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Atchison County
Missouri


Biographies
" G "


BENJAMIN FRANKLIN GARST,
farmer, etc., section 11, is the owner of 300 acres of land. He was born in Washington County, Tennessee, April 3, 1847. He was deprived of school opportunities when young, but by self-application has become one of the most posted men in the neighborhood. He came to this county with his brother Fred in 1860, and in 1864 and 1865 they went to Wyoming, where, by hard work, he secured sufficient money to enable him to make a start. They returned to this county and township, where they bought their first land, which they improved. Mr. Garst has been one of the most fortunate young farmers in the township. His additions, from time to time, with most excellent improvements upon them, together with his dwelling and surroundings, renders his place one of the most desirable. He married Miss Arminta Hackett, September 10, 1868. She is the daughter of S.H. Hackett. They have four children: William Tell, John Barton, Josephine and Jesse Oden. Mr. Garst, on commencing business life, rented a farm, secured a crop of corn, which he husked and cribbed, but it was set on fire and burned up by an incendiary. This left him in debt for the rent, but since that time his success has been remarkable. He is a Democrat and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

FREDERICK GARST,
farmer, section 11, is the owner of a farm of 550 acres. He was born in Virginia, January 4, 1830. His father, Frederick Garst, was a native of Pennsylvania, and was a farmer by occupation. His mother Sarah Garst, nee France, was a Virginian by birth. Fred spent his early life in Tennessee. He came to this state and county in 1860. He married Miss Mahala Adaline Miller, November 27, 1854. She was the daughter of Charles Martin Miller. They have six children: Charles Martin (who married Bell Hall), Frederick Melvin, Rueben Arnold, George Washington, Mary Jane and Frances Ella. Mr. G. went in debt for his first eighty acres of land, had bad luck, was sold out of house and home, and was obliged to again commence entirely new, with a family of six children to support. Determined to succeed, he bought another piece of land, went to work, and by economy and good management was fortunate to obtain enough to pay for his first purchase. He bought more land from year to year, until now he has a splendid farm, well improved, with one of the most desirable residences of the town, a large, excellent barn and many outbuildings. Though his educational advantages were much neglected, Mr. G. now ranks as one of the solid farmers of the county, and is a man universally respected. Politically he is a Democrat, and in his religious preferences a Dunkard.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

PETER GARST,
farmer and stock raiser, section 35, was born in Roanoke County, Virginia, in October, 1837, and when two years old his father moved to Tennessee, where he grew up. He came here in 1858 and bought a claim on school land. In 1862 he took a trip to Idaho, remaining there for three years, mining, etc. He returned with money enough to pay the interest on the land, and went to work with his brother John improving the 160 acres which they had bought. The first learned the carpenter’s trade, and worked at it for two years. Selling his school land to his brother John, he bought the farm he now occupies in 1875, containing 180 acres. He worked several years at his trade and built many of the best residences and business blocks in and about Watson. Mr. Garst married Miss Malinda J. McNeal in 1866. They had two children only, one of whom is now living, Frances Edna. Mrs. Garst died in March, 1872. For his second wife he married Miss Cordelia H. Morrow, daughter of Thomas N. Morrow, of Watson, in September, 1876. They have by this happy union three children: George, Luther and Lora. Mr. G. has a well located farm a short distance from Watson, and with his brothers, is one of the substantial farmers of the county. In politics he is a Democrat, and in religion a Dunkard.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DANIEL GERMANN,
farmer, section 4, was born in Switzerland, in November, 1820. While in his native country he worked in a slate mine. In August, 1840, he came to this continent and settled in Princeton, Canada, where he learned the chair and furniture business. After remaining there some three years he moved to Columbiana County, Ohio, built a shop and worked at his trade for two years. He there also learned the millwright trade and followed that occupation for several years. In 1851 he bought a saw mill in Whitley County, Indiana, and worked it for five years. He then went to Hillsdale County, Michigan, erected a saw mill, which he operated until 1858, when he sold out. He returned to Whitley County, and in 1862 he enlisted in the army, joining the One Hundredth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. At the battle of Mission Ridge, in the fall of 1863, he lost his left arm, and in the battle the steel clasp of his money purse saved a severe wound in the thigh, and a spent ball hit the other lower limb. His arm was amputated and he now receives a pension. He obtained an honorable discharge at Indianapolis at the close of the war. In 1868 Mr. G. moved to Grant County, Wisconsin, and partially improved 120 acres of land. In 1872 he sold out and moved to Missouri and settled in this county, where he bought his farm of 120 acres and has made a fine place. He is a Republican in politics and religiously a Baptist. He was married in Whitley County, Indiana, to Elizabeth Graves on April 19, 1855. There are five children living by this union: Edmond, James Walter, Ester Ellen, Daniel Grant and Elizabeth. Three children, William T., Susanna L. and Frank Ellsworth are dead. Mrs. Germann died February 24, 1876. Mr. G. is giving much attention to the raising of the Catalpa tree, said to be the best for growth, groves and for fence posts.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J.B. GIBSON,
farmer, section 15, is a native of Ontario County, New York, was born in 1831, and is a son of Benjamin and Mary (Chattin) Gibson, who were born and raised in New Jersey. Some time after being married, they settled in Ontario County, New York, and in 1837, moved to New Jersey, where the subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days, and received a good education. In the summer of 1856, he went to Des Moines, remaining there till March, 1857, when he visited Nebraska. In February, 1863, he enlisted in the Second Regiment, Nebraska Volunteer Cavalry, and served in Dakota till December, 1864. He was engaged in the milling business at Otoe, Nebraska, till the fall of 1866, after which he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and purchased his present farm consisting of 240 acres of well improved land. June 11, 1866, Mr. Gibson was married to Miss Hannah M. Benedict, a native of Venango County, Pennsylvania, born July 26, 1847. She with her parents came to Atchison County, in 1858. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson are both members of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN S. GIBSON,
was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, November 17, 1850, his parents, Stewart and Mary (Bell) Gibson, also having been natives of that state. The latter died when John S. was but four years of age. In 1853, the family moved to Decatur County, Indiana, where they lived for about six years, after which Davis County, Iowa, became their home, in 1859. Young Gibson was raised on a farm, his educational advantages being very limited. He was a resident of the state of Iowa until 1867, when he went to Morgan County, Illinois, there engaging in farming and handling stock. He remained there about nine years, and in 1875 moved to Buchanan County, Missouri, there resuming farming and the stock business, which he continued till the spring of 1879, when he came to this county and settled in Dale Township. Mr. Gibson now owns 83 acres of land, improved, with a comfortable dwelling, located in section 4, and a young orchard. June 5, 1873, his marriage to Miss Ella E. Corington, daughter of James C. and Mary Corington, occurred in Buchanan County, Missouri. She was born in Morgan County, Illinois, October 3, 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson have three children: Luella, born March 29, 1874; Emma Isadora, born October 11, 1876, and Mary Inez, born February 3, 1880. Mr. Gibson is a member of the Odd Fellows order. In his political preferences he is a Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOEL W. GILSON,
farmer and stock raiser, section 27, was born on the 26th of March, 1830, in Allegany County, New York, and was a son of George and Jerusha Gilson, who were old settlers of New York State. They moved to Brown County, Ohio, in 1837, and there Joel was reared to manhood on a farm and received a common school education. In 1848 he moved to Tazewell County, Illinois, where he engaged in farming. During the late war he espoused the Union cause and twice volunteered his services but was not considered able to do military duty. He came west in the spring of 1869 and settled where he now resides, the county then being thinly populated, with his nearest neighbor two miles distant. He now owns 280 acres of well improved land and has a fine grove of twenty-three acres, two good orchards, a comfortable residence and a good barn. He has filled the position of school director some nine years. Mr. Gilson was married June 5, 1851, to Miss Nancy A. McCalla, a native of Brown County, Ohio, daughter of James and Hannah McCalla. She was born January 17, 1823. He and his wife are members of the M.E. Church. They raised two children, who are now deceased, and they are raising two grandchildren: Willie Wolf, aged ten and Annie Wolf, aged seven years.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MYRON A. GILLETT,
section 9, was born September 2, 1826, and is a native of Hartford County, Connecticut, as were also his parents, Almond and Laura (Adams) Gillett. His grandfather Gillett was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and for his services drew a pension. Myron grew to manhood on the farm, and for a few months in the year attended the district school. In 1848, he went to New Jersey, where he spent about three years, part of the time being engaged in teaching. He also followed the water as a coaster. After leaving that state he moved to Indiana, and there learned the trade of millwright, remaining there and in Ohio for five years, working at his trade. After this he located in Galena, Illinois, in the spring of 1856. For two years Mr. Gillett’s time was occupied there and in Wisconsin in carpentering, saw milling and farming. Coming to Missouri in 1868, he settled in Daviess County, on a farm where he resided for ten years, after which he came to Atchison County. He has since lived on his place in this township, and now owns 160 acres of land, all fenced, and his orchard contains 100 apple, 100 peach and other fruit trees. December 29, 1858, Mr. Gillett was married at Galena, Illinois, to Miss Ellen Cutler, daughter of Simon Cutler. She was born in Windham County, Connecticut, April 24, 1839. Mr. and Mrs. G. have two children: Alva B., born August 11, 1861, and Stella D., born January 6, 1865. Mrs. Gillett is a member of the Baptist Church, and her husband of the Methodist Church. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity. Politically he is a Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES C. GOLDEN,
dealer in harness and saddles, is an industrious business man of Tarkio. He was born February 5, 1851, in Atchison County, Missouri. His parents, J.W. and Martha A. (Stone) Golden, were natives of Virginia, and were among the pioneers of Atchison County. James C. was the fourth in a family of thirteen children. He was reared on the frontier, spent his boyhood days on the farm, and received the benefits of a common school education. In 1869, he moved to Rock Port and engaged in the livery business with his father, but after continuing this some five years, he moved back on a farm. In 1875, he went to Hamburg, Iowa, and remained there some six years. Coming to Tarkio in April, 1881, he opened a restaurant, which he conducted for about six months, and on August 23, 1881, he purchased the harness shop which he now owns. He carries a good assortment and has done a flourishing business. He is a member of Tarkio Lodge No. 220, A.O.U.W. Mr. Golden was married February 22, 1872, to Miss Lydia M. Van Leuven, a daughter of William M. and Anna E. Van Leuven. She is a native of Illinois. They have one child living, Josie, born February 16, 1880. Four are deceased. Mrs. Golden is a member of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ANDREW JACKSON GOOD, farmer and stock raiser, is the owner of 245 acres of land, his home being on section 15. He was born in Washington County, Tennessee, in March, 1847, and in 1857 came to Missouri, with his father, who settled in this county. He grew up at home, helping his father to improve a beautiful farm. He married Miss Minnie Noble, November 9, 1872. She was the daughter of Frederick Noble, of Nebraska, and died in Texas in 1877. There are by this union two children living, Susan Pearl and Charles Winfred. Joseph C. died when three years old. Mr. Good commenced life with forty acres of land, given him by his father. To this he has added, from time to time, until he is one of the large farmers of the county. He has a fine residence, barns and other improvements. He is a Democrat in politics and religiously a Cumberland Presbyterian. Few young farmers stand higher in society than Mr. Good. His home and surroundings show culture and taste. The senior Good gave each of his sons forty acres of land, which they are all improving and to which they are continually adding.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN GOOD,
deceased, was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, in January, 1812. His wife was Susanna Harmon, of East Tennessee, born October 30, 1816, and whom he married July 25, 1833. He came to Missouri in 1854, and settled at Sonora, but very soon bought 300 acres of land on the Tarkio, entrusted a supposed friend to $1,100 in notes and money to build and make certain improvements, etc., but the title was defective, and the friend, who proved to be a rogue, ran away with the money and sold the notes to innocent parties. In after years, Mr. G. had the notes to pay, thus beginning in the world anew and in debt. He bought eighty acres of his old farm, moved a shop from Sonora upon it for a house, in which he lived for many years. He and his noble wife both worked hard, were blessed with good success, and in a few years he added to his farm, and became one of the most successful farmers in the county, owning 340 acres at the time of his death. They had fourteen children: Marion, McDaniel, Adam H., Andrew Jackson, Elbert, Charles Montgomery, Salina (Mrs. B. Plasters), Amanda (Mrs. N.H. Morgan), Phoebe (Mrs. Lott Watts), Sarena E. (Mrs. George Bowers). Two died in infancy. Mr. Good died April 23, 1878. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a Democrat in politics. Few men have left a better family of intelligent, industrious children, or a more honorable name.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MARION MC DONALD GOOD, farmer and dealer in stock and grain, is the owner of ninety-three acres of beautiful and finely cultivated land on section 3, adjoining the town of Watson. He was born in Washington County, Tennessee, March 2, 1840. He had a common education, and was raised a farmer. In 1856, he came with his father to Missouri, and settled north of Watson, where he improved a good farm, and in 1879, the father died. In 1867, Marion bought the farm he now occupies, which at that time included the village of Watson and the railroad grounds, and contained 134 acres. After the railroad was located, he sold the village plat to a company, of which he held one-quarter of the stock. Mr. James McNeal bought of Mr. Good one-half of the railroad plat, and presented it to the railroad company. In 1870, Mr. G. built an excellent residence on his place, and made other valuable improvements. His yard, shade trees, shrubbery, etc., all show culture and good taste. He married Miss Elizabeth Brainard, August 30, 1867. She is the daughter of Sylvester Brainard, Esq., of Cass County, Illinois. They have two children: Willie Henry, born October 27, 1868; John, born February 3, 1874. He is a Republican in politics, and religiously a Cumberland Presbyterian. In 1862, he joined the Thirty-fifth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, Company E, and after serving five months, he was mustered out on account of disability, receiving an honorable discharge. Mr. Good is liberal in his gifts to the needy, and as a farmer is above the ordinary, having been taught by his father, who has been considered by many to be one of the most successful agriculturists in the county.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

REUBEN P. GORMAN,
section 7, was born in Wyandot County, Ohio, December 7, 1843. His father, John Gorman, and his mother, formerly Margaret Alden, were also natives of Ohio. The youth of Reuben P. was passed on a farm, his education being received in the common schools. During the war he enlisted in the summer of 1864 in the Seventy-eighth Ohio Infantry, and joined Sherman at Marietta, Georgia, remaining with his army till the close of the war. After being discharged, he returned to Ohio, where he continued to reside until 1866, when he came west and settled near Sharp’s Grove in Holt County, Missouri. He was occupied in farming and handling stock in that vicinity until the fall of 1869, when he settled on his present place in Atchison County. He owns 240 acres of land, all improved, with a good orchard of 300 apple, 200 peach and other varieties of fruit trees. He is principally engaged in raising and feeding stock for the market. Mr. Gorman was married in Holt County, Missouri, to Miss Margaret Wise, daughter of John Wise. Mrs. G. was born in Holt County August 18, 1851. They have three children: Minerva, born October 3, 1872; Anna, born December 18, 1873; John, born April 7, 1876. Politically Mr. G. is a Republican. He is a member in good standing of the Masonic order.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN W. GRAVES, a native of Atchison County, Missouri, was born June 27, 1847. William E. Graves, his father, as also his mother, formerly Edna Saunders, were born in Kentucky. This subject of this sketch was raised in this county on a farm, and was educated in the common schools. He was married May 20, 1869, to Miss Rebecca Angel, daughter of Thomas and Ann Angel. She was born in Clay County, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Graves have four children: Carrie, born February 29, 1873; Ora, born July 26, 1876; Richard G., born November 27, 1874; and an infant daughter, born March 17, 1882. Mr. Graves came on his present farm in May, 1870. He has 250 acres of land in section 35, township 64, range 40, all fenced and mostly in cultivation, with a young bearing orchard of 200 apple trees, and other fruit. He at present handles and feeds large quantities of stock. Mr. and Mrs. Graves are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J.L. GRAY, proprietor of the Lost Grove Farm, section 10, was born on the 24th of October, 1822, in Brown County, Ohio, and is the son of Henry and Martha (Little) Gray, who were natives of Kentucky. John was reared at his birthplace on a farm, and received a common school education. He learned the brick mason’s trade, and followed it for some thirty-eight years. In April, 1867, he came to Atchison County, settling on the bottoms south of Phelps, where he opened a farm. He located on his present place in the spring of 1880, and now owns 320 acres of fine land, well watered and adapted to stock raising. He is a hardworking, industrious citizen, and is well known throughout the county. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Gray was married April 20, 1845, to Miss Lucinda Runyon, daughter of S.D. and Dorothy Runyon. She was born in Brown County, Ohio, November 8, 1824. They have been blessed with nine children, seven of whom are living: Lemuel W., born February 14, 1846; Alice A., born January 29, 1848 (now Mrs. Jesse C. Dawson, of Montgomery County, Ohio); Jennie, born June 17, 1850 (now Mrs. N.B. Vanlandigham, of Atchison County); Perry H., born December 23, 1852; Ira F., born March 17, 1856; Mary B., born December 28, 1857 (now Mrs. Austin Van Gundy); Effie, born June 13, 1860. Mr. Gray and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Tarkio.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

LEMUEL W. GRAY,
farmer and stock raiser, section 29, was born February 14, 1846, in Highland County, Ohio. His parents, John L. and Lucinda (Runyon) Gray, were natives of Ohio. Lemuel was reared to manhood at his birthplace, spending his boyhood days on a farm and receiving the benefits of a common school education. He immigrated west in 1867, and landed in Rock Port on the 10th of March. He then settled on the Nishnebotna River, south of Phelps, and in 1868 he commenced to learn the brick mason’s trade, which he followed two years. He afterwards worked four years at the carpenter’s trade. Since then he has worked at both industries, and has also been engaged in farming. Mr. Gray settled where he now resides in 1877. He owns eighty acres of well improved land, a young orchard of 100 trees, and an abundance of small fruit, comfortable residence, etc. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity; also, of Atchison Lodge No. 220, A.O.U.W., of Tarkio. Mr. G. was married March 17, 1872, to Mrs. Lizzie Gerlash, a widow with one child, Johnnie A. Gerlash, born January 30, 1865. Her maiden name was Lizzie Gibler, and she was born September 9, 1846, at Lynchburg, Highland County, Ohio. She is a daughter of William and Caroline Gibler. By this union they have two children: Leonard F., born February 5, 1875, and Alice B., born July 23, 1878. Mrs. Gray is a member of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MADISON GREER,
farmer and stock raiser, section 16, was another among the earliest settlers of this township. He was born January 10, 1831, in Knox County, Ohio. His father, Col. John Greer, was a native of Belfast, Ireland. He immigrated to the United States about 1801 and settled in Ohio about 1803. He served in the war of 1812 and held the position of colonel. His mother, Mary (Critchfield) Greer, was a Pennsylvanian by birth. Madison was the twelfth in a family of fourteen children. He spent his boyhood days on the farm at his birthplace, and after receiving a preparatory education in the common schools he attended the academy at Loudonville. In February, 1852, he took the California fever and started for the land of gold, by the way of New Orleans and Nicarauga, thence to San Francisco. He spent some three years on the coast, engaged in freighting, and during the winter of 1855 he returned, by way of the Isthmus of Panama, and settled at Berlin, Hardin County, Iowa, where he engaged in farming, also in saw milling, the first two years. In the spring of 1865 he crossed the plains, with his family, and spent the summer in California, but returned in the fall of that year and again located at Berlin, Iowa, where he remained until the spring of 1870. At that time he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and moved on his present farm. It was then wild land and there were but few settlers on the prairie. He camped out until he could build a house and since that date he has been a citizen of Atchison County. He owns a fine farm of 160 acres and has a handsome residence with beautiful grounds, which are an ornament to the township. His farm is well watered and is adapted to stock raising. During his residence in Hardin County, Iowa, he served as one of the board of county supervisors for some five years. Mr. Greer was married October 26, 1856, to Miss Amy C. Bradfield, a native of Knox County, Ohio, born August 9, 1838, daughter of James and Elizabeth Bradfield. They have two children living: Roland C., born August 25, 1857; Richard L., born March 15, 1863. Lost one. Roland C. was married September 3, 1878, to Miss Fannie E. Allen, a native of Missouri. He owns a fine farm of 180 acres in this township.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

FRED GREENLEY
is a leading merchant and farmer and also postmaster at York. Among the early settlers of Tarkio Township may be mentioned the subject of this sketch. He was born in Madison County, New York, April 19, 1835. His parents, Thomas H. and Lucy S. (Higgins) Greenley, were natives of York State. Fred spent his youth at his birthplace, on the farm, and received a common school education, principally at the old Hamiltonian College. When twenty-one years old he commenced steamboating on the Mississippi River, and after following this one year, he went to Texas, where he engaged in the sheep business. The county was then almost a wilderness and was inhabited by Indians. His brother filled the position of postmaster, and was afterwards murdered for his money. Mr. Greenley remained there some eight years, and then came to Atchison County in the fall of 1870, settling where he now resides. He commenced to improve a farm, and in September, 1874, he opened a store in a place which he called Greenville. On February 7, 1878, he received the appointment of postmaster, and the office was called York. He carries a large and well assorted stock of goods, and does a good business. He also owns a fine farm of 400 acres, an excellent stock farm. He commenced here with eighty acres of land, going in debt for that, and he has since been an enterprising citizen of this locality. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. G. has been twice married: first October 19, 1871, to Miss Betty Carter, a native of Lexington, Missouri. She died on the 21st of September, 1872. He was married again November 19, 1874, to Augusta Wait, a daughter of Chester Wait. She was born in Ovid, New York, on November 12, 1851. They have had three children: Fred C., born September 11, 1875; Hiram W., born March 22, 1879, and Carrie A., born May 19, 1880.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

A. B. GORDON; Among the substantial and progressive agriculturists of Colfax township, Atchison county, Missouri, is numbered the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch. He was born in Adams county, Ohio, on the 23d of April, 1855, and is a son of David and Lydia (Ellis) Gordon, natives of the same county, who are represented on another page of this volume. During his infancy he was taken by his parents to Adams county, Iowa, locating in the Nodaway valley, near the present site of Villisca. At that early day Indians were still living in that locality, and wolves, deer and other wild game were plentiful. As the country was sparsely settled his playmates were few and his educational privileges limited, though he pursued his studies for a time in a primitive log schoolhouse. In 1866 the family came to Missouri and after spending some time near Phelps City, Atchison county, they located at Center -Grove, where the father operated the farm belonging to Bartlett brothers. Later he removed to Lincoln township, and improved the homestead on which he now resides.
A. B. Gordon was reared to habits of industry and honesty upon the home farm, and early became familiar with the duties which fall to the lot of the agriculturist. He attended the public schools for a time, but his education is mostly of a practical kind, being gained through business experience and his dealings with the world. In 1880 he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land, and in his farming operations he has met with marked success, being now the owner of two hundred acres of as rich land as can be found anywhere in the state. He has a good residence, substantial barns and outbuildings, and all of the conveniences and accessories of a model farm are there found. There is a good orchard and a grove of forest trees upon the place, and the land is divided into pastures, meadows and plowed fields by well kept fences.
Mr. Gordon married Miss Amanda Ramsey, who belongs to a good family of Lincoln township, being a daughter of Rial and Hester Ramsey. She lost her mother when eighteen years of age and her father at twenty-eight years of age. She is a native of Nodaway county. Missouri, and one of the pioneer settlers of this county. Of the four children born to our subject and his wife only two are now living: Alva N., aged fourteen years; and Vina Sybil, aged eight. Those deceased were Naomi, W1k, died at the age of one year, and Jessie at the age of two.
The Republican party has always found in Mr. Gordon a stanch supporter of its principles, and he has labored untiringly for its success. He is connected with the Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company, and his wife is a faithful and consistent member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. In business affairs he has met with well merited success, and his career has ever been such as to gain for him the confidence and respect of his fellow citizens in a marked degree. He is popular socially and his friends are many throughout the county.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

DAVID GORDON; David Gordon has been the architect of his own fortunes and has builded wisely and well, being now the possessor of a handsome competence. He is numbered among the pioneers of both Iowa and Missouri and for more than a third of a century his name has been inseparably interwoven with the history and advancement of this section of his adopted state. He was born in West Union, Adams county, Ohio, March 31, 1832, and is a son of David Gordon, Sr., whose birth occurred in Pennsylvania. His grandfather, Bazleah Gordon, was born in Pennsylvania and served as a soldier in the Revolution and the war of 1812. His great-grandfather was a native of Scotland, born in the highlands and was a representative of a family that long resided in the land of hills and heather. Among his ancestors were some of the celebrated chiefs of the highlands.
David Gordon, Sr.. was reared in the Keystone state and in Adams county, Ohio, married Miss Christina Washburn, daughter of Joseph Washburn, who served as a soldier in the war of 1812 and was a representative of a very prominent Ohio family descended from English ancestors. David and Christina Gordon became the parents of thirteen children, namely: Bazleah: John Bryce; James, who served in the Civil war and now resides in Marshall county, Kansas; David; Joseph; Martin Van Buren; George W., who was also one of the "boys in blue" and is now living in Nodaway county, Missouri; Eleanor, of Villisca, Iowa; Rebecca; Jane; Mary Ann; Matilda, of Marshall county, Kansas; and Elizabeth, of Maryville, Missouri. The father died in Adams county. Ohio, at the age of fifty-six years. He had followed farming as his life work, thereby providing for his family. His political support was given to the Democracy. His wife, long surviving him, passed away at the age of eighty-seven years, having spent her last days in the home of our subject. She retained her vigor up to the last and a short time before her death could walk four miles and back. She held membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church and was an earnest Christian woman whose children rose up and called her blessed.
David Gordon lived the quiet life of the farmer boy who assists in the cultivation of the fields and the work of the meadows, and pursued his education in the district schools. In 1856 he became a resident of Adams county, Iowa, living on the Nodaway river among the early settlers of that portion of the country. The Indians were still in the wild western district and here the lover of the chase had ample opportunity to indulge his taste, for deer were often seen and the wolves frequently made the night hideous with their howling. The work of improvement and progress seemed scarcely begun and the settlers living in the log cabins endured many of the hardships and trials which are common to life on the frontier.
Mr. Gordon remained in Adams county for ten years and then came to Atchison county, locating near Phelps City, where he aided in opening up a farm at Center Grove for the Bartlett Brothers in 1876. He is today one of the most extensive land-owners in the county. He first became the owner of a tract of wild prairie,, and to this he has added until his farm in Lincoln township now comprises four hundred and five acres of rich land, making him one of the most extensive realty holders in this portion of the state. His residence is favorably located and is a commodious and convenient home. In the rear stand a big barn, sheds and other necessary outbuildings, and a windmill is the motive power for the water supply. Pastures, meadows and plowed lands are all in good shape and indicate the careful supervision of the progressive owner whose methods are practical.
Mr. Gordon was married in Adams county, Ohio, to Miss Lydia Ann Ellis, a native of that county, and a daughter of Clayborn and Betsey (White) Ellis. The marriage of our subject and his wife was blessed with seven children, of whom five are yet living, namely: A. B., a prominent citizen of Colfax township, Atchison county; Nelson Clay, who spends his time in California and Alaska; Thirza Letitia, the wife of Holland Coddle, of Lincoln township; Ann Marie, the wife of George C. Ward, of Nebraska; Elsie Irene, the wife of Wheeler Donahue, who is living on the old homestead farm: and Jessie and Ida, who are deceased. Mrs. Gordon was a faithful and devoted wife and mother, a kind neighbor and a consistent friend, and her many excellencies of character endeared her to all with whom she came in contact. In 1872. after her decease. Mr. Gordon was again married, his second union being with Miss Evelina Bryan, a lady of intelligence and culture, born in Adams county, Ohio, and a daughter of Colonel George Bryan, who was an officer in the war of 1812. He was born in Pennsylvania and married Miss Sarah Porter, a native of Maryland. He died at the age of seventy-four years, and his wife passed away at the age of seventy-five. Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. No children were born of Mr. Gordon's second marriage. He has some grandchildren, however. Mrs. Donahue being the mother of two children,—Nellie and 'Walter, —while Mrs. Coddle has three children,— Clarence, Sylvia and Pearl.
In religious faith Mr. Gordon is a Cumberland Presbyterian and has served as an elder in his church for a number of years. He exercises his right of franchise for the men and measures of the Republican party. The Gordon home is noted for its hospitality and the latchstring of his door, figuratively speaking, always hangs out. The poor and needy find in our subject and his wife warm friends, and the hungry are never turned from their door unsupplied. In business circles Mr. Gordon sustains an unassailable reputation for integrity and trustworthiness. His frank and genial manner has won him many friends and he is esteemed a valued resident of Atchison county.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

SOLOMON R. GREEN; Solomon R. Green, a member of one of the pioneer families of Atchison county and a well known farmer of this county, is a native of Randolph county, Indiana, and was born October 15, 1840. He was a son of James and Amelia (Vernard) Green. William Vernard, the maternal grandfather, was a native of Ohio and served in the war of the Revolution. He was a farmer by occupation, continuing at this until his death, which occurred at an advanced age at his home in Indiana. He was a prominent man and filled several offices with dignity and credit. He had two children— Amelia, the mother of our subject; and Mariah, who married J. Wade.
James Green, the father of our subject, married when comparatively young and settled in Randolph county, Indiana, where he began farming. In 1841 he started west and spent the following winter in Illinois. In 1842 he reached Atchison county, Missouri, where he exchanged his ox team and wagon for a claim of one hundred and sixty acres. There were no improvements on the claim save a rude log cabin, but after settling on the place he began farming. Having considerable money in Indiana, which he received for his farm, that he had sold, and wishing to obtain the money, he accordingly set out on foot to reach his old home. At that time there was no other way of returning to Indiana save by boat, and after making the trip he bought another farm, which he improved and then sold. He always retained the original homestead, and it was there he passed his last days, where he was honored and respected by all. He had undergone all the hardships of pioneer life, and was at all times a faithful and willing worker. Up to the time he had settled in Missouri he had been of the Quaker faith; but at one of the meetings of the Cumberland Presbyterian church held in his home he was converted to their faith, and continued a member of that church to the end of his days. His death occurred in 1879, and his wife died in 1865. Their children were: Nancy A.; William, who served in Price's army for a short time; Solomon R., the subject of this sketch; and Martin, who also served in Price's army, but as soon as he was able went to Kansas, where he entered the federal service, and finally was killed in battle; and Sarah, now Mrs. Combs.
Solomon R. Green, the subject of this sketch, remained with his parents until grown, and he, too, saw much privation and many hardships during those early days. He was very fond of hunting, and tells many interesting stories of his experiences with the gun. In 1867 he located where he now lives and where he had bought an eighty acre tract of land, and began his struggles in life in earnest. He has been very successful, and it has only been through hard J work and perseverance that he has succeeded. On settling in this locality there were but three neighbors, and nothing but a vast prairie for miles around. The grass was good for grazing, and Mr. Green took up j stock raising in connection with farming. He has gradually added more to his pos- I sessions each year, and is at present the owner of several hundred acres of land, besides his homestead. He is a Democrat in politics, though he has never aspired to political preferment.
Mr. Green married Nancy M. Wright, who was born in Iowa, a daughter of Robert and Jane W right. Robert Wright was originally from Pennsylvania, but for many years lived in Fremont county, Iowa. In 1850 he "took the gold fever and went to California, where he engaged m mining. He was in possession of a very valuable claim, but was obliged to leave, on receiving word that his wife was at the point of death. He returned in 1850 and never went again to California. He carried on farming until his death, which occurred in 1890. His wife died in 1885. He left a large estate. He and his wife were the parents of the following children: John, of Colorado; George, of California; Mrs. Ehna Bascoe; J Emily; Nancy, the wife of our subject; Ida; Yada; and Robert, of Nebraska.
Mr. and Mrs. Wright have been blessed with nine children, whose names are: Ida, who married J. Pearce; Martin; Jane, the wife of E. Proud; Randolph, a school | teacher; Arthur; George; Ethel; Dora, the wife of B. F. Sharp; and Solomon. The family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Two of the sons are I members of the Masonic fraternity.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

JAMES B. GRAY, Sheriff of Atchison County, is a native of Fulton County, Illinois, and was born February 19, 1833. His father, William Gray, was a native of South Carolina, and his mother, whose name before marriage was Isabel Ritchey, was born in Pennsylvania. When James was about three years of age, his parents moved to Peoria County, Illinois, and in the year 1855, located in Butler County, Iowa. He was reared on a farm, and made his home in Butler County, Iowa, till 1868, there being engaged in dealing in stock and other property. During the years 1864-5, he was occupied in freighting and mining in the mountains. In 1868, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and located in Rock Port, where he opened a veterinary stable, which he conducted for four years. He was also interested in trading, after which time he embarked in buying and shipping stock. In the fall of 1880, Mr. Gray was elected sheriff of the county, having previously been marshal of Rock Port, and a more suitable man for the position he now occupies could have hardly been found. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also belongs to the I.O.O.F. Mr. Gray was married February 11, 1852, to Miss Ann Quinn. She was born near Dayton, Ohio, in May, 1831. Her parents, John and Rachel (Nash) Quinn, were both natives of Ohio. Mr. Gray’s family consisted of eleven children, seven of whom are now living: Sarah A., Nancy J., John, Nettie, Maggie, Guy and Edie.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MARTIN GREBE, farmer, section 22, was born in Hesse, Germany, August 22, 1809. He was reared and educated in his native country, and when fourteen years of age he learned the cabinet-maker’s trade, which he followed in Germany until 1836. He then came to America, landing at New York City, where he worked at his trade two years, afterwards going to St. Louis, where he continued to be employed, resuming work at his trade on his own responsibility till October, 1847, when he came to Atchison County, Missouri. Here he has since worked at his chosen calling and has also been engaged in farming, now owning a farm of 145 acres. Mr. Grebe was married October 19, 1840, to Miss Augusta Smith, who was born in Prussia April 24, 1822. They have had six children, of whom four are now living: Martin, Rudolph, Willie and Lillie. Mr. G. is an experienced workman and has given universal satisfaction wherever engaged.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN GRIEVE, of the firm of John Grieve & Co., proprietors of the Rock Port Flouring Mills, was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, April 15, 1833. His father, James Grieve, and his mother, whose maiden name was Mary Watson, were both natives of Edinburgh, Scotland. John was reared and educated in his native county, and in 1861 he began working at the milling business, which he has since continued. In 1865 he came west and lived in Nemaha County, Nebraska, till 1868, when he removed to Rock Port, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Grieve was married December 15, 1858, to Miss Mary J. Otis, who was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, January 19, 1834. Her father, John Otis, was a native of New York, and her mother, formerly Mary Graham, came from England. Mr. and Mrs. G. are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. G. is turning out a brand of flour second to none in Northwest Missouri, and in quantity, as well as quality, is surpassed by no mill in this vicinity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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