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Atchison County
Missouri


Biographies
" C "

ALEXANDER CALHOON, dealer in groceries and provisions, is proprietor of the pioneer business house of Tarkio. He was born in Holmes County, Ohio, on the 15th of May, 1840. His parents, George and Jane (Carr) Calhoon, were natives of Pennsylvania. Alexander spent his boyhood days on the farm and received the benefits of an education in the neighborhood schools. Arriving at maturity he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He came west in the spring of 1868 and settled at Clarinda, Page County, Iowa, where he engaged in the mercantile business. There he remained some twelve years. When Tarkio was laid off he came here and erected the first business house in town. He has a neat store, well filled with a well assorted stock of goods, and having had a long experience in the business understands it thoroughly. He has the patronage of a large circle of friends, and does a thriving trade.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM M. CALVERT, M.D., was born in Belmont County, Ohio, in March, 1832. In 1842 his father moved the family to Meigs County, where William spent his young days in school and at labor on the farm. In 1856 he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. E.M. Beam, of Athens County, Ohio, and was engaged in the practice of his profession until the breaking out of the war, when, in 1861, he enlisted in the Thirtieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with whom he remained until January, 1863. He then received an honorable discharge, on account of an injury received. He was on detached duty nearly all the time, connected with the medical and hospital department. He had eight brothers and four brothers-in-law, all in the service. His father, John Calvert, who was born in Pennsylvania, in 1797, died in Ohio in 1871. His mother, formerly Edith Beale, was also born in Pennsylvania, in 1802. She now lives in this county, with a son-in-law, Mr. Reaves. They had sixteen children, two of whom died in infancy. Rev. John P. was killed in the battle of Shiloh. He was First Sergeant and was shot while urging his men on to duty. After returning from the army, Mr. C. practiced for a while in Virginia. Then he returned to his native county in Ohio and was appointed county physician. In 1865 he came to Missouri and practiced for five years in Warren and Montgomery Counties. He subsequently went to Pike County, Illinois, where he had a large practice for eleven years. In 1878 he attended lectures at the St. Louis Medical College and was graduated from that institution. In October, 1881, he moved to this city and has succeeded in establishing a liberal patronage. Dr. Calvert married Miss Carrie Martin, of Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1870. They have one child, Cecil. The doctor is very kind and pleasant in his professional visits to the sick and is a successful practitioner.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HON. ARCHIBALD S. CAMPBELL, farmer, stock and grain dealer, was born in Greene County, East Tennessee, May 26, 1836, and was the son of Adam Peck and Susannah (McNeese) Campbell, both natives of East Tennessee. The subject of this sketch came to Missouri in 1857 and settled in this township, where he has grown to manhood with the growth of the county and has kept pace with its needs and requirements. He early bought 200 acres of land, had limited  means with which to start, but by good management has succeeded in adding, from time to time, to his original purchase, until he now has 490 acres, with excellent improvements, good residence, etc., one-half mile from Watson. The surrounding shrubbery, etc., make it one of the prettiest places to be found in the district. Mr. C. has for many years been among the leading politicians of the county and was honored by the people as being their representative in the State Legislature, in 1878. In the faithful discharge of his duties he not only reflected credit and honor upon himself, but upon his constituents. He was the author of the hog law, which has been so popular since in the state. He is now engaged in farming extensively, dealing in grain, buying and feeding stock, and is known as an honorable man, having the confidence of all. He is a Mason and a Democrat, and belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He married Miss Nancy Jones, daughter of William Jones, of Greene County, Tennessee. They have eight children living: Landin Wayne, Martha S., William T., Jacob Newton, Mary Helen, John B., Robert Archibald and Albert Brookins. James Douglas died when two years old. Mr. Campbell has endeavored to give his family good educational advantages. L.W. Campbell, of Rock Port, is his oldest son, and is a leading attorney in the county. His daughter, Susan, had the first organ bought in the county. She is a talented musician and a young lady of cultured refinement.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES A. CAMPBELL, section 26, was born in Virginia, on the 10th of October, 1828, and was the son of John D. and Hardenia (Blunt) Campbell, who were both Virginians by birth. In 1833 the family removed to Missouri and settled in Cooper County, where they lived for three years, going thence to Morgan County, in the spring of 1837. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, but had limited opportunities for acquiring an education. In the fall of 1849 he moved from Morgan to Atchison County and settled in Clark Township and for thirteen years has lived on his present place. Mr. C. is one of the leading farmers and stock feeders of this portion of the county and now owns 520 acres of land, all fenced, with good improvements and a young bearing orchard of 300 trees. He has some good graded stock and makes a specialty of handling and feeding cattle. He was married in this county, in February, 1859, to Miss Ann DeWitt, daughter of William DeWitt. They had by this union one daughter, Mary H., who was born February 1, 1860. Mrs. Campbell died in November, 1877. Mr. C. was again married May 14, 1878, to Mrs. Nancy Jane Marshall, who was born in Bates County, Missouri, September 1, 1842. They have one child, James A., born October 3, 1879. Mrs. Campbell has two children by a former marriage, Beulah, born September 13, 1869, and L.E. Marshall, born May 14, 1872. Mr. and Mrs. C. are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In the spring of 1852 Mr. C. took a trip to California, where he remained two years. With this exception he has been in the county for thirty-two years.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ROBERT A. CAMPBELL, agent for the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad, at Tarkio, was born in Williamson County, Illinois, April 25, 1845. His parents, David and Elizabeth (Haddin) Campbell were natives of Tennessee. Robert was the fourth in a family of five children. He spent his boyhood days on a farm, and received a preparatory education in the common schools. When sixteen years of age, he commenced to attend the Salem high school, of Salem, Illinois, but after remaining about two years he left the school-room for the field of battle. He enlisted in Company D, Eighty-Seventh Illinois Mounted Infantry, in the fall of 1862, and served three years. He was detailed for special service at division headquarters, holding the postion of chief clerk, serving with the Gulf department and with the Army of the Cumberland. During the summer of 1864 he was commissioned major, but he declined the position. At the close of the war he returned to Macon County, Illinois, and engaged in teaching for some five years. In 1870 he accepted the position of agent at Blue Mound, Macon County, Illinois, for the Wabash Railroad, filling this position for about six years. He then turned his attention to agricultural pursuits for two years. In the fall of 1878, Mr. C. came to Missouri, and in 1879 he accepted the position as agent at Nishnebotna, Atchison County, Missouri, for the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad. On the 7th of December, 1880, he came to Tarkio and took charge of the office at this point for the same company. He fills the position with credit to himself and all parties interested. He owns a neat residence and property in block 8. He is a member of Blue Mound Lodge No. 682, A.F. & A.M.; also of the I.O.O.F. of the same place. He is also a member of the Missouri Valley Cornet Band, mention of which is made in another part of this work. He also serves the city as one of its council. Mr. Campbell was married November 8, 1870, to Miss Ella A. Ryan, a native of Macon County, Illinois, and daughter of Captain Martin Ryan; she was born February 13, 1852. They have had two children: Jennie, deceased; Annie, born May 8, 1874. Mrs. Campbell is a member of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JUDGE WILLIAM CAMPTON, section 9, a representative citizen of this district, is a native of Dubuque, Iowa, where he was born May 21, 1838. His parents were James V. and Phebe Campton. The former was a native of Morgan County, Ohio, who, in 1836, went to Iowa, where he was married. Mrs. Campton was a native of Ohio, and went to Iowa with her parents. His father had the first blacksmith shop at Dubuque, Iowa. He died in 1845, and in 1848 William’s mother died also. The subject of this sketch took care of himself after he was ten years old, and when at the age of fifteen he went to live with J.J. Vanmeter, an uncle, in La Fayette County, Wisconsin. From the age of eighteen years till he was twenty, he attended school, and then devoted his time to farming. He was married November 13, 1861, to Mrs. Phebe A. Dyer, (maiden name was Cox), a native of Suffolk County, Long Island. She was born May 1, 1832, and is a daughter of Stephen and Mary (Hallock) Cox. In 1850 she moved with her parents to Iowa County, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. C. soon settled in Iowa County, and in 1867 moved to La Fayette County, Wisconsin, where he remained till 1869. He then returned to Iowa County. Leaving the family there, he went to Woodson County, Kansas, and purchased land. He went back for the family, and while on the road to Kansas concluded to locate in Atchison County, Missouri, where he now resides. His farm consists of 400 acres of well improved land. Mr. Campton was elected county judge in 1880. Their family consists of six children: Thomas J., William D., George C., Charles C., Fanny and Louise A. Judge C. is a Mason. His official duties he ever discharged with scrupulous care and fidelity, and to the satisfaction of all.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CLINTON B. CASLER, proprietor of the Clifton House, is among the pioneer business men of Tarkio. He was born October 13, 1842, in Tipton, Indiana. His father, James B. Casler, was born in Ohio, and his mother, whose maiden name was Eliza A. Fallis, was a native of Indiana. Clinton was the youngest of two children. When eleven years of age he accompanied his parents to Montgomery County, Ohio, and after remaining there some three years went to Macon County, Illinois. When President Lincoln issued his first call for troops in April, 1861, the subject of this sketch enlisted as private in Company H, Seventh Illinois Infantry, although hardly eighteen. After serving for ninety days he re-enlisted in the Fourth Iowa Cavalry, Company L, and served three years. He again re-enlisted at Vicksburg in 1864 and served until the close of the war, having risen to the position of first sergeant. He participated in the battles of Helena, Vicksburg, Fourteen Mile Creek, Jackson (Mississippi), Meridian, Guntown, Tupelo, Independence (Missouri), and helped drive Price from Missouri, Selma (Alabama), Columbus and Macon (Georgia), and Wilson’s Cavalry raid. At the close of the war Mr. Casler settled at Indianapolis. In 1866 he crossed the plains to Wyoming and spent one summer in that country. He then came to Atchison County and settled on a farm near Hemme’s Landing. In the spring of 1868 he, in partnership with Henry Hast, built the first house in Phelps City and opening therein a restaurant and billiard hall. In the spring of 1870 he took a trip through Texas, thence to Kansas City and finally located at St. Louis in the fall of 1871, where he engaged in the hotel business. In 1876 he went to Dakota Territory, thence to Ottawa, Illinois, resumed hotel keeping, and in the spring of 1878 he came west and settled at Corning, Holt County, Missouri. There he embarked in the grocery business, and also held the position of postmaster. In the fall of 1880 he came to Tarkio and bought the first lot sold in the town, on which he erected a shanty, the first building in town. That same year he built his present hotel. Mr. C. has had a long experience in the business and is well qualified for the position he occupies. He was married October 29, 1868, to Miss Elizabeth Haught, daughter of David Haught. She is a native of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, born August 7, 1848.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DANIEL CARMEAN, farmer and stock raiser, section 30, was born in Fayette County, Ohio, December 12, 1849. Daniel Carmean, his father, was a native of Maryland, and his mother’s maiden name was Jemima Hirl. Young Daniel was reared in Ohio, his youth being spent on a farm, and his education was such as the common schools afforded. He made his home in his native state until February, 1866, when he came to Missouri, and settled in La Fayette County, where he was engaged in farming for some four years. In the spring of 1871, he moved to Atchison County, and located in Dale Township, on his present farm, where he now owns a farm of 160 acres, improved and with a comfortable dwelling. His orchard contains 100 apple, 50 peach, and 50 cherry trees, besides other varieties and some small fruit. Mr. Carmean was married in Cass County, Missouri, January 5, 1873, to Miss Fannie Parks, daughter of William H. Parks. She was born in Tennessee, September 27, 1847, but was raised in La Fayette County, Missouri. They have one child, Maud May, who was born May 10, 1874. Mrs. Carmean is a member of the Baptist Church. Mr. C. is Republican in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES HENRY CARPENTER, farmer, section 16, was born in Virginia, September 29, 1833. He learned the carpenter’s trade in youth, which has been a portion of his life work. April 20, 1856, he came to Missouri and settled in Linden, Atchison County, where he made his home for several years, doing quite an extensive business in building, some of the best structures in this vicinity being specimens of his work. In 1860 he bought 120 acres of his present farm and made nearly all the present improvements, and has bought land adjoining from time to time until his is one of the celebrated farms of the county, having 450 acres of land. September 5, 1858, Mr. Carpenter married the accomplished Miss Mary L. Livingston, daughter of Valentine Livingston, of Rock Port, but formerly of Indiana. They have seven children living: Lucy Miller, William Preston, Lillie Bell, Mollie May, George Burt, Anna Bessie and Daisy Maud Muller. Mr. C. has an orchard of 450 choice fruit trees on ten acres of land. Special mention should be made of Mrs. C.’s cultivated taste in her flower and house plant department. Her endless variety of roses, with other rare flowers selected from Father Vick’s collection, together with her house plants, renders her garden and grounds a beautiful spot. Her daughters, too, are being educated to their mother’s tastes. Mr. C. is a member of the Christian Church, and in politics is a Democrat. In his farming operations he has been more than usually fortunate, and is ably qualified to fill any position to which he might be called, endowed as he is with the Jeffersonian qualifications, honesty and capability. He is a friend to all, and has many acquaintances. Before long he contemplates building a model dwelling.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ALBERT CASEY, section 35, was born in Nova Scotia, in August, 1836. His father, Edward Casey, came to Missouri and settled in this county near Phelps, in 1849. He bought a claim and improved a farm, and the boys although young, worked hard with their father to make a good home. Mrs. Casey was formerly Jeanette Hunter, a sister of Uncle Billy and Jimmy Hunter, who were among the oldest settlers here. They were married in Nova Scotia, in 1835, and had fifteen children, six now living: Albert, Levi, Lafayette, Miram, Annie, Mary (now Mrs. James M. Scammon). Hiram, a young man, was killed in a well. In 1868, Albert married Miss Lydia Tate, the daughter of Judge Samuel B. Tate, who was from Kentucky. He settled in the county in 1849. He married Miss Jane Sloan, in Kentucky; they had eleven children, six of whom are living: Cecelia, James and Samuel (twins), Charles, Mary, Margaret and Lydia. Mr. and Mrs. Casey have but one child: Don Guy, born June 19, 1871. Mr. Casey subsequently moved upon his farm of eighty acres, which he improved; it is easy to work and sure of a crop, and is situated on the old bed of the Missouri; very little of it washes. Mr. Casey is a general favorite with everybody and is candid and reliable. Fifty yards from his door is the landing, where the steamboats used to stop for wood, and now what was once the bed of the immense Missouri River, is a pasture for his stock. He enlisted in the Confederate army, State Guards, Second Regiment, during the war, and was with General Price for eleven months, when he entered the battery service. He remained until the close of the war. He lost an eye at the battle of Three Creeks, in Arkansas. He is a member of the M.E. Church, south, and is Democratic in his political views. In 1853, Mr. Casey went to California and was engaged for some time in the mines, and in herding cattle. This was his first trip from home and he experienced a severe time in the cold winter, while crossing the mountains.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

H.H. CAUDLE, a progressive farmer of this township, was born in Atchison County, Missouri, May 6, 1852, his parents being Hugh H. and Mary (Bailey) Caudle. His father was a native of Kentucky and his mother of Tennessee. After being married they came to Atchison County, in 1844, and settled in section 34. The subject of this sketch was raised in this county and commenced business for himself in 1876. He was married October 16, 1875, to Miss Thurza L. Gorden, a native of Iowa, born January 23, 1858. She was the daughter of David and Lydia Gorden. Mr. and Mrs. C. finally settled where they now reside, in section 19. They have a family of three children: Clarence, Sylvea and Pearl. Mr. Caudle’s farm consists of eighty acres of well improved land.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J.C.H. CHRISTIAN, farmer, section 34, a native of Newport Courthouse, Cocke County, Tennessee, was born March 30, 1838, being a son of T.E. and Mary A. (Doughty) Christian, who were natives of the same county. The father was born in 1801, and the mother in 1804. After their marriage they settled in that county, remaining there till March, 1852, when by wagon they moved to Atchison County, Missouri, and located some seven miles south of Rock Port. There they continued to reside until death. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days in Tennessee, and with his parents came to Missouri, and since then has devoted his time to farming. He was married February 5, 1857, to Miss Mary A. Tate, a native of Wayne County, Kentucky, born in 1842. Her parents were Samuel B. and Minerva (Slone) Tate, who were natives of Cocke County, Tennessee. They moved to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1851, where Mr. Tate was county judge for one term. After their marriage Mr. Christian and wife settled on a farm in the Missouri bottoms and remained till 1864, when they moved to where they now reside. Their family consisted of six children: Columbus A., C.F., Maggie M., Thomas J.T., S.L. and Jessie.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

G.W.E. CHAMBERLAIN, M.D., is a native of Heidleburg, Germany, and was born November 26, 1835. His grandfather, Charles J. Chamberlain, and his wife now live in the same town, he being 109 years of age, and the latter 108 years old. They have been married over seventy-five years, and have had a family of eleven children, all of whom are living. Their oldest child, Una, who has been but once married, now lives in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, and has had a family of twenty-five children, all of whom are living. The second child of Charles J. Chamberlain, was also named Charles J. He is the father of G.W.E. Chamberlain, and came to America in the spring of 1836, locating in the town of Somerset, Somerset County, Pennsylvania. He now lives in Ravenna, Portage County, Ohio, and follows the profession of medicine, having graduated from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, about the year 1852. He has been for several years one of the lecturers in the same institution. G.W.E. Chamberlain, whose name heads this sketch, was reared and educated in Pennsylvania and Ohio, having moved to Trumbull County, Ohio, when about seventeen years of age. In 1856, he began the study of medicine under the instruction of his father, and afterwards was engaged in practicing till the breaking out of the war, when he entered the Second Ohio Cavalry as hospital steward. He was transferred in the spring of 1863, to the Fourth Ohio Battery, as assistant surgeon, and was furloughed in the fall following. During the winter of 1863-4, he attended the medical department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and in the spring of 1864, he went to Washington, where he had charge of ward thirteen of Harwood Hospital till the close of the war. A short time afterwards he located in Farmington, Minnesota, where he was engaged in the practice of his profession till 1872, after which he was graduated from the College of Physician and Surgeons of Keokuk. In the spring of 1873, Dr. C. settled in Albany, Illinois, and in the spring of 1876, he came to Rock Port, where he has since been successfully engaged in the practice of his profession. He also has a partner, Joseph T. Caveny, a graduate from St. Joseph, who has been studying with him for five years. He is a member of North West Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., also of the S.K.A.O.U.W. Dr. Chamberlain was married June 18, 1861, to Miss Mary E. Johnson, of Ohio. She died in the year 1870. They had five children, two of whom are now living: Cozella C., born March 7, 1863, and Carver C., born December 31, 1866. He was again married July 4, 1873, to Miss Maggie M. Beaty, who was born in Clayton County, Iowa, September 6, 1852. They now have two children living: Austin W., born January 2, 1880, and Oscar M.C., born September 4, 1881.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ALEXANDER CHANCE, was born near Oregon, Holt County, Missouri, October 29, 1843, and is the son of William and Rosann (Record) Chance, the former of Missouri, and the latter a native of Indiana. The earlier days of Alexander were passed on a farm, his opportunities for acquiring an education being very limited. In August, 1862, when eighteen years of age, he enlisted in the First Missouri Cavalry of the Confederate army, and served until the close of the war, being in numerous important battles, among which were the engagements of Pea Ridge, Corinth, Grand Gulf, Champion’s Hill, Black River, Mississippi, and Atlanta. After the war Mr. C. returned to Holt County, and for seven years was engaged in farming. In 1872, he came to Atchison County, and settled here, though he has lived on his present farm but one year. He has 50 acres of land, improved and a small orchard, in section 34. Mr. Chance was married January 31, 1869, in Holt County, to Miss Matilda Taylor, daughter of Elves and Matilda Taylor. She was born in Holt County, January 1, 1850. Mr. and Mrs. C. have had four children, of whom two are living: Araminta, born March 23, 1870, and Ernest A., born May 4, 1871. The two deceased are, William A., born September 26, 1872, died April 5, 1873, and Edgar, born June 29, 1873, died August 22, 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Chance are members of the Baptist Church. He belongs to the A.O.U.W. fraternity. In his political preferences he is a Democrat.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ANTHONY C. CHRISTIAN,
was born in East Tennessee, May 2, 1822. Charles E. Christian, his father, and mother, formerly Miss Mary Ann Doughty, were born in Cocke County, Tennessee. In 1852, the family moved to Missouri, and located in Clark Township, Atchison County, being among the first settlers of the county. The subject of this sketch spent his youth on a farm, obtaining a limited education at the subscription schools. He was married in Tennessee in January, 1843, to Miss Sarah B. Walsh. Mr. Christian has four children by this marriage: Adaline E., (wife of David Murphy) born December 27, 1843; John W., born December 15, 1845; Elizabeth M., (wife of Wm. Edington) born September 13, 1848; Mary E., born April 20, 1852, and died April 5, 1875. Mrs. Christian died in Tennessee, August 15, 1862. Mr. Christian was again married in Tennessee, April 24, 1864, to Miss Martha J. Murphy, who was born in Carter County, Tennessee, August 15, 1841. In the spring of 1866, he settled in Clark Township. He moved upon his present farm in the spring of 1871, and now has 133 acres of land, with 90 acres improved, having a good house and small young bearing orchard. Mr. and Mrs. Christian have two children: Sarah A., born February 19, 1865; Gustus H., born April 21, 1872. He resides in section 27, township 64, range 40, and is one of the most enterprising farmers of the community.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN L. CHRISTIAN; The Atchison County World is the leading organ of the Democratic party of Atchison County, Missouri, and is ably managed and edited by John L. Christian, the subject of this sketch. This gentleman was born in this county December 28, 1855, a son of L. C. and Sarah E. (Golden) Christian, the former being one of the oldest and best known of the pioneers of the county, who came here in 1850. At that time this part of the state was yet filled with Indians and wild beasts. The grandfather of our subject, who had been a soldier in the Mexican war, came to Atchison County with nine sons and two daughters, and his death occurred at this place. L. C. Christian, the father of our subject, has held many of the important local offices, being elected county clerk in 1868 and is now the president of the asylum board. For thirty years he has been connected with the Masonic order. The family of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Christian consisted of ten children, of whom, John L., W. B., J. T., C. M. and two sisters, Laura and Allie, are the survivors. Our subject was reared and educated in Rockport, Missouri, and at the age of twenty he settled at Lost Grove, in this county, and engaged in the stock business, where he remained until 1888, when he came to Tark1o and began to buy and sell cattle for commission houses in St. Joseph and Kansas City, in the live stock business. He is considered an expert in judging stock. His employers, the Seigle & Saunders Stock Company, of Kansas City and St. Joseph, consider that he is second to none, in his line. This is a large firm, having a capital of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars.
Mr. Christian was married, in 1876, to Miss Martha Haffner, a daughter of L. M. Haffner, of this county, who resided here on a farm until the time of his death in 1888. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Christian,—Floyd, Hattie, Eveline, Minnie and Mary.
The esteem in which Mr. Christian is held by his party may be indicated by his popularity as a buyer of cattle and success of his paper, and he fully comes up to their expectations. He is a Democrat who takes an active interest in every issue by which his party may benefit, and wields a wide influence. Aside from politics, the Atchison County World is also a bright and acceptable paper, and is one which may be admitted to the family circle with profit to all readers. For the past five years Mr. Christian has been the representative of his section in county and state conventions. Socially he is connected with the K. of P. and Modern Woodmen, and possesses a heart as warm as his physical frame is large, and is one of the popular citizens of this part of Atchison County. He gives to charity with an instituted hand, and no one ever asked alms of him in vain, for out of his bountiful income he divides with the poor.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

LOUIS C. CHRISTIAN, dealer in general merchandise, was born in Cocke County, Tennessee, August 28, 1830. His father, Thomas E. Christian, was a native of Tennessee, and his ancestors were from Virginia. His mother, formerly Mary A. Doughty, was also a native of Tennessee, and her ancestors came from Maryland. Louis C. was the sixth child in a family of twelve children, and was reared on a farm in his native county. March 24, 1852, he started for Missouri, and located in Atchison County, on a farm, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits till 1874, when he was elected county clerk of Atchison County. This position he continued to fill very acceptably till January, 1879. He was justice of the peace from 1858 till 1863, and was county assessor from 1859 till 1860. In November, 1878, he began in his present business. Mr. Christian is a member of North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M., of the North West Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., of Rock Port Legion No. 12, S.K.A.O.U.W., and the Oriental Order of the Palm and Shell. He was married August 25, 1853, to Miss Sarah M. Golden, who was born in Howard County, Missouri, March 25, 1837. She died August 3, 1875. They had ten children, six of whom are now living: John L., William B., Laura A., James T., Lydia A. and Charles M. He was married again August 2, 1876, to Mrs. Charlotte E. Squire, whose maiden name was Longenecker. She was born in Richland County, Illinois, July 27, 1842. Her father, Levi Longenecker, was a native of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and his father of Germany. Her mother, whose maiden name was Anna Beckwith, was born in Elmira, New York. Mrs. Christian was principally reared in Kansas, having lived there from the time she was ten years of age, till the year 1869, when she came to Rock Port. She was previously married to Albert Squire, a native of Connecticut. By this marriage she has two children, Alice, now Mrs. L.W. Campbell, and Hattie A. Mr. and Mrs. Christian are members of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ROBERT E. CHRISTIAN, a leading man of this township, and one of the pioneers of the county, was born in Cocke County, East Tennessee, October 25, 1829, and was the son of Thomas E. and Mary Ann (Doughty) Christian, who were also natives of Tennessee. In 1852 the family moved to Missouri, locating in Atchison County, being among the early settlers of this county. Robert received a common school education, and grew to manhood on a farm. He was married in East Tennessee, January 9, 1861, to Miss Mary Jane Holdeway, daughter of William Holdeway. She was born in Cocke County, Tennessee. Mr. Christian settled on his present farm in 1868, and has since been engaged in farming, though he is also interested in the stock and grain business. He has eighty acres of land, all improved, upon which is a good dwelling and a young orchard, his place being located on section 3, township 63, range 41. His residence is at Nishnebotna Station. Mr. and Mrs. Christian have seven children – William T., born October 8, 1861; Sarah E., born in 1867; Olive Maud, born February 6, 1869; Wayne S., born September 21, 1871; Elmer E., born February 5, 1872; Flora N., born March 20, 1876; Lulie E., born February 5, 1882. Mrs. Christian is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. C. belongs to the I.O.O.F. fraternity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE N. CIES, a native of Bavaria, Germany, was born March 4, 1848, and is a son of John G. and Catherine Cies, who were also born in that country. In 1852 the family emigrated to the United States and landed at New Orleans in the summer of that year. A few days after John G. Cies and his wife both died of cholera. The subject of this sketch was taken and raised on a farm by one Thomas Bates, of Bureau County, Illinois, and was educated in the schools of that county, where he lived till 1869, when he came to Atchison County, Missouri, working by the month on a farm. He now has a farm of eighty acres, all improved, and a good orchard and dwelling, situated in section 9, township 64, range 39. Mr. Cies was married November 3, 1872, to Miss Eldora F. DeArmond, who was born in Ringgold County, Iowa, February 15, 1856, being a daughter of William and Leah DeArmond, of Atchison County, Missouri. They have four children: Herbert W., born January 14, 1874; Arthur, born April 6, 1876; Charles E., born December 22, 1877, and Leah Ann, born August 11, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Cies are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. C., politically is a Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

H. CLARK, farmer and stock raiser, section 27, was born May 10, 1831, in Trumbull County, Ohio. His father, Almon Clark, was a native of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, born May 15, 1800. His mother, Delaney Clark, nee Bowles, was a native of York County, Pennsylvania. Mr. Clark was the eldest of a family of nine children. He was reared on a farm in his native county, receiving a common school education. In 1863 he moved to Johnston County, Iowa, where he remained for two years, afterwards going to Linn County, in the same state. He came to Atchison County, Missouri, in the fall of 1871, and settled where he now resides, it then being all wild prairie land. He set about to improve a farm and now owns 560 acres, well improved, with a new residence, good out buildings, etc. He deals quite largely in stock, raising, buying and shipping large quantities. He at present holds the position of school director and road overseer. Mr. Clark was married June 12, 1870, to Miss Emma S. Shaum, daughter of John and Rebecca Shaum. She is a native of Northampton County, Pennsylvania, born in June, 1844. They have three children: Austa A., born May 15, 1871; Annie B., born March 17, 1873; Fred, born August 15, 1877. Mrs. C. is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

THOMAS CLARK, farmer and stock raiser, is the owner of 364 acres of land, his residence being on section 14. He was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, January 12, 1843. He received a good common school education, and then learned the tinner’s trade, at which he worked until 1862. He subsequently enlisted in the Eightieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was attached to the Second Division Fifteenth Army Corps. He was in all the hard fought and notable battles of the army of the Cumberland, and was with General Sherman in his march to the sea. He participated in the ever memorable battle at Bentonsville, North Carolina, the last one of the war, and was mustered out at Little Rock, Arkansas, receiving an honorable discharge. Mr. Clark soon returned home, and after visiting his friends he came to Missouri and bought one of the farms he now occupies, and which he has since improved. He married Miss Josephine Carms, only daughter of the late Judge James Carms, of Coshocton County, Ohio, December 25, 1862. They have six children: James Carms, Fannie, Luella, Olive, Samuel and Josiah. Mr. Clark has a beautiful place, his farm containing 190 acres. Mrs. Clark’s father, Judge James Carms, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1818, and in youth enjoyed good opportunities for attending the schools of those days. He early learned the blacksmith trade, and in 1849, he went to California, with stock, etc., and again in 1851 and 1853. On these trips he met with fair success. He was superintendent of the state canals for four years, and on account of his known ability and faithfulness, made a good officer. In 1861, he raised a company for the Eightieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was elected its lieutenant, and later was promoted to captain. His military record is one of the best. In 1844, he married Miss Frances Arnold, in Coshocton County, Ohio. She died in 1859, leaving one daughter, Josephine (now Mrs. Thomas Clark). He married for his second wife, Mrs. Sarah (Arnold) Macomber, sister of his first wife, in 1860. In October, 1865, in company with Mr. T. Clark and family, they came to Missouri and settled in this township on lands purchased by him the year previous. They improved these farms and erected as good buildings as any in the county. Mr. Carms taught the district school for two winters, and in 1866, he was elected county judge for six years, serving the county with marked ability. He was a Republican in politics, and supported the M.E. Church. He died April 24, 1876, lamented by all who knew him. Mrs. Carms died in November, 1878, after whose death the property came into the hands of Mrs. Clark, the only heir. She and her husband then moved into the large residence built and finished so richly, which they now occupy.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

HENRY H. CLAYTON, farmer and fruit grower, section 11, was born in Randolph County, Indiana, February 3, 1849, and in 1852 came with his father, Stephen Clayton, to Logan County, Illinois. In 1856 they removed to Missouri and settled in this county and township. Stephen Clayton bought 240 acres of land, which he improved, built substantial buildings and made a good home. He married Miss Elizabeth Ray, in Indiana, in 1847. They had five children: Henry H., John Robert, Stephen F., Charley McC. and Mary Jane. Mr. C. died in 1867 and his wife in 1872. In 1869, Henry moved onto his land, near Tarkio, and improved eighty acres, remaining there until after the death of his mother, when he sold out and returned home and took charge of the old farm. Here he continued to dwell until the children grew up, when Robert bought the most of the homestead. Henry then bought his present farm of 229 acres, where he has made large improvements, building a fine residence, barn, etc. On his farm was an orchard, set out by James White, of 2,000 trees of the choicest varieties of fruit. Mr. Clayton married Miss Louisa Spellebery, of Germany, but now of this county. They have three children: William Kinney, Paul Bert and an infant. In politics Mr. C. is a Republican. He has been a very successful farmer and spends much of his time in his orchard, the largest in the county. He sold, the past year, $1,500 worth of apples. In 1877 he went to the Black Hills, in the freighting business, and in 1879 to Salt Lake, entering into the stock business.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES W. COE, farmer, section 19, a native of Cayuga County, New York, was born January 17, 1842, and was a son of Curtis and Hannah (Clark) Coe. The former, also a native of Cayuga County, was born August 25, 1797. He died in 1875. Charles’ mother, who was born in Rhode Island in 1794, died April 10, 1872. They were married February 20, 1820, and afterwards settled in Livingston County, and in 1830, moved to Cayuga County, New York, where they passed the balance of their days. Charles W. was raised and educated in his native county, and in 1861, went to Stark County, Illinois. He married Miss Julia Bennett, May 26, 1862. She was a native of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, born March 14, 1842, and was a daughter of Thomas F. and Diana (Howard) Bennett. Her father was a native of Cayuga County, New York, born in 1815, but he was raised in Livingston County. He is now a resident of Atchison County. The mother of Mrs. Coe, who was born in Maine in 1814, died in 1852. They were married in September, 1836, and moved to Indiana in 1837, returning to New York in 1843. They went to Stark County, Illinois, in 1856, and came to Missouri in 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Coe subsequently settled in New York, and in 1866, came to Atchison County. They have three children living: Edwin, Frankie and Fred, having lost one, Howard.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MICHAEL S. COLLINS, a prominent farmer of this township, is a native of Missouri, having been born near Oregon, Holt County, May 10, 1846. His parents were James M. and Rebecca Collins, nee Stephenson, the latter of Indiana and the former a Kentuckian by birth. Michael S. Collins spent his youth on a farm and attended the common schools for two or three months during the year. In March, 1875, he moved to his place in Atchison County, Missouri. He owns 200 acres of land, in section 2, township 63, range 39, all under fence. His orchard contains 300 apple, 500 peach and a variety of other trees, with an abundance of small fruits. February 20, 1868, the marriage of Mr. Collins to Miss Milla Jane Oliver occurred in Holt County. She was born in Vermillion County, Illinois, July 9, 1843. They have five children: Charles U., born December 18, 1868; William Mason, born January 7, 1872; Gool F., born July 14, 1875; Marvin P., born February 5, 1877; Minnie Belle, born April 21, 1879. Charles U., the eldest son, died in 1871, when about two and a half years old. Mr. and Mrs. Collins are members of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HARMON COOPER, farmer, stock raiser, and feeder, section 21, was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, in Aurich, February 16, 1831. He was fortunate enough to receive an excellent education and was brought up on a farm. On November 10, 1854, he landed in New Orleans, and came up the Mississippi to Alton, Illinois, but soon settled in Springfield. He once started for California, but returned and commenced to work for $10 per month on a farm, where he remained for three years. He then entered a farm, which he continued to cultivate until the spring of 1870, when he came to this county and bought 200 acres of his present farm. Mr. C. at once went to work with a will and succeeded beyond his most sanguine hopes. He soon had a fine range for his stock and well improved fields for grain. In 1876 he erected one of the best residences in the county, which he furnished in beautiful style. His barn and other buildings are good, together with several dwellings for renters. In his prosperity he has added several good farms to his original purchase, so that he now owns 940 acres of land. He keeps 150 head of young stock in his pasture lots, and he generally feeds 200 head of cattle a season. He devotes some 300 acres to corn, besides other grain. Mr. Cooper was married in Illinois, January 21, 1858, to Miss Martha Harms. She is a daughter of John Harms, of Germany. They have four children living: John H., Heibe H., Thomas H. and Edward F. Four died in infancy. Matilda died at the age of twelve years, in June, 1879. Mr. C. came to this country a poor boy, and he now owes his prosperity and large accumulations to his industry and perseverance. He is a Democrat in his political faith, and was religiously brought up a Lutheran. He has always been one of the substantial political workingmen of the party, and has attended most of the state and county conventions, and has many times been urged to accept the position of county judge. He has certainly done his share towards furthering all things which would tend to promote the growth of the county.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

G. COOPER, farmer and stock raiser, is the owner of 770 acres of land, and resides in section 20. He was born in Aurich, Kingdom of Hanover, January 13, 1837, and in 1857 came to this country, settling in Illinois. He received a good education in Germany, which has been of great value to him in this country. In 1864 he removed to Nemaha County, Nebraska, bought 240 acres of land, and worked hard for four years, after which he returned and settled in this county and township. He improved a farm, where he lived until 1878, when he bought the place where he now resides. This, as it now is, constitutes one of the finest and most beautiful natural places to be found. He keeps a large number of cattle and feeds some 150 head every year. His farming is conducted on a large scale, and is well attended to. Mr. Cooper married Miss Rixte E. Harms, daughter of John O. Harms, March 14, 1861. They have eight children living – Thomas G., Tillie G., Harmon G., Eiliet G., Witje G., Heibe G., John G., and an infant. Lost four in infancy. Mr. C., like his one brother Harmon, came here a poor boy, and his success in everything which he has undertaken, is remarkable. His home farm and surroundings are among the best, and his desire is to enjoy them. In politics he is a Democrat, and religiously, a Lutheran. John O. Harms, his father-in-law, is a retired farmer, and has a farm of ninety acres on section 28. He was born in Germany, February 2, 1816. He emigrated to this country in 1857, settling in Illinois, and in 1876 came to this county, and bought a farm near his children, where he and his wife are enjoying their days with their family about them. He married Tilda Hobbs in Germany, in 1838. They have seven children living – Harmon, Martha, Terrixte, Witje, Franklin, John and Eiliet. Politically, he is a Democrat, and religiously a Lutheran. He has helped all his children to start in life, and has the satisfaction of seeing all of them doing well. He is a noble specimen of the true German character – honest and reliable in all his dealings.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

D.A. COLVIN, collector of Atchison County, is a native of New York, and was born in Chautauqua County, February 24, 1840. His father, Welcome Colvin, and his mother, whose maiden name was Elmira Munn, were also born in New York. In 1847 the family moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they lived six years, after which they became residents of Brookfield in the same state. Here D.A. Colvin was principally educated. In 1859 he came to Missouri and located at Hemme’s Landing, in Holt County, where he was engaged in clerking till the beginning of the war, being employed by F.M. Thompson and one other merchant. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in the Missouri State Militia for six months, after which he helped to recruit Company C, Fifth Missouri, and was made first lieutenant. He remained in service for about eighteen months and at the expiration of this time he helped to recruit another company for the Twelfth Missouri, but on account of his father’s death he was compelled to resign and stay at home for the support of his mother and family at Rock Port. In 1864 he went to the mountains, where he was engaged in various branches of business, mining, freighting, etc. In the summer of 1865 he was elected county recorder at Helena, Montana, and was the first recorder in that county. In 1867 he was located at Fort C.T. Smith, on the Big Horn River, where he was contracting for furnishing hay and wood for that post. In 1868 he returned to Atchison County, Missouri, and the same fall was elected sheriff and collector of the county, holding that office till 1872, when he began in the livery business. In connection with this he ran a transfer line between Rock Port and Phelps. He followed this business till the spring of 1882. He was elected to the office he now fills in the fall of 1880, and has discharged his duties in a most acceptable manner. Mr. Colvin was married February 22, 1872, to Miss Ella Bennett, a native of New York. She was born in March, 1848, and was educated in Mississippi and Illinois. Her father, Thomas F. Bennett, was a native of New York, as was also her mother, whose maiden name was Diana Howard. Mr. and Mrs. C. have one child: Welcome R.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ALFRED COPPAGE, farmer, section 4, was born in Scott County, Kentucky, in 1832. His father, Paton Coppage, was a native of Virginia, and his mother whose maiden name was Jane Barlow, was a Kentuckian by birth. Alfred came with his father to Brown County, Illinois, where they improved a farm and remained until 1866. Young Coppage then moved to Iowa, and one year later came to Missouri, and settled in this county, where he now resides, after renting farms for five years to make a good start. He has a farm of 160 acres, and is one of the most industrious and independent farmers in the township. He married Emeline Lynn, of Illinois, in 1858. Her father was Newton Lynn. Their children are Eliza Jane, now Mrs. A.T. Athen, Mary and Alice. Mr. C. belongs to the Christian Church (New Light) and is a Union Democrat. He has been very successful in all his undertakings, and is a man universally respected.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

D. M. COULTER, farmer, section 33, was born in Richland County, Ohio, March 31, 1823. His parents were David and L. Coulter, the former a native of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, and the mother of Bedford County, Pennsylvania. They were married in Richland County, Ohio, and afterwards settled in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, but soon returned to Richland County, Ohio. In 1825 Guernsey County, Ohio, became their home and thence to Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, in 1850. The father died March 15, 1882, in his eighty-seventh year, and the mother of D.M. died April 26, 1881, aged eighty-four. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days in Guernsey County, Ohio, and began life for himself in 1844. He taught school and farmed till the year 1849, when he was in the employ of the St. Louis marble works as collector in the Missouri Valley. In 1850 he settled at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. Mr. Coulter was married January 21, 1851, to Miss Sarah Bowman, a native of Virginia, born January 29, 1831, she being a daughter of James and Rachel Bowman. With her parents she moved to Indiana in 1833, and to Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, in 1847. Her mother died in 1848, aged thirty-eight years, and her father is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Coulter resided in Iowa about eight years, then moved to Plattsmouth, Nebraska. In 1863 he enlisted in Company E, Second regiment Nebraska Volunteer Cavalry, and served in Dakota. He was mustered out in December, 1863. He then settled in Holt County, Missouri, and remained till 1869, when he purchased his present farm and made all improvements. They have a family of eight children: Oscar B., Francis J., James M., Chase A., Howard M., Sarah N., Emma G. and Laura. They have lost three: Annie B., Ida R. and Garrett W. Mr. and Mrs. C. are both members of the Liberal League.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

S.R. COWICK, of the firm of Cowick & Robertson, editors and proprietors of the Tarkio Republican, is a native of Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, where he was born on the 4th day of August, 1850. John Cowick, his father, was born in the State of Pennsylvania, as was also his mother, whose maiden name was Hannah Bixler. When four years old, the subject of this sketch accompanied them to Monmouth, Illinois. There he was reared, receiving his education at Monmouth College. In March, 1881, he removed westward, and in November of that year, purchased the Tarkio Republican of Murphy & Simmons, taking as a partner Mr. J.R. Robertson. Since that time they have continued to publish an unusually lively and interesting sheet, and are deserving of a liberal patronage from the citizens of Tarkio, whose cause they so ably advocate. They also carry a stock of books and stationery. Mr. Cowick is a member of Atchison Lodge No. 220, A.O.U.W., in which he now holds the position of Past Master Workman. He also belongs to Warner Lodge No. 160, I.O.O.F., of Monmouth, Illinois. He was married March 13, 1875, to Miss Kate L. Travers, daughter of Jasper Travers. She was born in Newport, England, March 26, 1850. They have two children: Bessie T. and John.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GRANVILLE H. COX, farmer, section 36, was born in Grayson County, Virginia, November 29, 1822. His father, Samuel Cox, was also a native of Virginia, and his mother, formerly Susan Fender, was born in Ashe County, North Carolina. Granville Cox was brought up on a farm. He subsequently settled in Ashe County, North Carolina, and there married Nancy Cornelia Choat in 1843. Her father was Richard Choat, of Ashe County. They have eight children living: Martha Jane, Joshua Carter, Sarah Ann (now Mrs. S.S. Choat), Charity Lucinda (now Mrs. J. Smith), Susan (now Mrs. F. Johnson), Samuel, Fanny and Phoebe. Four died in infancy, Marion died in 1864 in Denver, aged eighteen, William Tolbert died in 1864, aged sixteen, and John C. died in 1879 when thirty years of age. In 1855 Mr. C. sold his farm in North Carolina and came to this county and bought the claim of his present farm, which consists of 252 acres, and upon it he has made beautiful and substantial improvements. He is a member of the M.E. Church South, and is a Democrat in politics. He is liberal in assisting to improve society, build churches, encourage the best schools and endeavors the make the world better for his having lived in it. Mrs. Cox died January 16, 1879, and in her death a great loss was sincerely felt by hosts of her former friends.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.


ANDREW CRAIG, farmer and stock raiser, section 12, is an enterprising citizen of this township. He was born January 7, 1840, in Delaware County, New York. His parents were of Scottish extraction, his father, Robert Craig, being a native of Glasgow, Scotland. His mother, Ellison (Oliver) Craig, was born in Albany, New York. Andrew spent his boyhood days among the mountains of his native county, and received fair educational advantages, attending at the Delhi and Andes Academies. He has given his attention to agricultural pursuits through life. In 1874, he moved to DeKalb County, Illinois, and remained there until 1878, being extensively engaged in farming and stock raising. He came to Rock Port in the spring of 1878, and after remaining one year, he moved to the place on which he now resides, in 1879. He owns 1,400 acres of land in this county, the home farm containing 400 acres of well improved land. He has a neat residence situated on an elevation, giving a fine view of Tarkio and surrounding country. He commenced life as a school teacher, and has risen to his present position by honesty, integrity and attention to business. Mr. Craig is a member of Rock Port Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., also of the Knights. He was married on the 16th of January, 1866, to Miss Elizabeth Swan, a native of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, daughter of Rev. Samuel Swan, a Presbyterian minister. She was born October 21, 1841. They have had eight children, five of whom are living: Lilly R., born November 22, 1869; Andrew, born May 10, 1871; Samuel, born June 1, 1873; Mabel, born September 6, 1875, and Robert, born July 19, 1878. Himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES O. CROSLY, was born in Clay County, Indiana, August 8, 1830. His father, Thomas C. Crosly, was a native of Ohio, in which state he was married to Miss Amelia Spencer, a native of Pennsylvania. In 1827 they moved to Indiana. James C. Crosly was reared in Clay and Vigo Counties, Indiana, and in 1849 he came to Missouri, locating in Mercer County. In 1851 he moved to Rock Port, and the same year he returned to Ohio, where he was married August 16, 1852, to Miss Lydia Prickett. Since 1853 Mr. Crosly has lived in Rock Port and its vicinity, and has been principally engaged in the milling business, at which he is now occupied. Previous to this, however, he was interested in farming, at which occupation he was reared. In 1871 he started a lumber yard in Rock Port, which he continued one year. Mrs. C. was born in Clermont County, Ohio, in August, 1837. Her parents, Elias and Maria E. (Clark) Prickett, were natives of Ohio. The family of Mr. and Mrs. C. consists of six children – Thomas, William, Maria, Mary B., Fannie and Rena.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DR. WILLIAM CUNNINGTON, proprietor of the only exclusive dentistry establishment in the city of Rock Port, is one who is well worthy of representation in a public work. He is a native of County Peal, Canada, and was born November 25, 1844. His father, William Cunnington, was a native of England, and his mother, formerly Elizabeth Ceasar, was born in Ireland. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated at his native home. In 1866 he began the study of dentistry, and this profession he followed, in Canada, till 1869, after which he was engaged in the same calling, over the state of Iowa, till the spring of 1877. At that time Mr. C. came from Dallas Center, Dallas County, of that state, to Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri, and has been a citizen of this place. He has labored steadily in his profession and is deserving of much credit, being a skillful and careful dentist, always giving satisfaction. He is a member of North West Lodge No. 134, of the A.O.U.W. fraternity. He was married August 16, 1870, to Miss Mary E. Miller, who was born in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1853. Her father, Samuel Miller, was a native of Union County, Pennsylvania, and her mother, whose maiden name was Fannie Mack, was from Indiana County, Pennsylvania. The doctor’s family consists of four children: John N., Elizabeth F., Ella B. and Pearl M. Mr. and Mrs. C. are members of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

THOMAS CULLIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 21, is the son of Edward and Catharine (Sinnott) Cullin, the latter of whom, a native of Ireland, died in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1862. Thomas was born in Wexford, Ireland, in April, 1837, and at the age of twelve years he came to this country with his father, settling in Ohio. When Thomas was eighteen years old he started in life for himself. He first went to Kansas and Colorado, and then to the western part of Nebraska, where he raised stock and cut hay on a ranch, remaining there until 1865, when he came to this county and bought his present farm of 345 acres. He married Miss Elizabeth Proudfit, in Nebraska, in 1863. She was the daughter of Elias Proudfit, of this township. They have four children: Nettie, Emma, Mabel and Kate. Two children, Perry and Elias, died in infancy. Mr. C. is a well-posted Greenbacker and takes a leading part in promoting the interests of this county. He was raised a Catholic. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity. By his own indomitable courage and good judgment he has succeeded in obtaining a good farm, on which he soon expects to build one of the best residences of this county. In 1881 he fed 136 hogs, several car loads of stock, and raises annually from 125 to 200 acres of corn. His father is still living in Cleveland.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ISAAC N. CURRY, section 18, was one of the early settlers, and has long been numbered among the prominent men of this township. He was born in Monroe County, West Virginia, August 21, 1827, his parents James and Elizabeth N. Curry, both being natives of the same locality. Isaac was reared in Greenbrier County, his youth being spent on a farm and in attending the subscription schools. He subsequently entered the High School at Blue Sulphur Springs. On the 1st of September, 1853, occurred the marriage of Mr. Curry to Miss Mary K. Youel, a daughter of James G.W. Youel. She was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, April 30, 1849. Mr. and Mrs. C. have a family of five children: J.A. Youel, born January 16, 1857; Walter W., born August 23, 1858; Ida H. (wife of S.P. Jewell, of Fairfax), born August 23, 1860; Lillie N., born May 19, 1862, and I. Houston, born August 20, 1863. Mr. Curry has one adopted son, A. Wallace Crawford, who was born January 16, 1858. In 1856 the subject of this brief narrative removed from Virginia to Missouri and located in Atchison County. He was one of the pioneers in this portion of the country, and now has in his possession 200 acres of land, all fenced and improved, and with a good orchard. Mr. and Mrs. Curry are members of the Presbyterian Church, South.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM N. CURRY,
was born in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, August 16, 1838. James Curry, his father, and his mother, formerly Ruth Anderson, were both born in Virginia; the former died in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, May 8, 1880, in the eighty-first year of his age. William was brought up a farmer and was educated in the common subscription schools. In 1861, he entered into the Confederate army, enlisting in the Third Virginia Infantry. After serving in the regiment one year, he became a member of the Sixtieth Virginia Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He participated in numerous important engagements, among which were Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor, Frazier’s Farm, Malvern Hill, Cedar Mountain, Piedmont and others. After the war he returned to Greenbrier County, and until 1868, was engaged in farming and carpentering, at the expiration of which period he came to Missouri, locating in Tarkio Township, Atchison County, in 1870, and on his present farm in section 23, in the spring of 1872. Mr. C. owns 160 acres of land in his home place, all improved, and upon it is a fair residence and young orchard of 200 apple trees, besides other varieties of fruit. He was married in Greenbrier County, Virginia, February 2, 1870, to Miss Julia M. Bright, daughter of Jesse and Margaret Bright. She was born in that county, February 20, 1848. They have five children: Arthur Lee, born November 20, 1870; Maggie Ruth, born September 30, 1873; Jennie May, born January 12, 1875; James Bright, born November 8, 1879, and Thomas Henry, born April 8, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Curry are members of the Old School Presbyterian Church. Mr. Curry has upon his place some fine thoroughbred short horn cattle, and is greatly interested in handling and feeding stock.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J.C. CULBERTSON is an extensive dealer in pine lumber, doors, blinds, sash, etc., at Tarkio. Among the pioneer business men of this thriving town stands the subject of this sketch. He was born on the 17th of May, 1850, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. His parents, Joseph C. and Martha A. (Waugh) Culbertson, were both natives of Pennsylvania. The father died when J.C. was about two years old. His mother moved to Blairsville, Pennsylvania, where he was principally raised and received a good business education. In 1863 he came to Missouri and settled near Rosendale, Andrew County. In February, 1870, he went to California, engaging in teaching, and after remaining there one year he returned to Missouri and settled in Atchison County. Here he was occupied in farming some nine years. In November, 1880, he came to Tarkio and commenced the lumber business at this point. He carries a large and complete stock, and many of the buildings erected in this vicinity came from his yard. He is an enterprising business man, and holds the respect and esteem of a large circle of friends.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

AMON CURFMAN, of the firm of Curfman & Co., dealers in hardware, stoves, tinware, queensware, agricultural implements, barbed wire, etc., was born October 1, 1847, in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. His parents, Christian and Margaret (Garrett) Curfman, were natives of the same place. Amon accompanied them to Jefferson County, Iowa, in 1851, and remained there until the fall of 1869, engaged in farming. After receiving a preparatory education in the common school he attended Fairfield College four terms, and afterwards entered the Iowa Wesleyan University, of Mount Pleasant, Iowa. August 5, 1867, he commenced to learn the tinner’s trade, at Fairfield, Iowa, where he worked for two years, then going to Maryville, Nodaway County, Missouri, in October, 1869. He resumed work at his trade there, with his brother and Mr. Shaum, until the spring of 1881. On May 1, of that year, he came to Tarkio, and started his present business, his brother and Mr. Shaum owning a share in the store. His business room is 24 x 50 feet, besides a tin shop and wareroom. This is the only exclusive hardware establishment in the city. Mr. Curfman filled the position of town trustee in 1881. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was married August 15, 1871, to Miss Mary Ramsey, daughter of Meringo and Elizabeth Ramsey, of Fairfield, Iowa. She is a native of that place and was born July 21, 1852. They have been blessed with three children: Edith, born May 21, 1872; Nellie, born February 8, 1877; Effie, born October 14, 1880. Himself and wife are active members of the M.E. Church. He is a staunch Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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