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Atchison County
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DON C. PATTEN, farmer, section 3, was born in Lee County, Iowa. His father, Charles W., and his mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Campbell, early moved from Iowa to Missouri and settled in Caldwell County, on a farm. After a residence here for a time he removed to Iowa and lived there four years. After residing in Iowa, Kansas and different parts of Missouri, he came to this county, in 1860, and has since devoted himself to farming and stock raising. He owns 347 acres of choice land and is numbered among the leading and substantial farmers for which Atchison County is noted. Mr. Patten was married, in 1869, to Miss Catharine Stoner, a daughter of John Stoner, who was one of the early settlers of the county. She was born May 10, 1849.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

THOMAS J. PAYNE, section 30, was born in Wayne County, Indiana, January 6, 1850, being a son of William and Mary (Miller) Payne, the former a native of Union County, Ohio, and the latter of Indiana. In 1852 the family moved to Tipton County, Indiana, but returned to Wayne County in 1857. After residing there some three years they went to Randolph County in the fall of 1860, making this their home for eight years, after which, in 1868, they removed to Van Buren County, Michigan. Thomas J. Payne passed his youth on a farm, and received his education in the common schools. In 1871 he came to Atchison County, Missouri, where for one summer he was occupied in farming, after which he returned to Van Buren County in the fall of that year. In the fall of 1874 he again located in this county, and in the spring of 1879 moved upon his present place in Dale Township. He has 40 acres of land, and a thrifty young orchard. March 26, 1879, Mr. Payne was united in marriage in Holt County to Miss Ellen Meyer, daughter of John Meyer. She was born in Holt County May 6, 1859. Mr. and Mrs. P. have one child, Edith Meyer, born July 15, 1880. They are members of the Presbyterian Church. During the war he served for nine months in the Nintieth New York Infantry. He is Republican in politics, but was formerly a Democrat. Mr. Payne’s grandfather, Miller, was a soldier of the war of 1812. He died in December, 1881, in Wayne County, Indiana.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

E.E. PECK, section 5, is the owner of a farm which consists of 400 acres of finely improved land, including good buildings, orchards, etc. He is a native of Canada, and was born near Toronto, September 3, 1832. His father was a native of Connecticut, and with his parents moved to Canada. His mother was born near Rochester, New York, and she also moved to Canada with her parents. There they were married and then settled. The subject of this sketch, when at the age of eight years, moved to Illinois, and in 1845 to Wisconsin. He returned to Canada in 1847, and settled near London, and in 1850, with team and wagon, went to California, stopping at Salt Lake some time. He built the first cooper shop there. Mr. Peck was married to Miss Hannah Woodhull, December 25, 1855. She was a native of London, Canada, born January 4, 1837, and is a daughter of J. and Eliza Woodhull. Her father was a native of Canada, and her mother of Schoharie, New York. After being married, they settled in Canada, after which they moved to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1860. The father died in 1873, and the mother in 1861. In 1857 Mr. and Mrs. Peck came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled where they now reside. Their family consists of seven children: J.W., Eliza, Emma, E. Frank, Roscoe, Carrie and George. They are both members of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J. W. PECK; One of the most prominent citizens of Westboro, Missouri, who occupies the irresponsible position of cashier of the Westboro bank, is J. W. Peck, the subject of this sketch. He was born in Middlesex county, Canada, a son of E. E. and Hannah (Woodhull) Peck, both of whom were residents of Canada. E. E. Peck grew up and was educated in Montreal, and his children are: J. W., who is our subject; Mrs. Eliza Ware, who lives in St. Louis, Missouri; Mrs. Emma Ottvits, who resides in this county; Frank, who resides in Iowa; Ross, who resides in Fremont, Nebraska; Carrie, who married W. S. Gordon and resides in Westboro; and George, who resides in Lincoln township.
Our subject was reared on his father's farm, and was early taught habits of honesty and industry. He attended the common schools, receiving his higher education at the Wisconsin State University, later entering the St. Louis Law School, at which he graduated with honor in the class of 1881. Mr. Peck then located at Rockport, where he entered into the practice of his profession in connection with Mr. McKillop, a well-known attorney of Rockport, Missouri.
In 1883 our subject embarked in the banking business, his associates then being J. L. Carson, who was president, now deceased; M. McKilhop, who was vice-president, now deceased, and our subject was the cashier. Since the re-organization of the bank, D. M. McColl is the president, E. E. Feck is the vice-president and our subject is the cashier. This bank is one of the solid institutions of the county, has the entire confidence of the public and does an immense business.
In 1883, our subject married Miss Anna Lynn, of Tarkio, a lady of culture and refinement. She is a daughter of Robert and Flora Lvnn, and the following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Peck: Nellie G., Flora F., Evelyne, Lizzie, Margaret, Mary, and one son, deceased.
Our subject has taken a deep interest in the public affairs of the county ever since he was twenty-one years old, but his taste has not been for public life. Socially he is an active member of the blue lodge, council and chapter in the Masonic fraternity, and both he and his wife are consistent members or the Methodist church of Westboro where they are highly esteemed.
Mr. Peck has lately built one of the handsomest residences in Westboro, at a cost of thirty-five hundred dollars. It is of modern structure and fitted up with all the latest devices for convenience and comfort. Personally our subject is popular, possessing the courteous manner that always wins friends. He is an important factor in both public and social life in Westboro and may be considered a representative citizen.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack


ABRAHAM PENNY, farmer and stock raiser, section 29, was born February 26, 1832, in Morgan County, Ohio. His father, Daniel Penny, was a native of Maine, and his mother, Sarah (Taylor) Penny, was born in Virginia, but was principally raised in Ohio. Abraham was the eighth in a family of ten children. He was taken to Miama County, Ohio, when small and reared to manhood on a farm, receiving a common school education. He has given his attention to agricultural pursuits through life. In 1849 he moved to Cass County, Indiana, and remained there six years, and thence to Nemaha County, Nebraska, in the spring of 1856. He lived there thirteen years engaged in farming. On the 4th of November, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Second Nebraska Cavalry, in which he filled the position of corporal. This company served on the frontier. In 1869 Mr. Penny came to Atchison County and settled in Rock Port, where he remained seven years engaged in farming and milling. He located where he now resides in the spring of 1877. He owns 160 acres of fine land; has a nice orchard of 120 apple trees, 80 pear trees, etc. He has filled the position of school director. Mr. P. was married June 1, 1854, to Miss Mary Munty, a native of Preble County, Ohio, and a daughter of William and Elizabeth Munty. She was born June 25, 1836. They have six children: William, born October 6, 1857; Sarah E., born June 8, 1861; Lucinda F., born October 8, 1864; Abraham Lincoln, born August 20, 1867; Mary C., born September 6, 1869; Verta Eugene, born June 4, 1876. Four are deceased. Mrs. Penny is a member of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

AARON PERRY, farmer, section 18, was born October 12, 1847, in Holt County, Missouri. His parents were John and Hannah (Kerold) Perry, natives of Indiana, who, after being married, moved to Holt County, Missouri, at an early day. The father died when the subject of this sketch was but six months old and his mother soon married again and moved to Atchison County. When Aaron was seventeen years old he enlisted in Company I, Forty-third Regiment Missouri Volunteer Infantry, August 15, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. That fall he entered the employ of Robert Hunter, and freighted to Denver, Colorado, and the following season freighted for Samuel Walkup. He then began farming in Clay Township, Atchison County. Mr. Perry was married March 12, 1868, to Miss Sarah A. Millsaps, a native of Atchison County, Missouri, born February 12, 1850. She was a daughter of Callaway and Sarah (Handlay) Millsaps. Mr. and Mrs. P. soon settled near Rock Port, on a farm, and in the spring of 1876 came to Lincoln Township. Mr. P’s farm consists of 160 acres of fine land, well improved. They have a family of six children: Viola, Cora, Etta, Olie, Minnie and Arcatie, having lost one, George A., aged eleven years. Mrs. P. is a member of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

NICHOLAS PETRY, carpenter and undertaker, was born in Germany, November 12, 1849, and was reared and educated in his native country. He there learned the carpenter’s trade, and in 1869 he emigrated to America, and located in Chicago, where he was engaged in working at his trade. He continued to reside in or near the vicinity of that city till 1871, when he found employment for a short time, in Leavenworth, Kansas, and also for one year in Maryville, Missouri. After this he came to Rock Port, where he has since resided, and has, in connection with his trade been engaged in the undertaking business, for seven years, in which he has built up a liberal patronage. Mr. Petry is more than an ordinary workman, and deserves success. He was married February 8, 1874, to Miss Carrie Sommerheiser, who was born in Atchison County, Missouri, August 27, 1857. They have two children, Pollie and Emma.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ISAAC W. PHILLIPS, farmer and stock raiser, section 3, one of the most enterprising business men of this township, was born in Warren County, Illinois, January 30, 1853. His father, Robert Phillips, was a native of Ohio, and his mother, formerly Ester Woods, was a native of Indiana. Isaac spent his boyhood days on the farm, until sixteen years of age, and received a common school education. He accompanied his parents to Labette County, Kansas, in 1869, and upon arriving at maturity turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He came to Atchison County in the spring of 1881, and settled where he now resides. He farms 640 acres of D. Rankin, he being a brother-in-law of Mr. R., and is quite largely interested in stock raising. Mr. Phillips was married November 26, 1879, to Miss Mary Martin, a native of Sciota County, Ohio, born near Portsmouth, March 21, 1861. She was a daughter of John and Mary Isabelle (McIntrell) Martin. Her father was of Scottish descent, and her mother was a native of Ohio. She accompanied her parents to Labette County, Kansas, when about ten years of age, where she was reared and educated. Mr. P. and wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church, of Tarkio.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE A. PINNELL, dealer in general merchandise, is a native of West Virginia, and was born in Greenbrier County, April 11, 1838. His father, Hezekiah G. Pinnell, was born in Virginia and was of English descent. His mother, whose maiden name before marriage was Margaret Hauver, was also a Virginian by birth. George A. was reared and educated in his native county and was there engaged in blacksmithing. From 1864 till the close of the war he was in the Confederate service. In 1868 he came to Missouri and located in Atchison County, where he was occupied in working at his trade until 1872, since which time he has been engaged in the mercantile business with a good degree of success. Mr. P. is a member of North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M. He was married April 23, 1860, to Miss Sallie B. Feull, who was born in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, March 28, 1840. Her father, John Feull, was a native of Virginia, as was also her mother, formerly Sabel Hayes. They have five children, four of whom are living: John H., Anna B., Leona S. and Carrie M. Mr. and Mrs. P. are members of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

H.J. PINNELL, manufacturer of and dealer in fine harness, was born in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, October 21, 1841. He was brought up and attended school in the county of his birth, and when fourteen years of age, he learned the harness maker’s trade, which he followed till 1862. He then enlisted in the Confederate cause, in Company D, Nineteenth Virginia Battalion, Heavy Artillery, and remained in service till the close of the war, when he returned to his native county. In February, 1866, he left there and went to Ohio, and thence to Indiana, and in November of the same year, he came to Rock Port, where he has since principally made his home. The greater portion of the time he has been engaged in his present business, for a few years having been engaged in the grocery trade. Mr. Pinnell is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also belongs to the I.O.O.F. He was married in February, 1874, to Miss Irene Blair, a daughter of George Blair, one of the early settlers of Holt County, Missouri. Here she was born January 12, 1846. They are members of the Baptist Church. The work which Mr. P. is capable of turning out is of the best order, and finds a ready sale.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES A. POINDEXTER, section 9, was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, April 11, 1859. His father, William Poindexter, moved to Missouri and settled at Sonora in the fall of 1859, at which time he, with his brother, E.S., opened a store. During the war they were broken up by the Jayhawkers, their store and goods being destroyed. They then bought 160 acres of land near Sonora, on credit and improved it. In 1864 William Poindexter died, leaving his portion of land, eighty acres, to his two children: James A. and Edmonia S., (now Mrs. G. Beal). The mother of James A. died in 1873, and thus James and his sister were left alone. At the age of twelve years, he went to live with his uncle, R.M. Taylor, who had one of the best farms in the county. Mr. Taylor was a good man, and James being an industrious boy, was greatly encouraged by him. He was presented with two pigs, his first start in life, and from this small beginning the income was increased from time to time. He soon commenced to buy young stock, and when he was twenty years old, he had saved money enough to purchase eighty acres of land, stock and other things to start a farm. He married Miss Lillie Jane Stoner, daughter of John Stoner, Esq., February 16, 1879. They have one child: Daisey Dean, born April 3, 1881; one died in infancy. Mr. P. worked hard on his new farm and after making a good start, he sold out at a good profit and bought a second place on which he lived for two years. In the spring of 1882, he bought his uncle’s large estate of the widow, (his uncle having died), disposed of his place and moved on the farm where he had been brought up. He now has one of the best places in the county, containing 480 acres of land. Mr. P. has made what he now has in a short period, and has established a high reputation for honesty, industry, and of being more than an ordinary farmer. In his political affinities he is Democratic, and religiously a Baptist. He contemplates building a new residence and otherwise improving his farm.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

AMBROSE PORTER, station and express agent at Phelps City, the son of Henry and Lydia (Major) Porter, both natives of Maryland, was born in Alleghany County, Maryland, February 2, 1839, and when seven years old went to Knox County, Ohio. His educational opportunities were such as could be obtained at a common district school. He served a regular apprenticeship to the carpenter’s trade, and in 1859 came to this county, soon commencing work at building. Later he bought a small farm and made some improvements. The war breaking out, he enlisted in the Fifth Missouri Cavalry, and remained until January, 1863, when he was mustered out. He then re-enlisted in the Twelfth Missouri Cavalry, and remained in service until September, 1864, having been promoted to first lieutenant, and transferred to the Sixty-first United States colored. In May, 1865, they were consolidated with the Third United States Heavy Artillery, with which he was connected until the close of the war. He was mustered out April 30, 1866. After this, Mr. Porter engaged in the wood business in Arkansas, and after establishing himself therein, he went to Memphis, and obtained a position on the police force. He sold out his wood business after the overflow, losing 1,000 cords of wood. Resigning his position he returned to this locality in 1867. He moved upon his farm and made some improvements, but afterwards disposed of his interests. In the spring of 1868, he built a house, into which he moved in March, 1869, and thereafter worked at his trade, employing from five to ten men. He was occupied in building churches, school houses, residences, and in fact, did most of the building in this vicinity for two years. In 1870, he was appointed assistant agent of the station at Phelps City, and has been a faithful and efficient agent for twelve years, gaining the entire confidence of the company and the citizens of the town. In April, 1882, the agent, Mr. W.L. Shaw, resigned, and the company immediately promoted Mr. Porter to the situation. By his faithful career he became perfectly qualified to discharge the duties of this position. He married Miss M.A. Worthington, of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1867. They have raised several children. He has brought up and educated a niece, Bell Ramey, and also Annie Majors. He also has taken an infant orphan to care for, Annie Langdon. In politics he is a Democrat, and in his religious preferences a Catholic.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

E.F. POWELL, livestock raiser, section 24. Among the prominent men in Lincoln Township engaged in this business, is to be found the subject of this narrative, whose farm is a model one, consisting of about 1,000 acres of finely improved land. He is a native of Chittenden County, Vermont, born in 1840, and was a son of Welcome B. and Catharine Powell. When five years old, with his parents he moved to Lehigh County, in the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, this valley being one of the richest and most picturesque regions of the United States. Here he spent his boyhood days, and received an excellent education, at Moravian College, of Nazareth. Soon after he accepted the position as general superintendent of the Lehigh Iron Works, located at Allentown. Upon him devolved the general oversight of the production and success attending its operations, and he now owns a large interest in the same. He found a wife in the person of Miss E.C. Horn, to whom he was married in 1859. She was raised in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, and is a daughter of William and Mary Horn. She received the advantages of a good education at Allentown. Mr. Powell withdrew from the iron business in 1877, and with his family came to Atchison County, Missouri, where he took charge of a large tract of land situated in Lincoln Township, belonging to the Lehigh company. He afterwards purchased of the above company his present farm, now well improved. Mr. P. is a Knight Templar. Mr. and Mrs. Powell’s family consists of four children: Minnie C., Welcome N., Arthur L., Beulah. Welcome N. graduated March 31, 1882, at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and had the honor of winning the first prize given in that institution, consisting of a case of surgeon’s instruments.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES H. PRATHER, farmer and stock and grain dealer, section 36, owns 390 acres of land. He was born in Warren County, Kentucky, March 15, 1837, and in 1857 came to this state. He worked a piece of land on shares for a year and then labored out for several years. He married Miss Nellie L. Addington, daughter of Saybird Addington, April 13, 1861. They have two children living: Rosa J. and Laura. One son died in infancy. In 1876 Mr. P. went to Southwest Missouri for the health of himself and wife, and remained five years, working in the meantime on rented land. He returned and settled on 40 acres of land, which his wife received from the father’s estate. He then commenced to improve land, and has been very successful in life, having accumulated a fine property. He has for several years been in ill health; not able to do much work. As a man he is respected, and has the best wishes of all. He is a Democrat.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

SILAS H. PRATHER, farmer and stock raiser, section 22, was born in Hillsboro, Highland County, Ohio, December 10, 1846. His father, John H. Prather, was a native of West Virginia and was of Scottish descent, while his mother, Catherine (Chaney) Prather, was born in Ohio and of Dutch extraction. They came to Ohio in an early day. Silas is the only child now living of a family of three children. His mother died when he was about two years of age. In 1856 he accompanied his father and step-mother to Montezuma, Poweshiek County, Iowa, where they remained some three years, then returning to Ohio. Young Prather spent his youth on a farm and obtained a fair education. When President Lincoln issued his first call for ninety-day men the subject of this sketch was among the first to respond. He enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-eighth Ohio Infantry, Company F, and, after serving his time, he returned to Ohio and from there emigrated to Henderson County, Illinois. In 1864 he again enlisted in the Fifty-eighth Illinois Infantry, Company G, and served until the close of the war. He enlisted as a private and rose to first-duty sergeant, serving mostly on detached service, principally in the quartermaster’s office. He remained some time in Montgomery, Alabama, and at the close of the war he settled in Henderson County, Illinois, and a short time after went to Winterset, Iowa, in the fall of 1866, where he remained three years occupied in farming. In 1869 he went to Texas, was interested for two years in the cattle business, and in the fall of 1870 he moved to Henry County, Missouri. There he lived five years engaged in farming. In 1875 he settled in Warren County, Illinois, and became associated with David Rankin in farming and stock raising. He came to Atchison County in the spring of 1878. He owns a third interest with Mr. Rankin in 7,600 acres of land and they are largely interested in stock raising. Mr. Prather superintends the farm. He is a sterling business man. Commencing life a poor boy, he was early deprived of the care of a mother and was thrown upon his own resources. He has worked his way steadily upward by honesty, industry and attention to business. Politically he is a staunch Republican. Mr. P. was married December 20, 1870, to Miss Emma Rankin, youngest sister of David Rankin. She is a native of Illinois and was born December 17, 1845. She died March 15, 1881, leaving three children: Nettie Bell, born December 10, 1871; Homer Dee, born December 1, 1873, and Harry Rankin, born March 4, 1875. Mr. Prather is a member of the M.E. Church, of Tarkio, in which he holds the position of steward. He is also a strong temperance man.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

SAMUEL PRETTYMAN, section 13, township 64, range 40, was born on the 8th of May, 1829, and is a native of England, in which country also his parents, George and Mary (Upton) Prettyman were born. The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm at his birth place, and in 1857 he emigrated to Canada, where he was engaged in tilling the soil for fifteen months, after which he came to the United States. He first settled in New York State, in 1858, and there continued to reside until February, 1872, when he came to Missouri, locating in Holt County, where he lived some four years, after which Atchison County became his home. Mr. P. has been on his present farm for one year, and now owns 70 acres of land, all improved, upon it there being a good dwelling and fine orchard. On December 8, 1858, in Orleans County, New York, occurred the marriage of Mr. Prettyman to Miss Phebe Wiltse, daughter of Reuben and Nancy Wiltse. She was born in Canada, March 16, 1834. They have two children: George G., born April 29, 1860, and Susan (wife of William Dwyer), born August 15, 1862. Mr. P. is a member of the Episcopal Church, and Mrs. P. worships with the Methodist denomination.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

SAMUEL W. PROUD, section 30, was born on the 11th of March, 1844, in Fayette County, Ohio. His father, John Proud, and also his mother, formerly Sarah King, were natives of Ohio. In 1849 Samuel W. accompanied his parents to Howard County, Indiana. He was raised on a farm and for a time attended the common schools, though the greater part of his education was obtained by self-application, after reaching his maturity. During the war he served for three years, enlisting when seventeen years of age, in the Thirty-fourth Indiana Infantry. His regiment was known as the Morton Rifle Regiment. While he was in the service his father moved his family to Holt County, in 1863, and, after his discharge, at the close of the war, Samuel W. Proud came to Holt County, settling near Oregon. There he resided until the spring of 1870, when he removed to Atchison County, and located on his farm in this township. He has 138 acres of land, all under fence, with a good new dwelling and young orchard. Mr. Proud was married in Holt County, May 11, 1867, to Miss Margaret Thorp, who was born in Randolph County, Indiana, July 4, 1843. They have two children: Luella B., born August 20, 1870, and Dollie E., born February 26, 1873. Mr. Proud is Republican in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

TIMOTHY H. PROUD, a native of Fayette County, Ohio, was born March 31, 1836. John Proud, his father, who was born in Ross County, Ohio, married Sarah H. King, a native of Fayette County, of that state. In 1849 the family moved to Howard County, Indiana, where they lived until 1864, then emigrating to Holt County, Missouri, and settling near Oregon, where they still reside. The youth of the subject of this sketch was passed on a farm, receiving a common school education. In 1871 he removed from Holt County to his present place in section 34, of Dale Township, Atchison County, and is now the owner of 160 acres of good land, there being on his farm an orchard of 100 apple, 700 peach and other fruit trees. Mr. Proud was married October 30, 1859, in Fayette County, to Miss E.E. Goldsberry, daughter of Amos Goldsberry. She is a native of Ross County, but was raised in Fayette County. Mr. and Mrs. Proud have had seven children, six of whom are living: Emmerson T., born September 9, 1860; Anna W., born October 9, 1864; Sarah A., born May 20, 1866; Samuel E., born November 12, 1867; Jessie B., born October 10, 1869, and Clark W., born October 6, 1872. Mr. and Mrs. Proud are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In his political preferences Mr. P. is Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ANDREW C. PROUDFIT, farmer, section 23, was born in Indiana, May 21, 1857, and when a small boy, he came with his father to this state and county. While young, he had a severe spell of sickness, which left him deprived of the sense of hearing and speech. His mother has taken great pains in sending him to school, and he remained eight years in the State School for Mutes, under the tutorship of Mr. Kerl. He was an excellent scholar, learning rapidly, and has become a good practical business man, a fine reader and an excellent penman. He has with his mother over 100 acres of beautiful land, under the best of improvements. He has bought teams, plows, drags, etc., and has had great success in everything he has undertaken. He has entire charge of the farm, is a Democrat in his political views, and a valuable citizen of this county. His father, Thomas Proudfit, bought 160 acres of fine land on section 23. He was born in Virginia in 1819, and was raised in Indiana. His father was Elias Proudfit. Thomas P. came to this state and county in 1856. He married Miss Lana Anderson Davidson in Dubois County, Indiana, in February, 1856. They had two children: Andrew C. and Mary E., born November 20, 1859, who married James M. Sliger. Mr. P. died in 1860, leaving Mrs. P. and her two small children and a farm, almost wholly unimproved and unpaid for. But the land was rich, and having energy and courage she commenced raising stock and corn. She succeeded in paying for her farm, and has built a beautiful house. Her daughter, who married J.M. Sliger, lives quite near her. Mr. Proudfit was an excellent man and during the few years he lived after moving here, won the confidence of many.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JUDGE JEREMIAH PURDUM, is the son of Benjamin Purdum, who was a native of Maryland, and who married Miss Katie Reynolds, also of that state. They had a family of eight children, Jeremiah being the second child. He was born in Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio, April 21, 1814. His father was by occupation a farmer, and moved upon a farm near Chillicothe when Jeremiah was about three years of age, consequently, the subject of this sketch has made farming his occupation through life. He resided in Ross County, Ohio, till 1832, when he moved with his parents to Hamilton County, Indiana, being a citizen of that county till 1838. He then came to Missouri and located in Clay County, where he was married January 6, 1842, to Mrs. Jane Allen, whose maiden name was Jackson. She was born in Kentucky, in 1813, and died July 24, 1874. They had a family of nine children, six of whom are living: William T., Catharine (Millsaps), John W., George T., Elizabeth A. (Stecks) and Milton. All the boys are farmers but one, Milton, who has been engaged in teaching for several years. On account of the overflow of the Missouri River in 1844, Judge P. left Clay County, and came to Atchison County, where he has since lived, having been actively engaged in tilling the soil till 1874, since which time he has lived in his present location, at Rock Port. When he first came to this county he settled on government land, but was not able to buy land after the surveys were made, or it had come in market. He now has a landed estate of 240 acres, after having divided with his children. Judge Purdum has served four years as county assessor and nine years as public administrator. From January 1, 1873, till January 1, 1877, he was judge of the probate court, discharging his various duties very creditably. He was married the second time (February 24, 1875) to Mrs. Judah S. Buckham. Her maiden name was Barlow, and she was born in Shelby County, Indiana, August 5, 1834. Her father, Jeremiah Barlow, was born in Kentucky, and was there married to Miss Mary White, of Tennessee. They had a family of eight children, Mrs. Purdum being the youngest child. Her parents came to Atchison County, Missouri, when she was 14 years of age.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN PURDUM, farmer, section 9, is a native of Atchison County, Missouri, and was born May 29, 1847. His father, Jeremiah Purdum, is one of Atchison County’s oldest and most respected citizens. John’s boyhood days were spent on his father’s farm, and he has made it his life vocation. He owns a farm of 120 acres. He has been twice married, first, in 1874 to Miss Susan Barlow; she died in 1877. His second marriage occurred in March, 1878, to Miss Sophia Moore, a native of Pike County, Illinois. They have two children: Freddie and Geneva. Mr. P. is an excellent agriculturist, and conducts a good farm.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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