the greater part of his life in Iowa. He reared a small family, of whom two are yet living. His children who reared families are as follows: Elizabeth, who became the wife of Baxter Wooldridge, of Hopkins, who is the proprietor of the leading clothing and dry-goods house of the town and is one of the most prominent Democrats of Nodaway county. His two sons, Ed and Fred Wooldridge, are associated with their father in the conduct of his mercantile interests. The former married Miss Ella Torrance and they have two children, Dan and Mary. Mrs. Laura Law. the deceased wife of Dr. Law, was the second child of the family of Miles Bailey. She died in Liberty Center, leaving three children—Lora, the wife of Charles Fry, of Hopkins; Eugene, of St. Louis; and Louella, the deceased wife of Charles K. Allen, who was at one time a leading merchant of Hopkins,
William H. Bailey was the youngest member of the family who reached maturity. He entered upon his business career in Unionville. Iowa, where his father had located in 1857. That town and Moulton  provided the schools in which he acquired his education. When he approached the age of business preparation he made choice of the tinner's trade as a means of livelihood and learned that business under the direction of S. C. Sloss. Completing his four years apprenticeship he afterward spent six months with the firm of Scott & Bliss, jobbers in the same town. Returning to Unionville he was married, in 1877, and was elected constable, filling that office and the position of deputy sheriff for two years. During the following year and a half he engaged in buying stock near Hopkins.
A desire to see the northwest led to his removal to Deadwood, Dakota, where ha became wagon boss of a freighting outfit running between that city and Pierre, South Dakota, a distance of two hundred miles. The outfit consisted of thirty-one wagons and ninety head of cattle. The three years spent in the latter place proved a profitable period in the life of Mr. Bailey. On abandoning his position he spent a year and a half in Huron, South Dakota, where he returned to his trade, being employed in the tin shop of Brown & Stiver. Subsequently he located in Arlington, South Dakota, where he became a leading man in the employ of A. D. Maxwell, a hardware merchant, with whom he was associated for eight years, on the expiration of which time he entered into partnership with Mr. Mullins, forming the firm of Mullins & Bailey, and together they conducted a hardware business in Headland, South Dakota, for eighteen months. Mr. Bailey then disposed of his interests in that town and journeyed to the Pacific coast, locating in Portland, Oregon. In that city he was employed by various firms as a tinner, and while traversing his path eastward He was located for a time in Elmore and Amboy, Minnesota, having charge of a shop at the latter point. On again reaching Iowa he took up his abode at Creston, where he entered upon the management of the tin shop of Thomas & Daugherty, rema1ning with that firm until 1894, when he located in Hopkins. Here he conducted a repair shop for four years and later established his hardware store, subsequently adding a stock of furniture and implements. In January, 1899, James N. George was admitted to a partnership and the firm of Bailey & George has since carried on business, with gratifying success.
Mr. Bailey has been twice married. On the 26th of April, 1877, he married Miss Mamie Nash, and unto them were born two children, Georgie and Fred. For his second wife he chose Miss Annie Onstead, a daughter of Andrew Onstead, of Sioux Falls, Dakota. Their marriage occurred February 4, 1883, and has been blessed with seven children, namely: Oates, May, Minnie, Frankie, Lou, Milo and Clemi. Pleny and William are deceased. In politics Mr. Bailey is a Democrat. His forefathers were all Republicans but a friendly interest in the white metal and a desire for its reinstatement as primary money led him into the Democratic party. He has traveled extensively throughout the north and west, but is now permanently located in Hopkins, where his well-directed efforts in business affairs are bringing to him a well-merited success.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

W. G. BAKER, farmer, section 12, is a native of Licking County, Ohio, and was born in 1841, being a son of Charles and Eliza (Smith) Baker. The former was also born in the same county, May 19, 1814, and his mother was a Pennsylvanian by birth. They were married January 16, 1835. Mrs. Baker died December 31, 1845, and Mr. Baker subsequently came to Missouri with his son and is still living. The subject of this sketch accompanied his father to Wells County, Indiana, in 1852. There he married Rebecca Lesh, September 29, 1861. She was a native of Hardin County, Iowa, and was born in 1842. In 1866 Mr. and Mrs. Baker came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled near Linden. There Mrs. Baker died, June 10, 1868, leaving one child, Jennie. Mr. Baker was married the second time to Miss Eliza Kish, a native of Atchison County, born December 5, 1846. By this marriage they have five children living: Alonzo L., Rhoda B., Wm. N., Anna E. and Lulu.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILBER F. BAKER, farmer and breeder of fine hogs, section 6, is a native of Knox County, Illinois, and was born in 1849, being a son of Rev. Jacob and Mary A. (Chesney) Baker. The former was born in Virginia, January 16, 1806, and subsequently with his parents moved to Tennessee. When eighteen years old he went to Union County, Indiana, and was there married. Mrs. Baker was a native of Maryland, but with her parents early moved to Indiana. In 1853, the subject of this sketch moved to Fremont County, Iowa, where his parents now reside. He received his education at Tabor. In 1870, he purchased his present farm. March 12, 1872, Mr. B. married Miss Alice H. Hopkins, a native of Atchison County, Missouri, born March 31, 1855. She was a daughter of Hon. N.O. and Kitty (Hughes) Hopkins. She was educated at Rock Port. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have four children living: Emma, Mary A., George C. and Kitty. They have lost one, Anna M. Mr. and Mrs. Baker are both members of the M.E. Church. His farm consists of 290 acres of good land.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

ISAAC S. BALL; Isaac S. Ball, the county clerk of Atchison County, was born in Clark Township, of this county, March 11, 1869. His father, Joseph L. Ball, settled in that portion of the county in 1852, and died in 1869. He was born in what is now West Virginia, emigrated thence to Kentucky, and was there married to Miss Hannah E. Krusor, who still survives, and resides where she and her husband settled upon coming to Atchison County. They were the parents of the following children: James W., of Atchison county; Lizzie, the wife of D. L. Williams, of Milton, Missouri; John T., of Idaho; Tacy E., now Mrs. W. J. Graves, of Milton, Missouri; Joseph L., E. P. and Ulysses G., also of Milton; R. C., assistant cashier of the bank at Craig, this state; Mollie A., the wife of E. E. Taylor, of Fairfax, Missouri, and Isaac S., the subject of this sketch.
Isaac S. Ball passed his early youth upon the farm. In childhood he was permanently crippled, and thus incapacitated for farm labor. Obtaining a good common-school education he completed it in Tarkio College, having in view the life of a merchant as a means of support. For a year prior to entering actively the politics of his county he conducted a grocery store at Milton, and in the summer of 1894 was nominated by the Republicans of the county for the position of county clerk, being elected in the following November by a majority of three hundred and nine. After serving most efficiently for four years he was nominated as his own successor, and defeated a strong man on the fusion ticket, though by the narrow margin of only ten votes. Mr. Ball's greatest concern for the county is its welfare, as it may be affected through his office, and h1s re-election is the strongest endorsement the people could give him of his successful administration of its affairs, so far as they are under his control.
Mr. Ball was married in Rockport, November 29, 1896, to Mrs. Vena Wannschaff, the widow of Alfred A. J. Wannschaff. Mrs. Ball's two children by her former marriage are Hermie and Bessie, the former of whom is Mr. Ball's deputy clerk. From the above brief recital it is evident to every reader that Mr. Ball stands high in the estimation of his fellow men, and he in fact has the regard and esteem of all that know him.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

WILLIAM JACKSON BARNHART, farmer, section 13, was born in Greene County, East Tennessee, in 1837. In the fall of 1856 he came to Missouri with his father, Felix Barnhart, who bought a farm which he improved. In 1858 William purchased forty acres of the farm he now owns. In the spring of 1863 he went to Pike’s Peak and remained for two years. He married Miss Mary Jane Million October 16, 1866. They have eight children: Nina Viola, Ice Ander, Nellie A., Mary Malissa, Nora Persilla, Samuel Felix, John David and William Clarence. Lost two: Alice Frances died when three years old, and an infant. Felix Barnhart, who was born in Tennessee, died when sixty years of age, in August, 1866. William’s mother, formerly a Miss Bird, died when he was a child. The father was married a second time to Miss Polly Ann Runnells. Mr. B. is a Democrat in politics, and a zealous Baptist. He has an excellent farm of 213 acres, and is entitled to great credit for his improvements and success, having commenced a poor boy. He is now numbered among the best and most reliable citizens of the county.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

REUBEN BARRETT; This age is not wholly utilitarian. On all sides we see some earnest souls laboring devotedly to bring about a recognition of some higher principle in life than selfish greed, and stimulating in the hearts of others a desire for spiritual progress. The friends of Reuben Barrett will see in his years of faithful work in all forms of religious endeavor, a source of present good to the community, and long after he has entered into his final rest his influence will continue in everlasting circles. Mr. Barrett was born in Warren county, Pennsylvania. September 15, 1844, a son of Edmond and Matilda (Fryar) Barrett, natives of England. His paternal grandfather, John Barrett, was a farmer and gardener of Lincolnshire, where he spent his entire life. His children were John. Robert. William, Eli, Michael. James. Edmond, and Susan, the wife of T. Watts. Of these Eli, Michael, Edmond and Ann came to America. The mother of our subject was married to Michael Barrett, a brother of our subject's father who died soon after coming to the United States, and she subsequently married Edmond Barrett. By the first marriage she had four children: Reuben, who died at the age of nine years: Mary, the wife of H. Marsh: William, a resident of Pennsylvania; and Rhoda. the wife of John Howells. The children of the second union were Ellen, the widow of A. I. Russell, and Sarah, the widow of R. Russell, both residents of this county; Reuben, our subject; John, James E., Henry T. and Robert, all farmers of this county: Rose, the wife of E. Abbott, of Pennsylvania; and Charles W. a farmer of this county. In 1832 the father emigrated to America, and for the first year was employed in a hotel in Utica. New York. Soon after his I marriage he located in Warren county Pennsylvania, where he purchased a tract of heavily timbered land and improved a farm. He erected thereon a commodious house and three large barns, and made of the place one of the finest homesteads in the locality. Here his family was reared.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

JOHN T. BARKLEY, was born in Linn County, Iowa, September 5, 1846, and is the son of Gabriel M. and Elizabeth Barkley, nee McIntyre, both Kentuckians by birth. John T. was raised in his native county, and received a common school education. July 2, 1871, his marriage occurred, in that county, to Miss Mary E. Miller, daughter of A.K. and Jane Miller. She was born in Indiana, September 7, 1851. Mr. and Mrs. Barkley have two children: Blanche B., born April 17, 1872, and Roscoe K., born December 7, 1877. After leaving Linn County, Iowa, the subject of this sketch came to Missouri, and in the winter of 1872, located in Nodaway County, where he continued to live for three years. He then became a citizen of Atchison County, bought some land, and in 1875, settled in Dale Township. He has a farm of eighty acres, all fenced, his place being on section 19, township 64, range 39. Mr. Barkley is greatly interested in the stock business. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GUSTAVUS BAYHA, farmer and stock raiser, section 8, is a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, where he was born November 14, 1834, his parents Frederick and Nanny (Cayser) Bayha, having been born in the same country. The youth of Gustavus was passed in his native country at school, where he received a liberal education. In 1854 he emigrated to the United States, and settled in Lake County, Illinois, where he engaged in farming. After remaining there till 1877, he came to this county, settling on his present place in Dale Township. This contains 240 acres of improved land, with a good dwelling and an orchard of 300 apple, 100 peach and twenty-five each of pear, cherry and plum trees, besides a vineyard of 400 grape vines. October 15, 1871, Mr. Bayha was married in Illinois to Mrs. Anna Holycross, whose maiden name was Morse, and a daughter of Isaac Morse. She was born in Ohio, December 23, 1840. Mr. and Mrs. B. have five children: Herman R., born July 21, 1872; Minnie S., born March 12, 1874; Jessie S., born May 10, 1876, Christian T., born November 11, 1878, and Matilda, born July 14, 1881. Mrs. Bayha had one child by a former marriage, Henrietta Holycross, born March 30, 1861. He is Republican in his political views. He is extensively engaged in the stock business.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

G. BEAL, farmer, section 20, is the son of G.M. and Phebe M. Beal, and was born in Atchison County in 1854. His father was a native of New York, where he was reared, but later removed to Illinois, and thence to Indiana, coming to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1841, where he purchased over 2,000 acres of land unexcelled in the Union for productiveness. He was a successful agriculturist up to 1854, when he was killed by lightning. He left, besides his widow, three children: Lucretia (now Mrs. Rudasil); Lucinda (now Mrs. Taylor) and G. Mrs. Beal afterwards became Mrs. Ford. She died in 1873, leaving one daughter, Belle. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and owns about 900 acres of good land, well improved. He was married in 1878 to Miss Edmona Poindexter, a native of Atchison County. They have two children, Myrtle and Iva.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler
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AQUILLA BECK, farmer, section 23, was born February 4, 1809, in Rowan County, North Carolina. His father and mother, Samuel and Mary Beck, were also brought up in North Carolina. Aquilla was the fourth child in a family of nine children. In 1816, his parents moved to Wayne County, Indiana, the state then being a territory, and there young Beck was raised to manhood on a farm, receiving a common school education. In 1834, he went to Berrien County, Michigan, where he cleared a farm of 100 acres in the heavy timber. In July, 1854, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and located on the farm where he has since resided. In 1856, he engaged in the livery business in Rock Port, which business he continued for ten years, but since that time has been occupied in tilling the soil. His farm contains 220 acres of excellent land. Mr. Beck is a member of North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M. He has been twice married. First, to Ruth Alexander, their marriage occurring in the year 1830. Mrs. B. was a native of Tennessee. She died in August, 1870, leaving three children: Gazaway G., Reese W. and Ulysses H. In April, 1871, Mr. Beck was again married to Susan Brickett, a daughter of Thomas and Amelia (Crosby) Brickett. She was a native of Clay County, Indiana. Mr. B. was formerly a Whig, but is now a staunch Republican in his political views, and is numbered with the men of prominence in this vicinity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN W. BECK, section 5, one of the leading farmers of Clark Township, was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, January 5, 1815. His parents were Samuel and Mary (Wells) Beck, the former a native of Maryland, and the latter of Delaware. In 1815 the family moved to Indiana, settling in Wayne County. John W. Beck spent his youth on a farm, and attended the common district schools. He was married in Union County, Indiana, in December, 1845, to Miss Elizabeth Rush, daughter of Jacob and Sarah Rush. She was born in Union County, Indiana, March 17, 1824. Mr. and Mrs. B. have raised ten children, nine of whom are living – Sarah E., (wife of Drury Roberts), born December 24, 1847; Mary W., born May 12, 1849; Lysander, born July 15, 1851; Harriet M., born January 24, 1853, died March 2, 1877; Elizabeth A., born September 6, 1854; Nicander M., born December 15, 1856; Hamlin P., born July 29, 1859; John L., born October 26, 1860; Emma J., born May 9, 1863; Martha H., born August 8, 1866. The subject of this sketch resided in Wayne County, Indiana, until 1864, when he moved to Missouri, locating in Clark Township, Atchison County, on his present farm, where he has since lived. He owns 320 acres of land, all fenced, good improvements and an orchard of apple, peach, cherry, plum and pear trees being upon the place. Mr. Beck is a member of the Masonic fraternity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ULYSSES H. BECK, or Lee Beck, as he is familiarly called, is among the early settlers of this county. He was born June 8, 1840, in Berrien County, Michigan. His father, Aquilla Beck, was born in Canada, and was of Scottish descent. His mother, formerly Ruth Alexander, was a native of Greene County, Tennessee. She was of Irish extraction. Ulysses was the youngest in a family of four children. He was reared on a farm, at his birthplace, until fourteen years of age, receiving a common school education. In the spring of 1854 he accompanied his parents to Atchison County, Missouri, settling east of Rock Port. The county was then thinly populated and young Beck became acquainted with many early settlers here. He moved to Rock Port, in 1856, and engaged in the livery business. During the war he took an active part in defending the property of the citizens. In August, 1864, he enlisted in Company I, Forty-third Missouri Volunteer Infantry and remained in the field until the close of the war, serving on the frontier. He afterwards continued the livery business at Rock Port, until 1866, when he sold out and moved on a farm. He settled his present farm, in section 19, in the spring of 1870. It comprises 170 acres of fine land, well improved, though it was all wild when he located here. Mr. Beck is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was married February 22, 1872, to Rachel Evans, whose maiden name was Rachel Haught, daughter of David and Rachel Haught, of this county. She was born in Bureau County, Illinois, July 1, 1853. By this union they have five children: Elenora E., born March 11, 1873; Ulysses Grant, born October 7, 1874; Arthur E., born October 11, 1876; Daisy B., born July 28, 1878; Gasaway G., born July 10, 1880. Mrs. Beck has two children by her former marriage: Effie A. Evans, born February 15, 1869; Tracy A. Evans, born February 11, 1870. Mrs. Beck is a member of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ANDREW BEHRENDSEN was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, May 2, 1842. He had excellent opportunities for an education, and in youth thoroughly learned the mason’s trade, which has been his life business. In February, 1872, he emigrated to this country and settled in Chicago, where he worked at his trade. In the winter of 1875 he came to this city and has since been the regular brickmason and plasterer of this vicinity. He has built nearly all the buildings in Watson. In 1880 he gave up that industry and started a saloon, and is now conducting the only one in the city, he having bought out Mr. Eiler’s interest. Mr. B. has a peculiar faculty for this business, keeps an orderly house, and in connection with his saloon runs a good billiard room. Though Mr. B. came to this country a poor boy, he has worked his way up, and now has a fine house and lot, well furnished, and considerable town property. He married Miss Dorethea Nisson, in Germany, in 1867. They have nine children: Andrew, Theodore J., Elena Louisa, Frederick, Emma, Helene Maria, Margaret, Dorothea and an infant. Lost two in infancy. In politics he is a Democrat, and in religion a Lutheran. He has always been elected to fill either the school, city or township offices, and is greatly interested in education.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM BENEDICT, farmer, section 15, is a native of Venango County, Pennsylvania, was born March 12, 1828, and is a son of Alvin and Julia Benedict, who were natives of New York. William spent his boyhood days and received a good education in Pennsylvania. November 2, 1853, he married Mahala O. Dunham, a native of Venango County, Pennsylvania, born May 9, 1837. Her parents were John and Elizabeth Dunham, the former of whom was drowned in 1850. Her mother was married the second time to one Mr. G. Hall. Mr. and Mrs. B. finally settled in Pennsylvania and afterwards moved to Trumbull County, Ohio, living there during 1865. He then came to Atchison County, Missouri, and purchased his present farm, consisting of eighty acres of finely improved land. Mr. and Mrs. B. have five children living: Frank E., Charles O., Flora E., M.W. and John S. They have lost two: Flora D. and Effie M. Both Mr. and Mrs. B. are church members.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM BERTRAM, section 21, was born in Hanover, Germany, December 11, 1842. His father, Frederick G. Bertram, as was also his mother, formerly Dora Koon, was a native of Germany. William grew to manhood in his native country, spent his younger days in attending school and working at the blacksmith trade, in the shop of his father. When nineteen years of age he entered the regular German army, in which he remained six years. After being discharged in 1867, he emigrated to the United States and settled near the present site of Corning, Holt County, Missouri, where he engaged at his trade of blacksmith. He worked at this point three years, when he erected a shop at Corning, there carrying on the business some nine years. About this time, or in 1879, he disposed of this branch of industry and embarked in the hotel business at Corning. After conducting a good house for one year, in 1881 he purchased a farm in Dale Township, this county. His place contains 80 acres, all under cultivation, with a fair dwelling, etc. February 1, 1878, Mr. Bertram was married in Corning to Miss Emma Thiemann, daughter of Christopher and Mary Thiemann. She was born in Du Page County, Illinois, March 20, 1858. They have two children: Ada Mary, born August 9, 1879, and Henry A., born August 25, 1881. Mr. B. is independent in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

PROFESSOR DANIEL E. BIRD; Prominent in educational circles, highly respected as a citizen and at present head clerk in "The Main Line" at Graham, Missouri, is the gentleman whose name appears at the opening of this sketch. A gentleman of cordial and pleasing manners, an active worker in all matters pertaining to the development and advancement of the schools and town in which he resides, he is a man of whom any town might well be proud. Professor Bird is a native of Green township in Nodaway county, having been born March 6, 1873, a son of John L. and Rosanna (Murphy) Bird.
Jacob Bird, the grandfather of our subject, was one of the first settlers and prominent land holders of Nodaway county. John L. Bird was born in Kentucky, but was for many years a resident of Illinois, graduating at Lombard University. He came from Peoria county to Nodaway county, where he has been engaged in clerking and general merchandise business. Politically Mr. Bird is an ardent Democrat. He and his wife were raised under the old Presbyterian creed. Rosanna Murphy Bird, the mother of our subject, was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Daniel Murphy, who was of Irish extraction. Mrs. Bird' was reared and educated in her native state and removed to Nodaway county, Missouri, in 1868. She was the mother of eight children, four sons and four daughters, our subject being the third child of the family.
D. E. Bird, in early life, began to attend the schools of Nodaway county, and later became a student at the Maryville Seminary. He is now an under-graduate of the University of Columbia, Missouri, which he attended in 1897 and 1898. At the age of nineteen years he began teaching school, and has been engaged in this work ever since, also giving much time to the study of law. Professor Bird has followed in his father's belief, and is an active worker of the Democratic party, having been a delegate to county, senatorial and state conventions. He was an active and zealous worker even before attaining his majority. He is one of the best informed and greatest workers of the I. O. O. F. lodge, having held schools of instruction, and is recognized as authority on questions of law and the secret work of the I. O. O. F. He is a past grand of Comet Lodge, No, 284, of Quitman, being
the youngest man in his district at that time to receive that degree.
Professor Bird, by his close application to study, his untiring energy and efforts in the educational line, has won for himself a name which any older man might be glad to attain, and, as he is a young man has the prospects of a very rich and fruitful career.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

JOHN Y. BIRD, M.D., is a well-known medical practitioner, of Atchison County. His residence and its surroundings, which are most attractive, is located one mile south of Rock Port. Mr. B. is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Yeager) Bird, both natives of Virginia. There John was born, May 31, 1818. He was the second child in the family of twelve children, and when he was but six months old, his parents moved to Hardin County, Kentucky, where he was reared on a farm, there being educated. In 1840 he began the study of medicine, and in 1842 he came to Missouri, locating in Andrew County, where he completed his study with D.W. Peter, of Savannah. In 1846 he engaged in the practice of his profession, at Oregon, Holt County, Missouri, but one year later came to Atchison County and settled in Linden, where he was engaged in practicing till 1856, excepting in 1850-1, when he was in California. In 1856 Dr. Bird came to Rock Port, and in 1866, to his present location, where he has a farm of 227 acres, which is well improved and supplied with many varieties of fruit. From 1855 till 1860 he served as treasurer of Atchison County, having been appointed for the first year, and elected for the four succeeding years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity – also of the I.O.O.F. He was married October 29, 1849, to Mrs. Sarah Baird. Her maiden name was Sarah Stivers, and she was born in Adams County, Ohio, March, 1823. They have had six children, five of whom are living. Robert E., now practicing medicine in the Indian Territory, employed by the government, Albertine, Josephine (deceased), Eugene O., George and John L.
St.
Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE L. BISCHOF, of the firm of Bischof & Traub, dealers in hardware, stoves and tinware, was born in Germany, near Nuremburg, October 30, 1831. He was reared and educated in his native country, and when fourteen years of age he began working in the banking and commission business, which he continued till 1850. At that time he emigrated to America, landing at New York, and from there came to Atchison County, Missouri, where he was engaged in farming until 1861. After this he was for three years occupied in freighting across the plains. In 1864 he bought the Rock Port Mill, which he operated one year, after which he was engaged in farming till 1875. Mr. Bischof now has a valuable farm of forty acres adjoining the town, which is well improved, having upon it a fine orchard and vineyard. In 1875 he became a member of the present firm, and, in company with Mr. Traub, is doing a thriving business. Mr. B. was married in the year 1860 to Miss Philipine Helmer. She was born in Prussia, Germany, on June 20, 1843, and came to America in 1859. They have had nine children, seven of whom are now living: Philipina, born September 27, 1863; Theresa, born October 25, 1865; William, born May 27, 1868; Charles, born July 8, 1870; Mary, born November 28, 1872; Clara, born September 8, 1875, and Frank, born October 15, 1879. Mr. B. is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and his wife belong to the Lutheran Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE FAVOUR BIXBY, farmer, is the owner of 126 acres of land and resides on section 3. He was born in North Haverhill, Grafton County, New Hampshire, October 2, 1828. His father, George Bixby, born in Salem, Massachusetts, was a farmer by occupation, and his mother, formerly Sabina Morrill, was a native of New Chester, Massachusetts. George’s youth was spent at school and on a farm. In September, 1856, he moved to this state and county. He graduated from the institution at College Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio, and was school commissioner here in 1858-’59, and superintendent of schools from 1872 to 1875. He is a Republican in politics and religiously a Methodist. Mr. Bixby married Miss Bertha J. Hendrickson, daughter of Elza C. and Mary E. Hendrickson, September 29, 1868. They have three children: Elsie S., ten years old; Samuel M., five years old, and Charles Rutlege, three years old. In 1867 Mr. Bixby engaged in the dry goods business at Scott City, then a thriving village, with R.V. Muir. In 1858-’59 and ’60 he was engaged in teaching school. In 1872 he, as stated above, was elected superintendent of public schools and held this important position for four years. He taught his first school in the fall and winter of 1856-’57 in Atchison County at the Harmon & Fraisher’s school house, an old log cabin with puncheon floor, etc. This house, having no roof, he obtained a bolt of cotton cloth, sewed it together and nailed it over the cabin for a roof. At that time there were twelve organized districts in the county. He started a petition for and helped to secure the post office known as North Star, which was first located at William Fraisher’s, and was the assistant postmaster while his school lasted and Mr. Fraisher was the postmaster, and the second one in the Missouri Valley, while Squire Rich, of Sonora, was first, the office bearing his name. Mr. B. is one of the reliable men of the county, and is qualified for any position of trust or honor in the gift of the people of this county. He has a good home, is making farming his principal business, and keeps thoroughly posted on the current news of the day.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

C.E. BLAKE, of the firm of Van Pelt & Blake, editors of the Atchison County Mail, is the son of Daniel M. Blake, who was born in Litchfield County, Connecticut, February 20, 1807. When about ten years of age he moved with his parents to Tyringham, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, where he was married, July 14, 1832, to Miss Harriet E. Marsh. In 1843 he went to Monroe County, New York, living in Monroe and Wayne Counties till 1873, when he came to Atchison County, Missouri, where he has since resided. He had a family of nine children: William M., Homer F., deceased, Frances A., Charles R., George, Homer D., Henry S., Josephine, deceased, and C.E. Blake, editor of the Mail. Daniel M. Blake was a son of Brazella and Ruth Blake, both natives of Connecticut. Harriet E. Blake was born in Schenectady, New York, October 6, 1811, and when but one year old she accompanied her parents, William and Lydia Marsh, to Hartford, Connecticut. Her mother died when Harriet was under three years of age, and she made her home with different relatives in Connecticut and Massachusetts. C.E. Blake, whose name heads this sketch, was born in Wayne County, New York, November 7, 1854. He was reared on a farm in his native county, and was educated at the schools of Palmyra. In 1874 he came to Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri. He was for a few years engaged in working at the painter’s trade, but since July, 1879, he has owned a half interest in the office of the Atchison County Mail. He is a member of Rock Port Lodge No. 125, I.O.O.F. Mr. B. was united in marriage to Miss Orpha O. Ruland, February 4, 1880. They have one child, an infant. Mrs. Blake was born in Atchison County, Missouri, March 11, 1859. Her father, J.W. Ruland, was born in Carmichael, Green County, Pennsylvania, September 14, 1828. He was married May 15, 1853, to Miss Mary M. Dillon, who was born in Warren County, Missouri, July 5, 1832.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHRISTOPHER C. BLEVINS, is among the young men of worth and ability in Fairfax, who was born in the vicinity of Fairfax, August 19, 1859. Daniel M. Blevins, his father, was born in Jackson County, Missouri, and his mother, whose maiden name was Margaret C. Sandy, was a native of Indiana. Daniel Blevins, Sr., the grandfather of Christopher, was one of the pioneers of this county, and settled in Clark Township in 1840 on the same farm where C.C. was afterwards born. The subject of this sketch was reared as a farmer and received some advantages for acquiring a common school education. When sixteen years old he entered the High School at Rock Port, where he attended for two years. In September, 1877, he engaged in teaching, which profession he followed for eight months. He then went into the employ of J.J. Denny, at Milton, in the summer of 1878 as clerk and bookkeeper. In September, 1881, he accompanied his employer to Fairfax. Mr. Blevins is an excellent penman and bookkeeper besides being a practical druggist and pharmacist.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HERMAN LEANDER BOESENBERG, merchant, and dealer in agricultural implements, etc., was born in Cook County, Illinois, December 30, 1853. He received a good common school education, and graduated from Bryant & Stratton’s Commercial College of Chicago, in 1869. He worked at home until thirteen years old on his father’s farm, and at the age of seventeen he obtained a situation as clerk in a retail store in Chicago, where he remained until April, 1875. Mr. B. then came to this county, where he has since continued to reside. After clerking in a large store here several years, he started in business on his own account in 1878, which he continued until 1881, then forming a partnership with M. Giannini in April of that year. They have since been doing a prosperous business, and are having a good trade in the various kinds of agricultural implements. Mr. B. has also started a meat market. He married Miss Albertine Bettie White, daughter of Isaac Newton White, of this county, in 1877. They have two children, Alice and Hermie. He is a Republican in politics, and religiously was brought up a Lutheran. In his business enterprises, Mr. B. has relied upon his own efforts. Having obtained a good business education in youth, and having clerked with excellent business men, he naturally had to succeed. He is affable in his demeanor and a good salesman. His father is an old settler of Cook County, and one of its large and independent farmers.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler. CHRISTOPHER C. BLEVINS, is among the young men of worth and ability in Fairfax, who was born in the vicinity of Fairfax, August 19, 1859. Daniel M. Blevins, his father, was born in Jackson County, Missouri, and his mother, whose maiden name was Margaret C. Sandy, was a native of Indiana. Daniel Blevins, Sr., the grandfather of Christopher, was one of the pioneers of this county, and settled in Clark Township in 1840 on the same farm where C.C. was afterwards born. The subject of this sketch was reared as a farmer and received some advantages for acquiring a common school education. When sixteen years old he entered the High School at Rock Port, where he attended for two years. In September, 1877, he engaged in teaching, which profession he followed for eight months. He then went into the employ of J.J. Denny, at Milton, in the summer of 1878 as clerk and bookkeeper. In September, 1881, he accompanied his employer to Fairfax. Mr. Blevins is an excellent penman and bookkeeper besides being a practical druggist and pharmacist.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES C. BOTKIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 30, was born in Randolph County, Indiana, February 11, 1846. His parents were Peter and Elizabeth (Adamson) Botkin, the former a native of Knox County, Tennessee, and the latter of Indiana. James was brought up on a farm in his native county, and was educated in the common schools. In 1870 he came west, and after spending one season in Nodaway County, Missouri, engaged in farming, he removed to Atchison County in 1871, settling on his present farm in 1873, it then being nothing but prairie. He now owns eighty acres of valuable land, all improved, and has an orchard of 75 apple and 200 peach trees. January 1, 1871, Mr. Botkin was married in Randolph County, Indiana, to Miss Gertrude Payne, daughter of William F. Payne. She was born in Wayne County, Indiana, April 8, 1848. Mr. and Mrs. Botkin have two children (twins), Freddy and Edson, who were born January 20, 1875. One child is deceased.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

 JOHN W. BOTKIN was born on the 8th of August, 1839, and is a native of Randolph County, Indiana. He was the son of Peter and Elizabeth A. Botkin. His mother was born in Indiana and his father in Knoxville, Tennessee. John W. Botkin grew to manhood as a farmer and received a common school education. He has been twice married, first in his native county in December, 1865, to Miss Rebecca Mills, who departed this life in 1867. For three years during the war Mr. Botkin was in service. In 1861 he enlisted in Company D, Sixty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and was discharged in 1864, having participated in several engagements, among which were the battles of Richmond, Kentucky and Blakely, Alabama. After being discharged he returned to Randolph County, Indiana, and was there engaged in farming until 1870, when he moved west, settling in Holt County, near New Point. There he resided for some three years. December 26, 1872, Mr. B. was married in Holt County to his present wife, formerly Miss Mary Meyer, a daughter of John Meyer. She was born in Holt County, Missouri, November 12, 1852. They have one child, William L., born July 3, 1875. In the spring of 1874 Mr. B. came to Atchison County and located in section 41, township 64, range 38. He has a farm of 240 acres of land, all improved, and an orchard of 100 apple, 300 peach and other fruit trees. Mrs. Botkin is a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM A. BOWER, is a native of Howard County, Indiana, and was born May 22, 1848. His father, H.A. Bower, was born March 4, 1821, in Clarke County, Indiana, as was also his mother, whose maiden name was Catherine B. Allhands, the date of her birth being August 29, 1822. In 1849 the family moved to Mason County, Illinois, where they resided until 1865, then going to Des Moines County, Iowa. They remained in Iowa five years, and then, in 1870, removed to Wayne County, where they made their home until they came to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1872, settling in Clark Township. The youth of William A.B. was spent in the common schools, and he afterwards attended the Havanna High School. After leaving school he engaged in farming. He was married in Wayne County, Iowa, September 8, 1870, to Miss Mary E. Lewis, who was born in Mason County, Illinois, August 7, 1851. They have a family of four children: Norvil O., born November 11, 1871; Cora O., born September 1, 1873; Lloyd F., born November 3, 1875, and Floyd M., born February 29, 1877. Mr. B. has 120 acres of land, all improved, with a young orchard. He resides on section 35, township 64, range 40.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DR. RICHARD BUCKHAM, is the owner of 470 acres of land, his residence being on section 23. A history of this county would be incomplete and its pioneers would not be full represented should there not appear a short biographical sketch of the life of Rev. Richard Buckham, M.D. He was born in Sumner County, Tennessee, June 25, 1811. His father, Andrew Buckham, was born in Scotland, and his mother, whose maiden name was Charlotte Taylor, was from Maryland, but of Welsh parentage. While Richard was in his infancy they moved to Hopkins County, Kentucky, where he was brought up and received a good English education. In the spring of 1834 he came to Missouri, locating in this county in May, 1842. In 1838, while in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, he was ordained to preach in the Christian Church by Elder Collins. He studied medicine with a prominent physician of Union County, Kentucky, in 1838, and practiced this profession for many years, or until 1872, before receiving his diploma, when, on account of his long experience and being an able contributor to the medical journals, the Physic Medical Institute, of Cincinnati, Ohio, a regular medical college, awarded him a diploma, which has been well earned and worthily bestowed. In 1864 and 1870 he was elected to the state legislature, and it is said that his speeches are among the most practical and creditable on record. He was a Whig as long as that body constituted a party, after which he drifted into the Republican ranks. The doctor has been twice married. His first wife was Nancy White, from Boone County, Missouri, whom he married September 11, 1836. They had seven children, only two of whom are now living: Susan Ann, the wife of Colonel P.A. Thompson, and Lottie, who married Robert Hunter, of Rock Port. Dr. Robert Buckham, an excellent physician, died in this county May 29, 1879. Martha was married in 1868 to a Mr. Boley, and March 28, 1879, she died, leaving one child, Ena, a bright little girl, whom Dr. B. is bringing up. Mrs. Buckham died August 11, 1852. He was married the second time to Mrs. Julia Ann Gray Baird, July 24, 1853, and by this union they have had three daughters: Ida L. Joslin, Laura T.L. and Effie Everett. Mrs. B. by a former marriage had four children: Frances N., Martha Bell, George S. and Emma J., who married James Wade, of Phelps City. When they were united in marriage Dr. and Mrs. B. each had a son and three daughters about of an age, and these they brought up together, each one’s children always treating and regarding the others as their own brothers and sisters. As the doctor was absent from home much of his time engaged in practicing his profession, a good deal of responsibility rested upon his wife, who became an excellent manager, and instrumental to a certain degree in improving and making so valuable a place. In 1859 he bought his farm, which was then uncultivated prairie land, but now one of the most valuable farms in the county. Like many other persons, Dr. B. suffered much loss by the inundation of his land in the spring of 1881. His step-son is now working the farm, and together they are largely engaged in feeding and dealing in stock. The doctor has for many years been interested in raising and dealing in fine blooded stock, and much credit is due him for the interest he has manifested in that direction. During the Mexican War he enlisted in Captain Craig’s company of volunteers. They were kept at work making forts on the frontier and fighting Indians until the close of the conflict, having been out two years and for which he received an honorable discharge and a land warrant. Few men have experienced a much harder time in the early settlement of a country that did Dr. Buckham. He was the first physician in the county and as such rode many long and tedious miles with a reward of very poor pay. As a minister his salary was indeed small. He married the first four or five couples in this county, and it is indeed a rich treat to hear him relate his early experience here. He is a great reader and an honored member of society.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.


WILLIAM T. BUCKHAM, recorder of deeds of Atchison County, is the grandson of Andrew Buckham, who early emigrated from Scotland to America, and who afterwards located in Kentucky, where James Buckham, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born. He was married to Lucinda Davis, a native of Kentucky. William T. Buckham, their son, was born in Union County, Kentucky, December 22, 1846. In 1859 he came to Atchison County, Missouri, where he has since resided. He was reared on a farm and, in 1868, he embarked in the mercantile trade, which he continued till 1872, after which he was engaged in writing in the circuit and county clerk offices until the spring of 1875. He was then occupied in selling drugs, as one of the firm of W.T. Buckham & Co., continuing in this business till June, 1876, since which time he has been employed in the office of the circuit clerk, except during the summer of 1879, when he was in the mountains, visiting Leadville and other points of interest. He is a member of Rock Port Lodge No. 125, I.O.O.F. Mr. Buckham was married November 16, 1881, to Miss Ida B. McCallister, who was born in Atchison County, Missouri, August 1, 1862. Her father, John McCallister, was a native of Ohio. Her mother, whose maiden name was Jane Kirkwood, was also born in Ohio.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

THOMPSON BLACK was born February 8, 1833, and is a native of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. He is of Irish descent, his parents, Brice and Jane (Logan) Black, having been born in Ireland. In 1839 Thompson accompanied the family to Washington County, Pennsylvania, where they lived for twelve years, after which they moved to Lee County, Iowa, in 1851. That locality they made their home for five years, going thence to Page County, in 1856. Young Black was raised on the farm and attended the common schools in these different places. In 1877 he moved to Atchison County, Missouri, settling in Dale Township, where he now owns a farm, in section 15, township 63, range 39, of 400 acres of land, with an orchard of 600 apple, 200 peach, 75 cherry and other fruit trees, besides a vineyard of 100 grape vines. He is greatly interested in raising and feeding stock for the market. Mr. Black has been twice married; first in Page County, Iowa, January 24, 1861, to Harriet Margerum, who was born in Pennsylvania, in 1843, she being a daughter of David Margerum. She died May 12, 1868, leaving a family of four children: Nancy Jane, born February 1, 1862; Anson Monroe, born November 29, 1863; Ella May, born May 10, 1866; Thompson, born May 12, 1868. Mr. B. was again married February 18, 1869, to Miss Gizzella Margerum, also a daughter of David Margerum. She was born in Pennsylvania, December 12, 1845. By this union there are two children: Harry D., born February 17, 1870; Walter L., born December 24, 1872.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.


DR. R. S. BUCKHAM, is one of the oldest medical practitioners in Northwest Missouri. He is a native of Sumner County, Tennessee, and was born on the 6th day of September, 1809, and is the son of Andrew and Charlotte (Taylor) Buckham. His father was a native of Scotland and a carpenter and joiner by trade. While the subject of this sketch was very young, his parents removed to Kentucky, where his boyhood days were spent on a farm, which business he followed for some time in connection with dealing in grain. He selected the practice of medicine as a profession, and applied himself diligently to his studies in the science of the healing art, and after preparing himself thoroughly, in July, 1845, he came to this county, where he has since become so widely known, and whose presence and skill have gladdened the homes of many a pioneer settler of Atchison and adjoining counties in relieving the sufferings of their loved ones. His rides at first extended over a wide extent of country, but of late years he has confined himself to patrons in his immediate vicinity. Dr. Buckham was married in 1862, to Miss Irena M. Hall, a native of Illinois. They have two daughters: Highland Mary and Lucinda. They lost one daughter, Adaline.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

E. R. BUNN, farmer, section 10, is a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, and was born November 23, 1817, being a son of John and Rosana Bunn. They were born in New Jersey, and after their marriage moved to Ohio in 1812. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days and received a good education in his native state. He early learned the carpenters trade, at which he worked for forty-seven years. He was married March 1, 1842, to Miss Dorcas Cummin, a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, born in 1824. Her parents came from Pennsylvania to Ohio at an early day. Mr. and Mrs. B. subsequently settled in their native county, and there remained till 1863, when they went to Illinois, and in 1865 settled at Hamburg, Iowa. In 1869 they located at where they now reside. Their family consists of J.W., E.F., Ella R. and E.R. Bunn. Mr. B. is a Master Mason.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN E. BUSHER, farmer, section 5, is a native of Sangamon County, Illinois, was born October 12, 1848, and is a son of John and H. (Emmerson) Busher. The father was a native of Liverpool, England, and when at the age of nineteen years emigrated to America and settled in Virginia. He afterwards went to Sangamon County, Illinois, being a leather currier by trade. A few years later he entered the harness business, which he continued for fifty years. John’s mother was a native of Yorkshire, England, and with her parents she came to America, and settled in Sangamon County, Illinois, where she was married. She died in February, 1849. John E. Busher spent his boyhood days and received a good education in his native county. He worked at the harness trade for three years, and was in the employ of the Wabash Railway for some eight months. In October, 1873, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled at Hazel Grove, in Lincoln Township, where for a number of years he was the heaviest livestock shipper in Atchison County. Becoming tired of the business, he purchased a farm, and since then has devoted his time to agricultural pursuits. Mr. B. married Miss Sarah Webster, December 17, 1876. She was a daughter of Aaron and Octeve (Wright) Webster, the former a native of Oakland, Michigan, born in 1836, and her mother a native of Monroe County, Indiana. They were married in 1848, and in 1870 came to Atchison County, Missouri, locating at Hazel Grove. Mr. and Mrs. Busher have one child living, Mary, having lost three: J.L., Bertha and Jonathan. Mr. Busher is a Mason in good standing.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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