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Atchison County
Missouri


Biographies
" S "

ISAAC SANBORN, JR., manager of the White Pine Lumber Company, was born in Orono, Penobscot County, Maine, April 4, 1842. His father, Isaac Sanborn, was a native of New Hampshire, and his mother, whose maiden name was Lucy A. Mahoney, was born in Maine. Isaac was the second in a family of four living children. He was reared at his birthplace, and received a good business education at Orono High School. He was literally brought up to learn the lumber business. His native village was a great manufacturing place, and when President Lincoln issued his first call for troops, the subject of this sketch was among the first to respond. He enlisted in Company A, Second Maine Infantry, April 23, 1861, and October 26, 1862, he was transferred to the United States Engineering Corps, with which he served until the close of the war. He took part in the battles of First Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredricsburg, Gettysburg and many others. At the close of the war he made a trip through Michigan, thence to the oil regions of Pennsylvania, and from there to the oil regions of West Virginia, where he remained some eight years, engaged in the oil business, thence to Richmond, Virginia, in 1873. Here he resided about seven years occupied in the granite business. He went to Atchison, Kansas, in 1880, and followed the lumber trade, thence to Kansas City, where he remained a short time. He came to Tarkio, in February, 1882, and took charge of the business at this point. This company have a large assortment of lumber, and one of the largest yards in the county, and Mr. Sanborn understands the business thoroughly. He is a live, energetic business man. He was married August 3, 1875, to Miss Tilly L. Watt, daughter of James and Mary (Johnston) Watt, of Latrobe, Pennsylvania. She was born in that place, September 9, 1851. They are both members of the Presbyterian Church, of Tarkio.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM SAWYER, president of the bank and also senior member of the mercantile firm of Sawyer, Howard & Co., Westboro. Few men are more highly esteemed or respected by all in any community than is William Sawyer. He is a son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Roberts) Sawyer. The former was a native of North Carolina, and with his parents moved to Kentucky and afterwards to Marion County, Indiana. There he was married to Miss Elizabeth Roberts, a native of Kentucky, who, with her parents early moved to that county. The subject of this sketch was born in Marion County, Indiana, June 15, 1844. When at the age of eleven years he began life for himself by working on a farm. He came to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1860 and located near Center Point, where he devoted his time to farming, and in 1875 entered into partnership with D.R. Dunlap, at Central Point in the general merchandise business, afterwards coming here. Mr. Sawyer married October 22, 1864, Miss Hannah Daniels, a native of Atchison County, Missouri, born June 9, 1847. She was a daughter of William and Margaret Daniels, natives of Alabama, who came to Atchison County, Missouri, at an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer’s family consists of three children: William N., Mary A. and Charles. Mr. S. is an exceptionally successful man and in all his dealings is honorable and straightforward.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ENOCH D. SCAMMON, one of the early pioneers, and still (1882) a resident of Atchison County, was born in South Coast, State of Maine, November 17, 1806. He is the eldest of a family of five children, five of whom were sons. In early manhood he determined to seek his fortune in the distant west, and in 1838 landed in Jackson County, Missouri, at that period a comparative wilderness. Two years after, allured by the glowing accounts of the few who had penetrated the distant border of the Platte Purchase, he determined to make his home in that land of promise, and starting with his outfit, in due time reached the site of his present habitation, in Clay Township, where he has since continued to reside, two miles west of the city of Rock Port and three miles east of Phelps City. Shortly after the close of the civil war he laid out, on the site of his farm, a town which he named Union City, a full history and description of which will be found in the body of this work. This was once an important trading point, and but for the subsequent location of the line of the Kansas City, St. Joseph and Council Bluffs Railroad three miles to the westward of its site, would undoubtedly have become the commercial center of the county. Mr. Scammon was married in January, 1846, to Miss Elizabeth Templeton, daughter of William Templeton, a native of the State of Indiana, and also a pioneer of the Purchase. By this marriage he had seven children, of whom the following named are still living: Rev. William W. Scammon, a minister of the M.E. Church, born November 26, 1847; James M., born May 15, 1850, and for the past eleven years a prominent merchant of Phelps City; Mary C., wife of Lewis Fleming, Esq., of St. Joseph, Missouri; E. Jane, wife of James A. Smith, a farmer of Clay Township, Atchison County, and Mark Sedwick, born in 1866. Francis S. died at the age of three years, and another child died in early infancy. Mr. Scammon is a prominent member of the M.E. Church, to the support of which he has all his life largely contributed. The church edifice in Union City was built by him in Rock Port and moved to Union City on the establishment of that town by him, in the center of his extensive landed possessions.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES M. SCAMMON was born in Union City, Atchison County, Missouri, May 15, 1850. He acquired a good education at home and became well qualified for prosecuting the duties of the business which he has made his life work. He remained with his father until twenty-one years old and then rented a farm, which he worked for one year. In 1872, with his father, he started the store which he now conducts, and afterwards Mr. Bailey became a partner and since then they have been a very large and prosperous business under the firm name of Scammon & Bailey. Mr. S. married Miss Mary Casey, daughter of Edward Casey, of Nova Scotia, March 7, 1878. They are raising a nephew of Mr. S.’s, Levi Craighton Smith. Politically Mr. S. is a Republican and he is a leading member of the M.E. Church. He is liberal in building churches and supporting schools, and has been one of our energetic and prosperous men, both as a farmer and merchant. He has bought a fine farm of 550 acres of land which he cultivates. As a business man he has the confidence of the entire community. His father, Enoch D. Scammon, of Union City, is among the early pioneers of the county, and has large possessions, all accumulated by his own hard work. Reference to this noble man is to be found elsewhere in our work.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES SCARLETT, was born in Orange County, Indiana, on the 20th of October, 1827, and was the son of Samuel and Jemima Scarlett, nee Charles, the former of Orange County, North Carolina, and the latter from Indiana. James Scarlett was brought up on a farm, receiving his education in the common subscription schools. He was married in Orange County, Indiana, in the summer of 1849, to Miss F.C. Pace, daughter of Edward Pace. She was born in Tennessee. In the fall of 1853, Mr. S. moved from Orange County, Indiana, to Taylor County, Iowa, where he resided for ten years, after which he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled on his farm in Clark Township. He has 640 acres of land, well improved and under fence, and a bearing orchard of 500 apple trees, besides a variety of other fruits. His beautiful place is located in section 4, township 63, range 40. Mrs. S. died in Taylor County, Iowa, in 1860, leaving three children: Rachel E., Susana and Rebecca Isabelle. His second marriage occurred in this county, March 28, 1861, to Miss Sarah Van Gundy, daughter of John Van Gundy, Sr. She was born in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. S. have four children: William W., John G., Samuel V. and James F. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Church, while Mr. S. belongs to the Masonic order.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

C. SCHNEIDER, dealer in jewelry and sewing machines. Among the business enterprises of Rock Port, which are ably represented by men of business tact, the jewelry business is not to be found in the rear. C. Schneider was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, June 26, 1844. His parents, John and Maria Schneider, now live in Strawsburg, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. They came to America in the year 1852, first locating in Holmes County, Ohio, but afterwards moving to Tuscarawas County, where the subject of this sketch was reared and educated. He lived on a farm till he was six years of age, when in the fall of 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company C, Sixty-seventh Ohio Infantry, remaining in the service until in January, 1865. He participated in many important battles, among which were Winchester, Virginia, under McClellan, on the Peninsula, in front of Richmond, Blackwater, Virginia, and in June, 1863, in the battle of Morris Island, where he was wounded in his left arm. This would disabled him from duty for six months, after which he participated in many other battles and skirmishes. He was mustered out at Columbus, Ohio, and then returned to Tuscarawas County. One winter previous to his going into the army, he had worked at the jewelry trade. He resumed labor at the same business in Canfield, Ohio, where he continued till the fall of 1866, when he moved to Rock Port, Missouri. Here he has since been successfully engaged in his present business. He is a member of Rock Port Lodge No. 135, I.O.O.F.; Rock Port Encampment No. 79, I.O.O.F.; North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M., North West Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., and Legion No. 12, S.K.A.O.U.W. Mr. Schneider was married November 8, 1868, to Miss Lucinda Wood, who was born in Butler County, Ohio, December 3, 1849. Her father was a native of Pennsylvania and her mother of Indiana. They have had eight children, six of whom are living – Charley, Arthur, Jennie, Willie, Harry and Fred. Mr. and Mrs. S. are members of the Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J.F. SCHOENECKE, of the firm of Schoenecke & Farris, blacksmiths, wagonmakers and repairers, was born in the village of Cobel, Saxony, Germany, November 20, 1855. His parents Fredrick and Julia Schoenecke, were natives of Germany. J.F. was the eldest of five children. He started from Hamburg with his parents in 1867, for the United States, and landed at New York City, from whence he immigrated west and settled at Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas. There they engaged in farming. When seventeen years of age he commenced to learn the blacksmith’s trade at Manhattan. In the fall of 1876 he came to Rock Port and started a shop there, and in the fall of 1880 he moved to Tarkio, being among the first business men here. In February, 1882, he accepted W.W. Farris as a partner. They have neat shops, and are prepared to do all kinds of work. They have both had a long experience in the business, and deserve their success. Mr. Schoenecke is a member of the North Star Lodge, No. 157, A.F. and A.M., of Rock Port, in which he holds the position of Junior Deacon. He also belongs to Northwest Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., of Rock Port, and Legion No. 12, Select Knights, of Rock Port. Mr. S. was married February 10, 1879, to Miss Ida Golden, daughter of William Golden, of Rock Port. She is a native of this county, born February 15, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. Schoenecke are members of the M.E. Church, of Tarkio, in which he holds the office of steward and church trustee. W.W. Farris was born February 19, 1854, in Marshall County, Illinois. He accompanied his parents to Mount Pleasant, Iowa, in 1868, and then commenced to learn the blacksmith trade, which he has since followed. Mr. F. was married June 10, 1877, to Miss Dena May, daughter of D.G.W. May, of Burlington Junction, Missouri. She is a native of Iowa, and was born February 20, 1861.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

EZRA H. SCHOOLER, was born in Grayson County, Virginia, December 18, 1845. W.D. Schooler, his father, was born in Virginia, and his mother, Polly D. Nuckols, was born in Grayson County, of the same state. The family moved to Missouri in the fall of 1854, and settled in Atchison County, in the vicinity of Rock Port. Ezra Schooler, the subject of this sketch, spent his youth on a farm, and attending the common schools of the county. He moved to his present farm in Clark Township in the fall of 1871. His place consists of 400 acres of excellent land all fenced, with fair improvements, and is located in sections 22 and 24, township 64, range 40. There is on the place a fine young bearing orchard of 130 apple trees, also some peach, pear and cherry trees; of small fruits there is a nice variety. Mr. Ezra Schooler was married in Atchison County, October 19, 1871, to Miss Caroline F. Walkup, daughter of Daniel H. and Nancy Walkup. Mrs. Schooler was born January 25, 1854, in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Schooler have had six children, of whom only three are now living: Asa Lee Schooler, born September 21, 1872; Rosamond Grace Schooler, born October 29, 1877; Charles Henry Schooler, born March 24, 1881; Ida Burdelle Schooler was born November 25, 1873, and died September 5, 1880; Albert Austin Schooler was born July 30, 1875, and died September 8, 1880; Hubert Heath Schooler was born November 6, 1879, and died September 14, 1880.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

W.D. SCHOOLER, agriculturist, section 1, post office Rock Port, is a native of Virginia, and was born in Spottsylvania County, January 25, 1813. His father, Garrett Schooler, and his mother, Elizabeth B. Johnson, were both natives of the same county as himself. W.D. is the fourth child in a family of three sons and two daughters. When but a child his parents moved to Louisa County, Virginia, where they lived till he was fourteen years of age, then moving to Grayson County, Kentucky. He was reared a farmer’s boy and has followed that occupation during life, except for four or five years, when he was engaged as a clerk in a store. In 1854 he came to Missouri and located on the farm where he now resides, in Atchison County. This contains 440 acres of excellent land. Mr. S. was married September 6, 1838, to Miss Polly D. Nuckolls. They have had eleven children, six of whom are now living: Frances A., born November 5, 1840; James E., born September 4, 1843; Ezra H., born December 18, 1845; Wyley K., born October 18, 1848; Ella T., born September 12, 1856; Floyd H., born July 14, 1867. Mrs. S. is the oldest child in a family of six sons and five daughters, and she was born in Grayson County, Kentucky, February 29, 1824. Her father, Ezra Nuckolls, was a native of Louisa County, Virginia, and her mother, formerly Lucinda Hale, was born in Grayson County, Kentucky.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

BENJAMIN W. SEDWICK, of the firm of Sedwick, Walter & Co., merchants at Fairfax, was born September 25, 1847, in Page County, Virginia, in which state also his parents, Joshua T. and Elizabeth (Colvin) Sedwick, were born. In 1857 the family moved to Missouri and settled in Holt County, near Oregon, where they resided for one year, after which Forest City became their home. Benjamin W. passed his youth in a store, and for some time was an attendant at the Oregon High School, and also the school at Forest City. He first began business for himself at Corning with H. Patterson & Co. and carried a stock of general merchandise, remaining in Corning until he came to Fairfax, in November, 1881. This firm was one of the first to purchase business lots in the town, but have since met with great success, which they richly merit. Mr. Sedwick was married April 20, 1875 to Miss M. Louisa Dunlap, daughter of James A. and Melinda Dunlap. She was born in Missouri October 3, 1856. Mr. and Mrs. S. have two children: Ethel A., born March 13, 1876, and an infant son, born October 25, 1881. Mrs. S. is a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church, and Mr. S. of the Methodist denomination. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN SEYMOUR, section 5, one of the leading farmers of Clark Township, was born January 12, 1834, in Erie County, Pennsylvania. John R. Seymour was his father, and his mother’s maiden name was Levica Eaton, she having been born in New York State. In the fall of 1838, the family left Erie County, Pennsylvania, moving to Indiana, where they lived for three years. After this they came to Missouri and located in Ray County, where they resided for eighteen months, then selecting Atchison County as their future place of residence. They came to this township in 1843, and were numbered with the early settlers of this vicinity. John Seymour was raised on a farm, receiving a limited education at the common subscription schools. He was married in this county September 25, 1856, to Miss Sarah Jane Young, daughter of Rufus and Marinda Young. She was born in Missouri April 29, 1838, and died September 30, 1869, leaving six children – Martha Marinda (wife of William Combs), born July 24, 1857; Mary L. (wife of Eugene Rhodes), born July 22, 1859; Pearcy Ann, born December 25, 1861; Joseph H., born October 12, 1863; Emma J., born March 7, 1866, and Rufus G., born December 29, 1867. In 1860 Mr. Seymour settled on his present farm. He has 245 acres of land, nearly all fenced, his home consisting of 100 acres, with good improvements. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

LEANDER SEYMOUR, a native of Erie County, Pennsylvania, was born February 5, 1830, and was the son of John and Levica Seymour, nee Eaton. The latter was a native of the state of New York. In 1838 they left Pennsylvania and settled in Green County, Indiana, where they continued to make their home for four years, afterwards coming to Missouri. They located in Holt County, where they were among the earliest pioneers, and, in the spring of 1844, removed to Atchison County, settling in Irish Grove. The youth of Leander was passed on a farm and in working in a wagon and repair shop. In February, 1854, the marriage of Mr. S. to Miss Elizabeth Beck, daughter of Wilson N. Beck, occurred in Atchison County, Missouri. She was born in Berrien County, Michigan, March 31, 1839. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour have six children: Franklin, born December 3, 1854; Lydia, born July 18, 1856; Lindia, born September 26, 1858; Wilson N.B., born December 28, 1860; Leander, born February 16, 1863; Mary, born March 1, 1868. After his marriage the subject of this sketch settled on his present farm, which contains 320 acres of improved land, 280 acres of which are under fence, with a good dwelling, barn, etc., and an orchard of 250 apple trees, besides all varieties of large and small fruits. Mr. Seymour makes a specialty of dealing in and feeding stock. He resides on section 5, township 64, range 40.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

STEPHEN SHACKLETON, farmer and stock raiser, section 1, was born October 13, 1835, in Leeds, Yorkshire, England. His parents, John (a lawyer by profession) and Mary (Lee) Shackleton, were natives of England. Stephen received good educational advantages, and when about fifteen he commenced reading law with his father. After studying some two years he resolved to come to America. At the close of a seven weeks voyage he landed at New York on the 17th of August, 1854. From there he went to Rochester, thence to Bloomington, Illinois, and from there to Keokuk, Iowa, in 1856. There he remained until 1860, after which he located in Nebraska, where he put in a crop. He subsequently moved to Fremont County, Iowa. In the fall of 1861, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled on the Missouri River bottom. On the 6th of July, 1863, he enlisted in the Fourth Iowa Battery and was in service until the close of the war, serving with the Fifteenth Corps. He filled the position of quartermaster sergeant. At the close of the war Mr. S. returned to Atchison County and settled on what was known as Bloody Island in July, 1865. With the exception of one year, 1867, he remained on this island until 1870. In the fall of 1871 he took a trip to England and visited the home of his childhood, returning in the spring of 1872. In June, 1873, he settled on the Tarkio, where he now resides. He owns 275 acres in this county, the home farm containing 130 acres, improved with a neat residence. The farm is well watered and is one of the finest stock farms in this vicinity. He now fills the office of justice of the peace. He has filled the position of school director some five years. He is a member of Jerusalem Lodge No. 253, A.F. & A.M. of Hamburg, Iowa, also of Atchison Lodge No. 220, A.O.U.W. of Tarkio. Mr. S. was married on the 24th of October, 1857, at Fort Madison, Iowa, to Miss Susan Waymire, who was born on the 18th of March, 1840, in Independence, Warren County, Indiana. She was a daughter of Solomon and Betsy (Mason) Waymire. They have had ten children, six of whom are living: John W., born September 10, 1858; George E., born July 27, 1868; Harriett E., born October 11, 1870; Stephen M., November 9, 1872; James F., born February 7, 1877, and Maud M., born September 15, 1880. Mrs. S. is a member of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHRISTIAN SHAUM, farmer and stock raiser, section 21. Among the enterprising citizens of this county is the subject of this sketch. He was born in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, July 21, 1846. His parents, John and Rebecca L. Shaum, were natives of Pennsylvania. He spent his boyhood days on the farm and received his education in the neighborhood schools. He commenced learning the trade of slate roofing when he arrived at maturity, and in 1865 he immigrated west to Linn County, Iowa, where he engaged in farming, and also followed his trade. He slated the Iowa additional penitentiary, also the round house and depot at Cedar Rapids and Clinton, Iowa. He came to Atchison County in the spring of 1876 and settled where he now resides. It was then wild prairie land, but he now owns 320 acres, well improved, and has a nice grove and orchard and a neat residence. His farm is well watered and is an excellent stock farm. He is a member of Lisbon Lodge No. 162, I.O.O.F. and Mount Harbor Encampment, No. 147, also Bethlehem Lodge No. 3, Knights of Pythias, all of Lisbon. Mr. Shaum has been twice married; first, September 11, 1873, to Miss Emma Haren, a native of Pennsylvania. She died in December, 1876, and left one child, Hattie May, born June 22, 1874. He was married again July 21, 1878, to Kate Blessing, a native of Lynn County, Iowa, born October 21, 1851. She is a daughter of Michael and Mary Blessing, who were natives of Indiana. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Tarkio.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ANDREW SHAVER was born in Smith County, Virginia, February 8, 1849. S.K. Shaver, his father, as also his mother, formerly Elizabeth H. Kincano, were Virginians by birth. Andrew Shaver was raised on a farm, his time being mostly occupied in working about the place, but to some extent he attended the common schools. In the spring of 1868 he came to Missouri and settled in Atchison County, of which county he has since been a resident. Mr. Shaver was married January 20, 1875, in Smith County, Virginia, to Miss Elmira C. Ashlin, daughter of Hartwell Ashlin, Esq. She is a native of Virginia and was born July 15, 1853. Mr. and Mrs. S. have three children: Etta, born September 30, 1875; Bessie, born September 5, 1877, and Emeline, born January 30, 1880. In 1877 Mr. Shaver moved upon his present farm and now owns eighty acres of land, all improved, and upon it is a small bearing orchard. He resides on section 35, township 64, range 40.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN HENRY SHEPPERSON, farmer and stock raiser, section 6, was the son of William and Mary Ann (Webster) Shepperson, the former of Virginia and the latter of Scotch descent, but a native of London. John was born in Richmond, Virginia, April 16, 1834. His education was obtained almost entirely by self-application, and he spent several years in teaching in Virginia, Iowa and Missouri. He was the instructor of an excellent school for five years in Charlestown, now the capital of West Virginia. In 1862 he came to this state, and March 14th enlisted in the Fifth Missouri Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Penick. He served faithfully for sixteen months and on his return from the army bought some land, where he now lives. He spent some time in teaching and speculating in stock. December 15, 1869, Mr. Shepperson married Miss Susan Elizabeth Roberts, daughter of James and Elizabeth Roberts of this county. They have four children: Anna Gertrude, Jacob Malcolm, James William and John Lester. Mr. S. is a Mason and in his religious preferences inclines towards the Presbyterian denomination. He is a staunch Republican and whatever views he may take upon a question he is thoroughly competent to maintain his position. He is a great reader, keeping pace with the current literature of the day and also of the political movements of Congress. His farm contains 360 acres of good land.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES SHOECRAFT, farmer and stock raiser, section 26, one of the first to settle in this township, was born April 24, 1826, in Pennfield, Monroe County, New York. His parents, John and Laura (Brown) Shoecraft, were natives of New York State. James spent his earlier days on a farm at his birthplace, and attended the common schools. In 1855, he emigrated to Cold Water, Branch County, Michigan, where he remained for ten years engaged in farming. In 1865, he removed to Hardin County, Iowa, and settled on a farm. In the spring of 1870, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, with Mr. Reed, and they located on the uncultivated prairie. The first summer they camped out and broke land, and since that time Mr. S. has been a stirring citizen of this county. He owns 240 acres of fine land, and has it well improved. When Tarkio was started in the fall of 1880, he erected the first livery stable in the place, and conducted the business one year. He then sold out and moved back on his farm. He is quite largely interested in stock raising and shipping. Mr. Shoecraft has been three times married. First, in 1849, to Miss Emily Dawson, a native of New York State, who died in January, 1861, leaving one child, James, born July 22, 1853. He was married again in the fall of 1861, to Ellen Grove, a native of Michigan. She died soon afterward. Mr. S. was married the third time, in 1862, to Miss Adda Glass, who was born in Madison County, Ohio, on the 23rd of February, 1839. By this union they have one child, Minnie M., born November 27, 1866.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JAMES MONROE SLIGER, farmer and teacher, section 22, was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, May 21, 1853, and in 1868 came to this county. He commenced his education in Tennessee and completed it at the College of Stewartsville, Missouri. In 1880 he bought his present farm of 120 acres and has been making improvements upon it till he now has an excellent place. He married Miss Mary E. Proudfit, daughter of the late Thomas Proudfit, in February, 1877. They have one child, Ada. In politics Mr. S. is a Democrat. He belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he is a very active member. He is also a member of the Masonic order. Since completing his education he has taught the school in the same district. Mr. Sliger has done his part nobly in achieving what he has. He is a fine scholarly young man and well fitted for any position in life.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JESSE SLIGER, farmer, stock dealer and feeder, section 23, was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, July 14, 1838. His education was obtained at the common schools. He came to this county in 1859, and subsequently enlisted in the Second Missouri Infantry of the Confederate army, and was in the western army for four years. He was wounded in the battle of Pea Ridge, and discharged his duties well, enduring the trials and hardships of a soldier’s life without a murmur. He was discharged at Shreveport, Louisiana, at the close of the war. Mr. Sliger then returned to Nebraska, and became engaged with a freighter going to Fort Kearney. Upon coming back he moved to this vicinity and abought eighty acres of his present farm, which he has improved and made additions to until now he has 235 acres. In 1880, he built a beautiful residence, and few men have worked to a better advantage. He married Miss Mary Proudfit, daughter of Elijah Proudfit, in September, 1867. They have two children: Minnie Delona, born September 12, 1870; Wintford Emery, born August 31, 1873. Politically he is a Democrat, and belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Sliger is held in high esteem by his associates, on account of his high moral character, and known integrity.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JUDGE JOHN F. SLY, one of the most enterprising men of this township, and a man highly respected, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, February 22, 1828. His parents were Henry and Ann Sly, nee McCollister, the latter of Maryland, and the former a Virginian by birth. The youthful days of John F. were spent on a farm, he being reared to habits of industry, which have adhered to him during life. He received a common school education, and in 1851, he became engaged in the handling and shipping of stock, which business he followed for five years. In 1857 he came to Missouri, settling in Clark Township, and for twenty-four years has lived on his present place. Mr. Sly has 330 acres of land, about 220 acres being improved, and upon his place is a good brick dwelling. The subject of this sketch was married in this county, January 18, 1859, to Miss Mary J. Stephenson, daughter of William Stephenson. She was born in Indiana, February 10, 1830. Mr. and Mrs. Sly have four children: Henry Oscar, born December 31, 1860; Lillian, born October 10, 1864; Senoma, born October 11, 1868, and Mary, born January 3, 1872. Politically the Judge is Democratic, and once received the nomination of county judge, by his party, being elected to that position at the general election of 1876. He served for two years very acceptably and creditably. The Judge is greatly interested in dealing in and feeding stock.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

A SMITH, farmer, section 20, was born in Jackson County, Tennessee, December 17, 1843, and is the son of Samuel and Mary M. (Sanders) Smith, natives of the same county and state. Young Smith, with his parents, came to Atchison County, Missouri, in 1858, and settled near Linden. He went to Nebraska in 1860, returned to Missouri in 1878, and in 1881, purchased his present valuable farm. Mr. Smith was married February 1, 1872, to Miss Melinda Ruble, a native of Tennessee, born December 11, 1855. She came to Missouri with her parents when quite small. They have five children living: Mary M., Aaron, Lusin, Arceila and Anna M.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ABNER SMITH, farmer and stock raiser, section 16, a pioneer of Northwest Missouri, was born June 26, 1835, in Overton County, Tennessee. His father, George N. Smith, was a native of Kentucky, and his mother, formerly Nancy Carpenter, was born in Jackson County, Tennessee. When about eight years of age, Abner accompanied his parents to Cass County, Illinois, where he was principally reared, receiving a common school education. In 1852, they moved to Atchison County, Missouri, and settled on the Missouri River bottom. Abner commenced working for Richard Case, who kept a hotel at Linden, and in the fall of 1853, he began driving stage for him between Linden and Sharps. In May, 1854, he abandoned this occupation and broke prairie. He has since given his attention to agricultural pursuits. When he war broke out he joined the Enrolled Missouri Militia, and in July, 1864, he enlisted in Company I, Forty-third Missouri Infantry, and served on the frontier. At the close of the war he again settled on the bottom, and engaged in farming. He located where he now resides, March 3, 1875. He owns a fine farm of 126 acres, most of which is under cultivation. He has a good orchard. His farm is well adapted for stock purposes. He has filled the position of school director and road overseer. Mr. Smith was married July 1, 1854, to Miss Ersley J. Boull, a native of Clarke County, Missouri. She was born March 16, 1837, and is a daughter of Mathias and Mary Boull. She was principally raised in Platte County, Missouri. They have eight children: Ellen, born September 4, 1856 (now Mrs. George Jackson, of this county); Nancy J., born April 21, 1859 (now Mrs. Elizabeth Payne, of this county); Thomas (deceased); Isadore, born July 14, 1861 (now Mrs. Joseph Jackson, of this county); William F., born May 18, 1863; Matilda, born April 21, 1865; Laura, born July 2, 1867; Clara, born February 16, 1870; Tuller, born January 1, 1873, and Minnie, born November 17, 1879. Himself and wife are members of the Free Will Baptist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CAPTAIN GEORGE F. SMITH, farmer, sections 22 and 23, was born in Langensalea, Prussia, Germany, November 15, 1820. His parents, John G. and Louisa Smith, were also natives of Germany. George was the eldest child of a family of eight children, and in 1833 he came with his parents to America, landing at New York City, where he remained for three years. He then located at St. Louis, Missouri, where he lived for twelve years, receiving good educational advantages. While in St. Louis he learned the tanners’ trade, and also the trade of shoemaker. In 1844 he moved to Nebraska and in 1847 came to Atchison County, Missouri, but he did not locate here permanently till 1849. Since that time he has been engaged in farming and now has a farm of 220 acres. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Fifty-eighth Missouri Militia and was first elected to lieutenant and afterwards promoted to captain. He was subsequently appointed enrolling officer of Atchison County, Missouri, and is the only man that ever filled the position in the county. Captain Smith was married January 20, 1846, to Miss Tracy Rettinger, a daughter of John G. and Lena Rettinger. She was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 11, 1828. They have had ten children, seven of whom are living: George F., born January 4, 1847; Clara, born November 22, 1848 (now Mrs. Jesse White, of Atchison County); Anna, born May 31, 1853 (the wife of Mr. Henry Broughton, of this county); Louisa, born September 9, 1858 (now Mrs. Marion Underwood, of this county); William H., born February 3, 1861; George C., born August 17, 1863, and Emma A., born December 5, 1870.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOHN W. SMITH, present (1882) popular clerk of the circuit court of Atchison County, and for many years a representative citizen of the Platte Purchase, is a native of Madison County, Virginia, where he was born, December 22, 1823. His ancestors, originally from England, were among the settlers of the commonwealth in colonial days, and for generations ranked with the leading men of the country. His grandfather’s name was John, and his father, Adam Y. Smith. His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah J. Colvin, was also a native of Virginia, and a lady of rare mental acquirements, and great force of character. Mr. Smith, in early childhood, moved with his parents to Culpeper County, where they resided on a farm and where John was educated. In 1839, he left home for Luray, Page County, Virginia, where he had his first experience in life as clerk for his uncle Nicholas Yager. Ten years after he secured a position in a wholesale dry goods house, which he continued to fill till 1854, when he determined to try his fortune in the west. Landing in Missouri, he made his way to Sidney, Iowa, where he engaged in the mercantile business as one of the firm of Smith, McAllister & Co. In the following year he moved to Linden, then the seat of Atchison County, where he embarked in the goods business as head of the firm of Smith, Brown & McAllister. In the winter of 1858, he moved to Rock Port, where he engaged in the livestock and grain business till the spring of 1860, when he accepted the appointment of superintendent of the United States census of Atchison County. In August, 1860, he was elected on the Democratic ticket, sheriff of Atchison County, serving two years. He filled, during the succeeding two years, the position of county assessor. In 1865, he engaged in freighting on the plains, from Nebraska City to Julesburg. During the winter of 1865-66, he was employed in writing up abstract books for Buchanan County for Durfee, Pike & Davenport. He then went into the wheat business. In 1867, he returned to Rock Port, where he engaged in the livery business, till the winter of 1868. In the fall of 1869, he moved to Hamburg, Iowa, where he sold goods till 1873. From April of that year till January, 1875, he acted in the capacity of deputy clerk of the circuit court of Atchison County, at which latter period he assumed the duties of clerk of the same to what he had been elected in the previous fall. He was re-elected in the fall of 1878, and still (1882) holds the position. He is a member of North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M., and Past Master of the same. He is also an active member of Zerubbabel R.A. Chapter No. 59. He is also a member of Rock Port Lodge No. 125, I.O.O.F. On the 14th of June, 1877, he was married to Mrs. Susan P. Frederick, whose maiden name was Trubb. She was born in Pike County, Illinois, in 1836. They have one child, Willie F. Both Mr. Smith and his wife are members of the M.E. Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

DANIEL SNYDER, proprietor of the Rock Port Hotel, was born in Danville, Mantour County, Pennsylvania, April 20, 1827. His parents, Peter and Sarah Snyder, were both natives of that state. Daniel was reared to habits of industry in his native town, and during his boyhood days worked on the canal. In 1849 he moved to Ohio and drove a stage on the national road till 1852, when he located in Chicago, where he also drove a stage for a period. Mr. S. then went to Bloomfield, Iowa, and acted as office agent for a stage line till 1857, when he came to Oregon, Holt County, Missouri. There he was also agent for a stage company for a short time, after which he came to Rock Port, where he held the same position till 1865. Since then he has been engaged in his present business. He was married in October, 1867, to Miss Eliza Blair, a native of Holt County, Mo. Mr. S. has the name of possessing and keeping one of the most complete hotels in Northwest Missouri, it being elegantly furnished and well kept. There are few landlords who are more popular with the traveling public than Mr. Snyder, he being courteous in his manners and agreeable to all.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

STEPHEN SOUTH, farmer and justice of the peace, Watson, is the owner of ninety acres of land, and lives on section 4. He was born November 26, 1829, in Madison County, Ohio. His father, Samuel South, was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, and was a carpenter and builder by trade. His mother, formerly Marada Ann Bascom, was a native of Vermont. Stephen was deprived of the advantages of an education in youth. He learned the carpenters’ trade and in 1851, came to this state and county. He belongs to the Masonic Lodge, and is a member of the M.E. Church. He is a Republican in politics. Mr. South married Miss Mary M. Hall, in 1852. She was the daughter of John Hall, Esq., an early pioneer. They have six children living: John F., Augustus W., Robert E., Steven Stewart, Melvina Mary and William L. Mr. South came here with means enough to enter 170 acres of land, and after improving a part of it he bought some 680 acres of the county, which is now where the village of Watson stands. He has always been accommodating, and for many years before the war had become security for several persons. When the war came on, the most of the men left the country, and Mr. S. had the debts to pay. To do this he was obliged to sell his valuable lands and begin again. He now has a good home which he can enjoy. He has been the principal acting justice of the peace here for 14 years, and in his decisions and conduct of his cases all have great confidence. He went to Denver in 1870, and has traveled through Texas, each time returning to Atchison County, better satisfied with his home than before.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

RICHARD STAFFORD, farmer and stock raiser, section 7, was born March 25, 1836, in County Kavan, Ireland. His parents, John and Anna Stafford, were of English-Irish origin. They were born on the Emerald Isle. Richard was the fourth child in a family of eight children. He remained at his birthplace until seventeen years of age, when he crossed the ocean, landing at New York City. From there he went to Connecticut, thence to Kentucky, and finally to Indiana. Illinois then became his home, he settling in Knox County. There he remained two years, after which he moved to Southern Kansas, locating in Bourbon County, where he was engaged in the cattle business. He came to Atchison County, Missouri, in the spring of 1870, and purchased section 7, township 65, range 38. He improved it, and now owns 960 acres of fine land, well improved, with a neat residence, a good barn, an excellent orchard, etc. He commenced life a poor boy, and has worked his own way through life and been a self-made man. He helped to build a $700 schoolhouse when there were but three voters in the district. Mr. Stafford has been twice married. First, January 6, 1864, to Elizabeth C. Wilson, a daughter of Thomas S. and Mary Wilson. She died November 6, 1864, and left two children (twins) Mary E. and Anna, now deceased, born October 30, 1864. He was married again December 5, 1865, to Miss Phebe Ann Wilson, a sister of his former wife. She was born September 17, 1844, in Bennington, Erie County, Ohio. By this union they have four children: Ida C., born August 1, 1867; Thomas C., born October 20, 1870; John R., born December 6, 1874, and Frank M., born March 2, 1877.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Henry F. Stapel. During his career of thirty years as a newspaper publisher and business man in Atchison County. Henry F. Stapel has become one of the most influential citizens of Northwest Missouri. Though educated for the law, Mr. Stapel has never employed his talents to any extent in that profession, but in the newspaper field has built up a successful country journal, and has the distinction of having organized the first mutual insurance company in the State of Missouri, an organization which has been the pattern for a great number of followers in the same line, but it was Mr. Stapel who first secured the legislation which permitted the chartering of a type of insurance organization which has since done much to extend the benefits of the general insurance idea and at the same time has served to regulate the practical monopoly which the old line company once enjoyed in this state.
Henry F. Stapel was born in Dearborn County, Indiana, September 30, 1857, a son of Ernest H. and Louisa (Wulber) Stapel. His father, born in the province of Hanover, Germany, in 1825, at the age of sixteen left his friends and home in the land of his birth, and after crossing the Atlantic located in Dearborn County, Indiana, where he married and became a prominent and successful farmer and merchant. His death occurred in 1898, but his widow still survives and lives in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Like his father, Henry F. Stapel early began to depend upon himself, and at the age of fourteen was providing his own maintenance, and on leaving home finally reached West Union, Iowa, where he found employment on a farm and at herding cattle. He first became acquainted with Atchison County, Missouri, in 1873; arriving there William Hunter employed him at work on a farm. After half a year his desire to gain a better education caused him to enter the State Normal school at Peru, Nebraska, and at the end of three years he was graduated in the class of 1878. The following three years he spent in teaching at Rock Port, but his ambitions led him still further, and with the proceeds of his teaching career he entered the University of Michigan, pursued both the literary and law courses, and was graduated from the law department LL. B. in 1884.
On returning to. Atchison County, Missouri, Mr. Stapel turned his attention to journalism. The Atchison County Mail, then the only democratic paper in the county, began its issue under his proprietorship on January 1, 1885. A little later came an appointment from President Cleveland making Mr. Stapel postmaster at Rock Port. The Atchison County Mail, which is the oldest democratic paper in the county, when it first came under the ownership of Mr. Stapel had a circulation of about three hundred copies, and its size was a five-column quarto. Under the wise editorial and business policy inaugurated by Mr. Stapel the paper has since acquired a circulation of three thousand copies weekly and has been enlarged to a six-column quarto. Through the columns of his journal Mr. Stapel has in many ways promoted the welfare of his adopted county. The paper has always been on the side of progress, reform and improvement, and the people of that community have long reposed more than ordinary confidence in his editorial opinion.
While his success as a newspaper editor and publisher is in itself a sufficient distinction to mark him out from the ordinary citizen, Mr. Stapel's work of greatest benefit and importance is probably as founder of mutual insurance companies in this state. The idea and basic principles of such company were conceived by Mr. Stapel in 1880. It was his opinion that the old-line insurance companies were robbing the public by charging excessive rates, and he resolved that with the assistance of the Legislature he would engage in the insurance business on the mutual plan. By such a system high salaries would not have to be paid officials and the assured would share the profits of the undertaking. But it required seven years of advocacy and hard work to secure the passage of a law under which the first mutual organization could be effected, and it was not until 1889 that Mr. Stapel wrote the first policy for the Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Atchison County, the parent company of them all. So popular was the idea of mutual insurance that his first day's horseback ride into the country secured $100,000 worth of business. The company has had a most wonderful and healthy growth until a splendid business is now being conducted not only in the immediate territory of its home office, but throughout the 114 counties of the State of Missouri.
Besides the postmastership of Rock Port, the only public position Mr. Stapel has held was that of representative of Atchison County in the Forty-Fourth general assembly, to which office he was elected November 6, 1906, on the democratic ticket. His service in the state legislature was one of distinction and effectiveness, and during the session he introduced many bills for good laws and was regarded as one of the most useful members in the house of representatives. In 1903 he lacked only one vote of being the choice of the democracy for senator from the first district of Missouri. His fraternal and other associations are with the Masonic Order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of the World, the Rebekahs and the Globe lodges, the Missouri Press Association, and other organizations.
In 1887 Mr. Stapel married Miss Lilly Sly, daughter of Judge and Mrs. John F. Sly, of Fairfax, Missouri. Mrs. Stapel at her death left a son, John. In 1895, while touring Europe, he met, at Munich, Germany, Miss Anna Neidlein, and the same year they were married. After their marriage they continued their travels in Holland, Germany, France, Belgium and England. Mr. and Mrs. Stapel have a daughter, Frieda, and a son Henry F., Jr. Mr. Stapel and wife are members of the German Lutheran Church.
[A History of Northwest Missouri, Volume 2; edited by Walter Williams; Publ. 1918; Donated and Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]

CAPTAIN GEORGE STECK, farmer, section 24, a son of Michel Steck, Esq., a worthy citizen of this county, was born January 17, 1837, his native home being France. When three years of age he emigrated to America with his parents, locating in St. Louis, and in 1847 he came to Atchison County, where he has since lived. He now owns a farm of 136 acres. His education was received in Atchison County, he having attended the first school taught in the county. During the war he served as captain in Company A of the Missouri State Militia, having organized the first state company in the county. In October, 1863, Mr. Steck enlisted in Company B, Twelfth Missouri Cavalry, U.S. Volunteers, filling the position of second lieutenant. In November, 1864, he was taken prisoner. May 15, 1865, he was mustered out as a paroled prisoner. During his term of imprisonment he was in Andersonville, Oxford, Tallahatchie and other prison pens. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, also of the A.O.U.W. Captain Steck was married June 7, 1862, to Miss Emily J. Howell, a native of Meigs County, Ohio. They have eight children: Emma, Effie, Bertha, Ora, Frank L., Michel, Marcus and Irvin.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MICHEL STECK, farmer, section 22, was born in the village of Hackanaw, Elcers, France, and was the eldest child in a family of nine children. He was reared in his native country, and there learned the stonemason’s trade. In February, 1840, he came to America and first settled in St. Louis, where he followed his trade for seven years, after which he came to Atchison County, Missouri. Here he has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits, his farm containing 200 acres. It is most excellently improved. In the year 1850, Mr. Steck crossed the plains to California, where he was engaged in mining for four years, after which he returned home by the Isthmus. He has been twice married, first in 1836, to Miss Magdeline Wolf, a native of France. She died in 1862, leaving six children – George, Ansel, Antonio, Mary (now Mrs. Charlie Hartman), Hannah (now Mrs. George Hintneck), and Betty (now Mrs. George Gray). Mr. Steck was married again July 4, 1863, to Annie Rhody, whose maiden name was Annie Bear. She is a native of Hessia, Germany. Mr. Steck is a prominent member of the Christian Church, while his wife belongs to the Lutheran denomination.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

B.W. STEEL, farmer, section 19, was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, and early accompanied his parents to Vinton County, Ohio, and to Stark County, Illinois, in 1864. His father and mother were natives of Pennsylvania, who, after being married, settled in Ohio at an early day. The mother now resides with her son. The subject of this sketch began life as a farmer. In 1870 he came to Atchison County, Missouri, improved a farm in Tarkio Township, and, in 1880, sold out and purchased his present farm, in Lincoln Township, consisting of 240 acres of choice improved land, situated on East Tarkio Creek. Mr. Steel was married in 1870 to Miss Lavina Tautz. She died in 1874, leaving one child, Jennie. Mr. S.’s second marriage occurred in 1879 to Miss Maggie Tautz, a second cousin of his first wife, and by this union there in one child, Charles. Mrs. Steel is a member of the United Brethren Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

HIRAM STEFFEY, was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, July 2, 1847, and was the son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Burkett) Steffey, who were both natives of Pennsylvania. In 1849, the family removed to Ohio, where they lived for some seven years, then going to Fulton County, Indiana, in 1856, where they still continue to dwell. Hiram grew to manhood on a farm, and received such an education as the common schools afforded. In February, 1865, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry, and served until August of the same year, when he was honorably discharged. September 7, 1871, occurred the marriage of Mr. Steffey to Octavia True, daughter of Nelson True. She was born in Fulton County, Indiana, May 2, 1845. Mr. and Mrs. S. have one child, Leona, born July 28, 1872. About the close of the war, Mr. Steffey returned to Indiana, where he remained some six years working on a farm, after which, in 1871, he came to Warren County, Missouri. In the spring of 1872, he located in Atchison County. He now has a farm of seventy-three acres in section 18, township 63, range 39, all improved, and an orchard of 110 apple, 100 peach and other fruit trees, besides some grapes. He is a very enterprising farmer.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOSHUA W. STEVENSON, section 29, a native of Warren County, Ohio, was born December 7, 1843, his parents being George and Charlotta Stevenson, nee Ward, who were also born in Ohio. Joshua accompanied them to Randolph County, Indiana, in 1852, where he was reared, attending the common schools during the winter months. September 1, 1861, he enlisted in the Thirty-sixth Indiana Infantry, and was in the service for eighteen months, participating in several important battles, among which were Perryville and Murfreesboro; he was wounded at Stone River, Tennessee. After being honorably discharged February 26, 1863, he returned to Randolph County, where he was engaged in farming for seven years. In 1870, Mr. S. emigrated westward and settled in Nodaway County, Missouri, where he was occupied in tilling the soil for two years, after which he came to Atchison County. In the spring of 1872, he settled on his present place in Dale Township, and now has in his possession 239 acres of valuable land, all fenced, and a most excellent orchard of 184 apple, and some 800 bearing peach trees. Mr. Stevenson was married December 9, 1865, in Randolph County, to Miss Nancy E. Botkin, who died November 11, 1866. He was again married November 14, 1869, in Randolph County, to Miss Rachel A. Hunt, daughter of Miles Hunt. Mr. and Mrs. Stevenson have two children: George Tipton born November 21, 1871, and Mary Emma, born January 30, 1874. Mr. S. is a Republican in politics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

R.M. STEVENSON, is of the firm of Rankin & Stevenson, bankers. Prominent among the energetic and leading men of Northwest Missouri, is the subject of this sketch, who is worthy of more than a passing notice. He was born on the 27th of February, 1851, in Monmouth, Illinois. He was reared in his native village, obtaining his education at Monmouth College. In 1870, he accepted employment in the First National Bank of Monmouth, Illinois, and in 1876, became assistant cashier. He came to Tarkio in May, 1881, and assisted in organizing the bank at this place. Mr. S. owns a share of the stock and holds the position of cashier. He is a keen-sighted and shrewd business man, and his long experience in the business has given him a thorough knowledge of it. His gentlemanly manners have won for him the esteem of a large circle of friends. He was married September 3, 1874, to Miss Nina B. Bower, a native of Monmouth, Illinois, born February 15, 1854. She is a daughter of James and Susan Bower. By this union they have one child, Charlotte B., born January 31, 1882. Himself and wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

Austin F. Stitt
AUSTIN F. STITT; The unostentatious routine of private life although of vast importance to the welfare of the community, has not figured to any great extent in the pages of history. But the names of men, who have distinguished themselves by the possession of those qualities of character which mainly contribute to the success of private life and to the public stability, and who have enjoyed the respect, and confidence of those around them, should not be permitted to perish. Their example is more valuable to the majority of readers than that of heroes, statesmen and writers, as they furnish means of subsistence for the multitude whom they in their useful careers have employed.
Such are the thoughts which involuntarily come to our minds when we consider the life of him whose name initiates this sketch, who is now the honored mayor of Burlington Junction, a position which by the gift of the people he has filled for three terms. His reelections indicate unmistakably his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in him.
Austin Fallis Stitt was born in Hamilton county. Indiana, September 28, 1838. His father. Obadiah \V. Stitt. was a native of Hamilton county, Ohio, and on the 30th of June, 1856 he came to Nodaway county, Missouri, locating near the village of Burlington Junction, where he pre-empted a claim, entering the land from the government. He became the owner of four hundred and ninety acres here and continued its cultivation until the 9th of April, 1860, when he removed to Lawrence, Kansas. In that locality he also purchased a farm and made it his home until the fall of 1870. In the following spring he returned to Kansas and subsequently went to Bates county, Missouri, where he purchased fifteen hundred acres of land. He carried on farming on an extensive scale and was very successful in his operations, possessing excellent business and executive ability. He had only nineteen dollars at the time of his marriage, but through his well directed efforts he added constantly to his capital and at his death left to his family a comfortable estate. He wedded Miss Malinda Fallis, who was born in Ohio and died when her son Austin was only eighteen months old. He was their only child. The lather afterward married again. His death occurred January 24, 1889, when he had attained the advanced age of seventy-three years.
On the home farm Austin F. Stitt spent the days of his boyhood and youth. He enjoyed the pleasures of the playground, performed the duties of the schoolroom and aided in the work of field and garden. He was thus engaged until after the inauguration of the Civil war, when, prompted by a
spirit of patriotism, he left the fields and took up the rifle in defense of the Union, enlisting in 1861 as a member of Company E, of the Sixth Missouri Regiment. In 1864 he re-enlisted at St. Joseph, Missouri. At one time he and his captain were detailed for recruiting service, but the captain was kicked by a horse and all the work devolved upon our subject. He was offered a commission as sergeant major of his regiment, but he refused this in order to stay with his company, for he was a great favorite with the men, who loved and respected him. Going to Raleigh, Missouri, the company became part of the Forty-eighth Regiment, and on the 8th of December, 1864, proceeded to St. Louis and thence to Columbia, Tennessee, Mr. Stitt remaining at the front until honorably discharged. In June, 1865, he was once more sent to St. Louis and there mustered out. returning to his home with an honorable military record.
He engaged in the business of buying cattle in connection with Captain Grigsby, his old commander, and the business connection between them was maintained until the fall of 1866. In that autumn he was married and during the succeeding winter he boarded with his old partner, but in the spring he and his wife removed to their farm in Green township. Nodaway county, there residing until 1886, when they took up their abode in Burlington Junction. In the meantime he had bought and sold land, his investments proving profitable ventures, and at the time of his retirement he owned a very valuable farm of three hundred acres, which is still in his possession. In Burlington Junction he erected a comfortable residence, and. surrounded by all the necessities and many of the luxuries of life, he is here residing in retirement from active business cares, save his official duties, having been called to office by the vote of his fellow townsmen.
On the 6th of November. 1866, Mr. Stitt was united in marriage to Miss Caroline E. McClellan who was born in Indiana. They have never had any children of their own, but prompted by a great kindness of heart they have reared twelve or thirteen children—noble souls who have done honor to their foster parents, some of them being now prominent men and women of Nodaway county. They have been given excellent educational privileges, thus being well fitted for the duties of life.
In public office Mr. Stitt has manifested his fidelity to duty, serving as postmaster during President Grant's first administration. He was appointed to the office November 14, 1869, and served in that capacity until 1879, when he resigned. He is now serving for the third term as the mayor of Burlington Junction, having been elected to the office by his fellow townsmen without regard to political affiliations. His administration is progressive and business like. He has studied closely the needs of the town and exercises his official prerogative in support of all measures which he believes will contribute to the public good. In politics he has been a stalwart Republican since casting his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864, while serving in the army. He has frequently been a delegate to party conventions and his counsel carries weight among the members of the organization. He took the United States census in Nodaway county in 1890 and again in 1900. Socially he is connected 'with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Masonic fraternity and the Grand Army of the Republic, and of all is a valued representative. He and wife are leading members of the Christian church, of which he has been an elder since 1867; and he takes an active part in all the affairs of the church. In fact, he makes the church first and other things secondary. The social standing of himself and wife is high and they are active in all good work looking to the material and substantial benefit of the community. As a business man he has been conspicuous among his associates not only for his success but for his probity, fairness and honorable methods. In everything he has been eminently practical, and this has been not only manifest in his business undertakings but also in political, private and social life. Such is the record of one who has worked his way upward to a position of eminence in the community in which he has long resided.
Source:  A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri: with numerous sketches ... By William Smith Bryan publ. 1876 Transcribed by Andrea Stawski Pack

JOHN STONER, is one of the pioneers of Northwest Missouri, and has been a resident of Atchison County about forty years. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1816. His parents, George and Polly Stoner, were both natives of Pennsylvania. John was reared in his native place until seventeen years of age, and then removed to Starke County, Ohio, where he lived for three years. He then came to Sangamon County, Illinois, making that locality his home until 1843, when he moved to Atchison County, Missouri, and purchased a farm. To this he has added from time to time, until he now owns 1,100 acres, and has proved himself one of the leading agriculturists of Atchison County. In 1850, he went to California, and for two years was engaged in mining. He then returned home, and has since devoted himself to his farm and stock interests. Mr. S. was married April 20, 1846, to Miss Ellen Martin, who was born in Pickaway County, Ohio. They have a family of fourteen children living: Crosby, Catharine (now Mrs. Patten), Mary E. (now Mrs. Brown), Genevieve, Van Doren, Lucretia, John G., Lillie J., Austin F., Nelson O., Ulysses G., William M., Mollie F., Sarah V. Lost two: Venetia and Charles C. Mr. Stoner has taken a deep interest in educational matters, and is a liberal contributor to the Baptist Church, with which he is connected.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WARREN W. STRICKLER was born in Adams County, Illinois, August 26, 1844, and was the son of Wesley and Catherine (Kern) Strickler, who were both natives of Pennsylvania. Warren was brought up to habits of industry, on a farm, receiving his education in the common schools of Adams County. He was there married, February 4, 1868, to Miss Mary V. Stewart, who was born in Adams County, Illinois, September 30, 1847. She was the daughter of Bradley Stewart, Esq. In March, 1874, the subject of this sketch removed to Missouri and settled in Clark Township, on his present location. He is one of the leading agriculturists in this vicinity, and now has a landed estate of 880 acres, all fenced and improved, there being upon the place an orchard of 300 apple trees, besides other varieties of fruit. His good residence is situated on section 13, township 63, range 40. Mr. S. makes a specialty of raising and breeding thoroughbred Poland China hogs, and is at all times prepared to fill orders and supply parties with this valuable stock. He and his wife have two children: Orie, born July 27, 1870, and Firman, born April 8, 1872. Mrs. Strickler is a member of the Methodist Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

WILLIAM SUTTER, proprietor of the Rock Port Brewery, is a native of Switzerland, and was born May 26, 1846. He was reared and educated in his native country, and has followed his present business during life. In 1863 he came to America, landing at New York City. For a number of years he lived in St. Louis, Omaha, Council Bluffs, St. Joseph and Maryville, and in 1876 he came to Rock Port, where he has since been engaged in the manufacture of fine beer, in which he is very successful. He was married in February, 1868, to Miss Mary Hartman, of Atchison County, Missouri. They have five children: Emma, Henry, Willie, Edia and Johona. Having been so long in his present business, Mr. S. must needs have become thoroughly acquainted with the details of the work, and now has a large trade.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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