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SOL. D. OHL, farmer, section 25, is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in Lehigh County, in 1848. He there spent his boyhood days, and received a good education, and in 1868, began business for himself. He was a brick-mason by trade, and in 1876, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, where he has since devoted his time to farming. Mr. Ohl was married in 1871, to Miss Amanda Romack, a native of the same county and state as himself. They have four children: Alice, Eddy, Berime and Niles. Mr. Ohl has a good farm, and is ably qualified to conduct it properly.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE OLDFIELD, farmer and stock raiser, was born in England November 7, 1840, his father, John Oldfield, and his mother, formerly Anna Field, also being natives of that country. In the fall of 1847 the family emigrated to the United States and settled in DuPage County, Illinois, where George was raised on a farm, he receiving the benefits of a common school education. In the fall of 1871 he left DuPage County and came to Atchison County, Missouri, settling in Clark Township. He now owns 120 acres, all fenced, with a good dwelling and an orchard of seventy apple and fifty peach trees, besides other fruit. In connection with farming Mr. Oldfield is largely interested in raising and feeding stock. He was married October 27, 1866, in DuPage County, Illinois, to Miss Julia Kendall, daughter of Edward Kendall. She was born in New York State, March 29, 1844. Mr. and Mrs. O. have two children living: Minnie, born August 27, 1868, and Ula Belle, born June 8, 1881. One is deceased. Mrs. O. is a member of the Baptist Church. He is Republican in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

THOMAS H. OLIVER, section 5, a leading citizen of the township, was born in Callaway County, Missouri, November 12, 1841. Thomas H. Oliver, his father, was a native of Halifax County, Virginia, and his mother, whose maiden name was Mary Irvin, was a Kentuckian by birth. Thomas grew to manhood on a farm, attending the subscription school in his youth. In November, 1865, he came to this region of territory, and for three years was engaged in the saw mill and lumber business, after which, in 1868, he came to Clark Township and settled on his present farm. He has eighty acres of land in his home place, which is well improved, there being upon it a good house and orchard. Mr. Oliver also owns forty acres in another tract. He makes a specialty of handling and feeding stock. He was married in this county November 12, 1868, to Miss Eliza K. Young, daughter of Rufus Young. Mrs. Oliver was born April 3, 1851, on the same place on which she was married, and where she now resides. They have two children: Otis Y., born September 16, 1869, and Leona, born December 2, 1872. Mrs. O. is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and Mr. O. belongs to the I.O.O.F. fraternity. He is a Democrat in politics, and was nominated and elected by his party at the general election of 1876 as sheriff of Atchison County, and was re-elected in 1878, serving four years. After his election he moved into Rock Port, where he resided during his term of office, returning to his farm in 1881.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ELIAS D. OREAR; Elias D. Orear is now living a retired life in Maryville. where he is recognized as one of the most prominent, influential and representative citizens. He belongs to an early family of Nodaway county, and no man in Maryville has been more actively or honorably connected with the upbuilding and progress of the city than his father, William C. Orear.
The latter was born in Henry county, Virginia, September 20, 1816, and died on the 1st of July, 1898. No adequate memorial of William C. Orear can be written until many of the useful enterprises with which he was connected have completed their full measure of good in the world. He spent his youth and early manhood upon a farm, his time being largely occupied with the duties and labors of the fields to the exclusion of opportunities for securing an education. His father, John Orear, was a man in moderate circumstances, and on leaving the Old Dominion removed to Randolph county, Missouri, where his children were reared. When William C. Orear left home he made his way to eastern Iowa and was employed in the lead mines in this section of the state. During his residence there he wedded Mary Wilcox, whose parents were from Rochester, New York.
After his marriage he returned to Carroll county, Missouri, and as a result of his farming operations there accumulated a small capital, which he invested in a mercantile business in Maryville, in 1856. The year previous he took up his abode on a farm just east of the city, but determining to enter commercial life he severed his connection with agricultural pursuits and purchased a small general stock of goods. He had no experience behind the counter, having been reared upon the farm, where he also accumulated his capital. Entering into partnership with Mr. Jester they conducted business for a short time, when by mutual consent the partnership was dissolved, Mr. Orear remaining as the proprietor of the store. Some years later he formed another partnership, becoming a member of the firm of Jenkins, Torrance & Orear. From 1856 until 1870 the father of our subject was one of the leading representatives of commercial interests in this city and controlled a constantly increasing trade, his liberal patronage being accorded him as a result of his well directed efforts, his uniform courtesy to his patrons and his honorable dealing. In the latter year, however, he sold his stock and spent his remaining days in honored retirement from business cares.
He was one of the builders of the Arlington, now Ream Hotel, the first good hotel erected in Maryville, and erected individually the business block at Nos. 105-6 north of the square. He owned much property in Maryville, and the control of his real estate made sufficient demand upon his time and energies during the latter years of his life. His word was as good as any bond that was ever solemnized by signature or seal, and in the years of his long and active career he maintained an unassailable reputation in business circles. He took a deep interest in religious work and was an earnest and zealous member of the Methodist church, serving for many years as a trustee of the South Methodist Episcopal church. He was also largely instrumental in erecting their present fine house of worship. W hen very young he became a follower of the Christian religion and made its precepts a part of his daily life. His wife died in Maryville, in 1886, and their two children. Mrs. Laura A. Beal and Elias, still survive and are residents of this city. Mr. Orear's benevolence was unostentatious and genuine, and there is nothing in the story of his life to show that he ever for a moment sought to compass a given end for the purpose of exalting himself.
Elias D. Orear, whose name introduces this record, was born in Iowa, December 2, 1846, yet the greater part of his life has been spent in this city, whither he came with his parents at the age of eight years. Here he was reared and educated and entered upon his business life as a clerk in the drug store of Dr. Mullholland, with whom he remained two years. He then entered his father's store and gained an experience which made his after life so successful. Upon his father's retirement from business in 1870 he became a member of the grocery firm of Stinson & Orear, carrying on business on the west side of the square, where the Bacon dry-goods store now stands. Theirs was one of the leading grocery' houses of Maryville, and the firm continued in active business for five years. Mr. Oreai is now living retired, save for the energy which he devotes to the control of his investments. He is one of the stockholders of the Maryville National Bank, has some farming interests and is one of the leading property holders in the city which is his home.
In 1877 Mr. Orear was united in marriage to Miss May B. Nelson, and their union has been blessed with two daughters —May and Beulah. Like his father, Mr. Orear has never taken an active interest in political affairs, but is a leading worker and faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church. South, of which he is serving as a trustee. He is also a past grand of the Odd Fellows lodge. It is but just and merited praise to say that as a business man he ranks with the ablest; as a citizen he is honorable, prompt and true to every engagement; and as a man he is honored and esteemed by all classes of people.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack


HENRY OSWALD, farmer, section 2, is a native of Germany, and was born May 4, 1836. He was educated in his native country, and was reared on a farm till fifteen years of age, when he learned the shoemaker’s trade. In 1854 he immigrated to America, landing at New York City, after which he worked at his trade in Ohio and Indiana for about three years. Mr. Oswald then came to Missouri, locating in Platte County, and in 1864, he removed to Stephenson County, where he was engaged in working at his trade till 1868, when he removed on his present farm. This contains 160 acres of fine land. Mr. Oswald was married April 20, 1863, to Miss Frances Unnrissig. She was a native of Germany. They have nine children: Ernest, Albert, Frang, Anna, Minnie, Henry, Charley, Willie and an infant daughter.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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