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Atchison County
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Biographies
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SAUL HICKS HACKETT, farmer, stock dealer and feeder, was born in Bath County, Kentucky, February 11, 1827. His father, Daniel D. Hackett, was born in Kentucky, and was a farmer by calling. He died when Saul H. was only two years old. The mother was formerly Maudalina Hicks, born in Kentucky, who, after the death of her husband, moved the family to Crawford County, Illinois, in 1829. There they were raised. At that early day school advantages being very limited, what learning the children had was obtained at home. The subject of this sketch was the youngest of five children, and from his earliest recollections saw many hard times, and was deprived of many of the necessaries of life, and all its luxuries. He grew up with industrious habits, and with a determination to succeed, but poor in pocket. He soon bought a tract of land, improved it, and in 1865 sold out and came to this state and county, purchasing a part of his present farm. Upon this he made extensive improvements, built a substantial dwelling and other buildings, besides making large additions from time to time. He has become one of our heaviest stock dealers and feeds large numbers of cattle and hogs yearly, having as good facilities and lots adapted to that business as anyone in this township. He has 314 acres of land and lives on section 12. Mr. Hackett married Miss Polly Watts, March 1, 1849. She was the daughter of Lott Watts, a native of Virginia, but long a resident of Illinois. They have six children: Arminta (now Mrs. B.F. Garst), Mary Ann (now Mrs. George L. Hughes), Morton F., Zerelda (wife of John L. Harrison), William Levi and Phoebe Emma. He has raised quite a family of children, given them good advantages for an education and started them in life under favorable circumstances. Mr. H. religiously was raised a Methodist and is very zealous in advancing the interests of the church, giving much towards its support. He has for many years been superintendent of the Sunday school. After having made a successful start in life he was induced in 1868 to help the railroad and in the enterprise he suffered a loss of $6,000, which nearly ruined him. But with his characteristic energy he succeeded in re-establishing himself on a firm basis, and is now one of the solid and reliable men of the county. His father died in October, 1829, and his mother, who was born May 21, 1797, is living with him. Though deprived of her sight, she is enjoying good health for one of her years. She has two sons living: Felix Grundy Hackett, living in Illinois, and the subject of this sketch. Mr. H. has taken four children to raise: William Hale, Henry R. Hale, Sarah Collins, a very capable young lady, and Owen Hale.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE W. HALL, farmer and stock raiser, a native of Dayton, Ohio, was born on the 5th of August, 1847. His parents were Fleming and Elizabeth Hall, nee Kiser, the latter of Ohio and the former a Virginian by birth. In 1851 George accompanied the family to Champaign County, Ohio. He passed his youth on a farm, and was educated in the common schools. During the war his father was captured at Strasburg, and died a prisoner at Lynchburg, Virginia. In the fall of 1865, the mother moved her family to Christian County, Illinois, and there they resided for nine years, after which they came west and settled in Dale Township, Atchison County, Missouri, in the summer of 1874. Mr. Hall has been on his present place for three years. He has 326 acres of land in his home farm, and 120 acres in another tract, all fenced and improved. An orchard adorns each place – 200 apple and about fifty other trees of different varieties, on the latter farm, and 150 peach and 250 apple trees on the home farm. An abundance of small fruit is on either. Mr. Hall was married March 8, 1868, in Macon County, Illinois, to Miss Rebecca Herring, who was born in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1851. Her parents were John and Mary A. Herring. They have had four children, of whom two are now living: Cora Lee, born April 8, 1874, and Morris V., born February 24, 1876; Virgil M. was born September 3, 1879, and died August 1, 1881, and Georgie E., who was born March 27, 1881, died August 5, 1881. Mr. Hall is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He is Democratic in his political preferences.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JUSTUS HALL
,
farmer, section 8, is a native of Germany, and was born April 16, 1836. His father, Andrew Hall, was a shepherd by occupation. Justus lived in his native country until seventeen years of age, and in 1853 he emigrated to the United States, arriving here early in 1854. He soon found employment working on a farm until 1861, when he enlisted in the Fifth Iowa Cavalry and served until the close of the war. He participated in the fatiguing campaigns of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. He was taken prisoner near Newton, in Georgia, on the McCook raid and experienced the privation of the southern prisons for months, first in Andersonville, Savannah, Florence and others. After his discharge he returned to Atchison County, Missouri, and in 1865 was married to Miss Ursula Ruedy. She was born in Switzerland. They have a family of four children: Mary, Willie, Lizzie and Charlie. His farm contains eighty acres.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

SYLVESTER HALL, farmer, stock raiser and feeder, is the owner of 330 acres of land, his residence being on section 15. He was born in Bureau County, Illinois, October 31, 1837. He received a good district school education and worked hard at home, helping his father, John Hall, to improve a large farm. In 1851 the elder Hall, desiring to help his children to obtain some land, selected the Platte Purchase, sold his valuable farm in Illinois and moved to this county, where he bought a large tract of land, in and about Sonora, there making a good place. In 1858 he gave his son Sylvester 120 acres of land, which is now a part of his large and valuable farm. Few young men made better use of their time, or the small means at his command. With the additions made to his original gift not many men in the county have as good a home. Mr. Hall was married to Miss Sarah Elizabeth Horn, daughter of James and Sarah C. Horn, in 1861. They have seven children living: Melvina Isabel Garst, Mary Ann, Elizabeth Caroline, James Edward, Zuritha, Cora L. and Robert Crawford. Malissa died when three years old and two died in infancy. Mr. H. is a Democrat in his political views and an active member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He belongs to the Masonic lodge in Watson. He is one of the most enterprising men of the county, has always taken an active part in building up schools, churches, and all enterprises calculated to make the world and community better for his having lived in it. John Hall, his father, was born in Georgia, but was raised in Kentucky. He was among the earliest settlers in Sonora and did much to help build up that town. He first erected a saw mill, with horse power, and afterwards built a fine steam mill, a large warehouse and started a store, working hard to make a business town. At the same time he was improving his large farm, these improvements being commenced in 1851. He married Elizabeth Kellums, of Indiana. They had thirteen children: Wesley, Louisa B. Brown, Charlton, Elizabeth South, Sylvester, Irena Buckham, Elijah and Elisha (twins), and William M. Mr. Hall died near Sonora, in the spring of 1861. Mrs. Hall died in the fall of 1875. He was an active Methodist.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN F. HANNA
, is a member of the firm of Hanna, Hunter & Co., dealers in general merchandise and agricultural implements. This was one of the first business houses established in Tarkio. They carry the heaviest stock of goods in town and transact a large amount of business. John F. Hanna was born in Crawford County, Ohio, September 18, 1847. His parents, Samuel and Catherine A. (Hoffman) Hanna, were natives of Pennsylvania. The mother was of German origin and the father of Irish descent. They moved to Ohio in an early day. John F. was the second in a family of nine children. He spent his boyhood days on the farm at his birthplace, and after receiving a preparatory education in the common schools, he completed it at the Academy at Savannah, Ohio. He moved to Henderson County, Illinois, in the fall of 1876, where he was engaged as foreman of a large stock farm, owned by David Rankin. In February, 1879, he went to Warren County, Illinois, entering into partnership with Mr. Rankin in farming and the stock raising business. There he remained until October, 1880, when he immigrated westward to Atchison County, Missouri. He helped to raise the first boards to make a temporary shanty on the present site of Tarkio. In December of that year he moved his family here, and in April, 1881, in partnership with Mr. Hunter and Mr. Rankin, he opened their present store on the corner of Main and Third Streets. He also erected a handsome residence in block five; it is an ornament to the city situated as it is, on a gentle elevation, giving a good view of the surrounding country. He owns a fine farm of some 1,500 acres, four and one-half miles east of Tarkio; also an interest in the old home farm in Ohio. Mr. Hanna is a strong temperance man and a staunch Republican. He was married the 22nd of June, 1876, to Miss Nettie V. Rankin, of Biggsville, Henderson County, Illinois, daughter of David and Sarah Rankin. She was born near that place, July 28, 1855. They have two children: Charles Rankin, born May 13, 1878, and John Winfield, born February 8, 1880. Himself and wife are both members of the United Presbyterian Church of Tarkio, in which he holds the position of elder. In his manners he is much of a gentleman and carries the respect and esteem of all those who are favored with his acquaintance. Mr. H. owes his success in life only to his sterling principles of honesty, integrity and attention to business.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HIRAM HACKLER,
was born in Linn County, Missouri, July 3, 1847. David Hackler, his father, was born in Green County, and his mother, Matilda Golden, was a native of Grayson County, Virginia. In 1850, the family moved from Linn to Atchison County, and settled on the Missouri River bottom, near Phelps. The subject of this sketch was raised in Atchison County, on a farm, and received but a very limited education in the district school. He removed to his present farm, in Clark Township, in the spring of 1872, and this place he has improved himself. It contains eighty acres of land, with a fair house and a fine young orchard of apple, peach and cherry trees. Mr. Hackler was married October 16, 1870, to Miss Mary Beck, daughter of John W. and Elizabeth Beck. She was born in Wayne County, Indiana, May 12, 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Hackler have four children: David, born March 15, 1872; Elizabeth H., born June 2, 1876; John, born October 27, 1877; Ernest, born June 14, 1880. Mr. and Mrs. Hackler are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. H. is Democratic in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

OLIVER HAMILTON, a native of Grant County, Indiana, was born December 27, 1839. William Hamilton, his father, was born in New York, March 7, 1820, while his mother, whose maiden name was Drusilla Branson, was a Virginian by birth, born May 13, 1820. William Hamilton had been married in Grant County, Indiana, in 1838, after which with his family he moved and settled in Chillicothe, Missouri, when the town was just laid out. There they remained but a short time and then went to Huntsville, Randolph County, where they continued to dwell some seven years. Thence to Daviess County and from there to Lawrence County, where Mrs. Hamilton died shortly after. In the fall of 1856 the subject of this sketch came to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he worked for two years at the harness business. In the fall of 1858 he went to Fort Laramie, remaining there during the winter and in the spring located at Fort Bridger, Utah, where he spent the summer. In the fall of 1859 he returned to Missouri and commenced work on a farm in Atchison County, and since that time he has been a resident of this locality. In August, 1877, Mr. Hamilton moved upon his present farm, which contains 160 acres, all improved, and a fair dwelling, etc., located in section 8. He was married September 2, 1860, to Miss Melinda S. Pebbley, daughter of Thomas and Mary Ann Pebbley. She was born in Clay County, October 7, 1844. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton have had eight children, six of whom are living: Mary, born October 30, 1862; Ellen, born July 7, 1864; Lucy, born January 3, 1868; William, born March 26, 1874; Lottie, born February 22, 1876, and Charles, born November 2, 1881. Mr. H. is extensively and successfully engaged in handling and feeding stock. He is independent in politics, but was formerly Democratic.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JESSE M. HAMMOND,
was born in Perry County, Ohio, April 21, 1848, and is the son of W.G. and Mary E. (Hatcher) Hammond. The former was a native of Maryland, and the latter of Ohio. Jesse grew to manhood on a farm in his native county, receiving a common school education. In 1870 he came westward and spent one summer in McDonough County, Illinois, and from there moved to Nodaway County, Missouri, in 1871, where he purchased land on or near the Nodaway River, below Skidmore. After living there three years he came to Atchison County, locating on his present place, in the fall of 1874. He has a good farm of 160 acres in his home place, and 80 acres across the line in Nodaway County, all of which has been improved by himself. He has set out a young orchard of 100 apple, 80 peach and other varieties of trees. February 13, 1873, Mr. Hammond was married at Marysville, Missouri, to Jennie E. Wertz, daughter of Henry Wertz, of this city. They have two children: Nettie May, born February 27, 1874, and Edmond, born May 18, 1878. Mr. and Mrs. H. are members of the Methodist Church. Politically he is a Republican. Mr. Hammond has some good graded cattle, and Poland China hogs on his farm, which is located on section 9.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MATHEW HOUSTON HATTEN,
farmer and stock raiser, section 12, was born in Kanawha County, West Virginia, July 18, 1838. His father, William Dunbar Hatten, was of Amhurst, Virginia, and his mother, formerly Eliza Meeks, of Rockbridge County, Virginia. Matthew came to Holt County, Missouri, with his father, in 1852. In 1865 he went to Nebraska, returning in 1870. He has served four years as justice of the peace. He is a Democrat in politics and belongs to the Baptist Church. He married Miss Nancy Jane Norvell, January 9, 1861. She was a daughter of John Norvell, of Holt County, but formerly of Kentucky. Four children were the result of this union: William Price, Katie, Alvera Belle and an infant. Mr. H. commenced life poor, and has by his own industry made a farm which is among the best ones of the township, containing 250 acres. His place is well adapted for both stock and grain purposes, and he is well known and respected. He is a consistent Christian worker, and with his excellent wife there are but few who are doing more good in their community. The father of Mrs. H. was one of the real pioneers of Holt County, and was also among the first to organize a church. After Mr. H. married he rented land for several years, and in 1865 he went to Nemaha County, Nebraska, and settled on school lands, improving his place for several years. He then returned to this county and rented a farm from William Patten, and in the meantime bought the farm where he now resides. He erected the buildings, and well knows the value of time and the necessity of work to be successful.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE WASHINGTON HARMON
, retired farmer, stock dealer and feeder, is the owner of 960 acres of land, his home farm of 372 acres being located on section 32. Few men are entitled to a more prominent place in history than G.W. Harmon, as he was the second settler in the county, having come here a few months after Mr. Millsaps. He was born in Monroe County, Tennessee, April 4, 1818. He attended school for two days, and during his youth learned the gunsmith trade of his father, Nathan Harmon. In 1827 they moved to Bond County, Illinois, being among the pioneers there. They repaired guns for the Indians as well as for the settlers, and did quite a business. On the 19th of October, 1840, George came to this county and settled on the land which now comprises his beautiful farm. He and Callaway Millsaps both brought their young wives with them. His daughter Rebecca (now Mrs. Benson Bailey, of Brownville, Nebraska) was the second child born in Atchison County, the son of Mr. Millsaps being the first. Mr. H. built a log cabin, and also a log shop, when he worked for the Indians and the settlers for a long period, doing all their gunwork and blacksmithing, and in return they did his plowing and improving his land. The nearest mill was at Council Bluffs, sixty miles, and to go there and return took eight days. Previous to using the mill, for two years they made their hominy by pounding corn in a mortar. He then bought a hand mill (a large coffee mill), attached it to a tree, and it was in constant use. Mr. H. informs us that for seven years he wore one pair of pants, and so often were they patched that the original cloth could not be seen, and so greased and stiff had they become that they would stand alone. He then got deer skin of the Indians and made a suit, and wore moccasins and a coonskin cap, with the tail on. By this cap and suit he was known for miles around. His first adventure was purchasing beeves for the quartermaster of the United States Army, stationed at a fort where Nebraska City now stands, and in a purchase amounting to $300 he cleared for his services $200. This is where his life work commenced, and since then he has made stock dealings and feeding a success. He has fed and sold from 200 to 500 head annually. His farm is among the most productive and best arranged for stock purposes and raising corn in the township, upon it being a fine brick residence, the third one in the county, and other improvements. In 1870, with his two sons-in-law, Messrs. McGee and Bailey, of Brownville, Nebraska, he bought the ferryboat “Mary J. Arnold,” and has run it for nine years in connection with the transfer and bus line from Brownville to Phelps City. In 1880 Mr. H. bought out his partners in the business, and one month after the boat was snagged, and he lost $7,000. His former partners again took hold, fitted up a temporary flatboat, which was used until the present fine structure was finished, and since that time the three have conducted the business. In August, 1881, Mr. Harmon rented his farm and removed to Tecumseh, Johnson County, Nebraska, near his Nebraska farm of 480 acres. There he has built a house, and is having his farm improved on a large scale. This he intends for his only son, George Benson. He has also bought a beautiful lot in Tecumseh, upon which he has erected the finest residence in the city. Mr. H. has been twice married: First, to Sarah Roberts, of Montgomery County, Illinois, in August, 1837. She died in 1847, leaving four children: Betsey Ann, Martha, Rebecca (now Mrs. Bailey) and Mary Angeline (now Mrs. J.L. McGee). In August, 1848, he married Miss Mary Ann Hughes. They have two children, Sarah Angeline and George Benson. The first 4th of July celebration in Atchison County was held at the foot of the bluffs near Mr. Millsaps, he and Mr. M. being the chief persons there. This was in 1841. Corn bread, baked in a “pone,” and wild honey formed the dinner for the distinguished gathering. Every person in the county were there, and many Indians besides. Mr. Harmon was orator of the day, and also chief marshal. Mr. H. is a Mason, in politics a Republican, and a supporter of the Christian Church. There are not many persons who have lived in the county twenty years but what know Mr. H., and have heard him tell his stories of early days, the recital of which would fill a volume. He has made a reputation for honesty, enterprise and integrity which is lasting.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM J. HARRINGTON,
of the firm of Harrington & Millsaps, dealers in general merchandise, is a native of Atchison County, Missouri, and was born in Irish Grove, October 12, 1847. His father, John Harrington, was a native of Kentucky, and came to Atchison County about the year 1843. His mother’s maiden name was Mared Blevens, and she was also a Kentuckian by birth. William has made Atchison County his home during life. He was educated at Hamburg, Iowa, and attended for some time the college at Stewartsville, Missouri. In 1865, he began teaching, which profession he followed till 1874, when he came to Rock Port and engaged in clerking in a store. In 1876, he was elected county assessor, which office he filled for four years. In May, 1881, he began business as a member of his present firm. He belongs to both the A.O.U.W. and the I.O.O.F. fraternities. Mr. Harrington was married in March, 1871, to Miss Maggie Crook, who was born in Buchanan County, Missouri. Her father, James Crook, was a native of Kentucky, as was also her mother, whose maiden name was Eliza Christie. Mr. and Mrs. H. have had five children, three of them now living: M.B., Carrie and Jessie.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DAVID HAUGHT, farmer and stock raiser, section 4, was born July 21, 1826, in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. His parents, George and Elizabeth (Dixon) Haught, were both natives of Pennsylvania and of Dutch descent. His father served in the war on 1812. David was reared on a farm and received a common school education. He emigrated to Bureau County, Illinois, in 1851, and there opened a small farm. In 1864 he came to Atchison County and settled on the Missouri River bottom, moving to his present residence in the fall of 1868. He at once commenced to improve it and now owns eighty acres of well improved land, has a good orchard and a valuable stock farm. He fills the office of school director. He is a hard-working citizen, though he commenced life a poor boy. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Haught was married on the 23rd of October, 1845, to Miss Rachel Provance, daughter of Joseph Y. and Rachel Provance. She was an old schoolmate of his. They have had eleven children, eight of whom are living: Salina A., born September 16, 1846 (now Mrs. F.M. Meek, of this county); Elizabeth A., born August 7, 1848 (now Mrs. C.B. Casler, of Tarkio); Rachel Diana (now Mrs. Ulysses Beck, of this county); Joseph E.; Henrietta D. (wife of Edwin Evans, of Livingston County, Missouri); Christopher C.; Quimby G.; and Daisy S.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HENRY W. HAWLEY, section 11, was born on February 7, 1848, and is a native of Orleans County, New York. His parents were Edward Hawley, of Ohio, and Phenelipa Hawley, nee Hibbard, who was born in the State of New York. About the year 1855 Edward Hawley went to California, since which time nothing has ever been heard from him. In 1860 the family moved to Jackson County, Michigan. Henry was raised upon a farm and received his primary education in the common schools, supplemented by one term’s attendance at South Bend, Indiana. June 28, 1868, he was married in Jackson County, Michigan, to Miss Martha Beardsley, of that county, born August 2, 1849, and a daughter of William Beardsley. Mr. and Mrs. H. have four children: Adah, born April 26, 1869; Willie, born January 15, 1871; Frank, born July 10, 1873, and Edwin L., born March 29, 1877. In 1868 Mr. Hawley moved from Michigan to Fremont County, Iowa, but three months later went to Nebraska, where he resided some two years. In 1871 he returned to Michigan and learned the carpenters’ trade, and after a period of two years he came again to Missouri and settled in Craig, Holt County. For two years he was engaged in working at his trade there, coming thence to Atchison County and settling in this township. He has eighty acres of land, all fenced, a good orchard, and he makes a specialty of feeding stock, with a satisfactory result. He has lived in this place for five years.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE P. HAWKINS, section 2, was born in Saline County, Missouri, November 18, 1833, and was the son of Reuben Hawkins, who was a native of Virginia. In 1844 the family moved to Atchison County, and settled in Clark Township. George P. was raised on a farm and was educated in the common schools. He was married in Atchison County, April 24, 1859, to Miss Mary J. Farmer, daughter of Joshua Farmer. She was born in Iowa, February 22, 1843. Mr. Hawkins has one daughter, Mary P., born March 24, 1865. Mrs. Hawkins died May 12, 1865, and Mr. H. was again married April 12, 1869, to Mrs. Henrietta C. Hawkins, daughter of William Minter. This lady was born in Virginia, February 8, 1833. By this union they have two children, Charles P., born January 3, 1870, and Marinda A., born January 31, 1872. In 1859 Mr. Hawkins moved to Nebraska, and after living there some three years, he returned to Atchison County. He has been on his present place eight years, and now has eighty acres of land, improved, and an orchard of assorted fruit. Mr. Hawkins is a member of the Masonic order. In his political references, he is a Democrat. Mrs. H. is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

NATHANIEL HAYS, deceased, was born in Washington County, Tennessee, in 1805, and came to this state and county in 1857. His wife was Mrs. Anna Bayless Million, a daughter of Reuben Bayless, of Tennessee. They had four sons: Samuel Moore, William Alexander, Hugh H. and Nathaniel B. Mrs. Hays’ first husband was Edward Million, who died August 19, 1837, leaving five children: Joseph J., Malinda E., Mary Jane, John Asa and Reuben E. Mr. Hays moved to this state and county in 1857, and died in 1867, leaving a fine farm of 200 acres on section 29. However, this was partly unpaid for, and he commenced here with a very limited means, and had to work hard and alone to obtain a start. He had his land improved and was an energetic farmer and worthy citizen. His sons, as they grew up, took hold of the work with a will to help their mother pay the debt, and for this are entitled to much credit. They have labored together, assisting each other in business and in their speculative enterprises have been successful. The old farm was divided between the sons, the mother living with and keeping house for William A. Mr. Hays was one of the substantial men of the township, and had hosts of friends because of his honorable course. He was Democratic in his political views, and religiously a Baptist. William Alexander Hays, the second son of Nathaniel and Anna Hays, is the owner of a farm on section 35, containing 113 acres of choice land. He was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, July 27, 1847. In politics he is a Democrat. He had very poor school advantages, but in later life has been quite studious, so that by his own exertions he has acquired a liberal business education. He is a young man of much promise. Hugh Hezekiah Hays, the third son of Nathaniel and Anna Hays, was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, October 2, 1852. He has a good farm of 113 acres on section 34, finely improved. He married Miss Mary Elizabeth Hays, June 8, 1869. Her father is Hamilton Hays, of this township, but a native of Tennessee. They have had four children, two of whom are living: Daniel Franklin and Alonzo. Mr. H., like his brothers, has worked hard, been economical and is now among the successful farmers and feeders of the township. He is a Democrat.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ABRAHAM H. HAYNES was born March 27, 1827, in Union County, Tennessee. His father, Isaac Haynes, was born in the same county. Abraham grew to manhood on a farm at his birthplace, his educational advantages being very limited. By self-application and hard study he has, in later years, obtained such a store of knowledge as would do credit to one of far greater pretentions. In the spring of 1861 he moved from Union County, Tennessee, to Mercer County, Missouri, where he resided for about four years, going thence to Nodaway County. After sojourning six years in that county he came to Atchison County, in the spring of 1870, and settled on his present place, section 16, of Dale Township. He owns 200 acres of land, 120 of which is improved and adorned with 186 apple and 200 peach trees, also 100 grape vines and smaller fruit. He is greatly interested in the raising and feeding of stock for market and has upon his place good graded cattle and Poland China hogs. Mr. Haynes was married March 18, 1857, in Union County, Tennessee, to Miss Mary Lay, daughter of James Lay. They have ten children: Elbert, born January 5, 1858; James F., born May 3, 1859; Thomas M., born August 19, 1863; Anna A., born July 5, 1865; Ibbi O., born August 1, 1867; Francis M., born August 10, 1869; Tennessee, born March 27, 1873; Ollie B., born December 12, 1874; Fred L., born October 20, 1876; William E., born January 23, 1879.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DANIEL J. HENDRICK,
was born in the state of Ohio, March 13, 1843. His father, Jabez Hendrick, was born in Massachusetts in 1813, and his mother, Amanda M. (Abbey) Hendrick, was born in the state of New York in 1818. In 1853 the family moved to Henry County, Illinois. D.J. Hendrick was raised on a farm, attending the common schools. In 1863 he enlisted in the army and reserved as a soldier until the close of the war. He first enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry, and served five months, after which he was honorably discharged. He again enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry, and was afterwards transferred to Company A, Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. He was in the engagement of Spanish Fort, which lasted thirteen days and nights, and, after being discharged, he returned to Henry County, where he remained till the fall of 1869 engaged in farming. At that time he came to Missouri and located in Clark Township. Mr. Hendrick has eighty acres of good land, all improved, with a fine young orchard. He resides on section 11, township 64, range 40. He was married in Knox County, Illinois, December 10, 1843. Mr. and Mrs. Hendrick have four children: Lucy M., born October 31, 1869; Carrie M., born October 11, 1871; Everett D., born October 21, 1878, and Ira, born December 23, 1880. Mr. Hendrick is a Republican in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HENRY HICKEY,
a native of Jo Daviess County, Illinois, was born September 7, 1846. Edward Hickey, his father, was born in Canada, and was married to Harriet Porter, a native of Ohio. Henry grew to manhood in his native county, on a farm, receiving his education in the common schools. In the spring of 1869 he moved from Illinois to Tremont County, Iowa, where he was engaged in farming for two years, after which, in the spring of 1871, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled in this township. Five years ago, he moved upon his present farm in section 24. This contains 160 acres, all fenced, with a thrifty orchard of different varieties of fruit. He makes a specialty of the stock business. October 1, 1869, the marriage of Henry Hickey to Miss Mary A. Hamblen occurred, in Fremont County, Iowa. She is the daughter of Leven and Mary Hamblen, and was born in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, August 6, 1848. They have four children: William Harvey, born August 3, 1873; Eldora, born October 29, 1876; Cora Ella, born July 22, 1879, and Nancy D., born September 15, 1881. One child, Walter, who was born September 13, 1870, died November 29, 1871.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

PETER A. HILL,
section 1, was born January 12, 1836, in Prince Edward County, Virginia. His parents, James and Martha (Weston) Hill, were born in the same state. In 1837 the family moved to Missouri and settled in Saline County, from whence, after living ten years, the came to Atchison County, in 1847, and located in Clark Township. Peter A. Hill was married March 3, 1867, to Miss Grace W. Jones, who was born in Holt County, Missouri, February 9, 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Hill have had seven children, four of whom are now living: William A., born July 13, 1868; Herbert, born August 16, 1873; Izetta, born November 12, 1877; Lillie Myrta, born July 1, 1880. After his marriage Mr. Hill settled in Clay Township, where he resided some eleven years, moving to Clark Township, on his present place, in 1878. He has 240 acres of land, nearly all fenced, with 160 acres in his home place, and 80 acres in another tract, in Clay Township. He has on his farm a young and thrifty orchard. The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm and had very limited means for an education in youth. What he now owns has been obtained by his own industry. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are members of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

A HILL,
merchant, Westboro, is a native of Prince Edward County, Virginia, and was born January 11, 1834, being a son of James and Martha (Watson) Hill. His parents were both natives of Virginia. Young Hill accompanied them to Missouri in 1837 and settled in Saline County. There the father died. The mother was married the second time, after which, with her family, she moved to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1847, settling near Irish Grove. Mr. H. started out as a farmer, and continued as such till 1862, when he turned his attention to freighting across the plains. In 1867 he married Miss K.T. Rupe, a native of Atchison County, Missouri, born in 1842. She died in 1877, leaving two children living, and one deceased. Mr. Hill is an enterprising merchant, and is well known and respected by all.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HENRY SOUTH HILL,
farmer and stock raiser, is the owner of 245 acres of land, his residence being on section 34. He was born in Warren County, Kentucky, December 7, 1813. While he was a small boy, his father moved to Montgomery County, Illinois, and located on a farm in the timber, where Henry grew up. He did much hard work, helping his father make a farm. After being married he moved into Bond County, obtained a piece of land, which he cleared, and would have been contented, but for the stories of the famous Platte Purchase. He determined to seek a better country, and in 1848 he moved to this township, and bought the forty acre lot where his house now stands. He soon had a fine farm and was able to make additions to his place, until now he has one second to none. Mr. Hill married Miss Charlotte Temple Harmon, daughter of Nathan and Rebecca Harmon, of Bond County, Illinois, December 10, 1835. They have four children living: Mrs. Mary W. Lewis, George W., Drucilla Emeline (wife of Dr. Jones of Watson), and John Henry. William W. died July 16, 1865, aged 24 years; Sarah died in infancy; Nancy Jane married Valentine S. Kerl, and died November 2, 1874, leaving two children: Emma Ada Belle, who has a home with Dr. Jones, her uncle, and Malcomb Montrose, who lives with his grandfather. Mr. Hill has also been either a Whig or Republican, and belongs to the Christian Church and Good Templars. In 1852 he was elected county judge, and served with great satisfaction to all. March 14, 1862, he enlisted in the Fifth Missouri Cavalry, and served for one year. He was promoted to second lieutenant and then to first lieutenant, and was attached to General Loan’s Brigade. Wherever Mr. H. has been placed or whatever responsibility he has assumed, he has discharged his duty with ability, and under all circumstances has earned the title of an honest man.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE HINDENACH,
blacksmith and farmer, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, February 17, 1838. He received a good education in his native country, and in 1854 came to America, settling in Berks County, Pennsylvania, where he completed his trade, which he commenced in Germany. He worked at this and the iron business for ten years, in Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Washington and St. Louis. During the war he was employed by the government some two years in Washington. In 1865 he came to Bloomington, Illinois, and after stopping there a short time he came to Woodford County, where he started a shop, operating it for two years. In 1869 he came to Missouri and settled in this city, built a shop and has been extremely successful. He has erected a good residence and purchased and improved eighty acres of land near Rock Port, besides which he has considerable town property. Mr. Hindenach married Miss Hannah Stack, of this county, in the fall of 1869. They have six children living: George, Lillie, Willie, Betsie, Ella and Anna Christine. Minnie died at the age of two years. He is a Republican in politics and religiously a Lutheran. Mr. H. is one of the best workmen in this locality, as is shown in the fact that he has remained the town smith when all others have failed.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CALAWAY HODGES, section 16, was born in Washington County, Tennessee, December 21, 1844, and is the son of Allen and Louisa (Buckingham) Hodges, also natives of Tennessee. In 1847, the family moved to Barren County, Kentucky, where young Calaway was raised, received ordinary common school advantages. When in his seventeenth year, he entered into military service, enlisting in Company K, Thirteenth Kentucky Infantry, in 1861, and receiving his discharge in January, 1865. He participated in several important engagements, among which were the siege of Corinth, Perryville, and several encounters with Morgan through Kentucky, and at the siege of Knoxville, where he was wounded through the left shoulder and breast. After being discharged, he returned to Barren County, where he lived until the fall of 1868, then coming west and settling in Mills County, Iowa. Mr. Hodges was there married, January 14, 1872, to Miss Margaret Buckingham, a native of Washington County, Tennessee, born March 9, 1842. Mr. Hodges continued to reside in Mills County, Iowa, for eight years, and in the fall of 1875, he came to Atchison County, Missouri. He has a fine bearing orchard of 100 apple and 100 peach trees, besides some cherry and plum. In his political preferences he is a Republican. He is a member of the Masonic order.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HON. N.O. HOPKINS,
farmer and cattle feeder, section 18, is a native of Bath County, Kentucky. He was born April 22, 1823, and is a son of Joseph and Margaret (Murphy) Hopkins. His father was a native of the same county and when quite young commenced to read law. He practiced for many years in Bath County. He was married in Kentucky and after a few years moved to Carrollton, Illinois, where he died. Young Hopkins went to Jackson County, Missouri, in 1836, and the following year to Clay County, Missouri, he being educated at Liberty. Mr. Hopkins was married at Plattsburg, Clinton County, Missouri, May 10, 1840, to Miss Kitty Hughes, a native of Nicholas County, Kentucky, born May 3, 1823. Her parents, William and Peace (Hopkins) Hughes, were natives of Virginia, but raised in Bourbon County, Kentucky, moving to Clay County, Missouri, in 1830, and settling near Liberty. Her father died in 1838 and her mother in 1865. Mr. Hopkins later settled in Clinton County and in 1842 moved near Corning, Holt County, Missouri, where he remained till 1843, then coming into Atchison County. He located near the Missouri River, and in 1846 settled where they now reside. His landed estate consists of some 2,000 acres of finely improved land. They have nine children living: Joseph, Eliza, Mary, Nelson O., William, Emma, Alice, Lulu and James. They have lost one. In 1847 the subject of this sketch was nominated and elected by a large majority to represent this county in the State Legislature, and also in 1882. This important position he filled to the satisfaction of all concerned and with credit to himself.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOSEPH A. HOPKINS,
farmer, section 7, was born in Atchison County, Missouri, February 21, 1841, and was the eldest son of Hon. N.O. and Kitty Hopkins. Joseph spent his boyhood days and received a good education in that county. He began business for himself as a farmer in 1860. September 2nd of the same year he married Miss Elizabeth M. Barger, a native of Callaway County, Missouri, born in 1839. She was a daughter of H.B. and Phoebe Barger, the former a native of Virginia and the mother of Tennessee. They came to Missouri at an early day, and in 1855 settled in Atchison County. Mr. and Mrs. H. finally settled where they now reside, the farm consisting of 160 acres of well improved land. They have a family of ten children living: James G., John W., Laura J., Phoebe C., Joseph B., Charles O., Bob, Henry, Louisa and Myrtle. Three children are deceased: Orlando N., Mary A. and Bettie. Mr. and Mrs. H. are members of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

FRANCIS HOLBROOK was born in England, May 25, 1843, his parents being John and Jemima Holbrook nee Wooley, also natives of England. The subject of this sketch was reared a farmer at his birth place, receiving a common school education. Emigrating to the United States, he landed at New York, December 24, 1863, but soon moved westward to Bureau County, Illinois, where he was engaged in working on a farm by the month. Here Mr. H. was married September 9, 1864, to Miss Margaret Cies, a native of Germany. She was born February 13, 1844, but was raised in Illinois. They have four children living: Eva, born October 23, 1871; Thomas, born February 22, 1874; Jemima, born January 15, 1878, and Maud, born June 17, 1880. Four are deceased. Mr. Holbrook resided in Bureau County, Illinois, for seven years, after which he removed to Missouri, and settled in Dale Township, Atchison County. He has a farm of 80 acres, all improved, upon the place being fruit of all kinds adapted to this climate. He has a lease upon 480 acres of land, and is engaged quite extensively in handling and feeding stock. His residence in on section 5. Mr. and Mrs. Holbrook are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DAVID PINCKNEY HOLLY,
farmer, section 6, was born in Henderson County, Tennessee, May 22, 1841. He accompanied his father, John Holly, to Missouri, he settling on the place his son now owns. The subject of this sketch commenced to work by the month and upon obtaining enough, he bought forty acres of the farm he now owns. This he improved, and his hard work has brought its reward. In due time he bought the forty-acre tracts until now he is among the large farmers of the county, having 450 acres. He has two fine dwellings and good improvements. Mr. Holly married Miss Elizabeth Bougers, of North Carolina, November 3, 1867. Her father was Richard Bougers. Of this union there are five children living: Mills, Cread B., John Richard, Nellie May and Sarah Ann. William Pinckney died February, 1879, aged six years. Richard Bougers came here in 1854 and settled on High Creek, where he remained until he died in December, 1879. Mrs. B. died October, 1880. John Hawley died May 23, 1879. Mr. H. is a Greenbacker in politics and belongs to the Christian Church. His life has certainly been a perfect success.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohle

NELSON O. HOPKINS, JR
., a leading farmer, stock raiser and feeder of this township, in section 6, is a native of Atchison County, and was born September 5, 1846, being a son of Hon. Nelson O. and Catharine (Hughes) Hopkins. His parents were natives of Kentucky, and came to Atchison County at an early day. Young Hopkins spent his boyhood days and received an excellent education in this county, commencing business life for himself as a farmer. He was married April 30, 1872, to Miss Mary G. Evens, a native of Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, born June 29, 1843, being a daughter of Gabriel and Mary Evens. Her father was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in 1788, and died in 1863. Her mother, a native of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, was born in 1800, and is still living. They were married in 1821, and in 1839, moved to Ohio, where Mrs. E. now resides. After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. H. in Ohio, they came directly to this county and settled where they now reside. His farm consists of 400 acres of finely improved land, on West Tarkio. They have three children living: Frank, Elizabeth and Nelson; having lost one son, Horace H. Mrs. Hopkins is a member of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES SMITH HOWELL,
farmer, teacher and surveyor, is the owner of 100 acres of land, on section 1, and also has a farm in Nebraska. He was born in Orange County, New York, February 12, 1822. He had but limited opportunity for acquiring an education, but was a great student from early childhood. He commenced to teach a common school at the age of fourteen years. He has studied and taught for forty years, and has become a thorough scholar and an accomplished and practical teacher. He was elected county surveyor, in 1876, and served four years with great credit. He owned a farm and lived in High Creek for several years, also in Iowa and Nebraska. Mr. Howell married Eliza Jane Pound, in 1843. She was the daughter of Isaac Pound, of Orange County, New York. Her mother was Elizabeth Davis, of Orange County, who is now ninety-five years old and in good health. They have nine children living: Sarah Mariah (now Mrs. Austin Humphrey), Margaret (wife of L.D. Sturdevant), Josephine (now Mrs. J.H. Smith), Eliza J. (now Mrs. W.H. Spurlock), Amanda (wife of C.W. Lizotte), James W., Jesse E., Minnie May and Rosetta. DeWitt C. was drowned in the Mississippi River, at Davenport, Iowa. Arabella died in Nebraska, when two years old. They have seventeen grandchildren, many of whom are among the most promising youth of the country. A granddaughter, Miss Julia E. Humphrey, of Lincoln, Nebraska, is a graduate of the Lincoln High School, and a talented young lady, she being among the most accomplished musicians of the state. The life of Mr. Howell has been a grand success, as all will acknowledge.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES B. HURST,
farmer, section 6, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, in 1842. His parents were James and Elizabeth Hurst, the former a native of Maine, who, when at the age of seven years, with his parents, moved to Ohio. He was a mason by occupation and worked at that trade for over fifty years. He was twice married. The mother of Charles B. was a native of Pennsylvania, and she early accompanied her parents to Ohio. There they were married, after which they settled in Pickaway County, remaining till 1852, when they moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, and in the fall of 1853 to Holt County, Missouri. In the spring of 1855 they located near Rock Port, Atchison County, and afterward, in 1869, moved to Lincoln Township. The father died in 1879 and the mother still survives. The subject of this sketch came to Missouri with his parents. He started out in life for himself, as a farmer, in 1863, commencing with comparatively nothing. He now owns a fine farm of 114 acres. Mr. Hurst was married April 8, 1866, to Miss C. Rich, a native of Illinois, born in February, 1848. She was a daughter of Washington and Julia Rich, natives of Pennsylvania, who moved to Illinois in an early day. Mr. and Mrs. H. have five children living: Linley S., Finley D., Mary S., Sophia S. and Benjamin B., having lost one, Aara L. Mr. and Mrs. H. are both members of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

H. P. HURST,
farmer, section 19, is a native of Fayette County, Ohio, where he was born May 13, 1844. He was a son of William and Charlotte (Duval) Hurst. The former was a native of Pickaway County, Ohio, and his mother of Ohio. The subject of this narrative, with his parents, moved to Clarke County, Missouri, in 1858, and the following year settled near Corning, Holt County, Missouri. He started out in life as a farmer, in Clark Township, Atchison County, in 1865. In 1871 he was married to Miss Angeline Hindman, a native of Holt County, born April 18, 1850. Her parents were John and Jane Hindman. The former was a native of Clay County, Missouri, and the latter of Holt County, Missouri. They came to Atchison County in 1858, and in that year Mr. Hindman was drowned. Mr. and Mrs. Hurst have a family of six children: Bertha J., Willie, Oscar, Clarence, Arena and Jessie. Mr. Hurst’s farm consists of 545 acres of fine land, with good buildings and surroundings, indicating the successful agriculturist.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ROBERT THOMAS HUNTER,
farmer, stock raiser and feeder, is the owner of 640 acres of land, his residence being on section 22. He was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, February 2, 1841. For some time he attended the common schools, and remained at home until manhood, when his father, Judge William Hunter, gave him the use of 320 acres of land. Young Robert embarked at once on the road that has led him to a fortune. He commenced to raise corn and buy stock, and with his profits he has purchased his section of land, though he still works his father’s 320 acre tract. Very few men in this county have obtained a competency so comparatively easy, though this is partly to be attributed to his genius for doing business and in buying and selling stock. In 1881, he raised his own corn and fed the stock which he sold for $11,000. In common with others he suffered much from the overflow. In 1881, lightning struck his barn, a very fine one, consuming this, together with his grain, hay, some ten horses and mules, harness, wagons, etc. Mr. Hunter has been twice married; first, in 1861, to Miss Ella Stout, daughter of Francis Stout, of Platte County. She died in 1870, leaving four children: William, Francis, John and Charles. His second wife was Martha J. Proudfit, daughter of the late Elias Proudfit, whom he married in 1872. They have lost five children, who died in infancy. One is living, Blanch. In politics he is a Democrat, and belongs to the Masonic fraternity. Elias Proudfit, father of Mrs. Hunter, came here in 1856, from Virginia, and bought and improved the farm where Mr. Hunter now lives. His wife was formerly Edith Reed. Their children were Mary (now Mrs. J.M. Sliger); Elizabeth (now Mrs. Thomas Cullins); Martha M. (Mrs. R.T. Hunter). Four sons are in other states. James died in 1865, Thomas died in 1860, Mrs. P. died in 1868, and Mr. P. in 1873.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM W. HUDGENS,
is a member of the firm of Hudgens & McMichael, druggists. His father, James W. Hudgens, was a native of Virginia and early emigrated to Kentucky, where he was married to Miss Lucinda Roberts, a Kentuckian by birth. William W. was born in Shelby County, of that state, July 5, 1855, and when but a child his parents and the family moved to Savannah, Andrew County, Missouri. In a few years Iowa Point, Kansas, became their home, from whence they went to Oregon, Holt County, Missouri, subsequently returning to Savannah. In 1862 they moved to Denver, but upon residing there one year, they located in Montana. Young Hudgens was page in the first legislature held in Montana. After he had lived in Montana for three years, he returned to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he studied the art of telegraphy. This he followed for a period of time, being employed by the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad Company. In 1869 he began clerking in the drug house of Penick & Loving, with whom he remained until 1874, when he accepted a position as traveling salesman with Samuel I. Smith & Co., wholesale druggists of St. Joseph. This position he held for three years, after which he became employed in a like manner by Sommers, Lynds & Co., of Quincy, Illinois. After remaining with that firm till May, 1879, he then came to Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri, having one year previous purchased a half interest in a stock of drugs which he opened in Rock Port. Here Mr. H. has since been engaged in his present business. He also conducted a branch store in Blanchard, Iowa, from October, 1879, till December, 1880. He now has the leading drug trade in Atchison County, and his is in reality the oldest established store in the city. He is a member of North West Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., and of Legion No. 12, S.K.A.O.U.W. Mr. Hudgens was married April 6, 1881, to Miss Alice M. Shelters, who was born in Atchison County, Missouri, in the year 1861. Her father, John L. Shelters, was a native of New York. They have one child, an infant.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JACOB HUGHES,
farmer, section 34, is a son of John and Sarah (Baird) Hughes, who were both natives of Ohio. Jacob Hughes was the oldest in a family of fourteen children, and was born in Adams County, Ohio, November 19, 1822. He was reared on a farm in his native county, and in the spring of 1844 came to Missouri. He was located in Buchanan County till the fall of the same year, when he removed to Atchison County, where he has since resided, and where he has made farming his occupation. He now has a farm of 300 acres of well improved land, which is worked by a man who thoroughly understands his business. In 1847 Mr. Hughes enlisted in the Mexican War, in Company C, Oregon Battalion, and was mustered in July 4, remaining in service till in November, 1848. He was married December 23, 1840, to Miss Malinda J. Thompson, who was born in Callaway County, Missouri, October 21, 1832. Her father, George C. Thompson, was a native of Tennessee, as was also her mother, formerly Elenor Leeper. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes have had a family of twelve children, six of whom are now living: Joseph C., Alice, William P., Francis M., Sarah and Jacob. Mr. Hughes is a member of North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

STOKELY STRATHER HUGHES,
county surveyor, first saw light in Cooper County, Missouri, on the 6th of April, 1838. His parents, John W. and Susan (Williams) Hughes, had previously come from Tennessee, in which state they were born. Stokely, as he is familiarly called, is the fourth child in a family of seven children. He was reared as a farmer’s boy, in his native county, and there attended the common schools, afterwards entering the seminary at California, and also at Boonville. While at school he gained quite a thorough knowledge of civil engineering and surveying, and when sixteen years of age he began teaching. In the year 1864, he helped to survey the Missouri Pacific Railroad through Cass, Johnson and Jackson Counties, Missouri, and in 1864 he went to Brownville, in this vicinity, and taught school many terms. Having also learned the art of telegraphy, in the year 1865 he was employed by the Western Union Telegraph Company, at a station on the plains. After this time he lived in different localities in Atchison County and at Hamburg, Iowa. In 1875, he came to Rock Port, and he has long been regarded as the surveyor of Atchison County, having been elected as such two terms. In 1877, he platted a map of Atchison County, and is the author of the first public work in the county. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and belongs to the I.O.O.F. Mr. Hughes was married February 14, 1869, to Miss Martha A. McCoy, of Virginia. She died July 6, 1864. They had two children, Julia and John. Mr. H. took for his second wife Miss Jane Rummerfield, their marriage occurring July 11, 1868. Four children are the fruits of this union: Olive, Lucy, Fannie and Philo De Witt. Mrs. Hughes is a native of Cass County, Illinois, and was born May 29, 1849. She was a daughter of Rodney Rummerfield, a native of Ohio, who, in 1843, came to Atchison County, and located in Nishnebotna Township. There he lived till the time of his death, in 1874. His widow, whose maiden name was Pricie Keethly, a native of Kentucky, now lives in Nishnebotna Township.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM HUNTER,
was born in Scotland, February 21, 1805. He was reared and educated in his native country, and, about the year 1821, he moved, with his parents Robert and Jennet (Carr) Hunter, to Nova Scotia, where his father died. About 1828 William Hunter left Nova Scotia and, after traveling through Maine, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, he finally located in Baltimore, where he was engaged in the distilling business for two years. He then went to Dayton, Ohio, and was interested in the same business for about three years, after which he moved to Lafayette, Indiana. The livery business there occupied his attention for nearly two years, at the expiration of which time he came to Missouri. After living in Buchanan County one year he came to Atchison County, in 1841, where he has since resided, following the occupation of farming. Mr. Hunter now lives on section 9, township 6, range 41, and has retired from active labor, on account of age. His landed estate consists of 900 acres. He has served as justice of the peace for eight years and as a member of the county court for seven years. He was married, in Indiana, in 1839, to Miss Elizabeth Ouschaw, who was born in Ohio, in 1807. She died in 1875. They had six children, of whom two are now living, Robert T. and John H. Being an old pioneer of this county Mr. H. is widely known and possesses the esteem of many acquaintances. In the discharge of his official duties he ever exercised a care and displayed excellent judgment. Though now advanced in years he bids fair to see many more days.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES HUNTER,
is an enterprising farmer of this township, his place of abode being on section 16, township 64, range 41. He was born in Scotland, April 23, 1813. In 1821, he emigrated with his parents to Nova Scotia, where he grew to manhood. He was there engaged in farming till 1846, when he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and located on the farm where he now resides. His landed estate consists of 500 acres. In 1849, while laboring under the gold excitement, Mr. H. went to California, where he was engaged in mining for one year. He was a member of the County Court of Atchison County for eleven years, and now belongs to the Masonic fraternity. He was married March 3, 1840, to Miss Elizabeth McKay. She was born in Nova Scotia, August 8, 1817. Her parents were natives of Scotland. She died April 2, 1875. They had nine children, eight of whom are now living: Robert, born December 26, 1840; Isabel, born February 19, 1844; William, born October 21, 1845; James A., born August 16, 1848; Janet K., born January 26, 1852; George L., born March 15, 1854; John W., born January 29, 1857; Una J., born December 31, 1859. All of these children are residents of Atchison County, Missouri, and the male members of the family are most industrious, and successfully situated in life.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ROBERT HUNTER,
a representative citizen of Atchison County, and one of the wealthiest merchants of the city of Rock Port, was born in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, December 21, 1841. His parents, James and Elizabeth Hunter, moved to the United States and settled in Atchison County in 1847. There young Robert received his education in the log cabin schools of that day. He is the eldest of a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters. His brothers are William, a farmer of the county; Dr. James A., a physician of Fairfax; George, a partner in his mercantile business in Rock Port, and John Walter. His sisters are: Isabel, wife of Jerry Bush; Mrs. John D. Campbell, of Rock Port; and Unie Jane, unmarried. Reared in habits of industry, and endowed with excellent perceptive faculties, he early achieved success in life. In 1864 he embarked, in partnership with E.L. Clark, in general merchandising on the spot where now stands his spacious and substantial brick business house in the town of Rock Port, and where he has been uninterruptedly engaged in business during all that period. In 1868 he married Miss Charlotte E. Buckham, daughter of Dr. Richard Buckham, the pioneer physician of the county. By this marriage he has four daughters: Ella, Drusa V., Lula R. and May. He is a member of no religious organization. In 1867 he was made a Master Mason in North Star Lodge No. 157, in Rock Port. He is also a member of Zerubbabel Royal Arch Chapter. In politics he has always been a Republican. His first vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Hunter is the owner of several fine farms in the county. On his home of 170 acres, a part of which is included within the limits of the city of Rock Port, stands one of the finest and perhaps the most spacious residences in the county. This structure is of brick, and was erected at a cost of about eleven thousand dollars. Liberal and public spirited, no man in the county enjoys a wider personal popularity than does Robert Hunter.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE T. HUNTER,
is a member of the firm of R. Hunter & Brother, of Rock Port, and of Hanna, Hunter & Co., of Tarkio, who are extensive dealers in general merchandise, furniture, agricultural implements, etc. He was born in Atchison County, Missouri, May 15, 1854, and here he has made his home during life. In 1878 he became interested in each of the present firms, previous to this having been engaged in farming and dealing in stock. He is also occupied in the stock business at the present time. Mr. Hunter married December 12, 1880, to Miss Hallie P. Coale. She was born in Atchison County, Missouri, September 21, 1860. They have one child, Una. He is a leading salesman, and a man possessed of excellent business qualities.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES A. HUNTER, M.D.,
a prominent practitioner of this county, was born in the vicinity of Rock Port, August 16, 1850. James Hunter, his father, and also his mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth McKay, were born in Scotland, and his grandparents early emigrated from Scotland and settled in Nova Scotia, when his parents were children. In 1847 they came to the United States and settled in Atchison County, near Rock Port, being among the very first settlers of the county. James A. spent his youth on his father’s farm and attended for a time the common schools. At the age of eighteen years he went to Macon County and entered the McGee College, where he spent three years. In the fall of 1871 he engaged in teaching, which profession he followed one year. In the fall of 1872 he began the study of medicine, at Rock Port, with Dr. J.L. Tracy. In the winters of 1873 and 1874 he attended lectures at the St. Louis Medical College, and also in the winters of 1874 and 1875, graduating from this institution in February, 1875. The doctor soon commenced the practice of his profession at Milton, Atchison County, and there he remained and practiced six years, moving to Fairfax in the fall of 1881, and the winter following attended lectures at the Bellevue Hospital College, and was also graduated from this institution. The subject of this sketch was married in Milton, February 29, 1876, to Miss Amanda Graves, daughter of J.P. and Ann Graves. She was born in Kentucky. Doctor and Mrs. Hunter have three children: Owen, Zetta and James Don. Mrs. Hunter is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The doctor belongs to the Masonic fraternity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES T. HURST,
was born on the 2nd of May, 1841, and is a native of Pickaway County, Ohio. His parents, William E. and Charlotte Hurst, nee Duvall, were also born in the same county. In 1843, the family left Pickaway for Fayette County, and there they made their home for thirteen years. In 1856, they moved to Clark County, Missouri, but after living there one year, came to Atchison County, and in 1857 or 1858, settled in Clark Township. The youthful days of James T. were passed on a farm. He received but a limited education. September 13, 1864, he was married in this county to Miss Flavilla Kimball, who was born in Indiana, October 22, 1846. She died October 20, 1880, leaving a family of seven children: Willie H., Hattie Belle, Sarah Florence, John T., Charlotta, Ernest G. and Emma Villa. In 1865, Mr. Hurst moved upon his present farm, which consists of 160 acres in his home place, besides 80 acres in another tract. A good orchard, with a variety of small fruit, adorns the place. In the fall of 1861, he enlisted in the army, and was in the state service for six months. In the spring of 1862, he re-enlisted in the Fifth Missouri Cavalry, receiving his discharge in 1863. Mr. Hurst was one of the pioneers of this county, and is widely and favorably known.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

E. E. HOWENDOBLER
is of the firm of Howendobler & Co., druggists and apothecaries, at Tarkio. Prominent among the rising young business men of Northwest Missouri is the subject of this sketch. He was born the 6th of July, 1861, in Clarinda, Page County, Iowa. His parents, Dr. Jacob and Sarah (Crotcher) Howendobler, were natives of Pennsylvania. They moved to Iowa in an early day and settled in Page County. Elmer E. is the third in a family of six living children. When he was about twelve years of age his father moved to Maryville, Nodaway County. There he was principally reared. He received a good business education, and was brought up to learn the drug business, consequently he understands it thoroughly. He came to Tarkio on the 5th of November, 1881, and opened a drug store in partnership with a brother, who is in the business at Maryville. He carries a large and complete assortment, and his long experience in business makes him a capable druggist. He well deserves the esteem in which he is held by a host of friends. Mr. H. is ably assisted in the store by a younger brother, J.W. Howendobler. He was also born in Clarinda, Iowa, on the 27th of October, 1862, and has also been reared in the drug business.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES G. HOWELL,
farmer and stock raiser, section 5, is a pioneer of Atchison County. He was born July 5, 1838, in Meigs County, Ohio. His father, Richard Howell, was a native of Canada and came to Ohio when a boy. His mother, Elmira (Tyler) Howell, was a native of Maine. Charles was reared on the farm at his birthplace and received a common school education. He accompanied his parents to Buchanan County, Missouri, in the spring of 1855, and thence to Atchison County, in the fall of that year. They settled on the Tarkio River, and soon afterward the subject of this sketch returned to St. Joseph, to learn the mercantile business with John Curd. After working one year he took a course at Westminster College, at Fulton, Callaway County, Missouri. Going again to St. Joseph in 1857, he entered the store, in which he continued one year. The close confinement was injuring his health and he was compelled to abandon this business. He then turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, with his father. During the war he served in the Enrolled Missouri Militia. He settled his present farm in March, 1871. It contains 160 acres of well improved land, besides a piece of timber land. Mr. H. has filled the various township offices. He was married January 1, 1866, to Miss Martha Caudle, a daughter of Hugh and Mary Caudle, who were both old settlers of Atchison County. She was born April 27, 1850, in Tarkio Township, and was raised here. They have four children: Prudentia, born June 27, 1867; Lafayette, born January 31, 1869; Lillie May, born February 9, 1872; Charlie F., born October 29, 1881. Lost one, Linley A. They are both members of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

P.H. HULL
, farmer and stock raiser, section 8, was born on the 13th of January, 1826, in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, and was the son of Joseph S. and Ruth (Smith) Hull, who were natives of the same county. P.H. Hull was the eldest in a family of nine children. His father was a farmer and cabinet maker, and his son spent his boyhood days on the farm, and also learned the cabinet trade. He received the benefits of a common school education. In 1863, he settled in Sheffield, Bureau County, Illinois, where he resided for six years. In the fall of 1869, he came to Missouri, locating in Nodaway County, near the line of Atchison County, and in January, 1874, he settled where he now resides. It was then in an uncultivated condition, but he has improved a farm of 160 acres, and now has a neat, comfortable residence, etc. Mr. Hull was married May 20, 1848, to Miss Mary J. Lunce, daughter of Joshua and Mary Lunce. She was a native of the same county as her husband, and was born November 24, 1827. They have seven children: Eliza A., born June 22, 1849 (now Mrs. Miles Warren, of Oregon); John S., born May 6, 1852; Joseph S., born February 3, 1858; Theodore Y., born August 24, 1860; Eleazer S., born December 3, 1863; Mary L., born March 9, 1868, and Warren, born November 3, 1870. Two are deceased.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES A. HURLEY,
farmer and stock raiser, section 1. The subject of this sketch was born June 10, 1834, in Cocke County, Tennessee. His parents, James and Sarah (Gillet) Hurley, were natives of Tennessee. James was raised on a farm and received a common school education, and during life he has given his attention to agricultural pursuits. During the war he espoused the southern cause, shouldered his musket and went to the front. In November, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Sixty-first Tennessee, under General Bragg, and was afterward transferred to General Pemberton’s command. He took part in the battles of Tazewell, Tennessee, Azure City, Chickasaw Bayou, Black River Bridge, and Siege of Vicksburg. His regiment was captured here, but he happened to be on the outside and escaped with Johnston. He then joined the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry and went through the Atlanta campaign and thence before Sherman to the sea and finally surrendered at Greensburg, North Carolina, April 26, 1865. At the close of the war Mr. Hurley emigrated west, intending to go to Salt Lake City. He stopped awhile at Rock Port and finally located here. In 1877 he settled on his present farm. He owns 250 acres, well improved, with a neat residence, young orchard, etc. He has filled the position of school director some six years, and has often been road overseer. He was married on the 28th of November, 1867, to Miss Rachel Frampton, a native of Clay County, Missouri, and a daughter of Isaac and Clarinda Frampton. She was born July 27, 1845. They have five children: Sarah, born September 27, 1868; Gertrude, born May 11, 1870; John, October 10, 1876; Clarinda, born in October, 1877, and Lydia, born July 12, 1881. Mrs. H. is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of Rock Creek.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOEL AYERS HORN
was born in Cass County, Illinois, July 15, 1830. His father was Reddick Horn, of Logan County, Kentucky, and his mother, formerly Milly Stribbling, was also a Kentuckian by birth. She died in 1859. Joel came to this state and county in the spring of 1851, and settled in Sonora, where he has lived for most of the time since. In the spring of 1864 he took a trip to Montana and was engaged in mining and the grocery business. After remaining there for two years he sold out and returned, in the winter by the overland route, suffering many hardships. He went to Nebraska in an early day and made several claims, but subsequently sold them, and finally returned to Sonora, where he remained until the spring of 1882, when he came to Watson. He has bought and sold several farms, and has been occupied in dealing in stock, etc., very successfully. His farm of sixty-four acres is well improved. Mr. H. is one of the reliable men of Watson, and is interested in every enterprise looking towards the improvement of Watson and its society. In all his business affairs he has retained an honorable name, and no man in the community has a better standing for integrity. He is a constant attendant of the church, and has the confidence of the community to a great extent. Mr. Horn is a member of the Odd Fellows order. In politics he is a Union Democrat. He married Miss Addie L. Crockett, in August, 1860. She was a daughter of Leander Crockett, of this town. They had two children: Lee Reddick, born in Nebraska City in 1867, and Carrie Lambuth, born in Sonora in 1869. Mrs. Horn died September 11, 1869, at Chillicothe, and was buried at Sonora. Reddick Horn was a preacher of the M.E. Church, and organized the first church in Sonora. He afterwards moved to Pawnee City, Nebraska, then sold out and moved to Pawnee County, where he died in 1858.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN J. C. HAYES; Among the prominent and representative farmers of Atchison county, Missouri, is John J. C. Hayes, the subject of this sketch. He has been a resident of the state since 1869 and has done much to develop the agricultural interests of his section. Mr. Hayes was born in Barren county, Kentucky, March 7, 1848, and was a son of William and Sidonia (Harding) Hayes, both
natives of Kentucky, who reared the following children: William H., a farmer at Farragut, Iowa; our subject; James T., deceased; Mrs. Sidonia Wilson, deceased; Charles M., deceased; Mrs. Mary L. Lafolette, of Oklahoma; Millard F., of Atchison county; Mrs. Nancy Phelps, of Nebraska; and Augusta W. William Hayes, the father of our subject, was a son of William Hayes, well-known in his native state of Kentucky, at an early day. The former grew to manhood and married in Kentucky, removing to Holt county, Missouri, about 1851. This location did not please him and six months later he went to Cass county, Illinois, where he first rented land and later bought a farm, which he cultivated until 1866. The lands of Iowa then attracted his attention and he removed to Fremont county, where he purchased land and remained during life, his death occurring April 30, 1899, when he had reached his seventy-fourth year. He was an honest, worthy citizen who accumulated a competence by his own endeavors. He was well and favorably known, and was a very prominent and useful member of the Methodist church, in which he had filled every position except that of minister. The first wife of Mr. Hayes was a daughter of John Harding, a planter and owner of slaves, in Kentucky, who, having lost heavily during the Civil war, removed to Red Oak, Iowa, about 1880. He had married Sarah Clemens, also of Kentucky, a good and religious woman. Their family record is as follows: Sidonia, the mother of our subject; James, John, William, Winfield, Augustine, Mary, Sarah, Minnie, Milla and Harriet. Mrs. Hayes, the mother of our subject, died April 14, 1864. Her life had been one of good deeds, and when her last hour came she testified to the peace which was vouchsafed for her. Mr. Hayes married Eliza E. Bidleman. September 20, 1864, and the children of this marriage were Frank, Wesley, Charles, J. G., Saphronia, Ida, and three infants who passed away in early life.
Mr. Hayes, who is the subject of this sketch, was reared at home and received his education in the district schools. He engaged in farming at Red Oak, Iowa, but in 1869 came to Missouri, marrying here the same year. He engaged in farming near Fairfax, where he rented some land, later buying and then selling several other tracts and at length returned to Iowa. For a time he resided in Nebraska, but in 1894 he returned to Missouri and purchased the farm of two hundred and forty acres where he now resides. There was much to be done in the way of repairs when Mr. Hayes took charge of this place, but he has spared neither time, money or labor in the way of improvements, until now he has one of the best equipped and best cultivated farms in the county. His buildings, fences, orchards and ornamental trees and shrubbery make his farm one of the most attractive in the section. As these changes have been the result of his own efforts, our subject has reason to be gratified with them. He has done a general farming business, also raising cattle and stock. While he resided in Iowa he engaged for two years in the mercantile business.
The marriage of Mr. Hayes took place October 31, 1869, to Miss Margaret Gilkinson, a lady of intelligence, and a member of an old and honored pioneer family of this county. James Gilkinson, the father of Mrs. Hayes, came to Missouri from Kentucky when but a boy, married and reared his family in this county and died here in December, 1877. He was an excellent man,
a good citizen and a valued member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. His children were John, Mrs. Hayes, Joseph, and Mrs. Malinda J. Sharer. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hayes are the following: Luella, who died at the age of eighteen months; James W., deceased: Essa M., now Mrs. J. A. Roads; George A., deceased: Elmer E., Herbert A. and Oren R.
Mr. Hayes is a Republican in his political opinions, although he has never been a seeker of office. Mrs. Hayes is a valued and consistent member of the United Brethren church, where she is recognized as a most worthy and Christian woman. The family is one of the most highly respected in this part of the county, where they are so well known.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

JAMES A. HUNTER, M. D.; Dr. James A. Hunter, a public-spirited citizen and prominent physician of Atchison county, Missouri, is a descendant of one of the honored pioneer families of that county. He is a son of James and Elizabeth (McKay) Hunter, and was born in Atchison county, August 16, 1850, Robert Hunter, the grandfather of our subject, was a native of Scotland, but for many years lived in Nova Scotia. His children were: William, who died in Atchison county; John, who died in Nevada; James, the father of our subject; and Janet, who was Mrs. Casey, and died in Atchison county in 1894. James Hunter, the father of our subject, was born in Scotland, but moved with his parents to Nova Scotia, where he lived until after three of his children were born. He then moved to Atchison county, Missouri, in 1847, where he carried on farming until the time of his death, which occurred in October, 1885. He was a prominent Republican, and served as county judge for twelve years. A man of sterling integrity, and of upright character, he won many friends all through life and his death was much regretted by all who knew him. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and also a Mason. He married Elizabeth McKay, who was a native of Nova Scotia, but of Scotch descent. Her death occurred April 2, 1875. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter had eight children, all of whom are now living. They are: Robert, of Rockport; Mrs. Isabelle Bush, of Wyoming; William, a farmer of this county; James A., the subject of this sketch; Jennie K. Campbell; George T., a live-stock commissioner of St. Joseph, Missouri; John W., in the stock business in Wyoming; and Una, the wife of J. Bailey.
Dr. James A. Hunter was reared and educated in this county. He began his education in the common schools of his native town and attended. McGee College, in Macon county, Missouri, for three years. He then taught school one year, and in 1872 began reading medicine with Dr. J. L. Tracy, of Rockport, Missouri, as his preceptor. In 1872-5 he attended lectures at the St. Louis Medical College, and was graduated in the spring of 1875. Dr. Hunter was a thorough student and started in practice well equipped in the knowledge necessary in the practice of his profession. After practicing six years in Milton, Missouri, he took a course at Bellevue Hospital, New York, graduating there in 1881. He then located in Fairfax, buying the first lot sold in the town. His practice is large and lucrative, and he has many patients throughout the county, where by his kind and courteous manner he has won a host of warm friends. He is now engaged with the Elliot Hunter Drug Company, where all modern medical appliances may be obtained. Dr. Hunter has a fine residence and office, and besides this owns considerable property at Fairfax. He is a loyal and upright Citizen, always lending his assistance in anything which tends to develop the town in which he lives. Politically the Doctor is a firm Republican, but has never aspired to office.
February 29, 1876, Dr. Hunter was united in marriage with Amanda Graves, a daughter of J. P. Graves, formerly of Kentucky, but for many years a prominent farmer of Atchison county. J. P. Graves had nine children, who are as follows: William J.; Sarah, who was Mrs. J. R. Treat; David; Mary, the wife of J. Galliway; Elizabeth, deceased; John H.; Amanda, the wife of our subject; Julia; and Emma, who married W. W. Scarlett.
Dr. Hunter and his wife are the parents of five children: Owen A., born January 5, 1877, a practicing physician of Corning, Missouri; Zita, born August 21, ^79; J- Don, born June 13, 1881; Beulah, born November 9, 1887; and Basil, born April 27, 1889. The parents are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church; and Dr. Hunter is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Missouri Valley Medical Society.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

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