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CLAUDIUS TARDIVEL, farmer and carpenter, is the owner of 150 acres of land on section 25. He was born in Clermont, Furand Payde Dome, France, January 10, 1829. His parents were Claudius and Catherine (Malhais) Tardivel. He received an excellent education, was among the better class of scholars in France, and was engaged in teaching for three years. In 1848 he came to this country and settled in Covington, Kentucky, where he learned the carpenters’ trade. In 1854 he moved to Mount Vernon, Ohio, where he continued to work at his trade, remaining there until 1858, when he came to this county, with but $10 in money. He soon rented a farm of Dr. Buckham, worked on his land and at his trade, building some of the best buildings of that day. After obtaining a good start he bought a farm of the doctor, and has made valuable improvements. In 1861 he built a beautiful residence, and now has a fine orchard and a large vineyard of all varieties of grapes, etc. Mr. T. has become a thorough English scholar, and enjoys reading the current literature of the day. He is one of the representative men of the township and a leading man in the county. He married Miss Isabella Brant, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1850. She died in 1854, leaving three children – two now living – Julius Paul and Annie. In 1856 he married Miss Caroline Postlewait, of Newark, Ohio. They have five children living: Charles L., Agnes Genevieve, Francis M., Joseph Claudius and Gertrude. He is a Democrat in politics, and religiously inclined towards the Catholics.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

CHARLES T. TAYLOR, proprietor and publisher of the Fairfax Independent, was born in Bethel, Connecticut, December 21, 1859. His parents were Theodore F. and Juliette Taylor, nee Bassett, both natives of Connecticut. The youth of the subject of this sketch was spent mostly in school. When in his thirteenth year he entered a telegraph office, and there learned the art of telegraphy, which he followed for five years. In 1877 he went into the office of the Bethel Ledger and learned the printing business, remaining in that office for one year, after which he came west and located at Avoca, Iowa. He was there employed in the newspaper office of the Delta, and in 1880 he came to Corning, Holt County, Missouri. He acted as telegraph operator there and also worked on the Corning Herald until the spring of 1882, when he moved into Fairfax and started his present newspaper enterprise. The Independent is a live, spicy journal, and though but a short time here, Mr. Taylor has clearly demonstrated his ability to give the people of Fairfax and vicinity a paper of which they may well be proud. He was married in Corning, Holt County, June 4, 1881, to Miss Mollie L. Dodds, daughter of J.R. Dodds. She was born in Des Moines County, Iowa. Mr. T. is a member of the Masonic order.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

MRS. MARY TAYLOR, is the widow of the late James A. Taylor, who was born in Clarke County, Indiana, November 21, 1825. He was a son of Judson and Elizabeth (Cassady) Taylor, who were natives of Kentucky. Judson Taylor now lives in Indiana and has for many years been engaged in the practice of medicine. James A. Taylor was reared and educated in his native county, and during his boyhood days his time was divided between working on a farm and clerking in a store. He was afterwards occupied in teaching school for several years. November 21, 1850, he was married to Miss Mary Callaway, by whom he had four children, and of these two are now living, Eugene P. and Eddie W. In 1855 Mr. Taylor moved from Indiana to Missouri, and located on section 11, of Clay Township, Atchison County, where Mrs. Taylor now resides. There he was engaged in farming till the time of his death, which occurred September 3, 1878. He then had a farm of 240 acres, which has since been cared for by Mrs. T. and her sons. They now have 300 acres of choice land and know how to keep it in cultivation. During the time of Mr. Taylor’s residence in Atchison County he was for several years a member of the county court. He belonged to North Star Lodge No. 157, A.F. and A.M., and was buried by that fraternity. Mrs. Taylor was born in Clarke County, Indiana, August 8, 1826. Her father, Samuel Callaway, was a native of Kentucky, and her mother, whose maiden name was Lucy Cable, was born in North Carolina. Mrs. T. is a member of the Christian Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

REUBEN MOORE TAYLOR, deceased, was born in Washington County, Tennessee, in August, 1840. His father, Arthur Taylor, also of Tennessee, was a farmer by occupation. His mother’s maiden name was Elizabeth Bayless, a native of Washington County, Tennessee. Reuben spent his youth at home working on the farm, and attending the district school. He completed his education at the Washington College in Tennessee. He was a Democrat in his political views, and a zealous member of the Baptist Church. He married Miss Lucinda Beal, in December, 1871. She was the daughter of Moses Beal, of Schoharie County, New York. Mr. Taylor came here while a young man, in 1859, and bought a farm with his father in Sonora, where he lived until the spring of 1872. They then sold out and bought a large tract of land in Buchanan Township. He had but very little means in his possession at the close of the war, and soon went to the mountains of Colorado, where he engaged in mining and also conducted a ranch. He remained there two years, making a small start, then returned and bought eighty acres of land, on which he settled. For the few years he was permitted to live, but few young farmers had as prosperous a history. He was industrious, and with his rich land he soon began to reap the fruit of his toil. His farm consists of 750 acres on section 31, was finely improved, and upon it he built one of the most substantial bank barns in the township. He had made arrangements to erect an excellent residence, at the time of his death, which occurred December 9, 1880. Since that time Mrs. Taylor has sold her interest in the farm and has moved on to a farm of 400 acres, where she has built a fine barn, etc. Mrs. Taylor’s father, Moses Beal, of this township, was born in Schoharie County, New York, in 1805. He married Phoebe Moore, of the same place, and afterwards moved to Missouri, settling at High Creek, in Polk Township, in 1841. His early history will be remembered by the pioneers of the county, with great pleasure. He always took an active part in county matters, assisting in the organization of the county and township and was, perhaps, the first postmaster in the county, being appointed as such at High Creek. He was also one of the first Masons. Their children were Lucretia (wife of P.J. Rudasill); Lucinda (now Mrs. R.M. Taylor) and Gobryas Beal. Mr. Moses Beal was killed by lightning in 1854. In 1860, Mrs. Beal was married to Mr. James M. Ford. They had by this happy union, one child, Bell. Mrs. Ford died in 1873. Mr. Ford died in 1877. In their deaths the children lost their kind and affectionate parents, and the community two of its most esteemed citizens. Miss Bell lives with her sister, Mrs. Taylor. She has taken a three years course of study at Dr. Dulin’s Female College, St. Joseph, and for one year attended the Baptist Female College, at Lexington, Missouri. She is a young lady of rare ability, culture and refinement.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

J.W. TEED, farmer, section 10, was a native of Cook County, Illinois, born in 1848, being the son of Joseph and Martha Teed. The former was a native of Germany, and his mother of New York. After being married they settled in McLean County, Illinois. During the war the subject of this sketch enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Forty-fifth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as a drummer. During the years from 1869 to 1873, he had the entire charge of a fine herd of Short Horns belonging to J.M. Woodrong, in Indiana. In 1874, he entered the mercantile business at Williamsburg, Indiana, doing an extensive trade till 1876, when he sold out and returned to McLean County, Illinois. There he was engaged in farming till 1880, when he came to Atchison County, Missouri, and purchased his present farm consisting of eighty acres of well improved land. March 31, 1875, he married Miss Elma Gale, a native of Johnston County, Indiana, born in 1859. She was a daughter of V.P. and Louisa Gale, who were natives of the same county. Mr. and Mrs. Teed have two children, Alonzo and Minnie. Mr. T. is a Master Mason.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

FRANCIS MARION THOMPSON was born in Callaway County, Missouri, August 26, 1832. He is the son of David H. Thompson, a native of Tennessee, and Anne (Williams) Thompson, who was born in St. Louis County, Missouri. They had nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the third in number. His parents emigrated to Missouri before its admission as a state, and located in Callaway County. Francis removed with his brother to Buchanan County, Missouri, in 1840. He received a common education near DeKalb in that county and worked on a farm until he was seventeen years old. In 1849 he came to Holt County and was engaged for two years in working with Hawk, Dillon & Co. at Hemme’s Landing. He was then interested with W.E. Dillon in the mercantile business in that place, they remaining together for ten years. In 1861 he moved to Rock Port, where he sold goods for seven years. In 1868 he came to the present site of Phelps City, erected the first building in the place and filled it with a stock of goods. He prospered in his business and in 1871 sold his stock of goods to Judge Saunders, who moved them to Troy, Kansas. In February, 1873, he purchased the interests of Judge Saunders and moved the stock back to Phelps, where he has since been in trade with his brother, Colonel P.A. Thompson. They have built up a large trade, commanding the patronage of the people for a long distance around about. Mr. T. has accumulated a large and valuable estate in lands and personal property besides his individual estate. The company owns 2,500 acres of the most fertile lands of Atchison County. He and his brother are also engaged in the livestock trade, in general merchandising and in banking, occupying a front rank among the representative business men of Northwest Missouri. Mr. Thompson has contributed liberally towards the building of churches of different denominations and enjoys the reputation of being a public spirited citizen. He joined the Masons in 1863 in Rock Port and has been advanced to the degrees of the chapter and council. He also passed through the order of Odd Fellows to the noble grand chair. Until the commencement of the war he acted with the Democratic party, but his intense devotion and attachment to the cause of the Union induced him to act with the Republican party. After the war closed he returned to the Democratic party, with which he has since been connected. He was married in Holt County to Miss Margaret A. Dillon, daughter of a prominent farmer of Callaway County, Missouri, February 20, 1857. Her father died when she was a mere child. They have four children: May, Ada, Anna and Philip. In person Mr. T. is of medium height and quite robust. Though having commenced life under adverse circumstances he has achieved a success which has given him the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

COLONEL PHILIP AUSTIN THOMPSON was the son of David Hamilton Thompson, who was a native of Tennessee. His mother, formerly Annie Williams, was born in St. Louis County, Missouri. They came to Missouri before the State was admitted into the Union, and settled in Callaway County, where Philip, the second of nine children, was born in July 31, 1830. His education was indeed a limited one. At the age of eighteen years he entered a store in DeKalb, Buchanan County, as salesman and bookkeeper. His intention was to study law, but this desire he was obliged to forego. He remained in DeKalb until 1851, at which time he removed to Holt County and taught school one year. In 1852 he took a trip to California and resided there three years, engaged in farming. Returning in 1855, he settled in Holt County. In 1856 he embarked in merchandising in Rock Port, Atchison County, in connection with Messrs. Dillon and Ruland, under the firm name of Dillon, Thompson & Co., which continued until 1859. In the latter year he entered into partnership with Dr. Buckham, whose daughter Susan he married on December 31, 1859. When the civil war began Mr. Thompson closed his store and joined the Union side of the State Militia, enlisting for six months. He was elected major of the Fourth Battalion, a position he held until his time had closed. At the expiration of his term of service, he re-enlisted for three years, in the Fifth Cavalry, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the regiment, Colonel Penick being his superior in command. The regiment was mustered out of service in 1863, and Colonel Thompson returned to his mercantile pursuits in Rock Port, having his brother, F.P. Thompson, as his associate, in April, 1867. In 1868 the business house was removed to Phelps City. In March, 1875, he began a general banking business, purchasing and selling exchange, etc. In politics Colonel T. was a Whig as long as that party was in existence, since which time he has been a Republican. In 1870 he was elected Treasurer of Atchison County. In 1873 he was elected to fill a vacancy in the state senate from the district composed of Atchison, Holt and Nodaway Counties, and at the end of two years declined a re-election. In 1876 he was nominated by the Republicans of the Ninth Congressional District, for a seat in congress. Though defeated, he ran five hundred ahead of his ticket, in his own county, thus showing the esteem in which he is held. Colonel T. is a member of the Blue Lodge, and a member and Past High Priest of the Royal Arch Chapter, while it was at Phelps City. He was also an active Odd Fellow. He is a supporter of the Christian Church. Mr. T. has one of the largest and most valuable farms in the county, located at Langdon, two and a half miles south of Phelps. There he owns the town site and a large store, doing a good mercantile business, with Mr. Ruland as a partner. He has built upon his 700 acre farm in Langdon, an elegant and attractive residence, the most costly in the county. The Colonel lives here, surrounded by his family of nine children, enjoying the confidence and respect of his fellow citizens. He annually feeds and ships a large quantity of livestock.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

SOLOMON THOMPSON, farmer and stock raiser, section 21, one of the first to settle in this township, is the son of Andrew and Margaret Thompson, nee Wilson, who were natives of Ireland. Solomon was the second child in a family of six children, and was born May 26, 1821, in Ireland. He was brought to the United States, when a child, by his parents, they settling in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, where he was brought up on a farm. He received a common school education, and in 1865 immigrated west to Cedar County, Iowa, there remaining six years, thence to Atchison County, Missouri, arriving here April 28, 1872. Mr. T. at once settled where he now resides and commenced to improve a fine farm. He owns 162 acres of cultivated land, has a nice grove, good orchard, etc. His farm is well adapted to stock raising. Mr. Thompson was married February 28, 1848, to Miss Jane Guthrie, a native of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. She died September 17, 1876. He has five children: William S., born November 27, 1850; Samuel, born November 9, 1856; Anthony, born February 4, 1859; Isaiah, born June 4, 1861; Mary C., born December 12, 1865.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ADAM S. TIMERMAN, a native of Jefferson County, New York, was born July 19, 1828. His father, Marcus Timerman, as was also his mother, whose maiden name was Catherine Smith, was born in Herkimer County, New York. Adam S. passed his boyhood days on a farm, receiving a liberal education at the Jefferson County Institute and the Hartwick Seminary, which school was under the charge of the Lutheran denomination. He attended that college for about three years and was licensed to preach by this church in 1862, being ordained in 1864. In 1862 Mr. Timerman went to Illinois, where he was engaged as minister at Jackson for five years, and in 1867 he moved to Marshal County. In the fall of 1869 he came to Atchison County and settled on a farm in Dale Township. He has been twice married, first, in Jefferson County, New York, in March, 1864, to Miss Mary J. Ford, daughter of Alexander Ford. She died in Atchison County, February 17, 1874. In May of that year Mr. T. went to California on a business trip, remaining for about eighteen months, when he returned to this county in December, 1876. Soon after this, on December 17, he was again married to Miss Ann B. Hanger, daughter of Matthias Hanger. She was born in Germany, July 23, 1849. Her family emigrated to the United States when she was a child and settled in Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Timerman have three children: Herman, born September 8, 1877; Percis Emma, born August 16, 1879, and Lillie R., born April 17, 1881. Mr. Timerman has eighty acres of land, all improved, with a variety of small fruits and a good bearing orchard on the place. He resides on section 16. Politically he is a Republican.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ALBERT TRAUB, of the firm of Albert Traub & Co., bakers and dealers in groceries and confectionery, was born August 7, 1840, and is a native Germany, where his father now resides. Albert was there reared and educated. While a boy he learned the blacksmith trade, which he followed in Germany till the spring of 1868, when he emigrated to America, landing at New York. In a short time he came to Rock Port, where he followed his trade till 1881, in the fall of which year he began at his present occupation, and in which he has built up a good trade. Mr. T. was married January 30, 1869, to Miss Sophia Volkmann, who was born in Germany, November 28, 1840. They have two children, Amelia and Laura. They are members of the Lutheran Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

FREDERICK TRAUB, of the firm of Bischof & Traub, dealers in hardware, stoves and tinware, is a native of Untler Schlechtbach, Germany, the date of his birth being March 9, 1824. He was reared and educated in his native country and there learned the bakers’ trade, and also the milling business, which he followed in Germany till 1854. At that time he came to America, landing at New Orleans and from there removed to Rock Port, where he has since lived. Having no money when he came here, he worked at various employments for a period of time and was afterwards engaged in the milling business, and for eighteen years he was occupied in farming. He now has a farm of eighty-four acres east of town and at his residence twenty-one acres, surrounded with fruit trees and a vineyard, besides other property in Rock Port. In 1874 he began in his present business, which he has since continued, and in which he has been more than ordinarily successful. Kind and courteous to all, he commands the esteem of many patrons. Mr. Traub was married May 15, 1849, to Miss Louisa Buhner. She was born in Germany, August 18, 1827. They have one child, Louisa K. They are members of the Lutheran Church.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

GEORGE TRAUB, was born in Germany, August 5, 1821, and when sixteen years of age he learned the wagon maker’s trade, which he followed till 1846. After this time he served for several years as a soldier in the regular army. In 1849 he came to America, and soon located in Atchison County, where he was engaged in working at the blacksmith and wagon maker’s trade, in Rock Port, from 1852 till 1873. He built the first blacksmith shop in the town. In 1869, he embarked in the lumber business, which he continued for eleven years. He is not now engaged in any active business, his time being occupied in looking after the interests of his farms. He has a landed estate of 480 acres. His residence farm, adjoining the town contains 80 acres, and is well improved, and upon it is more than an ordinary large orchard and vineyard, from which he made, in 1881, seventeen barrels of wine. As far as the quality of this article is concerned, one has only to taste to judge of its purity. His home is upon an eminence commanding a fine view of the town. During the late war he served in the Missouri State Militia, and acted as lieutenant. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. Mr. Traub was married March 4, 1849, to Miss Fredrica Holzwust, who was born in Germany, November 14, 1828. They have nine children: Frederick, Louis, Charles, Regana, John, Mary, Louisa, Gustaf and George, Jr.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

ROBERT W. TRIMBLE, is the present affable deputy clerk of Atchison County. Robert Trimble, his grandfather, was a native of Virginia, from which state he emigrated to Kentucky, settling in Bourbon County. There he was engaged in the practice of law, and at the time of his death was one of the supreme judges. Trimble County, Kentucky, was named in his honor. Henry T. Trimble, the father of R.W., was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, and studied the professions of both law and medicine, but practiced neither. He was married to Miss Nancy Wyatt, and from this marriage there were born four children, Robert W. Trimble, whose name heads this sketch, being the second child. He was born in Nicholas County, Kentucky, July 24, 1841, and there lived till the fall of 1856, when, with his parents, he came to Missouri. They located in Sonora, now a town of the past, which was then in Atchison County. Young Trimble was principally reared on a farm. His father died in August, 1858, and in 1861 he crossed the plains to Colorado, where he was engaged in freighting to different points in that territory, and also Montana. While there he was interested in the photograph business for a short time. Mr. T. returned to Atchison County in the fall of 1866, after which he was for six years occupied in milling in different parts of the county. For one year he was in the mercantile trade at Watson, being a member of the firm of Jarne & Trimble. He then went to Indianola, Iowa, and followed the photograph business for one year, at the expiration of which time he was located in Oregon, Holt County, Missouri, in the same business. He soon again engaged in the milling business in Holt County, but in one year returned to Atchison County, where the tilled the soil till the fall of 1879. Mr. Trimble then accepted his present position under M.L. Lee. He is a member of the North West Lodge No. 134, A.O.U.W., and of Rock Port Legion No. 12, S.K.A.O.U.W. He was married in October, 1867, to Miss Martha E. Starnes, by which union they have four children – Henry, Willie, Irene and Alma. Mrs. T. was born in Greene County, East Tennessee, December 16, 1852, and came to Atchison County in 1853. Her father, Alexander Starnes, was a native of Tennessee, as was also her mother, formerly Elizabeth McAdams.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JACOB TROUT, farmer and stock raiser, section 24, was born October 19, 1823, in Perry County, Ohio. His father, Hall Trout, was a native of Virginia, while his mother, Mary (Atkins) Trout, was born in Ohio. When Jacob was twelve years of age he accompanied them to Hocking County, Ohio, where he was reared, passing his youth on the farm and receiving a common school education. During the war he served for 100 days in Company A, One Hundred and Fiftieth National Volunteer Guards, and guarded Washington. These guards were made up after Morgan made his raid through Ohio, for home protection and were called into active service. Mr. T. came west and settled in Atchison County, in the spring of 1866. In 1869, he located where he now resides. He owns 240 acres of improved land, watered and well adapted to stock raising. He has a neat residence, a good barn, etc. He has filled the position of school director and road overseer. He is a member of the Ancient Odd Fellows. Mr. Trout was married February 19, 1850, to Miss Elizabeth Crawford, a native of Coshocton County, Ohio, born October 31, 1831. She was a daughter of James and Ursula Crawford. They have five children living: Mary E., born March 6, 1851 (now Mrs. W.S. Wood, of this county); Ursula, born November 29, 1854, (now Mrs. Maitland Brown, of Kansas); Hannah J., born July 30, 1852 (now Mrs. Philipp Dragoo, of this county); James C., born August 7, 1859; Noah C., born October 14, 1861. Two are deceased. They are members of the M.E. Church of Tarkio, in which he holds the position of trustee.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

JOSEPH TYSON, farmer and sheep raiser, was born in England in 1805, and was the son of John Tyson and Jennie Tyson, (nee Cooksie), also natives of that country. Joseph was educated in the common schools, and in 1855 he emigrated to the United States and settled in Shelby County, Illinois, where he resided for fifteen years, after which he came to Atchison County, Missouri. He then located on his present place in Dale Township, where he has been extensively engaged in farming and stock raising for the last twelve years. Mr. Tyson has 1,800 acres of land, all under fence, with about 600 acres in cultivation. He is engaged very extensively in the breeding and raising of fine Merino sheep, of which he has at the present time 1,600 head. He also has some thoroughbred Short Horn cattle and Poland China hogs. There is on the place a fine bearing orchard of some 500 apple, 200 peach, and other fruit trees. Mr. Tyson is one of the heaviest land owners in the county, and all his farming interests are conducted on a large scale. He is a representative citizen of this vicinity, and one honored by all. Mr. T. was married in England in 1838, to Miss Ann Fleming, also a native of England. Mr. and Mrs. Tyson have eight children: Jane, Mary, John, James, Joseph, Isaac, Thomas and William.
St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by Kim Mohler.

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