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ARAD S. LAKIN; was born in Delaware county New York, in the year 1810.  His father, Jonas Lakin removed from Maryland to the Empire state in early pioneer days. He was born in 1760 and died in 1846. He was one of those prominent figures in the community in which he lived that are occasionally found,—being an extensive farmer, the merchant of his community, officiated as magistrate, and in other public capacities. One of his peculiarly striking characteristics was his opposition to orthodoxy, and when his son, Arad S. Lakin, permitted himself to be converted at a Methodist revival, he disinherited him. He married Prudence Parks, a daughter of that Mr. Parks that carried the news of the approach of the Indians when they were planning the massacre of the Wyoming settlers, and who made the journey, forty miles, through an unbroken wilderness. Arad S. Lakin was one of seven children that grew to mature years and by his own efforts acquired the rudiments of an education. He never attended a college. While he remained at home he aided his father in the work of the farm. He was intellectual, determined in his purpose and was a natural leader of men, thus partaking in a most striking manner of the leading characteristics of his father. When converted to Christianity, as mentioned above, he was eighteen years of age, and he was immediately sought out by the leading members of the church to take an active part in the work of the same. With the assistance of local teachers he prepared himself for the work he felt himself .called upon to do, and was soon a pronounced success in this, to him new field. So remarkable were his gifts that he was styled by his admirers the “Delaware prodigy." His mental strength, his comprehensive grasp of great religious and moral questions, and his courage to dare and to do what seemed to him right, were his most remarkable characteristics. The work he performed was that of an organizer in the pastorate, and his fame soon spread far and wide. The third call he received, to become a pastor in New York City, was accepted by him; but in 1854 he left the east, taking up his residence in Indianapolis. In this far western state he soon became equally prominent in church work as he had been in the east, and he was acquainted, in both the east and west, with many of the ablest divines and public men of his time.  He was held in high regard by Governor Morton, the "war governor" of the state; and when troops were needed to suppress the greatest rebellion of history, his patriotic words induced many young men in Indiana to join the Union army. He himself enlisted as a private soldier in the regiment which he assisted to raise; but the parents of the boys insisted upon his being made chaplain of the regiment, in order that he might the more readily and easily look after the welfare of their sons. At first this regiment was the Thirty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but later it was changed to the Eighth Cavalry; and although it was not the province of the chaplain to carry a gun, yet Mr. Lakin carried one, which he carried to the firing line, and thus inspired by his example all the boys to greater efforts and greater deeds of bravery than perhaps they would otherwise have felt called upon to perform. He was conspicuously fearless, saying frequently that "man is immortal till his work is done." On one occasion General Thomas called for volunteers to carry a dispatch through and between the lines of the enemy amidst a shower of bullets to a federal officer beyond, and as there seemed to be no one willing to take the risk Rev. Mr. Lakin rode up, saluted and said: "General, I'll take it." Being reluctantly permitted to carry the message, he went safely through the enemy's lines and returned from the delivery of the dispatch as safely as he went. At one time he was recalled to Indiana to recruit for the depleted regiments at the front, and his efforts had much to do with saving north Indiana from the grasp of the "Copperhead" Democracy. At Atlanta, just as Sherman was starting on his march to the sea, Rev. Mr. Lakin was discharged from the service; but at his request to be permitted to accompany the army at his own expense, in order that he might continue to he of service to the men of the regiment, he was permitted to go. From Savannah he made his way to New York and thence to Indianapolis.  After the close of the war, when affairs in the southern states were settling down to something like their normal condition, the Methodist church needed a man to take charge of its work in those states. As no man that could be found seemed so well equipped for this work as Rev. Mr. Lakin, he was chosen by the Cincinnati conference to enter upon this labor. His especial mission into the southern states was to re-organize the Methodist Episcopal Church, which had not seceded or favored secession; and he found at Huntsville, Alabama, the former church practically without members. After being in the south twenty years, so effective had been his work that there were then two large conferences, white and black, with thousands of members, and the Methodist Episcopal church is still in a flourishing condition in those states.  At the request of his daughter, Rev. Lakin returned to the north in 1885, to pass the remaining years of his life with her.
At that time he was seventy-rive years of age, and had the health to warrant his friends' belief that he would reach his one hundredth year. When his mother died she was past one hundred and seven, and his father died at the age of eighty-six. And these friends still believe that had some duty called into daily activity his powers of mind his life would certainly have been prolonged beyond the year 1890, when he died, at the age of eighty years. His wife died in Huntsville, and the two lie side by side in the cemetery near that place.
Mrs. Raines is the only child of Rev. and Mrs. Achsah La Bar (Newton) Lakin. She was born in Delaware county, New York, June 21, 1839. She and her husband, the subject of this sketch, are the parents of the following children: Mary Edith, a teacher in the high school of St. Joseph, Missouri, having graduated at the high school at Rockport. then the Tarkio College and finally Wellesley College, taking honors in all three institutions; Herbert L., a jeweler of Tarkio; Earle M. with the First National Bank of Tarkio, and Laura T., a graduate of Tarkio College and now a teacher in the Rockport schools.  Men, like children, are to a greater or less extent, imitative in their lives. They are in numerous cases led to accomplish results by the reflections that those gone before have done good and worthy deeds; and he is this reason, in part, that makes biographical sketches, like the one now drawing to a close, of such value to young readers, awakening in them, as they do, the ambition to "go and do likewise," the result being more heroic lives than otherwise would be led. It is a great pleasure to the publishers to be permitted to place in enduring form the record of the deeds of such men as Mr. Raines and his father-in-law, Rev. Mr. Lakin, the latter of whom was certainly one of the most patriotic and brave of men. Mr. Raines is still living; still greater praise for him will be appropriate after he shall have been "gathered to his fathers."
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

JOHN LARAMORE, farmer and stock raiser, section 18, was born November 12, 1818, in Caroline County, Maryland. His parents, Thomas and Mary (Blades) Laramore, were natives of Maryland. John was taken to Kent County, Delaware, when quite young and there spent his youth on a farm, receiving a common school education. In 1857 he immigrated to Bureau County, Illinois, and resided there for nine years, after which he went to Stark County, of the same state, and thence to Fremont County, Iowa, in March, 1874; after remaining there one year, he went to Page County, Iowa. He came to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1879, and in 1881 he moved to Shenandoah, Iowa. In April, 1879, he settled the place where he now resides, soon returned and settled upon it permanently in the spring of 1882. It contains 160 acres of fine land, improved. Mr. Laramore was married February 13, 1840, to Miss Dorcas Wyatt, a native of Kent County, Delaware, born April 12, 1823. She was a daughter of Moses and Sarah Wyatt. They have twelve children: James H., born August 7, 1841; Nancy E., born January 12, 1845 (now Mrs. William Deal, of Nebraska); Sarah C., born September 4, 1846 (now Mrs. Joseph Andrews, of Nebraska); John W.B., born November 22, 1850; William T., born July 12, 1853; Willmina G., born September 23, 1848 (now Mrs. John Gudgel, of Iowa); Willis H., born September 13, 1857; Susan M., born June 14, 1860; Aner, born February 18, 1862; George G., born May 19, 1863; Sherman, born June 22, 1866; Isabella, born April 21, 1869. Mr. L. and wife are members of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES W., ELIZA AND FRANK LEE, who are natives of Canada, were the children of W.T. and Margaret Lee, nee Woodhull. The former was born in Canada, February 28, 1838. He there spent his boyhood days, and received an excellent education, beginning life for himself as a farmer. December 5, 1859, he married Miss Margaret Woodhull, after which they settled in Canada, where they continued to reside until 1870, then coming direct to Atchison County, Missouri, and settling in section 7, Lincoln Township, May 9, 1872. Mr. W.T. Lee died, and subsequently his widow was married to A.B. Wilkinson. She departed this life September 3, 1878, leaving three children by her second marriage. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Lee, Charles W., Eliza and Frank, now reside on the old homestead, which contains 120 acres of excellently improved land.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.
 
MARTIN L. LEE, clerk of Atchison County, is a native of Illinois, and was born in Cass County, April 8, 1840. His father, Caleb Lee, was a native of Virginia, and is supposed to have been a relative of General Lee. Martin’s mother, Matilda Higgins, was born in Maryland. She died in the year 1847, and his father in 1847. Young Lee was reared in Illinois, and was educated in the Wesleyan University of Bloomington, in that state. In the year 1863, he was graduated from Eastman’s Commercial College, of Poughkeepsie, New York. He commenced teaching school when seventeen years of age. He continued that profession for seven years. In 1865, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, first locating at Sonora, where he was engaged in clerking and carrying on the mercantile business at different locations in the county until 1870. Mr. Lee then came to Rock Port, where he resumed clerking. In the fall of 1872, he was elected state and county collector, and was re-elected in the fall of 1874. In 1877, he embarked in the mercantile trade, which he continued till 1880, having been elected by the Republican party as county clerk during the fall of 1878. This position he is at present filling. He is a member of North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M., and Rock Port Lodge No. 125, I.O.O.F. Mr. Lee was married September 2, 1866, to Miss Nancy P. Trumble. He was born in Nicholas County, Kentucky, July 29, 1847. They have five children: Lulu L., Don T., Carrie W., Martin L., Jr., and Nannie.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HENRY LEMON, the leading merchant of Nishnebotna Station, was born in Canada, May 1, 1829. Samuel Lemon, his father, and his mother, Elizabeth (Sovereign) Lemon, were also Canadians by birth. In 1842, they moved to Ohio, but only remained in that state for one year, after which they returned to Canada. Henry passed his younger days on a farm and in a blacksmith shop, his education being obtained in the common schools of Canada. His marriage to Miss Sarah Ann Jarvis occurred on the 27th of April, 1857, in his native country. Mrs. Lemon was born in Canada, March 18, 1835. They have a family of six children: Sarah Ann, (wife of William Simering) born February 14, 1858; William H., born May 5, 1859; Mary Levina, born January 20, 1861; Lewis L., born February 11, 1864; Eliza E., born September 24, 1869, and Harriet E., born February 9, 1875. In 1840, the subject of this sketch moved to the United States and soon came to Atchison County, Missouri, where he opened the pioneer store at Nishnebotna Station. In 1871, he, himself, built the store which he has since occupied.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ADAM LIESS, farmer, section 22, was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria, Germany, in March, 1826. He was well educated and was brought up a farmer, coming to this country in 1854, and settling near Cleveland, Ohio, where he bought a farm. He remained there for five years, then moved to Nebraska City and rented a farm, and in 1865, he came to this township and rented land of Mr. Grosebeck. In February, 1866, he bought eighty acres of prairie and forty of timber, earning this money by hard work. He brought some means from Germany, but lost it all in Ohio. He chose one of the best selections of land that can be found in this township, has made many valuable improvements and additions to his farm, and now owns 315 acres. His residence is a good one, and his vineyard embraces three-quarters of an acre. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and a Republican in politics. Mr. Leiss married Miss Catharine Hildabrandt, in Germany, in 1853. She died in 1873, leaving five children: John Adam, Anna Barbara, Ernst Christian, Louisa and Frederick. His second wife was Mrs. Amelia Folk, of St. Joseph, whom he married in 1873. She has one child by her former husband, Emma. By this latter union there are five children: George, Joseph, Julia, Mina and Mary. Mr. L. was a faithful soldier for four years, entering the cavalry in 1849, in one of the eastern wars.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob LinebaughJACOB LINEBAUGH; One of the most extensive land-owners of Nodaway county is Jacob Linebaugh, who is now living a retired life. He belongs to that class of representative American citizens who owe their success to their own efforts, whose labors have been diligently prosecuted and whose energies have been directed along well defined lines of labor. In this manner he has continued increasing his capital and to-day he stands among the most affluent residents of that community and is now enjoying a well earned rest.
Mr. Linebaugh was born January 13, 1829, in Tennessee, his birth having occurred in Greene county. He is a son of John and Sarah (Tucker) Linebaugh, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. The paternal grandfather, John Linebaugh, Sr., removed from the Keystone state to Indiana, becoming one of the honored pioneers of the locality in which he located. The father of our subject removed with his family to Indiana, where the mother died. In an early period in the development of Iowa he became a resident of Page county, that state, where his death occurred, at the age of sixty-three years. Throughout his entire life he carried on agricultural pursuits and in that way provided for his family. He had six children, but only two are now living—Abram and Jacob.
The latter was but five years of age when his parents removed with their children to Fountain county, Indiana, where he was reared to manhood. He was early trained to habits of industry and economy upon the home farm and from an early age assisted in the cultivation of the fields. In 1850, two years after the arrival of his father in Iowa, he emigrated to that state, locating in Page county before it was organized. He there secured a tract of wild land and when it came into market entered his claim. In the work of reclaiming the section for purposes of civilization he bore an active part and became one of the founders of the county. He aided in its organization and in other ways was active in promoting its interests, there residing until about 1860, when he removed to Nodaway county, Missouri. He was married on the 6th of January, 1853, to Miss Mary A. Gray, who was born in Tennessee, a daughter of Martin and Nancy (Langtry) Gray. Her father was a native of North Carolina and was a son of William Martin. His death occurred in Nodaway county, at the ripe old age of nearly eighty-six years, and his widow is now living with our subject, at the age of eighty-nine. Mrs. Linebaugh's great-grandfather was one of the Revolutionary heroes who valiantly fought for the independence of the nation, and in the struggle was wounded. Her people have all been farmers, living quiet, industrious and honorable lives. She was one of twelve children, but only six are now living.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Linebaugh have been born seven children, four of whom survive: William Jefferson is married and has one child. Sarah J., their eldest child, is married and has seven children. Julia A. is the next of the family. Marietta is married and has two children and has lost one. Francis M., their eldest son, was married and at his death left a wife and one child. He was one of the young representative farmers of the community, active and enterprising in business and honorable in all life's relations. He commanded the respect of all who knew him for his upright life and in his death Nodaway county lost one of its valued citizens. He was taken in the prime of life, but he left to the family an untarnished name. The others who have passed away are Martha Ella and Martin E.
For many years Mr. Linebaugh was actively connected with the farming interests of Nodaway county. From time to time he added to his original purchase until he became the owner of sixteen hundred acres of land, which made him one of the extensive realty holders in this community. He placed much of it under a high state of cultivation and the well-tilled fields brought to him a good income. He carried on general farming and everything about his place denoted his careful supervision and care as well as his progressive and practical methods. Of recent years, however, he has lived retired. Formerly he raised stock and grain on an extensive scale, but with a handsome competence to supply him with all of the necessities and comforts of life he put aside business cares, leaving to younger shoulders the burdens which he had long borne. In business matters he showed keen discrimination and sound judgment, and these qualities, combined with his unfaltering energy, led to his success. He cast his first presidential vote for J. K. Polk and is now an earnest supporter of the Democratic party. He holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and nearly all of the family are identified with that religious organization. Jacob Linebaugh and his wife arc well known in northwestern Missouri, and no one has ever been heard to say aught against them. His name is a synonym for honesty in all business dealings, and in every relation of life he has been prompted by manly principle and by a true spirit of Christianity.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

GEORGE W.C. LITTELL was born in Greene County, Illinois, May 1, 1840. His father, Aaron Littell, and his mother, formerly Jane Brown, were natives of New Jersey. In 1843 the family removed to Mason County, Illinois, where he spent his youth on a farm, attending for a time the common schools. In the spring of 1874 he came from Mason County to Nodaway County, Missouri, after having spent the winter in Linn County. Mr. L. resided in Nodaway County for nearly two years, and in the fall of 1875, came to Atchison County. He was married in Mason County, Illinois, February 15, 1860, to Miss Amanda Robinson, who was born near Manchester, Ohio, June 3, 1842, being a daughter of Dr. William R. Robinson. They have nine children living: Aaron, born December 31, 1861; Martha A., born March 20, 1863; William R., born September 30, 1864; Carrie E., born February 3, 1870; Fannie H., born February 20, 1872; Walter B., born March 6, 1874; Corwin Pearl, born March 8, 1876; Catharine E., born March 1, 1878, and Weaver, born July 12, 1880. During the war Mr. L. was in service for three years, being a member of Company C, Second Illinois Cavalry. He was on detached duty most of the time, and was in numerous engagements. He now owns 690 acres of land all fenced and improved, with an orchard of 150 apple, 200 peach and other trees besides an abundance of small fruit. He is successfully engaged in the feeding of cattle and hogs as well as farming. Politically, he is independent.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE W. LITTLER is a native of Greene County, Ohio, where he was born July 13, 1834, his parents, Robinson and Catherine (Wilkerson) Littler, being Virginians by birth. George W. was brought up on a farm and for a while attended the common schools; however, the greater part of his education has been obtained since arriving at maturity and by his own energy and self-application. In 1876 he moved to Darke County, Ohio, where he resided for three years, then coming to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1879. He then settled on his place in section 1, and is now in possession of a fine farm of 320 acres, all under cultivation, with a good residence, barn, granary, etc. An orchard which adorns the place contains 150 apple and fifty peach trees, besides cherry, pear and plum trees. February 28, 1860, the marriage of Mr. Littler to Miss Mary J., the daughter of James Stillings, occurred in Greene County, Ohio. She was born in Clinton County, Ohio, January 28, 1835. They have six children living: Algernon W., born January 2, 1861; Rosa A., born April 14, 1862; David R., born February 3, 1864; James S., born October 28, 1865; Mary Ella, born December 4, 1869, and Josie May, born January 28, 1876. Three are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Littler are members of the Methodist Church. In his political views Mr. Littler is Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

AMOS B. LININGER, was born on the 31st of March, 1847, and is a native of Mercer County, Pennsylvania. His parents, Joseph Lininger and wife, were also born in Pennsylvania. The subject of this narrative grew to manhood on a farm in his native county, and attended for some time the common schools. In 1867, he came west, and for a period was located in Wisconsin and Iowa. For about eighteen months he was in Fillmore, Andrew County, Missouri, engaged in working at the blacksmith trade, after which he returned to Pennsylvania. In 1872, he again came to Missouri, and for one summer followed his trade in Milton, going from there to Rock Port in November, 1872. He was occupied in his chosen calling until March, 1874, when he moved to his farm in Clark Township. In the spring following he moved to his present place, which consists of 160 acres of land, all fenced, with eighty acres improved, and an orchard of 200 apple, 100 peach, and other fruit trees. He resides on section 23, township 64, range 40. Mr. Lininger was married in Atchison County, Missouri, March 3, 1874, to Miss Lydia Seymour, daughter of Leander and Lizzie Seymour. She was born in this county July 8, 1856. Mr. and Mrs. L. have two children: Elmer, born April 1, 1876, and Jesse Lee, born August 27, 1877. Mr. Lininger makes a specialty of handling and feeding stock.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

VALENTINE LIVINGSTON, farmer, section 16, was born January 26, 1817, in Pennsylvania. His father, Isaiah Livingston, and his mother, formerly Mary Boyce, were both natives of Pennsylvania. When Valentine was two years of age they moved to Ohio, where they remained two years. His parents then settled near Brookville, Indiana, and after residing there a few years removed to Shelby County, Indiana, where he was reared and educated, spending his boyhood days on a farm. He came to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1848, and here he has since continued to dwell. His landed estate consists of 1,000 acres, and he has also given liberally to his children. His home farm consists of 200 acres and has one of the best improved farms in the county, there being upon it an elegant residence, good barn, fine orchard, and, being  an old pioneer, he is widely and favorably known and holds the respect of a large circle of friends. Mr. Livingston was married January 31, 1839, to Miss Elizabeth Townsend, who was born in Adair County, Kentucky, September 5, 1818. Her parents, John and Mary (Atkins) Townsend, were natives of Virginia. When Elizabeth was sixteen years of age they went to Shelby County, Indiana, where she was married. Mr. and Mrs. L. have been blessed with six children, four of whom are now living: Alfred, Mary, Jane and Thomas. They are active members of the M.E. Church. Mr. L. has been a self-made man, as, when he came to Atchison County, his worldly possessions consisted of a yoke of cattle and fifty-five dollars in money. For four years this was his only team, and served for a plow team through the week and also to take the family to church on the Sabbath.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

LYMAN Z. LOTSPEICH was born November 23, 1841, in Menard County, Illinois. Eden Lotspeich, his father, was born in Ross County, Ohio, and was married to Melinda Caldwell, also a native of the state of Ohio. In 1846 they moved to Des Moines County, Iowa, where they still reside. Lyman Z. was raised in that county, his youth being spent on a farm. His education was received in the common schools, supplemented with one term’s attendance at the University of Mount Pleasant, Iowa. In 1867 he moved to Wayne County, Iowa, and was engaged in farming some two years, after which, in 1870, he went to Corydon County, and commenced to learn the blacksmith’s trade. At this business he labored for two years in that county, when he moved to Hamburg, Fremont County, Iowa, in the spring of 1872. There he resumed work at his trade, and after making his home in that place for six years, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1878, and settled on his present place in Dale Township, where he has since been carrying on farming and conducting a blacksmith shop. He owns eighty acres of land, all fenced, with an excellent new dwelling, and a small orchard. Mr. L. was married in Des Moines County, Iowa, September 30, 1868, to Miss Arminda Brown, daughter of Edward and Sarah Brown. She was born in Des Moines County, Iowa, in March, 1850. They have three children: Edward E., Charlie C. and Ula M. Mr. and Mrs. Lotspeich are members of the Advent Christian Church. He belongs to the Masonic order. In politics he is independent, but was raised a Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES F. LUJA, M.D., was born in Prussia, Germany, on May 27, 1837. He was reared and educated in his native country, and in 1857 he began the study of medicine. After a usual preparatory course, he was graduated in 1863, after which he was engaged in the practice of his profession till 1865. Dr. L. then came to America, and has since been occupied in attending to the duties of his chosen calling. He first landed in New York City, from whence, after remaining one year, he went to Richardson County, Nebraska. In 1875 he located in Holt County, Missouri, and in October, 1878, he came to Rock Port. Dr. Luja was married September 5, 1867, to Miss Eliza N. Storey, who was born in Highland, Kansas, September 25, 1850. They have three children: Louisa, Mary A. and Charles F. The doctor is fast becoming recognized as an able and skillful practitioner among his medical brethren, and though not such a great time has elapsed since his locating here, he has built up a good patronage.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

LORENTZ LUTZ, farmer and dealer in stock and grain, section 25, is the owner of eighty acres of land. He was born in Germany, in the year 1834, and came to this country with his father in 1839, settling in Cass County, Illinois, where the senior Lutz entered some land, which he improved. On this he remained until his death, in 1845, his wife dying in 1846. They left two children: Catharine Dorrity (now Mrs. Welch), and Lorentz, the subject of this sketch. In 1852 he came to Missouri, and in 1856 bought his present farm. In 1858 and 1859 he was engaged in freighting for the Government to Salt Lake and other western posts, and also driving stock to Fort Randall, etc. This he continued for four years successfully, when he returned. He married Miss Catharine Wilson, January 27, 1867. She was the daughter of Hon. Isaac Wilson, of this county. They have six children: Sarah Ann, Edmund Lee, Lillian Stella, Thomas Jefferson, Lulu Onie and William Dudley. Hon. Isaac Wilson, Mrs. L.’s father, was born in Virginia, December 24, 1794, and subsequently moved to Indiana, and in 1854 to Missouri, locating near Linden, then the county seat, improving a good farm. He married Ann Townsend, also of Virginia, born January 3, 1801. She died December 24, 1851, and May 27, 1874, he died. They had thirteen children, Mrs. Lutz being the youngest of the family. Mr. Wilson was elected to represent this county in the State Legislature in 1850, and made an honorable and faithful member. Mr. Lutz, on commencing life for himself, worked for the senior Addington at $10 per month. He now has a good farm.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ROBERT LYNN, proprietor of Tarkio nursery, situated on section 19, was born May 7, 1828, his native home being Ballymenia, County Antrim, Ireland. His parents were William and Agnes (Lamont) Lynn, who were of Scotch descent. Robert was the third child in a family of seven children. He was reared and educated in Ireland, and in 1846 he emigrated with his parents to Canada West, where he continued to live for twenty-two years. In 1865 he traveled through Illinois and Iowa and returned to Canada, and in the spring of 1868 came to Atchison County, Missouri, where he has since lived. His first intention was only to improve a fruit farm, but knowing the wants of a nursery in Atchison County, he shortly after embarked in the nursery business, and now has one of the most complete stocks in Northwest Missouri. A bearing orchard of 2,000 fruit trees and a grove of larch, pine and evergreens, containing about 6,000 trees, adorn the place. His farm contains 372 acres. Mr. Lynn is and has long been one of the leading grangers of Atchison County, having been a delegate to the State Grange, for four years, serving on the auditing committee. He was married March 3, 1863, to Miss Flora McKillop, a daughter of Donald and Ann McKillop. She was born in McGenty County, Province of Quebec, Canada, in November, 1841. They have eight children: Anna A., born December 11, 1863; Lizzie I., born September 15, 1865; Thomas, born July 25, 1867; Maggie, born September 22, 1869; Hugh A., born December 24, 1871; Carrie, born March 30, 1974, and Robert W. and Flora W. (twins) born March 26, 1877. Mr. Lynn and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church at Rock Port. He has held the position of elder in the same since 1870, and has been one of the most active of Sabbath school workers.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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