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Atchison County
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JOHN MACRANDER; This well-known pioneer and honored citizen of Lincoln township has been identified with the agricultural interests of Atchison county for many years, and has been a resident of Missouri since 1860. He comes from across the sea, his birth having occurred in Prussia, Germany, October 6, 1819—-the same year in which Queen Victoria was born. His father, John Macrander. spent his entire life in Prussia, following the trade of a dresser or tanner of fine skins. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Catherine Kramer, was a native of the same province, and died at the age of seventy-four years, while his death occurred when he was eighty-four years of age. They were both consistent members of the Lutheran church and reared their children in that faith. Their family consisted of four sons and one daughter, but the latter died young. The sons were Jacob, John, Georg« and Christian.
Attending school until fourteen years of age, the subject of this review acquired a good practical education, and with his father he learned the trade of skin dresser. Bidding his parents a sad farewell; he left his old home in Prussia at the age of twenty years, and after a voyage of sixty-nine days on a sailing vessel landed in Baltimore, Maryland. He spent one year at Fredericktown, that state, dressing deer skins, and in 1841 went to Roanoke county, Virginia, where he continued to follow his trade for six years. We next find him in Metamora, Woodford county, Illinois, where in connection with work at his trade he also engaged in farming until 1859, when he removed to Buchanan county, Missouri. The following year he took up his residence in Atchison county and purchased eighty acres of wild land in Lincoln township, which he has since converted into a fine farm that he now rents. His first home here was a log house, which has long since been replaced with a good frame residence, and everything about the place denotes the thrift and enterprise of a progressive owner.
In 1854, in Woodford county, Illinois, Mr. Macrander married Miss Sarah Frances Arthur, a native of Bedford county, Virginia, and a daughter of Eli Arthur, who also was born in the Old Dominion. She was reared and educated in that state and Illinois. Her parents both died in Missouri, at the age of sixty years. She and Mrs. Arthur were both faithful and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church and were highly respected and esteemed by all who knew them. Their children were Amaziah, Jane, Emeline, Sarah F., and Josephus and William Jordan, twins. Mr. and Mrs. Macrander are the parents of four children, namely: Mary, the wife of Thomas Ward, of Lincoln township; William, who is successfully engaged in farming on a farm of eighty acres in the same township; David, who owns and works a farm of ninety-four acres in Lincoln township; and George, who has a fine place of eighty acres in the same township. The last named married Miss Ida Wilson, a daughter of C. C. Wilson, of Tarkio, who served as a soldier of Company H, First Iowa Cavalry, during the Civil war. By this union has been born one child, Zerah Todd.
Politically Mr. Macrander is identified with the Republican party, and religiously both he and his wife are earnest members of the Christian church. They have reared their children with results of which they may be justly proud, and they occupy a position of prominence in the community where they reside.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

W. J. McMILLAN; W. J. McMillan is one of the early set tiers of Lincoln township, Atchison county. He came to northwestern Missouri during the era of its pioneer development and has witnessed most of its entire growth, having seen its wild lands reclaimed for purposes of civilization. Churches and schools have been built, indicating the advance of progress; towns and villages have sprung up, and the community has become settled by an intelligent and enterprising class of people. In the work of improvement Mr. McMillan has ever borne his part and is known as a loyal citizen. He is of Scotch-Irish descent and manifests in his career the sterling characteristics of those people, having the versatility of the latter and the steadfast thrift and reliability of the former.
Mr. McMillan was born in Ireland, on the 16th of September, 1848, and is a son of William McMillan, also a native of the green isle of Erin and of Scotch lineage. He married Margaret Jackson, a representative of a good family of county Antrim and a daughter of John Jackson, who also was a native of that county. Her mother belonged to the Bruce family, of the same county, her ancestors having been driven from Scotland at a period of persecution for a religious belief. To William and Margaret (Jackson) McMillan were born the following named: W. J., of this review; Mrs. Martha Ferguson, of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Eliza Gait, of Des Moines county, Iowa; Mrs. Mary Smith and John, who also are residents of Des Moines county; Mrs. Nannie Hensleigh, of Clarinda, Iowa, the wife of the present auditor of Page county; Mrs. Rose Stahl, of Monmouth Illinois; Maggie, who died a young woman; and Joseph, who died at the age of eighteen years.
During his infancy Mr. McMillan, the subject of this sketch, was brought by his parents to America. The family left Ireland in 1849. and after spending six months in New York city removed to Maysville. Kentucky, and in 1856 became residents of Des Moines, Iowa, living at Kossuth. They were among the early settlers there and were actively identified with the pioneer development of the county. In that locality W. J. McMillan of this review was reared upon a farm. He assisted in the arduous task of developing wild land and transforming it into richly cultivated fields and with the family bore the hardships and experiences which usually fall to the lot of the pioneer. He attended the schools of the neighborhood, although the advantages of that time were rather primitive, the sessions being held in a log cabin. However, reading and experience in later years have added greatly to his knowledge and he is now a well informed man. The first event which varied the monotony of his farm life came with the opening of the Civil war. He was a young boy in his 'teens when he enlisted for service as a member of the Ninth Illinois Cavalry, a regiment which made a brilliant record for gallantry. He served under the command of Captain C. G. Dack, Colonel Mock and General Thomas. His regiment was in some of the most hotly contested fights of the war. and in connection with the Second Iowa Cavalry met five I thousand Confederate troops under General Forrest, at Shoal creek, where the brilliant fighting of the Union troops won the highest admiration. Mr. McMillan also participated in the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, and of Nashville, and with his command followed General Hood's army to Alabama. He was in active service in the vicinity of Mobile, and when honorably discharged was but seventeen years of age. He is numbered among the soldier boys whose valor and bravery upon the field of battle were equal to that of the time-tried veterans. He went through all the experiences which fall to the lot of a soldier and was ever found at his post of duty, whether upon the firing line or upon tented fields.
W hen the war was over and the country no longer needed his services, Mr. McMillan returned to his father's farm and assisted in its cultivation for a time. His father is now deceased, having departed this life in Des Moines county, Iowa, at the age of seventy-four, while the mother is living, at the age of seventy-five. In politics he was a Democrat and in his religious belief a Presbyterian. They were widely known as earnest Christian people, as devoted parents, as kind neighbors and valued citizens.
Entering upon an independent business career. W. J. McMillan of this review began working as a farm hand and was thus employed until he had acquired five hundred dollars. He then invested his capital in a team and wagon, came to Missouri and purchased forty acres of land, upon which be built a log cabin, 14x14 feet. From that time success has attended his efforts. He worked from early morn until evening in improving and cultivating his fields, and in course of time abundant harvests rewarded his efforts. At different times, as his financial resources increased, he added to his property until he now has five hundred acres of as good land as can be found in the county. Upon the place is a very attractive and commodious residence, built in modern style and surrounded by shade and ornamental trees. In the rear stand good barns and outbuildings, and these and the fences are kept in good repair. The meadows, pastures and fields of grain indicate his careful supervision and progressive spirit, and the McMillan farm is one of the most desirable country seats in Atchison county.
At the age of twenty-six Mr. McMillan was united in marriage to Miss Nancy Jane McElroy, of Lincoln township, a daughter of John McElroy. She died in August, 1885, at the age of twenty-eight years, leaving three children—Bert, O. M. and Cora—the last named now the wife of E. E. Beck, of Lincoln township, Atchison county. On the 28th of March, 1889, Mr. McMillan was again married, his second union being with Miss Anna Scott, a representative of one of the respected families of the community. Her mother is Margaret Scott, of Des Moines county, Iowa. The McMillan home is a hospitable one, and our subject and his wife occupy an enviable position in social circles. Mr. McMillan exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the Republican party, and for eight years has filled the office of justice of the peace, discharging his duties in a manner that has won for him the commendation of all concerned. He was a candidate for the legislature on the Republican ticket in 1892, but was defeated by the combination of the Democrats and the Populists. He holds membership in the Grand Army of the Republic and in the United Presbyterian church, to which his wife also belongs.
He is a self-made man, whose advancement in business life is attributable entirely to his own efforts. As the architect of his fortune he has built wisely and well, his perseverance and diligence enabling him to overcome all obstacles in his path and work his way steadily upward to a position among the substantial residents of his adopted county. He is a man of unquestioned probity and is a popular and valued citizen of Atchison county.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

W.M. MC ADAMS, farmer and stock raiser, section 29, is one among the old pioneers of Atchison County. He was born the 5th of November, 1838, in Washington County, Tennessee. He is of Scottish descent, though his parents, W.S. and Eleanor (McNeal) McAdams, were natives of Tennessee. W.M. was the fourth in a family of five children. The father died when he was about four years of age. He was reared on a farm and received a common school education, mostly by self-application. In the spring of 1853 he came west and landed in Atchison County, Missouri, on the 27th of April of that year, settling in the little town of Sonora. The country was then new and thinly settled, but he concluded to make his home on the frontier, and has since remained here, being engaged in farming and sawmilling. In the spring of 1882 he located where he now resides, and at present owns 160 acres of fine land, well improved. He has a handsome residence, young orchard, etc. Being an old settler, he is well and favorably known. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. McAdams was married June 11, 1865, to Miss Rachel Ralston, daughter of Charles and Mary A. Ralston. She is a native of Ohio. They have six children: Thomas W., born March 15, 1866; Charles M., born November 23, 1867; Alvin E., born October 31, 1870; James W.E., born May 3, 1873; Bertie, born January 18, 1876, and Bird, born April 22, 1879.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM S. MC CALLEY, farmer and stock raiser, section 30, was one of the first to settle on the prairies in this vicinity. He was born July 28, 1843, in Gibson, Indiana. His father, David McCalley, was born June 24, 1805, in Ohio, and died in Louisa County, Iowa. His mother’s maiden name was Ann Wilson, and she was also born in Ohio. William was taken to Lee County, Iowa, in 1844, and was reared there on a farm, receiving a common school education. During the war he enlisted on August 22, 1862, at Keokuk, Iowa, in Company A, Nineteenth Iowa Infantry. He took part in the battles of Prairie Grove, siege of Vicksburg, Spanish Fort, surrender of Mobile, and with General Banks on his Texas expedition. He was mustered out at Davenport, Iowa, after which he settled in Louisa County, Iowa, where he resided five years. In 1870, he moved to Page County, Iowa, and thence to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1875, locating where he now resides. He now owns 160 acres of well improved land, has a comfortable residence, etc. Politically, he is a staunch Republican, and a strong temperance man. Mr. McCalley was married February 6, 1873, to Miss Mary A. Munzzingo, daughter of Edward Munzzingo. She was born near Richmond, Indiana. They have five children: Annie G., Maggie E., David C., Amanda and Arthur. Himself and wife are members of the Greenville United Presbyterian Church, in which he holds the position of Elder. He is widely and favorably known throughout the county.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES MC CASKEY was born in Wilcox County, Alabama, November 26, 1843, and is the son of John Adam and Elizabeth McCaskey, nee Lynch, the former a native of Alabama, and the latter of Georgia. James grew to manhood on a farm, his opportunities for acquiring an education being exceedingly limited, he having attended only the subscription school. For nearly three years he served in the Confederate army, being a member of the Thirty-eighth Alabama Infantry. He was in several important engagements, among which were the battles of Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge. He was taken prisoner at the latter mentioned place and held as such for about seventeen months. After the war Mr. McCaskey returned to Monroe County, and after remaining about seven months he moved to Sangamon County, Illinois, in the spring of 1866. There he remained some three years, subsequently going to Fremont County, Iowa, where he resided till the spring of 1876, when he moved to Atchison County, Missouri. He has since been a resident of this county and is now the owner of 100 acres of land, a small orchard, etc., his place being located in section 32. Mr. McCaskey was married March 7, 1869, in Fremont County, Iowa, to Miss Sarah Barnard, daughter of Philip and Nancy Barnard. She was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, December 18, 1853. They have four children: Mary Ida, born December 25, 1869; Laura, born April 16, 1872; Stella, born April 26, 1877; Lottie, born June 3, 1880. One child, John C., was born January 26, 1875, and died October 9, 1877. Mr. McCaskey is Democratic in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DOUGAL MC CALL, a prominent man of this portion of the country, was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, April 8, 1835, and is the son of Dougal and Jane McCall, who were also natives of that state. In 1839 the family moved to Michigan, settling in Kalamazoo. The youth of Dougal McCall, Jr., was passed in attending the common schools and also at the Kalamazoo College, where he received a liberal education. At the age of nineteen years he became engaged in teaching, which profession, in connection with farming, he has since continued to follow. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Seventy-second Illinois Infantry, known as the First Board of Trade Regiment, and was in service for nearly three years. He participated, with his command, in numerous important engagements on or near the Mississippi River. At Natchez he met with a severe accident, though fortunately escaped with his life. He fell a distance of fifty-seven feet, breaking both arms and otherwise bruising him. After returning from the army he was in the employ of the Government, at Leavenworth, Kansas, for two years. While in that city Mr. McCall was married February 10, 1867, to Miss Margaret Jane Mark, who was born in Buchanan County, Missouri. After his marriage Mr. McCall settled in Cass County, Missouri, where he resided seven years, coming thence to Clark Township, Atchison County, in 1874. He has since been occupied in farming and teaching. In April, 1882, he purchased a hardware store at Fairfax, and is at present engaged in this business, meeting with good success. He is the Greenback orator of the county, and during the last campaign advocated the principles of his party, speaking at numerous places in the district. Mr. McCall is the present county school commissioner, having been appointed in 1881. He has a family of eight children, all boys: Mark R., Frank A., William M., Hugh W., Edward D., Fred H., Tiberias and Charles Bruce. He and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES J. MC CARTNEY, a prominent and successful agriculturist and stock raiser, has been a citizen of Atchison County, Missouri, since 1856, except from the year 1860 to 1863, when he was in Kansas. He now resides in section 3, in Clay Township, and has a landed estate of 400 acres, 340 acres of it being in his home farm, which is well improved. Previous to his emigration to Atchison County he had lived in Fremont County, Iowa, to which locality he had moved from Crawford County, Indiana, having gone there from Marion County, Indiana, when ten years of age. He was born in Montgomery County, Indiana, January 28, 1831, and when in his third year he was taken to Marion County. He is a son of M.D. McCartney, a native of Pennsylvania, who was married to Miss Elizabeth Baylor, a native of Virginia. They had a family of seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the sixth child. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., belonging to Rock Port Lodge No. 125. Mr. McCartney was married February 19, 1865, to Miss Martha J. Pall, and by this union they have seven children: Arthur M., Ida B., Lizzie H., Earnest, Walter, Eva and Ellen. Mrs. McCartney was born in Ripley County, Indiana, May 21, 1846. She was a daughter of Daniel M. Pall, a native of Pennsylvania. Her mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Walton, was also a native of Pennsylvania.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

D.A. MC COLL, farmer, section 24, is a native of Fulton County, New York, and was born November 13, 1845, being a son of Hugh and Agnes McColl. His father was a native of Scotland, and when but a boy came to America with his parents. His mother was born in New York. The subject of this sketch was raised and educated in his native state, and in 1867, with his mother moved to Marshall County, Iowa, where he devoted his time to farming. November 18, 1871, he married Miss Jane Pye, a native of Livingston County, New York, born May 14, 1847. Her parents were James and Jane Pye. She went to Marshall County, Iowa, in 1870. Mr. and Mrs. McColl settled in Iowa after their marriage, and in 1872, moved to Atchison County, Missouri, locating where they now reside. Mr. McColl’s farm consists of 200 acres of well improved land, in excellent cultivation.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN MC COLLISTER, farmer, section 35, is a native of Ross County, Ohio, was born August 10, 1833, and is a son of Andrew and Maria McCollister. The former was a native of Dorchester County, Maryland, born July 12, 1801, his parents being Robert and Ann McCollister. Andrew moved with his parents to Ross County, Ohio, in 1802. He married July 17, 1823, Miss Mariah Kilpatrick, a native of Ross County, Ohio, born November 17, 1805. They soon settled at the old homestead and remained till June, 1856, when their family went to Johnston County, Iowa. The following spring they came to Atchison County, Missouri, and located where their son John W. now resides. The father died February 12, 1872, and the mother survived till September 28, 1881. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days and received a good education in Ohio. He was married March 10, 1857, to Miss Jane Kirkwood, who was born in Ross County, Ohio, December 22, 1834. She was a daughter of James and Ann Kirkwood. Her father was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1811, went to Ross County, Ohio, in 1834, and was married in January, 1834, to Miss Ann Young. In 1857, they moved to Montgomery County, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. McCollister came to Missouri with their parents, and have since lived here. Their family consists of five children: William W., Belle I., Clara, Hallie and James A. Mr. McC.’s farm consists of 320 acres of fine improved land. Mrs. McC. Is a member of the M.E. Church South.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ADOLPHUS MC DANIEL, was born in Atchison County, Missouri, October 12, 1849. His father, Abel G. McDaniel, and his mother, formerly Susan Swinn, were natives of Saline County, Missouri. In the spring of 1847, the family moved to Atchison County, and settled in Clay Township. Young McDaniel grew to manhood and attended the common schools of his native county, and in 1877, came to Dale Township, locating on his present farm in section 7, township 64, range 39, about one year ago. He has 160 acres of land with fair improvements, and is engaged quite extensively in handling and feeding stock, as well as farming. Mr. McDaniel was married September 26, 1869, to Miss Lucy Ann Angel, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Angel. She was born in Clay County, Missouri, March 14, 1853. They have six children: James A., born August 6, 1870; Mandy Susan, born February 24, 1873; Bertie R., born October 14, 1875; Perry D., born February 7, 1878; Floyd A., born October 18, 1879; Verna L., born January 25, 1881. Mr. McDaniel in his political preferences is Democratic.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HUGH MC INTYRE, farmer and livestock shipper, resides in section 30. He was born in Selkirk, British America, on North Red River. His parents were born, raised and married in Scotland, and his father came to America in the employ of the Hudson Bay Company, in 1812. He resided in the above mentioned locality for some time, and subsequently moved to Jo Daviess County, Illinois. Hugh went to Illinois with his parents, and at manhood commenced to devote his attention to farming. He afterward went to Jones County, Iowa, where he was in the livestock business, in connection with farming, till 1866. He then sold out his entire effects and came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled where he now resides. His farm consists of 320 acres of fine land, well improved. Mr. McIntyre is a member of the Masonic lodge. He married April 16, 1862, Miss H.A. Millard, a native of Lee County, Iowa. They have ten children.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DANIEL H. MC KAY, physician and surgeon at Tarkio, was born in the village of Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia, on the 25th of November, 1843. His parents, John and Ann (McHeffey) McKay, were both natives of Nova Scotia. Daniel was principally raised at his birthplace. When fourteen years old he commenced to attend college at Truro, Nova Scotia, where he remained for three years. He then began the study of law at Truro, and afterwards went to Halifax, and studied under A.G. Archibald, who was at that time Attorney General of Canada, now Governor of Canada. The subject of this sketch was admitted to the bar in February, 1866, and then engaged in the practice of his profession in Halifax. He immigrated west in 1868, and settled at Rock Port, where he was occupied in teaching for some five months, after which he went into the real estate business with J.P. Lewis. In 1869, he moved to Maryville, Nodaway County, and made a set of abstract books for that county. In 1870, he purchased a drug store at Quitman, and commenced the study of medicine. In 1873, he moved to Lamar Station, and started a drug store at that point, but eighteen months later he located at Maryville. He continued the study of medicine under Dr. Millholland, and took his first course of lectures about 1874, at the Bennett Medical College, of Chicago. He graduated from the St. Louis Medical College in the spring of 1878, and then commenced practicing at Maryville. In the spring of 1879, he went to Montana Territory, where he practiced some and also engaged in mining. He returned that fall, and made a subsequent trip there in the spring of 1880, and is still interested in the mines. In October, 1880, he came to Tarkio, and has been occupied in the practice of his profession since that time. He was married on the 20th of April, 1870, to Ester Fisher, whose maiden name was Ester Thoughman, a native of St. Joseph. They have two children: Edgar T. and Daniel McH. Lost one. By her former husband, Mrs. McKay has four children: William Y., Tahonas O., Boone K. and George R. Mrs. McKay is a member of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

W. J. MC KAY, farmer, section 17, was born December 18, 1827, in Boone County, but was raised in Moniteau County, Missouri. He was a son of Joseph and Margaret McKay, who were natives of Madison County, Kentucky. After being married they settled in Howard County, Missouri. His father was born in 1788 and died in 1833. His mother, who was born in 1793, died in 1860. The subject of this biography started out for himself when at the age of eighteen years, as a farmer, supporting the mother and younger children. In 1846 they moved to Platte County, Missouri, and settled on a farm near Weston, where they remained till 1851, then moving to Graham, Nodaway County, Missouri. Mr. McKay there opened the first store in the place, and in 1860 moved near to Rock Port and farmed till 1862. Selling out, he returned to Graham, living on a farm till 1866, when he again came to Atchison County and located near where he now resides. He was married in 1853 to Miss Cydarilla Burris, a native of Tennessee, born May 25, 1833. By this union they have eight children: James, born June 23, 1854; Margaret, born November 20, 1856; Nancy, born November 27, 1858; George, born April 18, 1860; Laura, born August 4, 1862; Ida, born September 20, 1865; Robert, born March 10, 1869, and Elizabeth, born June 10, 1878. Mr. and Mrs. McKay are both members of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE MC KEE, farmer, section 20. Among the oldest pioneers of Atchison County stands the subject of this sketch. He was born September 2, 1830, in Holmes County, Ohio. His parents, Eben and Sarah (Hazel) McKee, were natives of Delaware. They moved to Marion County, Indiana, about 1840, where the subject of this sketch was reared to manhood, spending his boyhood days on the farm, and he has since given his attention to agricultural pursuits through life. He accompanied his parents to Missouri, in the fall of 1847, and settled in Center Grove, Atchison County. The country was then wild and thinly settled and abounded in game. Young McKee devoted much time to the clearing of a farm, and during the summer seasons of 1848 and 1849 he was engaged as a Government teamster on the plains and made two trips to New Fort Kearney, at Grand Island. He was then married and settled down to farming. Soon afterwards he moved upon the place he now occupies and since then has remained upon it. During the war he served in the Enrolled Missouri Militia. He has always been an industrious, hardworking citizen, and is widely known in the neighborhood. He owns 230 acres of fine land, in a good location for a stock farm. Mr. McKee was married February 20, 1852, to Miss Nancy Ann Ross, a native of Tennessee, a daughter of Robert and Jane Ross, nee Bird, who were natives of Tennessee. They have nine children: Sarah J., born November 30, 1852, (now Mrs. William Fowler, of this county); Elizabeth, born April 19, 1855 (now Mrs. John Woolsey, of this township); Mary E., born December 18, 1858 (wife of Granville Woolsey, of this township); Martha E., born September 1, 1859 (now Mrs. James Bonhardt, of Nebraska); Lucinda C., born May 31, 1861 (now Mrs. David Wolf, of this county); Louisa A., born May 31, 1861; Nancy S., born October 24, 1865; Eugenia, born February 4, 1868; George W., born March 25, 1871; Rebecca, born January 14, 1873. They are also raising an adopted child, Robert K. Archer, born February 24, 1868. They are members of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

W. J. MC MILLAN, farmer, section 17, is a native of New York City, and, with his parents, moved to Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky, in 1850. There he remained till 1859, when he went to Des Moines County, Iowa, and settled on a farm. He enlisted in October, 1864, in Company A, Ninth Regiment Iowa Cavalry, and participated in many battles, until the close of the war. He afterward returned to Iowa and came to Atchison County, Missouri, and purchased his present farm of 160 acres of fine land, making all the improvements himself. Mr. McMillan married Miss Jane McElroy, in 1875. She was a native of Indiana. By this union they have three children, Bert E., Oliver M. and Cora M.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

THOMAS MC TLRAVEY, farmer, section 11, is a native of Ireland, and was born in January, 1831. His parents were Thomas and Mary (Higgison) McTlravey. Thomas remained in his native country till 1852, when, with his mother, he came to America, landing at New York. He went direct to Beardstown, Cass County, Illinois, devoting his time to farming. October 5, 1858, Mr. McTlravey married Miss Elizabeth M. Morrow, a native of Greene County, Illinois, born January 31, 1836. They soon settled at Lancaster, Cass County, Illinois, remaining there till 1863, when he moved to Nebraska. After living there a short time he settled in the river bottoms in Atchison County, Missouri, where he resided till 1877. He then purchased his present farm, consisting of 30 acres of fine land, well improved. They have seven children living: John A., Thomas A., Rebecca E., Charles A., Eliza J., Maggie and Franklin D. One is deceased, Mary Louisa. Mr. and Mrs. McTlravey are both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a Master Mason.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ALLEN MANSON was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, in May, 1827, his parents being David and Mary Manson, nee Mecance, the former a native of Washington County, Ohio, and the latter of Pennsylvania. Allen grew to manhood on a farm in Coshocton County, Ohio, obtaining very limited school advantages, having attended the district schools but a few months. In 1858 he came westward and settled in Clarke County, Iowa, where he resided until the year 1863, then removing to Caldwell County, Missouri. There he was engaged in farming for some eleven years, when he came to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1874. Here he remained but a little over one year, when he removed to Barton County and stayed one summer. In November, 1875, he returned to Atchison County and has since been a resident of this locality. Mr. Manson has been on his farm in Dale Township for five years and now owns 240 acres of land, all fenced, with an orchard of 300 apple trees and a few cherry, pear and plum, besides small fruit. He is quite extensively engaged in feeding cattle for the market. On the 27th of November, 1851, Mr. M. was married in Ohio to Miss Jane Gracy, and by this union there were two children, one of whom survives, William A., born September 20, 1852. Mrs. Manson died in Clarke County, Iowa, March 14, 1860. Mr. M. was again married November 27, 1862, to Miss Sarah A. Spurlock, a native of Indiana, and a daughter of John Spurlock. He resides on section 9.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN WESLEY MAPES, farmer, section 6, was born in Dearborn County, Indiana, April 23, 1829. His advantages for obtaining an education were very limited, yet he has been a student all his life and is well informed on all important subjects. He was raised a farmer. July 4, 1849, he married Miss Mary Ann Stickel, the daughter of Peter Stickel, of Jennings County, Indiana. As his father and also his father’s father-in-law were millers, Mr. Mapes also learned that trade. He rented a mill with his father-in-law, in Indiana, which he operated for several years, when they came to Adams County, Iowa and bought a mill, conducting it for seven years. He also ran a saw mill for a long period. Mrs. Mapes died in Iowa, on the 8th of February, 1866, leaving five children: Charles W., Arthur Wilson, Manuel S., John E. and George W. He married for his second wife, Mrs. Julia Ann (Hughes) Athens, March 3, 1867. They have by this union five children: Edgar, Bird and Edmond Fry (twins), Cora Lee and Ora Prentice. Mrs. M. had three children by her first husband, Mr. James S. Athens: Oswell Thomas, Lenora N. (now Mrs. R. Millsaps) and James S. Mr. Mapes is a leading Republican, and belongs to the Christian, or New Light Church. Mr. Mapes has a good farm of ninety-six acres, and a fine new dwelling.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

G. W. MARQUIS, farmer and stock raiser, section 10, was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, June 4, 1832. His parents, James and Jane (Curry) Marquis, were natives of Pennsylvania. They moved to Logan County, Ohio, when G.W. was about ten years of age. He was reared on a farm and received a common school education. Arriving at maturity he moved to Marshall County, Illinois, where he remained six years. He then returned to Ohio, and three years after immigrated to Iowa and settled near Mount Pleasant, Henry County, where he remained some three years; thence to Atchison County, Missouri, locating where he now resides. He owns a fine farm of 160 acres. He has filled the offices of school director and road overseer several terms. Mr. Marquis has been twice married; first, December 13, 1855, to Miss G.A. Farris, a native of Ohio County, West Virginia, and daughter of John and Ann Farris; she died September 4, 1868. They had three children, one of whom is living: Albert, born December 25, 1861. Mr. M. was married again September 7, 1869, to Miss H.M. Farris, a cousin of his former wife. She was born in Ohio County, West Virginia, December 8, 1839, and was a daughter of Adam and Sarah Farris. By this union they have had three children, one only now living: Sarah B., born July 25, 1874. They are members of the Presbyterian Church of Tarkio.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

THOMAS W. MARTIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 11, a pioneer of Northwest Missouri, is a son of Thomas Martin, who was born in Franklin County, Kentucky, while his wife, whose maiden name was Hannah P. White, was born in Orange County, New York. They came to Buchanan County, Missouri, in 1837. Thomas was born in that county December 9, 1838. When he was about three years of age his parents moved to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled on High Creek, in Polk Township, where they took up a claim, built a log cabin and commenced to clear a farm. His father also traded considerably with the Indians. It was on this frontier that the subject of this sketch was reared to manhood. He received an education in the log schoolhouses, and has given his attention to agricultural pursuits through life. On March 23, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, Fifth Missouri Cavalry, and served until June, 1863, filling the position of corporal. On the 8th of March, 1865, he enlisted in Company C, Fifty-first Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He served on the frontier and in Southwest Missouri, taking part in some fifteen skirmishes against the noted Quantrell. At the close of the war he turned his attention to farming. He now runs the Hopkins’ farm, of 170 acres, near Center Point. Mr. Martin was married July 16, 1863, to Miss J.F. Braxdale, a native of Boyd County, Kentucky, and a daughter of John and Emeline Braxdale. They have eight children: Orlando A., born October 5, 1864; Emma H., born November 14, 1866; Tommy J., born February 13, 1869; Jennie B., born June 16, 1871; Edith E., born July 23, 1873; David C., born October 8, 1875; Lillie D.O., born June 14, 1878, and Mary S., born May 2, 1880.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN MARKLEY, the owner and occupant of “Bloody Island,” was born in Marion County, Ohio, October 10, 1827. He early moved to Iowa, where he spent his youth, and in 1857 came to Missouri, settling in Gentry County. In 1866 he located in this county and moved upon this island. Though it was covered with heavy timber, he has by hard work cleared it and made a perfect garden. He has erected good buildings, and has an orchard of fine fruit, grapes, peaches, etc. Mr. M. married Rebecca Bird, of Indiana, in 1852. They have seven children: John Harvey, Garrett G., Aaron S., Mary (now Mrs. Solomon Hoffin), Albert and Alfred (twins), and David George. He was in the State Militia during the war, and served faithfully. He is one of the honest and reliable men of the community, and attends to his own business. When the Government surveyed the State of Missouri, their boundary line on the west was the Missouri River, and when the State of Nebraska was surveyed the river had changed its channel one-half mile west, and Nebraska ran to the new channel, and consequently an island was left, which neither belongs to one state or the other, nor to the Government. Mr. M. is one of the most independent men living. In an early day, when this island was covered with heavy timber there was quite a great strife, and a rough set settled there. Upon one occasion one party who destroyed the house of another was arrested and had a trial, and one of the party called for three cheers for “Bloody Island.” Thus the name.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler..

A. R. MERRITT, farmer, section 6, is a native of Warren County, Pennsylvania, where he was born June 22, 1853. He was a son of Lewis H. Merritt, who was a native of Onondaga County, New York, born July 9, 1809. He married Miss H. Jewett, January 2, 1832. She was born in Deerfield, Massachusetts, October 14, 1812, and with her parents moved to Onondaga County, New York, in 1824. A.R. Merritt, with his parents, moved to St. Louis County, Minnesota, in 1856. There he grew up and was educated, and with his parents moved to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1876. His farm consists of 144 acres of fine land. Mr. M. married Miss Susan Bullock December 22, 1877. She was a native of Wayne County, Pennsylvania, and was a daughter of James and Loreday (Bullen) Bullock, natives of Cornwall, England, who, after being married, came to America in 1856. Mrs. Merritt died March 10, 1880, leaving two children, James C. and Thomas A. Mr. M. is, and his wife was, a member of the church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

N. B. MERRITT, lumberman and farmer, section 5, was born in Chautauqua County, New York, April 16, 1834. His parents were Lewis H. and Hephizah (Jewett) Merritt. The former, who was a native of Onondaga County, New York, born July 9, 1809, married Miss H. Jewett, January 2, 1832, she being a native of Deerfield, Massachusetts, born October 14, 1812. With her parents she moved to Onondaga County, New York, in 1824. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days and received a good education in his native county. In 1855 he went to Ashtabula County, Ohio, and was there married to Miss Jennie H. Holman, October 14, 1857. She was a daughter of Aaron J. and Sarah Holman. Mr. and Mrs. Merritt subsequently settled in Ashtabula County, Ohio, and in 1860 moved to St. Louis County, Minnesota. Being a millwright by trade, Mr. M. worked at that industry till 1866, when he came to St. Joseph, Missouri, and remained till 1870. He then settled where he now resides, owning a fine farm. Mrs. Merritt died April 24, 1881, leaving a family of four sons: E.T., Frank W., Thomas A. and Frederick T. The winter of 1881-’82 Mr. M. spent in Minnesota.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler

LEWIS J. MILES; Lewis J. Miles, an eminent attorney and advocate of Rockport, Missouri, in 1872 first established himself in the practice of law at Watson, this state. But the necessity of being at the seat of government of the county, soon perceived by him, for the more successful and satisfactory conduct of his legal practice, led him in 1873 to remove to Rockport.
When Mr. Miles first located in northwest Missouri he was yet a young man, and he was in search of a location which promised him a liberal return for honest and able efforts in the line of some profession. Mr. Miles had come from the mountains of east Tennessee, where he was born, April 17. 1852, the county of his nativity being Warren, then Jefferson. There he obtained a good common-school education, such as was afforded by his native state at the time of his early youth. Mr. Miles inherits a love for study, his father having been one of the prominent ante-bellum educators of the state, Professor S. D. Miles, principal of the Morristown and of the Knoxville Institute. He died in 1859, while in charge of the latter institution.
Professor S. D. Miles was born in 1811, near Raleigh. North Carolina, received his education in Rogersville College, east Tennessee, and devoted his life to the education arid training of the young. He was a prominent Mason and a Baptist, from which facts it is natural to infer, which was the fact, that he had a personal acquaintance with many of the most prominent men of his state. Among his best and warmest friends was the noted "Parson Brownlow," through whose efforts east Tennessee was saved to the Union, notwithstanding the state seceded. The ancestors of Professor Miles were Scotch people, who settled in North Carolina during the early days of the history of the American colonies and who contributed of their strength to the establishment of the new civilization in what is now the United States of America. Professor Miles married Miss Nancy Brown, a native of Tennessee, by whom he had the following children; Luc Miles, of Lyndon, Kansas; Lewis J., the subject of this sketch; Robert Miles, M. D., of Lyndon, Kansas; and Frank Miles, a druggist of the same place.
"Boss Miles," as the subject of this sketch is called, resided in his home county in east Tennessee until he was twenty years of age. Having completed his education and being ambitious to see the great west, with the view of being a factor in the development of that part of the country, he left his native state of Tennessee when just coming of age and spent his first year or two on a farm working by the month. This' proving too much of a plodding life to suit his taste and temperament, he determined to qualify himself for a profession which would bring him into contact with the business of the country and with its leading men, and at the same time furnish him an opportunity to compete for the intellectual mastery of his' country. With this object in view he read law. with Hon. John P. Lewis for his preceptor, one of the most eminent practitioners before the Atchison county bar, and was admitted to the bar by Judge Kelley in 1875. In the early years of his practice he discovered a tendency toward criminal law, which he has since pursued and is regarded as one of the best of the criminal lawyers in northwest Missouri.
His most important cases have been trials for murder, and embrace the Blake and Harris cases, which he prosecuted, securing conviction in each instance. The Coon Franklin case he defended and secured an acquittal. He also secured the acquittal of Lee Dillon at Nebraska City, and of John Morrow, in Atchison county, both of whom were charged with murder in the first degree. He defended Albert Sons, and prosecuted Grounds in Holt county, the latter of whom was convicted and sent to the penitentiary for ten years. He also prosecuted George Ray, who was likewise convicted and sentenced for the same length of time. In his civil practice he managed the Hunter & Wyatt suit, defending the mortgagees and securing a verdict for his clients. The equity suit of the Beck heirs was under his supervision, their claim was established and judgment rendered accordingly, through the efforts of Mr. Miles.
Politically Mr. Miles is one of the leading Democrats of his congressional district. So effective is he as a speaker that he has been prominently mentioned as a candidate for congress, and his campaign work has been unusually effective. So well were his abilities thought of by his fellow citizens that in 1880 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Iris county, and he was re-elected in 1882. In 1886 he made the race for the state senate, but was defeated.
"Boss Miles" cannot be properly measured and understood without a knowledge of his personality, as he possesses points of interest and ability which are not made manifest under the ordinary circumstances. While he is not what may properly be called a great student, yet he is well versed in the law and has a wonderful memory of whatever there is in law and evidence. As a trial lawyer he is a master, handling testimony with a remarkable accuracy and deftness, and making playthings of jurors. One of the leaders at the bar has said: "If I had the worst murder charge against me that it is possible to conceive of, I wouldn't want anybody but that little high-cheek-boned Boss Miles to handle my case." Mr. Miles was married December 25, 1881, to Miss Ada Thompson, whose father, Marion Thompson, was a Phelps City merchant. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Miles are named Hallie and Ray. Mr. Miles is an Odd Fellow, having received both the subordinate and encampment degrees.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

LEWIS J. MILES, attorney at law, was born in Knoxville, East Tennessee, in July, 1852. He studied under his father and thoroughly fitted himself for college, graduating from Emery and Henry College in Virginia in 1870. He commenced the study of law with Judge Barber, of Morristown, Tennessee, and in 1872 he came to Rock Port, Missouri, where he continued his law studies with Hon. J.P. Lewis. Mr. Miles was admitted to the bar in January, 1874, after which he opened an office in Phelps City and commenced the practice of his profession. He has a good understanding of the principles of law, is an able advocate, commanding good language, and is an impressive speaker. In May, 1881, he established an office in the new city of Tarkio, in which place he spends a portion of his time. In politics he is a Democrat. He received the nomination by his part to the legislature in 1880, and while he ran 150 votes ahead of his party ticket, yet by a combination of Republican and Greenbackers he was defeated. He is an active member of the Odd Fellows fraternity. Mr. Miles was married to Miss Ada Thompson, the second daughter of the late F.M. Thompson, of Phelps City, December 25, 1881. Mr. M.’s father, Hon. S.D. Miles, at one time president of the Knoxville University and also of the Rutlege Academic Institute, was born in North Carolina, where he in part received a thorough education, completing it at Warrensburg, Tennessee. He was a leading Whig in his day, and, as such, with Parson Brownlow, used to stump the state. He served in the Tennessee legislature and held many positions of trust and responsibility. He was an active Mason and acted as lecturer for the order.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.


EDWARD JACKSON MILLION, farmer, is the owner of 329 acres of land, and resides on section 26. He was born April 6, 1838, in Washington County, East Tennessee. His father was John Million, of East Tennessee, and his mother, whose maiden name was Alice Adilla Bayliss, was a native of the same state. Edward was brought up on a farm to habits of industry, and received his education at the common schools. He came to Missouri May 2, 1857, locating in this county in 1864. In his political views he is a Democrat, and his religious sympathies are with the Baptists. He married Miss Nancy Broyles, August 21, 1858. She was the daughter of William W. Broyles, of Tennessee. They have six children: William Franklin, John W., Martha Jane, Washington L., Charles Bird and Olive Mabel. Mr. M. is improving his stock with the pure Holstein breed. John Million, his father, settled in Nodaway County in 1857, bought a farm and improved it, and became a prosperous farmer. When Edward was twenty years old, he went to work at making brick with a brother. They worked hard all summer, lost their time, and came out two hundred dollars in debt. He then rented a farm for two years, and made two crops, one being a failure. Although the most of young beginners would have been discouraged, he knew no such word as fail, and soon bought eighty acres of land on time, which he improved and in two years sold it and rented a farm. In the fall he disposed of his crop and stock, which made the first payment on 200 acres of this farm, which he then bought, going into debt for the remainder. He came here in 1869, and finding the land so rich he determined to make this his home, and for many years he worked hard and successfully. He raised large crops of corn and grain, fed it to his herds of stock, from fifty to one hundred head yearly, for twelve years, built a splendid residence and other necessary buildings. His farm contained 473 acres, making one of the most valuable farms in the county. Mr. M. is now assisting his children to homes and giving them good educations. His second son, John W., is a fine scholar, and taught the district school to the great satisfaction of all. He is eighteen years old and is determined to obtain an education, hoping to enter college the coming fall and take a regular course of study. Mr. Million is deserving of great credit for what he has done, not only for his own profit and pleasure, but for the improvement and beautifying of the county.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

C. H. MILLER, farmer and carpenter, section 9, is a native of Wayne County, Michigan, and was born on the 3rd day of February, 1837. His father, Richard D., was a native of New York, and a wagon-maker by trade. His mother’s maiden name was Sarah Whitaker, and she was born in England. The subject of this sketch, when quite young, was taken by his parents to Wayne County, Indiana, where his youthful days were spent on a farm and in learning the carpenters’ trade. In 1858 he emigrated to Nebraska, and during the late war he enlisted in a battalion of Nebraska cavalry, which was afterwards consolidated with scattering companies and was known as the Fifth Iowa Cavalry. They participated in the campaigns through Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi. After the war he settled in Atchison County, and has since worked at his trade and conducted his farming operations. His farm contains 110 acres of choice land. Mr. Miller was married August 3, 1871, to Miss Deborah Postlewaite, who was born in Ohio in 1837. Her father, Joseph Postlewaite, was a native of Virginia, and her mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Gilson, was born in Maryland. Mr. and Mrs. Miller’s family consists of two children: Joseph R. and Mary C.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

A. J. MILLIER, is proprietor of the Opera House grocery store. The subject of this sketch was born November 6, 1848, near Fulton, on the bank of the Mississippi River, in Whiteside County, Illinois. His parents, Edward and Salina (Tucker) Millier, were natives of England. Alfred was the second in a family of three children. He was reared at his birthplace on a farm, and after receiving a preparatory education in the neighborhood schools, he completed his education at Fulton High School. In 1869 he emigrated west to Webster City, Iowa, where he remained some two years. In 1871 he came overland to Missouri and settled in St. Joseph, where he was engaged as clerk in a grocery store, and since then he has continued the grocery business. In the spring of 1881 he went to Carrolton, Missouri, and thence to Tarkio in August, 1881. He carries a well and large assorted stock and does a flourishing business, for which he is ably qualified, having had long experience therein. He is a good salesman. He has a residence property in town. Mr. Millier is a member of St. Joseph Lodge No. 22, Knights of Pythias, and is also an ancient Odd Fellow. He was married on the 25th of May, 1878, to Miss Annie Hossick, daughter of George Hossick, of Carrolton, Missouri. She is a native of Ohio. They have had two children: Roy C., born January 18, 1880, and Alfred W., born January 17, 1882. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CALLAWAY MILLSAPS, dealer in general merchandise, is a member of the firm of Harrington & Millsaps. His grandfather, James Millsaps, was a native of Ireland, and was there married to Miss Elizabeth Hood. They immigrated to America, and here their son, William M., was born in East Tennessee. He was there married to Miss Elizabeth Clevenger, a native of England. They had a family of five children, three boys and two girls, Callaway being the oldest child. He was born in Cocke County, East Tennessee, September 26, 1815. In 1818, his parents and their family moved to Missouri, and settled in the section of country now Saline County, and in 1820, they located in what is now Clay County, Missouri. Two years later they settled on Fishing River, in Ray County, where Callaway grew to manhood. He was reared on a farm, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Ray County till the year 1839, when he came to Atchison County, Missouri. Here he has since lived, and his was the first white family to come to the county for a settlement. He had been occupied in farming till the fall of 1881, when he moved into the city and began in his present business. From 1855 till 1861, he sold goods on his farm, in section 32, township 65, range 41. Mr. Millsaps has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for some thirty years. His first marriage occurred May 1, 1834, to Miss Sarah Handley, a native of Kentucky. She was born June 18, 1816, and died January 15, 1874. They had twelve children, ten of whom are living: Joseph, John, William, Emily, Sarah A., Robert, Samuel, Josephine, Russell and Mary M. He was married to his present wife (Mrs. Mary Entwisel) August 1, 1879. Her maiden name was Mary Reed, and she was a native of Shelby County, Missouri. Mr. M. is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mrs. M. of the Christian denomination. Although advanced in years, he is still hale and hearty, bidding fair to see many more years. He is a man honored by all for his honesty and kindness.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HARRY MOSES, dealer in general merchandise, fine clothing a specialty, has one of the most complete stocks of goods in his line in Atchison County. He is a native of Hessen, Germany, and was born July 26, 1851. He was reared and educated in his native country, and has followed merchandising during life. In the summer of 1868, he emigrated to America, landing at Baltimore, where he remained till January, 1869, after which he came to Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri. He has since made a five months’ trip to this native country, which was in 1876. Mr. M. has been doing business upon his own responsibility for four years, and is known by his customers as an upright and an honorable man, and one who can always please those who patronize him. He is a member of North West Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., and of the Rock Port Legion No. 12, S.K.A.O.U.W. Mr. Moses was married May 12, 1879, to Miss Rosa Silher. She is a native of Konigsberg, Germany, and was born January 2, 1856. They have two children, Albert and Ethel.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

LUKE MOONEY, was born in Canada West, September 14, 1844. James Mooney, his father, was a native of Ireland, and was married to a Miss Millmo, who was born in England. The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm in his native country, and was educated in the common schools. In 1865, he immigrated to the United States, and was engaged in working by the month on a farm in Iowa for some two years. In July, 1868, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and labored on a farm in Clark Township for two years. Mr. Mooney was married September 17, 1870, to Miss Sarah E. Hinderman, daughter of John and Nancy Hinderman. She was born in Nebraska, February 17, 1853. After his marriage he settled in Clark Township, where he lived for some eighteen months, and then moved to Clay Township, where he was engaged in farming for three years. In the spring of 1879, he came to his present location, section 7, township 64, range 39, and now owns 160 acres of land, all fenced, with a fair house and thrifty orchard. He devotes considerable attention to stock feeding, in which he is very successful. Mr. and Mrs. Mooney have had four children: James W., born February 15, 1872; Oscar S., born November 6, 1875; Frederick C., born September 4, 1877; Charles O., born August 19, 1881. The latter two are deceased. Mr. M. is Republican in his political preferences.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

H. P. MOORE, M.D., is one of Atchison County’s most worthy and respected citizens. He was born in Yates County, New York, May 31, 1823. His father, William Moore, was a native of the same state, as was also his mother, whose maiden name was Mary Phillips. H.P. lived at his birth place until twelve years of age, and then accompanied his parents to Carroll County, Indiana, where he was reared on a farm until eighteen years of age. His education until this time has been confined to the common schools of the vicinity. He then entered the State Institution at Jacksonville, Illinois. After selecting the practice of medicine as a profession, he commenced reading with Dr. James M. Justice, an eminent physician of Logansport, Indiana. He attended lectures at the Cincinnati Medical College, also Rush Medical College, of which he was a graduate. He came to Atchison County, Missouri, first in 1847, and in 1855, made it his home, where for twenty-seven years he has been a leading medical practitioner. He is well known throughout the county, and the respect shown him is as wide as his acquaintance, and to his most thorough qualifications as a physician he adds promptness and dispatch in his professional duty, and is ever ready, regardless of distance or weather to attend to the wants of the afflicted. He is a man of kindly feelings and his heart as well as his judgment prompts him to be very attentive to the sick and suffering. He has served the citizens of the county as a member of the county court, and proved himself a prompt, reliable and efficient official. He is largely interested in agricultural pursuits, and owns 1,200 acres of land. Dr. Moore was married in 1856, to Miss Eliza Matthews, a native of Platte County, Missouri, who came with her parents to Atchison County, they being among its first settlers. Their family consists of seven children: Gobryas, George, Lincoln, Mary, Henry, Jennie and Frank. The doctor is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and an active and liberal supporter of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

W.D. MORROW, farmer, section 10, was born in Greene County, Illinois, June 21, 1836, and was the youngest son of Allen and Lizzie (Robertson) Morrow. His father was born in 1783, and died in 1854. His mother, who was born in 1794, died in 1853. They had settled in Greene County, Illinois, in 1833. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days, and was educated in his native county. October 15, 1866, he married Miss Lizzie Allen, a native of Greene County, Illinois, born March 11, 1841. When five years old she moved to Mason County, Illinois, where she was raised. Upon the death of her father she went to Cass County, Illinois, where she was married. In 1870 Mr. and Mrs. Morrow came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled where they now reside. Their family consists of five children living: Edna, Jesse, Naomi, Ruth and George W. Lillian Ann is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Morrow are both church members.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DANIEL BARTLETT MORGAN, farmer, was born in Morgan County, Illinois, May 16, 1829. His father, Ralph Morgan, was a native of Ohio and was a farmer by calling. His mother was formerly Nancy Ann Stergess, of North Carolina. Daniel’s early life was spent at school and on his father’s farm. He came to Missouri in 1855, settling in this county in April, 1858. He married Miss Tacy Baxton, daughter of Peter Baxton, February 5, 1854. They have four children living: James T., Benjamin Franklin, Marquis Lafayette and George H. Four are deceased. Two died in infancy. Marcellus, at the age of twelve years, died in 1881, and Leonidas died in 1881, aged ten years. Mr. Morgan has 366 acres of land and lives on section 2. He commenced life poor, was for two years a resident of Gentry County, after which he sold out his small farm and came to this place, locating on lands which are now beautifully improved and situated on the banks of the Nishnebotna. His large dwelling and splendid barn and other valuable improvements attest the fact that he has not been an idler, or spent his time in vain. He is a good farmer, is ever making valuable improvements, and is now numbered among the wealthy men of the county. Mrs. M., a practical, economical woman, is one calculated to make life happy and home desirable. Mr. Morgan is a Mason in good standing, belonging to Sonora Lodge. In politics he is a Democrat and religiously a Cumberland Presbyterian.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JUDGE WILLIAM HENRY MORGAN, section 3, was born in Owen County, Kentucky, in October, 1840. He received a common school education. In 1844, he moved with his father, Presley Morgan, to Morgan County, Illinois, where the father made a farm and lived until 1856. He then sold out and went to Worth County, thence to Nodaway, and finally to Atchison County, the same year, and purchased the farm where his son William now lives. In 1861, W.H. Morgan married Miss Mary Bushong, the daughter of Zach and Louisa Bushong. She died in 1862, leaving one child, Louisa, who also died in the winter of 1881, aged eighteen years. His second wife was Miss Amanda Good, whom he married in 1864. They have four children living: Laura May, Agnes E., Henry W. and Richard Marion. In March, 1882, Mrs. Morgan accompanied these children to Lincoln, Logan County, Illinois, where the Lincoln University is located, and where she remains while her children are obtaining an education. Judge Morgan is Republican in politics, and religiously a Cumberland Presbyterian. He is a Mason, being a member of Blue Lodge, Chapter and Council. He was elected county judge and served for four years very acceptably. He is a thoughtful, candid and enterprising man, and has a beautiful farm of 166 acres adjoining the town, with good improvements. His father, Preston G. Morgan, married Miss Susan Cox, also of Kentucky. They moved to Illinois in 1844, and then to this state. He died here in 1874, and Mrs. Morgan died in 1857, leaving eight children: D.C., I.S., William H., Jennie, J.P., C.R., R.P. Jacob and Susan.

G. F. MUINCH, farmer, section 28, was born in Saxony, Germany, July 20, 1826. He was reared in his native country on a farm and while there learned the coopers’ trade. June 10, 1853 he started for America, and, after being on the water for nine weeks, he landed at New York City, but soon located in Osnaburg, Stark County, Ohio. In the fall of 1871 he came to Atchison County, Missouri. While in Ohio he was engaged in the grocery and provision business, and also worked at his trade. Since coming to Atchison County he has followed farming as his occupation and now has 100 acres of land, cultivated in an excellent manner and well improved. Mr. Muinch was married in March, 1850, to Miss Matilda Kuntze, an estimable lady. She was born in Germany in the year 1831. They have had eight children, seven of them now living: Emma F., Adeline, Paulina, Lewis, August, Ida and Charlie.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

L.S. MUNSELL, M.D., is a native of Mercer County, Ohio, in which locality he was born, September 21, 1841. His father, W.A.O. Munsell, was born in Ohio, and was of English ancestry. His mother, Deborah Gray, was also a native of Ohio. L.S. was reared in his native county, and was educated in the common schools and the college at Delaware, Ohio. In 1866 he began the study of medicine under J.C. Williamson, of Versailles, Darke County, Ohio, and attended the Starbury Medical College of Columbus, Ohio, where he graduated in the spring of 1870. He then located in Geneva, Adams County, Indiana, where he continued the practice of his profession till the year 1876, when he became a citizen of Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri. Dr. Munsell is a member of North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M., and North West Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W. He was married March 1, 1866, to Miss Elizabeth J. Young, who was born in Mercer County, Ohio, July 5, 1841. Her father, Philip Young, was a native of Ohio, as was also her mother, formerly Lucinda Plummer. They have five children: Philip Dayton, William Oliver, Pearl Ettie, R. Nettie and Grace. The subject of this sketch is a prominent practitioner, and is recognized as being possessed of the most thorough qualifications as a physician, in Rock Port and vicinity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GOULD D. MYERS, farmer and stock raiser, is the possessor of 200 acres of land, his residence being on section 22. He was the son of Valentine and Nancy (Bennett) Myers, both natives of Tennessee, and was born in Sullivan County, Missouri, in 1841. In 1866 he settled in this county, where he bought forty acres of land. He had money enough to pay for this and an old horse and wagon, and from that small beginning he has obtained as good a tract of land as can be found, all well improved, with several small dwellings on the different places. He married Miss Elizabeth Manies, daughter of Stokely Manies, of Tennessee, in Sullivan County, Missouri, in 1866. They have five children: Florence, Walter, Laura, Lewella and Samuel. Politically Mr. Myers is a Democrat and belongs to the Methodist Church. He is a good farmer, has practical views of business on the farm, and surrounded by an industrious family and worthy companion is bound to succeed.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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