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Atchison County
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JAMES RAHMAN was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, October 23, 1843, and in 1847, accompanied his father to this country, settling in Monroe County, Illinois. After living in several places the family moved to this county, in 1867. The father bought 160 acres of land and improved it in good condition, building a nice residence and making it one of the most desirable homes in the county. After the death of the father, the two sons divided the homestead, James keeping the old residence. He was married April 8, 1874, to Miss Ida Gardes, daughter of George Gardes, of Germany. They have two children: Henry and George J. He is a Republican in politics, and religiously a Lutheran. Henry Rahman, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, in 1815. He came to this country in 1847, and was a resident of Monroe County, Illinois, for two years, after which he lived in Nebraska for two years. Coming to this county he bought his excellent farm. In 1853, he went to California and remained for nearly four years; had bad luck on the start, but was afterwards successful, obtaining quite a sum of money. He then returned home, wiser and better, and a little richer, for his experience. He married Catharine Margaret Clichouse, of Germany. They had two children, James and George. Henry died in the Old Country. James followed teaming to Salt Lake for three years, for a freighting company. He has ninety acres of land, situated in section 2.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

 JOHN W. RAINES. John W. Raines, ex-treasurer of Atchison county, and abstracter of titles, was born at Lancaster Wisconsin, January 3, 1840. His father, who died in 1840 was reared and educated in the vicinity of Newbern, Pulaski county, Virginia, and was there married to Miss Mary Miller, by whom he had the following children: William, of Lancaster, Wisconsin; Mary E., the wife of Edward Pollock, the editor of the Lancaster Teller; and John W. the subject of this sketch. After the death of her husband Mrs. Raines married Albert Burks, by whom she had two children, viz.: Samuel Burks, of Leadville, Colorado; and Laura M... who married William M. Hess and with her husband resides in Chicago. Mrs. Burks died at about seventy years of age.
A considerable portion of the youth of John W. Raines was passed on a farm near Lancaster, already mentioned. During the winter season he attended the district, school, and by the time the war of the Rebellion broke out he had acquired a good common-school education. On June 11, 1861, he enlisted in Company C; Second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, the first company raised at Lancaster and on the same day was mustered into service at the capital of the state. From Camp Randall, at Madison, the regiment was ordered to Washington, D. C., and there became a part of McClellan's "great plan," participating in the first battle of the war, that of Bull Run or, as it is otherwise known, the battle of Manassas. The following winter was passed at Arlington, Virginia, and the next spring, when the army was again put in operation, the regiment to which Mr. Raines belonged went with General Pope into Virginia. In the retreat of this general the battle of Gainesville was fought and in this battle Mr. Raines was struck in the left hip by a musket ball and was thereby rendered unfit for further service at the front. The bullet with which he was wounded was not removed until it worked itself to the surface and became visible. Mr. Raines remained in the hospital until December 31, 1862, and was sent home discharged. On June 19, I 1863 he entered the provost marshal's office a! Prairie du Chien. Wisconsin, as a clerk, I retaining this position until the spring of 1865, when he was appointed first lieutenant by Colonel John C. Clark; but on account I of the condition of his wound the government refused to muster him into the service. On July 16, 1866, Mr. Raines became connected with the Freedmen's bureau as a clerk, remaining in this service two years and being located at Huntsville, Alabama. Then he entered the internal-revenue service at the same city, as the chief clerk of the office. Later on he was made a deputy in the United States marshal's office, and was still in this position when Grover Cleveland was first elected president of the United States, and Mr. Raines, being of course an "offensive partisan," was removed and his position given to a Democrat.
Upon thus retiring from the service of the government in 1885, Mr. Raines' acquaintance with John D. Dopf led him to visit Rockport, January 16, 1886, where he purchased an interest in the business of abstracting with Mr. Dopf, and since that time he has been exclusively connected with Atchison County. So great had become his popularity that in 1894 he was nominated by the Republicans of the county for treasurer and was triumphantly elected, and was again nominated in 1896, but this year he was defeated by the fusion of the opposing elements. In 1898 he was nominated for the office of county recorder, but again the fusion elements in the county were too strong for him and he was defeated. But to his credit it should be stated that each nomination he received was given him by his party entirely without solicitation on his part, and his defeat reflected no discredit upon him.
On January 16, 1870, Mr. Raines was married, in Huntsville, Alabama, to Miss Mary M. Lakin, a daughter of Rev. Arad S. Lakin. One of the most intelligent men of the country, who was especially well known for his strength of character and religious zeal.  In the southern states after the war Rev. Mr. Lakin having once bee.1 a resident of Atchison County, it would appear particularly appropriate in this connection to present a brief biographical sketch of this remarkable man.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

SAMUEL RAINEY, agent for Col. P.A. Thompson, grain dealer, was born December 20, 1841, in Sardina, Brown County, Ohio. His father, James Rainey, was a native of Virginia, while his wife, formerly Peggy Kimes, was from Kentucky. Samuel was the fourth in a family of eight children. He was reared in his native village, receiving fair educational advantages. When the civil war broke out, he enlisted October 12, 1861, in the Eleventh Ohio Cavalry. They were placed out on the frontier to fight Indians; he took part in the battle of Mud Springs and several other noted engagements, serving until July 14, 1866, when he held the position of sergeant. At the close of the war Mr. R. returned to Ohio. In the spring of 1867, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and has since made this his home, having been engaged in farming and stock raising. He commenced the grain business at this point for Colonel Thompson, January 1, 1881. They enjoy a liberal patronage, have a neat office and stock scales and yards, dealing in stock to some extent. Mr. Rainey is a good business man and much of a gentleman in his manners. He is a member of Atchison Lodge No. 220, A.O.U.W., of Tarkio, and was formerly a member of the Grange. Politically he is a staunch Republican. He was married February 12, 1877, to Miss Sadie Majors, a native of Mount Vernon, Knox County, Ohio. She died April 27, 1878.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

D.C. RANKIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 28, was born in Warren County, Illinois, on the 14th day of September, 1855. His father, Alexander Rankin, was a native of Indiana, and his mother, formerly Martha J. Struthers, was born in Ohio. They came to Illinois in an early day. D.C. was the second in a family of five children. He spent his youth at his birthplace on the farm, and after receiving a preparatory education in the common schools he attended Martin Bros. Business College, of Monmouth, Illinois. He came west in the fall of 1876, and in partnership with his brother Ed F., settled on the wild prairie, which they began breaking. They hauled their first lumber from Shenandoah, Iowa, some thirty miles distant. Mr. R. now owns 580 acres of well improved land, a neat comfortable residence, young orchard, etc. He was married October 24, 1881, to Miss Anna J. Ray, a native of Chicago, born in 1856. She is a daughter of L.C. and Anna Ray, of Chicago. She is a member of the M.E. Church. Mr. Rankin is largely interested in stock raising and feeding. He is respected by all and numbers his friends by the score.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HON. DAVID RANKIN. Prominent among the self-made men of Missouri is the subject of this biography. He was born on the 28th of May, 1825, in Sullivan County, Indiana. His father, William Rankin, was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, and was a wheelwright by occupation. He married Elizabeth Gross, who was a native of Guilford County, North Carolina, both of whom were of German-American origin. David accompanied his parents to Parke County, Indiana, when six years of age, and then to Vermillion County, Indiana, when eight years old. After remaining there three years, they emigrated west to Warren County, Illinois, in what is now Henderson County, in 1836. There the subject of this sketch was reared to manhood, spending his boyhood days on the farm and in his father’s saw mill. He received the benefits of a common school education. Being a member of a poor family, he was obliged to work hard. When he became a young man, his father gave him a colt, and this was his commencement in the stock business. By trading and saving what money he could, he finally obtained enough to buy eighty acres of land, giving one hundred dollars for it. He still resides on this old homestead, which is located near Biggsville, Illinois, some twelve miles east of Burlington, Iowa. Mr. R. then went to work with a will, farming and stock raising. He possessed those sterling principles of honesty, integrity and attention to business, and has made a grand success in life. He owns thirty thousand acres of improved land, valued at one million dollars, about twenty-four thousand acres of which is located in Atchison County, and he may truly be called the land king of Northwest Missouri. He is president of the First National Bank, of Monmouth, Illinois, and is largely interested in several others, among which is the Savings Bank of Burlington, Iowa, Rankin, Stevenston & Co., of Tarkio, and others. He is a member of the Tarkio Town Company, and owns a sixth interest therein, and also owns a sixth interest in Fairfax and Westboro. He was elected on the Republican ticket to represent his district in the Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth general assemblies of the Illinois Legislature, in 1872, and was re-elected again the next term (1874). His district was a strong Democratic one, but he was elected the first time by sixty-seven majority, and the next time by over 1,800 majority. He was a candidate for congress in 1876, and received every vote of his district for twenty-five ballots. He superintends his business himself, and knows just how every department is conducted. His assistant superintendents generally have an interest with him, and are therefore working for themselves as well as him. He owns some 600 head of horses and mules, feeds his grain mostly to his stock, and owns a large stock ranch in Nebraska. He generally ships a train or two of cattle at one time. In his manners he is unassuming, yet cordial, kind-hearted and generous, every worthy public enterprise receiving his support. He has been an active member of the United Presbyterian Church since he was about twenty-six years of age. He is honored and respected by all who are favored with his acquaintance, and none deserved success more than David Rankin. He has been twice married. First, on the 21st of March, 1850, to Miss Sarah Tompson, a native of Guernsey County, Ohio, born in 1826. She was a daughter of Adam and Jane Tompson, who were natives of Ohio. She died in December, 1878, leaving three children: Nettie V., born July 28, 1855 (now Mrs. J.F. Hanna, of Tarkio); John A., born November 21, 1856, and William F., born January 1, 1860. Mr. R. was married again in January, 1879, to Elizabeth Gowdy. Her maiden name was Elizabeth Philipps, and she was born in Gibson County, Indiana, but was brought to Warren County, Illinois, when quite small. There she was reared. She has five children by her former husband: Ella (now Mrs. Joseph Ely, of this county), Mary, Rolly, Chester and Grace.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ED F. RANKIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 28, was born in Warren County, Illinois, February 1, 1854. His father, Aleck Rankin, was a native of Indiana, and his mother, whose maiden name was Jane Struthers, was born in Ohio. They came to Illinois in an early day. Ed F. was the eldest in a family of five children, four of whom are now living. He was reared to manhood at his birthplace, spending his boyhood days on a farm and after receiving a preparatory education he attended Monmouth College. When twenty-one years of age he commenced business for himself, engaging in farming and stock raising. He came to Atchison County in June, 1876, and purchased his present farm, moving upon it the fall of 1876. He settled on this place in partnership with his brother, Dr. C. Rankin, and commenced to improve it. He owns 760 acres of fine land which is well improved; has a neat residence, a good barn, and a nice young orchard. He is largely interested in stock raising, and has some Short Horn cattle. He is an industrious, enterprising young man, and one that Atchison County may be proud to own. Mr. R. was married December 26, 1879, to Miss Mary Willsie, a native of Des Moines, Iowa, daughter of Henry and Mary Willsie, who are now residents of Burlington Junction, Missouri. She was reared and educated at Des Moines. They have one child, an infant, born February, 1882.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE A. RANKIN; A prominent and representative farmer of Atchison county. Missouri is George A. Rankin, the subject of this sketch. He was born in Scott county, Indiana, September 19, 1848, and was a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Bingham) Rankin, natives of Pennsylvania and Kentucky, respectively. After marriage Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rankin settled upon a farm in Scott county, Indiana, where most of the family were born, but later moved to Iowa, where twenty years were spent. Mr. Rankin then went to Henderson county, Illinois, later changing into Warren county, where his death occurred, March 24, 1898, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. Early in life he had engaged in a mercantile business, but for the last forty years had pursued farming. He was a man of high character, was noted for his charity and commanded the respect of all with whom he came into contact. A consistent member of the Methodist church, his interests in good and benevolent objects could always be relied on. In politics he was a Republican, but never asked for office.
The mother of our subject was a daughter of Joseph and Isabella (Moore) Bingham, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Mrs. Rankin died in June. 1893, after having had the following children: Mary, deceased; our subject; Mrs. Flora Laur, of this township; J. E., a farmer of Colorado; Cora and Mrs. Lulu Bond. Mrs. Rankin was a devoted member of the Methodist church, in which she was most highly esteemed; Mr. Rankin by a previous marriage had several children, the survivor being W. A. Rankin, a prominent citizen of Onarga, Illinois.
The youth and boyhood of our subject was similar to that of other lads of his age. He accompanied his father in the family removals, but soon after attaining to his majority he came to Missouri, and in 1876 he and his brother engaged in farming, continuing together for five years, through many changes. Mr. Rankin was married April 12, 1898, to Miss Lillie McCan, born in Ohio, October 26, 1868, a daughter of John and Catherine (Summers) McCan, both of whom lived and died in Ohio, where they had lived worthy lives and were deserving members of the Christian church. They reared a large number of estimable children, named as follows: Thomas J., Henry, Hamilton, Mrs. Julia Smally, Mrs. Rebecca Mehaffee, Franklin, William, Mrs. Rankin and Mrs. Naomi Grimes. All those living have remained in Ohio, except the wife of our subject.
Mr. and Mrs. Rankin are well and favorably known in Atchison county, both in the Methodist church, of which they are valued members, and through the country, where Mr. Rankin is known as a just man and she as a helpful neighbor and friend. Politically Mr. Rankin is a Republican and takes an intelligent interest in the affairs of the nation.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack


J.E. RANKIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 18, is a native of Mahaska County, Iowa, and was born December 1, 1855. He is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth A. (Bingham) Rankin, both of whom are natives of Indiana. They were married at Indianola, Iowa, and then moved to Kirkwood, Warren County, Illinois, in 1866. There J.E. Rankin spent his boyhood days and received a good education. In 1876 he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and purchased his present farm of 280 acres, it then being nothing but wild, raw land. Now it is one of model farms in the county. Returning to Illinois, Mr. R. was married, January 15, 1878, to Miss Clara E. Allison, a native of Henderson County, Illinois, and the daughter of John M. and Sarah (Rodman) Allison. The former was born in Pennsylvania, and her mother in Kentucky. They settled in Henderson County at an early day. Mrs. R. spent her girlhood days and received an excellent education in Illinois. They have two daughters: Pearl B., born September 29, 1878, and Bessie, born July 10, 1881. Mrs. Rankin is a member of the United Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES RANKIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 36, was born in Sullivan County, Indiana, June 23, 1828, and is the son of Hugh and Nancy (Milligan) Rankin, natives of Ohio. They were of Scottish descent. When James was seven years of age his parents moved to Warren (now Henderson) County, Illinois, and there the subject of this sketch passed his youth, receiving a common school education. He has given his attention principally to agricultural pursuits through life. He fell a victim to the gold fever in the spring of 1861 and immigrated west to Colorado, where he engaged in mining. He returned to Illinois in the fall of 1862, and in 1866 he commenced the hardware business at Kirkwood, Warren County, which he continued some ten years. Mr. R. then came to Atchison County, in August, 1876, settling in Dale Township. He moved on the place on which he now resides in the fall of 1880. It was then all wild prairie land and he commenced to improve it, now owning 800 acres well improved. He has a handsome residence, good barn, a nice young orchard, etc., also oversees some 6,000 acres for his cousin David Rankin. He commenced life a poor boy and has worked his own way through by honesty, integrity and attention to business. He is one of the largest cattle feeders and shippers in this county, and is well and favorably known to the stock men of Northwest Missouri. He was married in July, 1849, to Miss Elenore Lusk, a daughter of James and Isabella Lusk. She was born in February, 1832, in South Carolina. They have had eight children, four of whom are living: Isabella J., born February 23, 1850 (now Mrs. William J. Putney of this county); Rebecca L., born November 14, 1856 (now Mrs. J.A. Tompson of this county); William W., born January 13, 1859; Laura E., born March 4, 1861 (now Mrs. J.A. Nelson of this county). Himself, wife and three daughters are members of the United Presbyterian Church. He fills the position of elder in the Greenville congregation. Politically he is a staunch Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN A. RANKIN, farmer and banker, at Tarkio, is a prominent man of this county. He is the eldest son and second child in a family of three, who were children of David and Sarah Rankin. He was born November 21, 1856, near Biggsville, Henderson County, Illinois. He was reared at his birthplace, and passed his youthful days on the farm, receiving a preparatory education in the neighborhood schools. In 1873, he entered Monmouth College, from which institution he graduated in 1877. When not in school he assisted his father in the stock business, and also in the bank. He remained some time in the First National Bank of Monmouth, Illinois, and made his first trip west to Atchison County, Missouri, during vacation, in 1876. In the fall of 1877, he went to Cheyenne, remaining about two months, then returned home and the following winter he came to Atchison County, where he became engaged in farming and stock raising. During the summer of 1880, he erected his present handsome residence, on the western outskirts of the town of Tarkio, also a good barn. His farm contains 400 acres of choice land, and is said to be one of the finest pieces of land in Atchison County. From his residence he has a good view of the surrounding country. He also owns a farm of 850 acres near Westboro. His land is all well improved, he has some fine stock, and is also interested in banking. He was the first to sell lots in Tarkio. Politically, he is a staunch Republican. He has inherited some of the vim and energy of his father, and is a stirring business man. He is not addicted to the use of strong drink, and never tasted a drop of liquor in his life, although having been associated with those who did drink. Mr. R. was married June 9, 1879, to Miss Hattie Arms, daughter of J.D. and Harriet Arms, of Monmouth, Illinois. She was born in Monmouth, Illinois, December 18, 1856. They have been blessed with one child, Nellie, born September 29, 1881.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM F. RANKIN, farmer and stock raiser, section 9, the subject of this sketch, was born January 1, 1860, near Biggsville, Henderson County, Illinois, and is the youngest child of David and Sarah Rankin. He was reared to manhood at his birthplace, on the farm, and after receiving a preparatory education in the common schools he attended Monmouth College, finishing his education at Eastman’s Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. From this institution he was graduated, December 22, 1880. He drove a four-horse plow when only ten years of age, then being so small as to be compelled to stand on a nail keg to harness his horses. He also assisted his father in shipping stock and in the banking business. He made his first trip west in July, 1877. He came to Atchison County and remained two or three weeks. In June, 1879, he again visited this county and put in a crop. He returned to Illinois again and continued his studies. In June, 1880, he came west and purchased a farm. After completing his course at the Business College, in January, 1881, he moved out and settled on the old Burr Oak Farm, locating where he now resides in November, 1881. He owns 1,280 acres of fine land, all improved, 320 of this lying just west of the city of Tarkio. His land is well watered and suitably adapted to stock raising. He has a handsome residence. He also owns an interest in the Tarkio Bank. Mr. Rankin carries the respect of a large circle of friends. He is a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, of Monmouth, in which he held the position of secretary. Politically, he is a staunch Republican. He is a strong temperance man. Mr. R. was married May 12, 1881, to Miss Lizzie Marshall, daughter of J.W. and Anna Marshall, of Monmouth, Illinois. She was born in Springfield, Ohio, August 12, 1861. She was brought to Monmouth by her parents when about six years of age, and there was reared and educated. They are both active members of the United Presbyterian Church, of Tarkio.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES F. RAPP, an enterprising and energetic farmer, section 35, was born in Germany, November 17, 1842. In the spring of 1849 he came with his parents to America and located in Atchison County, Missouri. He has made farming his occupation during life and now has a farm of 122 acres. He was married in August, 1864, to Miss Leah Fox, who was born in Shelby County, Indiana, October 31, 1849. They have five children: Mary, William, George, Frederick and Martha. Mr. R. has improved his farm by hard labor and now has a good place, which is carried on under his careful supervision in which he is assisted by his worthy wife.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE W. REED, farmer and stock raiser, section 6, township 65, range 39, is a prominent pioneer of this township. He was born March 7, 1832, in Portage County, Ohio. His father, John Reed, was a native of Virginia, and his mother, formerly Rebecca Moran, was born in Maryland. George was reared to manhood at his birthplace on the farm, and received a common school education. He also learned the blacksmith’s trade. In October, 1854, he immigrated to Iowa and settled in Hardin County, at the then new town of Eldora, there being only three houses in the place. He started a shop and did the first blacksmithing in the county. After remaining there some twelve years, he moved on a farm where he lived six years. In March, 1870, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, with Mr. Shoecraft and settled where he now resides. They built a small shanty and broke prairie. He helped to locate the roads and put in the first bridge. At that time there were but four farms opened between his place and Rock Port. He was instrumental in establishing a mail route from Rock Port to Maryville. His first building lumber he hauled from Phelps and Craig. Mr. R. now has 160 acres of fine land, well improved, comfortable buildings, etc. He has been a hard working man and deserves his success. During the war he enlisted in September, 1861, in Company A, Twelfth Iowa Infantry. He took part in the battles of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Smithland, Kentucky and Shiloh. He was taken prisoner at the battle on April 6. They were taken to Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and were three days without anything to eat. They were confined at different points: Macon, Georgia, and finally to Libby Prison. He suffered fearfully and lost about 100 pounds in weight, and was little more than a skeleton when he was released in December, 1862. He held the position of sergeant; returning home he recruited forty men, with whom he went to Davenport. He was offered a lieutenant’s commission, but ill health would not permit his going to the field again. Mr. Reed has been twice married: First, in September, 1854, to Miss Mariah Ewell, a native of Maine; she died June 16, 1870. By this union he has two children: John I., born September 3, 1858, and George R., born April 9, 1860. He was married again January 12, 1874, to Helen Mar Ewell, a sister of the former wife. She was born in Kennebec County, Maine, November 17, 1833. They had one child: Stella, born October 15, 1874. Mrs. Reed is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES REITER, druggist and grocer, was born in the town of Paschel, within a few miles of the city of Trier, on the river Mosel, Germany, on the 23rd of September, 1841. He was reared in his native town, and received a very fair education in the German language. He was also brought up to play on most all musical instruments. September 30, 1864, he started for America, and after landing at New York, he located in Calumet County, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in teaching music and farming till the fall of 1868. At that time he came to Rock Port, where he lived till 1874, then moving to Maryville, Nodaway County, Missouri. After leaving Wisconsin, he was interested in the saloon business till 1878, when he returned from Maryville to Rock Port, and here has since been occupied in the grocery business. In February, 1880, he also began in the drug business, and now has two business rooms. He gives some attention to teaching music. Mr. Reiter was married April 16, 1868, to Miss Jane Mitchell, a native of Bohemia. She was born May 24, 1850, and came to America in the year 1855. They have six children: John N., born in Rock Port, Missouri, February 28, 1869; Carl J., born in Rock Port, Missouri, January 2, 1871; Frederick W., born in Rock Port, Missouri, March 21, 1873; Clara W., born in Maryville, Missouri, May 23, 1875; Losa N., born in Maryville, Missouri, November 23, 1878; Ida C., born in Rock Port, Missouri, March 8, 1880. Mr. Reiter’s family are all musicians, and all play on different musical instruments, excepting the youngest child. He and Mrs. Reiter both having a talent for music, and being expert performers on a variety of instruments, their children seem to be natural musicians.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES RENNER, a leading merchant tailor of the city of Rock Port, was born in Prussia, Germany, August 5, 1818. He was reared and educated in his native country, and has followed his present trade since he attained the age of fourteen years. In 1849, he emigrated to America, and located in New Orleans, where he lived till 1854, when he went to Louisville, Kentucky, and in 1858 he came to Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri. He has since been a resident of the place, and being an unusually excellent workman, commands a good trade. May 12, 1845, Mr. Renner was married to Miss Amelia Schultz, who was born in Germany, March 5, 1821. They have three children, Charles, Emma and Bettie.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN RICHARDS, farmer and stock raiser, section 34, is a native of Wayne County, Ohio, and was born on the 3rd day of November, 1837. His father, Solomon Richards, was of Welsh descent. The maiden name of his mother was Matilda McIntyre. His Grandfather Richards was born in Wales and immigrated to America at an early day. He was a soldier in the revolutionary war and was with Gen. Washington when he crossed the Delaware River, at Trenton, New Jersey. He died at the remarkable age of one hundred and four years. Although urged to accept a pension he steadfastly refused, a marked contrast to the unworthy recipients of this much abused provision for those it was intended to benefit. Mr. Richards’ grandmother was of German extraction. John’s youth was spent at the place of his birth until he attained the age of sixteen. Up to this period his education was confined to the neighborhood schools. He then went to Fort Wayne, Indiana, and remained in school two years, after which he had recourse to the occupation of all aspiring youth, school teaching. After teaching one year in Fountain County, Indiana, he, in 1857, immigrated to Nebraska, but, becoming dissatisfied with the outlook, he retraced his steps to Missouri and the same fall located in Atchison County. His wealth at this time was only twenty-five cents. He found employment at cutting wood at fifty cents per day. He soon after secured a school and for several years his time was divided between working on a farm in summer and teaching school during the winter months. He purchased a piece of land which he improved and has added to it from time to time, until his landed estate consists of 640 acres. Mr. R. was married December 24, 1862, to Miss Elizabeth Hays, daughter of John Hays, who settled in Atchison County, in 1844. Mrs. Richards was born in Indiana. Their family consists of eight children: Matilda Jane, Sarah Ellen, Eliza Eveline, Emmet Earl, Bret Allen, Rilla May, Frank Lee and an infant unnamed. Mr. Richards has been closely identified with the interests of the county and holds the office of public administrator.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WATSON R. RICHARDSON, farmer and plasterer, section 23, was born in Cumberland County, Kentucky, February 5, 1826, and in 1827, he moved to Morgan County, Illinois, with his parents, his father, Jesse C. Richardson, being one of the pioneers of that county. In 1840, the family moved to Cass County, Illinois, when they bought a farm. In 1846, Mr. R. enlisted in Company E, First Illinois regiment, for the Mexican War, and passed through all the hard fighting of the campaign, and at last received a severe wound in the hip, which has disabled him for life, the ball still remaining in him. After receiving an honorable discharge, he returned home. In 1851, he moved to Missouri, and in the spring following he came to this county, and after farming through the season, he entered the farm where he now lives, from the government. He has improved a fine place, has a good home and is enjoying his decline of life, surrounded by his family and friends. His landed estate contains 120 acres. In 1859 his father came to live on one of his son’s farms, but died April 5, 1866. In his boyhood Watson learned the plastering trade, and it has been his business through life, where work in that line was to be had. He married Miss Amanda J. Beard, of Cass County, Illinois, November 30, 1849. She died in 1852, leaving two children, Amanda J. and Alceres C. His second wife was Emily A. Edwards, whom he married August 4, 1855. She died in 1860, leaving three children: Alvetieus F., Alvarez F. and Emily A. In 1856, he married Miss Eliza J. Cameron, of this county. They have four children: Violet L., Eliza J., Dillon E. and Jesse C. Mr. R. has seen much of this country in pioneer times, and has been active in its enterprises. He was a member of Company B, Fourth Artillery, during the war, being sergeant and gunner. He was also engaged in the Mormon War, and was present when the mob killed Joseph Smith, and was captain of a company of home guards in the rebellion. He has been a justice of many years. He was very prominent in politics in Illinois, and held several offices. He is a Democrat, and favors the Christian Church. His grandfather, George Richardson, who was from England, settled in Virginia, and was in the revolutionary war for seven years, with Washington. He was a cousin of General Morgan, of revolutionary fame. The grandmother of Watson Richardson, was Martha Snow. His mother was Rebecca P. Ellis, and his father was with General Jackson at New Orleans, and all through the war of 1812. Mr. R. is known everywhere as a kind neighbor and a friend to the needy.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

S.L. RIDGEWAY, one of the most prominent and enterprising stock dealers in this vicinity, resides on section 1. He is a native of Sangamon County, Illinois, and is a son of S.L. and C.A. (Stout) Ridgeway. His father was born in Danville, Kentucky, and in 1828, went to Sangamon County, Illinois. His mother is also a native of Kentucky, and in 1826, removed to Sangamon County, Illinois. There they were married and afterwards settled, and in July, 1872, moved to Maryville, Nodaway County, Missouri, where they now reside. The subject of this memoir passed his boyhood days and received a very good education in his native county. He started out in life as a farmer and stock raiser, and in 1871, came to Atchison County, purchased the whole of section 1, and now he has one of the finest improved sections in the northeast part of the county, surrounded and subdivided with Osage hedge, and planted in orchard and forest trees to the extent of twenty acres. Mr. Ridgeway married Miss Laura Hamlin, a native of Sangamon County, Illinois, and a daughter of H.N. and Evelin (Scott) Hamlin. Her father was a native of New York, and her mother of Kentucky, who, with their parents early went to Sangamon County, Illinois. There they were married and afterwards moved to Morgan County, Illinois, where they still reside. Mr. and Mrs. Ridgeway have one son, Samuel Leslie. Mr. R. is a Mason in good standing.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HENRY B. ROBERTS, farmer, is the owner of 600 acres of land on McKissock’s Island, Missouri. He was born in Henry County, Kentucky, October 18, 1810, and in 1822, removed to Illinois. He was in the Black Hawk War, in 1832, remaining in its service until the close. After his return he was appointed by General Jackson to a lieutenancy in the United States Rangers, to guard the western frontier. He went with his company to Fort Leavenworth, and in the spring the company was ordered to guard a train to New Mexico. In the fall of 1833, he resigned his commission for the purpose of herding with the Comanche Indians. He returned to Fort Leavenworth to attend a court martial, and remained there through the winter. He was appointed commissary during the Florida War, and went with Colonel Morgan. They returned in the spring of 1838, to Liberty, Missouri, after being discharged. In April, 1838, in conformity to a law of congress, forts were to be established at different points, among which, one to be at Table Creek, where Nebraska City now is.
Mr. Roberts and A.G. Williams were to supply the future fort with beef, corn and hay. So they made a claim of a tract of land where Sonora now stands, in Atchison County, broke 100 acres, and planted it in corn, etc. This was in the spring of 1838, and it is claimed by some that it was the first settlement made in the county. They built a house, and in the fall of 1839, Charles Beacham bought out Thomas Wilson, and in December of the same year, Mr. Beacham went to Ray County, Missouri, after some hogs. There he fell in with Callaway Millsaps and his wife, and two of her brothers, and also Alexander Hawley. He brought them to Sonora, to keep house and work on the farm. Mr. R. gave the city of Sonora its name, it meaning Rising Sun in Spanish. Mrs. Millsaps gave birth to the first child in the county, at Mr. R.’s house. The child is now William Millsaps. Mr. R. subsequently went to California, but returned and made a claim in Nemaha County, Nebraska. He afterwards sold out, and in 1870, he bought land on the island, where he has since resided. He married Mary King in 1846. They have six children living: Elizabeth Ann, Nancy R., Benoni B., George Albert, Nancy Alice, and William Tillman. They have lost four. Mr. Roberts having spent his entire life on the border, has seen and experienced true pioneer life. He has a good farm on the island, and a good range for stock. A bill is now pending before congress to have this island attached to Missouri, as it now is, it not being either in Nebraska or Missouri.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

H.O. ROBERSON, farmer and stock raiser, section 22, was born in Hardin County, Tennessee, October 27, 1850, and is the son of Jesse and Elizabeth Roberson. The former was born in Alabama and the latter in Kentucky. In 1856 H.O. was brought by his parents to Missouri, where he remained until after the war. In 1865 he made his home permanently in Atchison County, and by industry and good management he has secured 323 acres of land, with good improvements, and is one of the large stock feeders of the vicinity, and in his farming operations he has been very successful. He was married in 1874 to Miss Lucinda Noblitt, a native of this county, and a daughter of one of Atchison County’s pioneers. They have four children: Rosa Belle, Charles O., Bert O. and Lulu.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J.R. ROBERTSON, of the firm of Cowick & Robertson, publishers of the Tarkio Republican, was born near Monmouth, Warren County, Illinois, August 7, 1853. His parents, James W. and Emeline (Morgan) Robertson, were natives of York State. J.R. was reared at his birth place, and received his education at Monmouth College. He came west in November, 1881, and settled at Tarkio, where he became associated with Mr. Cowick. He is a member of Warren Lodge No. 160, I.O.O.F., of Monmouth, Illinois. Mr. Robertson was married July 23, 1878, to Miss Laura E. Bugby, daughter of Elisha T. and Melvina Bugby. She is a native of Vermont, and was born March 7, 1853. They have one child, Ernest A., born October 8, 1880. Messrs. Cowick & Robertson are men of energy, and fully alive to the wants and desires of the citizens of Tarkio. They publish a sheet which is an honor to them.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

L. M. Robertson, farmer and stock raiser, section 16, was born 3 August 1843, in Clay Co., MO. His father, A. E. Robertson, was a native of Tennessee, and his mother, who maiden name was Mary Gross, was a native of Missouri. They moved to Atchison County in 1849 when L. M. was about six years old, settling on the bottom south of Rock Port. It was on this frontier that the subject of this sketch was reared to manhood. He passed his youth on the farm and attended school in the old log school houses with puncheon floors, slab benches and sod chimney. He has given his attention to agricultural pursuits through life. In the spring of 1862 he enlisted in the State Militia and assisted in routing the bushwhackers out of the lower counties. In 1864 he enlisted in an independent company of cavalry, made up at Nebraska City. They were attached to a Minnesota regiment and served on the frontier, fighting the Sioux, Winnebago, and Flat-head Indians. They went through Montana and up into British America, experiencing some pretty hard fighting. At the close of the war Mr. R. settled in Atchison County, on a farm, and has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. In February, 1880, he settled where he now resides. He owns 100 acres of fine land, has a neat residence, a good orchard, etc., his farm being well watered and well adapted for stock purposes. He has filled the position of school director some seven years. He was formerly a member of the Grange. Mr. Robertson was married November 17, 1867, to Miss M. J. File, a native of Illinois, born September 17, 1848. She was a daughter of William and Betsy File. They have three children: Samuel R., born August 5, 1868, Melissa, born April 26, 1871, and Carrie B., April 28, 1875. Himself and wife are active members of the Christian Church.
Note: this is Littleton Mayberry Robertson.
(Source: County History of Holt & Atchison Cos, Mo.; p. 929. Contributed by: Sara Hemp)

Richard B. Robertson, of Tarkio township, was born at Union City, Atchison county, Missouri, on Jan. 4th, 1857, the son of Samuel O. and Elizabeth Robertson.  His parents came from Ray county, Missouri, in 1844, and located on the Missouri bottom.  The whole life of the subject of this sketch has been passed in Atchison county.  In Richard's eighth year his father died, and he lived on the farm until in his twenty-first year, when his mother died and h e commenced farming on his own account.
In the year 1882 he located four miles east of Tarkio, where he farmed until in 1894, when he began work for Dr. Baker, selling his medicines, in which business he has made a decided success. He has a nice home, one mile northeast of Tarkio, the residence being of modern design and of the following dimensions:  14x__ (illegible) feet, 1 1/2 stories, and 14x16 feet, one story.  Also a barn, brick cellar, necessary outbuildings and an orchard and vineyard.  The residence is beautifully located and nicely kept.  Mr. Robertson and wife make a specialty of raising poultry and have some of the finest chickens we ever saw.
On Feb. 5th, 1881, Mr. Robertson was married to Miss Emma Francis Bale, daughter of Samuel A. and Mary J. (Richardson) Bale.  She was born in Petersburg, Ill., Feb. 14, 1859.  Mr. and Mrs. Robertson's son, R. Richard, was born Feb. 10, 1885.  The young man graduated from Tarkio High School in his sixteenth year, with first honors among the boys of the class.  He also attended Tarkio College.
Mr. and Mrs. Robertson are members of the Christian church at Tarkio and are active workers in same.  Mr. Robertson is a member of the Masonic lodge at Tarkio and the Modern Woodmen camp at Tarkio.  Mrs. Robertson is a member of the Order of Royal Neighbor s and the Ladies' Aid Society.  Politically, Mr. Robertson is a Democrat. in charge of the local Masonic lodge.
(Source: Biographical History of Atchison co., Mo; Issued by the Atchison Co. Mail; Stapel, H.F.;MR-977-811 At24b; p. 434; available Pub. Lib. of  Independence MO. Contributed by: Sara Hemp)

N.C. RUNDLE was born in Jackson County, Ohio, February 3, 1843. John Rundle, his father, was also a native of Ohio. His mother’s maiden name was Lydia M. Rush. In 1848 the family removed from Jackson County, Ohio, to the State of Missouri, settling in Macon County. After residing in that locality for four years, Monroe County, Iowa, became their home, and there they lived until coming to Atchison County in 1857. At that time they settled near Rock Port, being among the early settlers of the township. The earlier days of young Rundle were spent in a woolen mill, and he also attended the common schools. December 11, 1865, he was married in Atchison County, to Miss Mary E. Bopst, daughter of O.A. Bopst. She was born in Ohio, October 21, 1845. After his marriage, Mr. Rundle worked at the woolen business for some nine years. In the spring of 1875, he became engaged in farming near Phelps, and in the spring of 1880, he moved to his present location. He has eighty acres of land, with sixty-five acres fenced, fairly improved, and with ninety fruit trees upon the place, which is in section 26, township 64, range 41. Mr. and Mrs. R. have five children – John C., born October 21, 1869; William A., born June 9, 1873; Walter G., born May 6, 1876; Harry F., born June 14, 1878, and Luola, born June 14, 1880. Mr. and Mrs. Rundle are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

SCHUYLER ROUSE, farmer and stock raiser, section 20, an early settler of this township, was born January 8, 1830, in the town of Rawdorn, Hastings County, Canada. His father, George C. Rouse, was a native of New York State, and his mother, Martha Rouse, nee Tompkins, was a Canadian by birth. They moved to Brown County, Illinois, when Schuyler was about eight years of age and there he grew to manhood on a farm and received a common school education. When twenty-one years old he moved to Knox County, Illinois, where he made his home until 1874. He has given his entire attention to agricultural pursuits through life. March 1, 1874, he came west and settled on his present farm. It was then wild prairie land and he now owns 640 acres, all improved. He has a comfortable residence, a good barn, grove and small orchard. His place is well adapted to stock raising, in which he is largely interested. Mr. Rouse was married June 21, 1864, to Falenia Rowe, a widow with two children. Her maiden name was Falenia Green, and she was a daughter of Daniel and Amy Green, born in New York State July 4, 1833. By this union they have four children: Mary, born March 19, 1866; Sheldon, born April 9, 1872; Albert H., born November 11, 1875; Raldon C., born November 11, 1877. Mrs. R.’s children by her former husband are: Amy Rowe, born December 8, 1850 (now Mrs. Samuel Edwards, of Knox County, Illinois); John N. Rowe, born October 8, 1854.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

BRADFORD RUPE, section 6, was born in Atchison County, Missouri, January 16, 1848, his parents being Richard and Mary J. Rupe, nee Renick. The former was a native of Howard County, Missouri, and the latter was a Kentuckian by birth. In 1842 they came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled in Clark Township, being among the pioneers of the county and among the very first settlers of this township. The subject of this sketch resides on the old homestead. He has 560 acres of land, all fenced, with fair improvements and is one of the most successful agriculturists of the township. He makes a specialty of dealing in and feeding stock. Mr. Rupe was married in Holt County, Missouri, February 26, 1872, to Miss Bircha Taylor, daughter of A.C. Taylor. She was born in Holt County, September 2, 1851. Their family consists of five children: Henry Y., born September 29, 1873; Elizabeth C., born January 29, 1875; William A., born June 24, 1877; Van, born October 4, 1879, and Orvil, born September 21, 1881.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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