Welcome to
Barton County
Missouri

BIOGRAPHIES

E. W. Jenkins is a son of Joseph H. and Julia A. (Colley) Jenkins, who were born in the "Old Dominion," December 5, 1812, and 1816, respectively. After starting out in life for him­self, Mr. Jenkins was engaged in the tanning business for about fifteen years, then turned his attention to woodwork, turning chairs, etc., following this occupation the remainder of his life. In 1838 he settled in Saline County, Mo., where he purchased a farm, and resided until 1840, then moved to Clay County, mov­ing to Platte County at the end of five years, and back to Clay County in 1861. In 1875 he returned to Platte County, and there died on the 26th of November, 1876, his wife having died in 1851. They were married the 4th of September, 1833, and became the parents of four children: E. W.; Elvira J., wife of John Ebard, of Platte County; Mary C, wife of Joel W. Pedric (deceased); and one child that died in infancy. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Jenkins married again, his second wife being Eliza Jane Letchworth, of Clay County, Mo., and by her became the father of five children, of whom four are living: J. H., of Smithville, Clay County, Mo.; J. T., of California, and a cabinet­maker by trade; and G. W. and B. F., contractors of St. Joseph, Mo. E. W. Jenkins, the subject of this sketch, was born on the 21st of July, 1834, and in 1855 began business for himself, engaging in farming on land in Platte County, Mo., where he con­tinued for four or five years. He then commenced trading in stock, but sold his farm in 1879, and moved to Barton County, Mo., where he purchased his present property of 225 acres, which was then mostly raw land, but which is now a well improved tract, 125 acres being under the plow, twenty five acres in tame grass, and the remainder in wild pasture land. January 25, 1855, he was married to Miss Mary C. Ligon, of Platte County. She was born April 23, 1831, and became the mother of five children, only one of whom is living, the other four dying in infancy and childhood. Joseph C., the living child, was born April 3, 1861. Mr. Jenkins commenced raising carp on his farm in 1887, starting with twenty four fish, and now has a pond six acres in area, and expects to put ten more acres in ponds. His fish now number 10,000 or 12,000, all except the original twenty four being from one to two years old. He claims that the cul­ture of fish is the most profitable business in which he can engage. In 1877 he patented a trap for the catching and removal of the young, also for catching the older fish for eating purposes, and also for the purpose of keeping the pond clear of wild fish and turtles. His trap for catching fish works like a charm, and he has often caught from 500 to 800 small fish at one time. When he wishes to catch more, he baits his trap over night. He always donates liberally to churches, schools, and other public enterprises, and in his political views has always been a Democrat. His son Joseph C. was married December 10, 1878, to Miss Annie E. Dickson, of Platte County, who was born October 1, 1858, and by her had two children, one now living: Terry E., who was born April 9, 1881. They reside on the old homestead with our subject.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


O. Johnson, proprietor of a livery and feed stable at Lamar, Mo., is a native of Cleveland, Ohio, where he was born, on the 20th of January, 1845, his parents being Almon S. and Mary Johnson, the former born in the "Green Mountain State," and the latter in York State. Having moved to Ohio, they made that State their home until 1847, when they took up their abode in Boone County, ILL, and two years later in Dane County, Wis. The father was a trader by occupation, and in his political views were first a Whig and then a Republican. His wife was a worthy member of the Methodist Church, and died in the prime of live, leaving four sons and one daughter to mourn her loss. After her death Mr. Johnson married a second time, becoming the father of four children by his last wife. He lived to be about sixty nine years of age. O. Johnson is the eldest child by the first wife, and received his education in the common schools. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, Third Wisconsin Volunteer Cavalry, U. S. A., and joined his regiment at Fort Leavenworth, serving nearly three years in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. He was neither wounded nor taken pris­oner, and after the close of the war returned to Wisconsin, where he was married in 1867 to Miss Lorinda Loveland, a native of New York. No children have blessed this union. Mrs. Johnson is a member of the Congregational Church. In 1867 Mr. John­son moved to Kansas, and until 1880 was engaged in farming, trading, and the livery business in that State. At the latter date he came to Lamar, Mo., and built the stable where he is now doing business. He also owns a good home in the town. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and in his political views is a Republican.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Caleb S. Jones, of the firm of McCutchen & Jones, was born in Lexington, Mo., February 5, 1848, and is the son of Rev. William W. and Jane M. (Kennedy) Jones, born respectively in Kentucky and Virginia, he of Welsh, and she of Irish descent. When about nineteen years of age, William W. Jones began his ministerial work and continued this until his death, when sixty six years of age. His wife is still living, and is fifty eight years of age. Mr. Jones was converted at Mitchell Camp Ground, in Polk County, and gained quite a reputation as a minister, all his labors being in the State of Missouri. He was on the editorial committee of the “Christian Advocate”, and was a prominent man. He was the father of eight children, seven sons and one daugh­ter, of whom Caleb S. Jones is the eldest. He received his education in the private schools, and at the age of fifteen began clerking in a store in St. Louis, in a jobbing house. In 1866 he began traveling for Hastings, Wilkerson & Co., and traveled over Southwest Missouri and Kansas when there were no railroads. In 1868 he opened a store at Renick, Randolph County, where he continued until 1875, when he came to Lamar, and has been with his partner ever since, with the exception of eighteen months. In 1877 he married Miss Florence McGruder, a native of Cooper County, and the fruits of this union are two children, a son and daughter. Mrs. Jones died in 1883, and in 1885 he married Miss Carrie J. Timmonds, who bore him one daughter. Mr. Jones started in life with little or nothing, and has made all of his property by the sweat of his brow. Aside from his mer­cantile business he is also interested in farming, and is one of the prominent men of the county. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is a Democrat in politics.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


 

J. Joyce is of Irish descent, and was born in Patrick County, Va. in 1815, being one of nine children born to the marriage of Alexander Joyce and Mary Coffee, natives, respect­ively, of Virginia and North Carolina. The father was reared in Stokes County, N. C, and, after his marriage, returned to his native State, and, in 1829, located in Indiana, taking up his abode in Johnson County of that State, where he was engaged in farming until his death, in 1872, his wife's death having occurred in 1847, and her birth February 29, 1782. The paternal grand­father, who also bore the name of Alexander, was a citizen of North Carolina from Virginia, the latter being probably his native State. A. J. Joyce was reared in his native State, and, at the age of sixteen years, removed with his parents to Indiana, and was there married, in 1838, to Miss Keturah R. Mann, who was born in Kentucky on the eleventh of January, 1817, and removed to Indiana in 1835. Seven of the fourteen children born to their union are yet living: Mildred, Mary F. (deceased), Thomas S., who died while serving in the Union army; Lucinda F., wife of John W. Hughes; Elizabeth, Tilitha B., Arch. H., Margaret L. (deceased), Frank A., Judson (deceased), Charles F. (deceased), Ruth A., Horace and A. J. (deceased). Mr. Joyce was en­gaged in farming while in Indiana, but also gave some atten­tion to merchandising, and, previous to coming to Barton County, failed in business. From that time up to three years since he dealt in stock, but afterward gave his entire attention to farming his land (130 acres), at which he did well financially He was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church for fifty years, and in favor of Prohibition.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


T. J. Kelley, watchmaker and jeweler and dealer in clocks, watches, etc., at Golden City, Mo., was born in Allen County, Ky., February 18, 1842, and is a son of J. W. and Elizabeth A. Kelley. He was married to Anther Butler in Hardyville, Ky., and they have had seven children born to them, four of whom are now living: Annas, Ida, Ethel and Ula. The names of those deceased are Joseph, Emma and Ollie, who died in childhood. Another Kelley was born July 4, 1842. The parents received fair educa­tion in the common schools. T. J. Kelley began learning the watchmaker and jeweler's trade in the year 1859, and it has been his principal business since that time.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Amos Kentner, a farmer and stockman of Golden City Town­ship, has been a resident of Southwestern Missouri for fifteen years, and has resided on his present farm since 1881. He was born in Wyoming County, Penn., and is a son of William and Susan (Heller) Kentner, who were also born in Pennsylvania. In 1848 they emigrated to Lee County, ILL, where the father bought a farm of 240 acres, on which he lived until his death, in 1857, at the age of fifty five years. His widow is still living, and is residing on the old homestead, at the age of eighty four years. Amos Kentner was reared on this farm, educated in the public schools, and made his home with his parents until twenty one years of age, when he took the overland trip to California, in which State he remained, engaged in mining, for twelve years. The following two years he then spent at his old home in Illinois, after which he went to Nebraska, and was engaged in the grain business for one year. In 1876 he moved to Jasper County, Mo., and, after renting a farm for about five years, came to Barton County, and purchased his present property, which first consisted of eighty acres, but now amounts to 240 acres of well improved land. He was married in 1875 to Miss Elizabeth Waters, a native of Indiana, by whom he has one child, Jacob. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which he is an elder; and in his political views he is a Republican, and is one of the most enterprising farmers of the township. He served one term as justice of the peace.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


J. W. Kinder, a farmer residing in Newport Township, was born in Macoupin County, ILL, and is a son of Christopher G. and Mary Ann (Cook) Kinder, who were born in Kentucky and Indiana, respectively. When the father was about one year old, he was taken by his parents to Indiana, and was he was reared to manhood on a farm. After his marriage, he moved to Macoupin County, ILL, where he made his home until his death, in 1863, at the age of forty one years. His widow is still residing in Barton County. He was a true Christian gentleman, and for many years was a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In his political views he was a staunch Republican. His children are as follows: Jesse, who was a soldier in Company J, One Hundred and Twenty second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, U. S. A., and died while in the service; J. W., Nancy, the widow of T. W. Hampton; Mary E., wife of John H. Cox, of Litchfield, ILL, Laura G., wife of Robert Ferguson, a farmer of Barton County; and Wilson, who died in childhood. J. W. Kinder was reared on a farm in Illinois, and was married there in March, 1866, to Sarah J. Ferguson, who was born in Saline County, ILL. After their marriage Mr. Kinder bought the old homestead of the heirs, on which he lived until September, 1884, when he came to Bar­ton County, and purchased 160 acres, where he now lives. He has been a successful farmer and stockman, and has never re­gretted his removal from Illinois. He and wife are the parents of five children: Annette, wife of T. L. Ferguson, of this county; Cyrus Wilson, Thomas Emmett, James Nolan, Eva Maud and Ralph. Mr. Kinder is a Republican politically, and is a member of the Farmers' Alliance.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Matthew Lasley was born in Gallia County, Ohio, in 1845, being a son of Matthew and Rebecca (Eakin) Lasley, who were born in Pennsylvania, and were married in Ohio, removing in 1870 to Cass County, Mo., where the father was killed in the storm of 1876. He was a farmer by occupation, and was township treas­urer in Ohio for thirty years. His father, Jonathan Lasley, was born in Pennsylvania, and died in Ohio, the maternal grandfather's (Joseph Eakin) death also occurring in that State, though he was born in Pennsylvania. Matthew Lasley, our subject, is the fourth of nine sons, eight living, and was educated in the common schools of Gallia County. In 1861, when but sixteen years of age, he joined Company H, Fifty third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served three years and ten months in the Fifteenth Army Corps of Tennessee, and was a participant in the siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Miss., the Georgia and Atlanta campaign, and was at the capture of Atlanta. He was captured, and, after being in Andersonville prison for two months, was being taken with others for exchange, but, finding he would have to return to prison, he made his escape, and was six days reaching his com­mand, being all this time without food. Soon after reaching the Union lines, he was furloughed home, as he was almost dead from exposure, starvation, and disease contracted in prison. After remaining at home one month he so far recovered that he again joined his command and remained in the service, although not really fit for field duty, until the close of the war, being present at the grand review at Washington, D. C. A history of his army and prison life would be of deep interest, and many a time while making his escape from prison life to the Union lines, he would lie in fence corners for hours at a time, unobserved by the rebels, by whom he would be surrounded. He entered the service one of the most rugged and healthy men of his com­pany, and came out almost a skeleton, and broken in health. He is a Prohibitionist in his political views, although he cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1865, and was an earnest Republican for many years. Since becoming a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church a few years ago, he has made a thorough study of the Scriptures, and for about four years has earnestly devoted himself to the ministry and the cause of Christianity and temper­ance, and doing all in his power to suppress vice in all its forms. In March, 1867, he was married to Margaret, a daughter of William and Clara Coughenour, who were born in Virginia and Ohio, respectively, the father being only a child when he was taken by his parents to Ohio. In 1870 he removed to Cass County, Mo., but is now residing in Pittsburg, Kan. Mrs. Lasley was born in Ohio and is the mother of three sons and four daughters. In 1871 Mr. Lasley came with his family to Barton County, Mo and is now residing on a fine farm of 240 acres.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


J. L. Mccomb, M. D., a successful physician and surgeon, of Kenoma, Barton County, Mo., was born in Miller County of the same State in 1849, and there grew to manhood on a farm. He was engaged in teaching school from the time he was seventeen years of age until he was twenty seven, and in the meantime read medicine under Dr. William Terry, of Dade County, Mo. He entered the Medical College of St. Louis, Mo., and February 28, 1882, was graduated from the College of Physician and Surgeons, soon entering upon his practice at Newport; he had, however, practiced previous to his graduation, at Milford, under his preceptor, Dr. Terry. In September, 1882, he came to Kenoma, and here has since made his home, having become well established as a practitioner of worth and standing in the community. He was first married to Miss Mary Wright, who died leaving two children: Cora and Nettie. The Doctor married his second wife, Miss Ham, March 6, 1889. He is a Master Mason, and is a member of the Barton County Medical Society. His parents were William and Anna (Hobson) Mccomb, the former's birth occurring in Tennessee in 1819. He was reared to manhood in Illinois, but moved to Miller County before he was grown, there serving in the Home Guards as lieutenant. In 1873 he moved to Barton County, Mo., and now resides in Polk County. While residing in Miller County, Mo., he was elected by the Republican Party to the office of county judge. His father was a Tennesseean, who served in the Mexican War, and died in Miller County, Mo.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Gwinn McCuistion, farmer and fruit grower, is a member of the Horticultural Society of Barton County, Mo., and was born in Bedford County, Tenn., September 3, 1826, being a son of James and Isabel (McClintock) McCuistion, who were born in Guilford County, N. C., September 15, 1805, and January 27, 1808, respectively. They accompanied their parents to Ten­nessee in their youth, and there married in March, 1825, moving four years later to Ray County, Mo., and, in 1858, to Navarro County, Texas, where the mother died in April, 1867, and the father in September, 1869. James McCuistion served in the Black Hawk and Mormon wars, being a lieutenant in the latter, and throughout life was engaged in farming. His father, James, who is the grandfather of our subject, was also a farmer, and was born in the "Palmetto State" in 1758, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. After the close of this war he made his home in Guilford County, N. C, for some time, and in 1806 moved to Davidson County, Tenn., and built the first gristmill in that county. Later he moved to Bedford County, and built the first mill there. Here he died in March, 1826. In 1830 his aged widow traveled horseback, with her son James, to Ray County, Mo., a distance of 600 miles, in twenty days. She died December 1, 1841. The paternal great, great, grandfather was a Scotchman, and came to America from Londonderry, Ireland, in 1700, and set­tled in Charleston, S. C., where he died. His name was James, and his son Thomas was the great grandfather of our subject. Gwinn McCuistion, the eldest of five sons and three daughters, was three years old when brought by his parents to Ray County, Mo., and he has been a resident of this State since 1829. He received a common school education in the log school houses of that day, and for a year and a half attended the higher schools at Richmond, Mo. He spent the first eleven years in teaching, receiving at first only fifteen dollars per month for his services, but afterward, towards the close of his services as teacher, received sixty dollars per month, and the last seven years taught in the same school house. Success followed his labors until the unpleasant war came up, and during that struggle he lost heavily of his property. On the 28th of March, 1850, he was married to Miss Martha I. Lile, daughter of Henry W. and Lydia (Comer) Lile. The father was from the State of Tennessee, and the mother from the State of Ohio, coming with their parents to Ray County, Mo., about the year 1820, and being united in marriage in 1828. The father was born November 17, 1803, and the mother April 8, 1809; in 1854 they moved to Daviess County. Mr. Lile died January 26, 1879. His wife is still living, aged eighty years. He served in the Black Hawk and Mormon wars, being a major in the latter, and was sheriff" of Ray County for several years. Mr. McCuistion has resided in Barton County since 1880, and owns a fertile and well-improved farm of eighty acres. He served in the Confederate army, in Company C, Third Missouri Infantry, as captain, until after the fall of Vicksburg. He then commanded Companies C and F (consolidated) until the close of the war, and was engaged in nearly all of the battles fought by his division of the army, and was once wounded by gunshot. He was captured at the battle of Blakely, April 9, 1865, and, on the day of exchange of prisoners, came under the capitulation when hostilities ceased. Before the war he was a Whig in politics, but since that time has been a Democrat. He is a Master Mason, and belongs to Lamar Lodge No. 292. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. They are parents of the following named children: Perneety F., wife of Harrison Hamer; James W., of Carroll County, Mo.; Nancy R., wife of Balaam Barham; John G.; Martha I., wife of J. M. Casteel; Charles H., and Montie V.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Alonzo W. McCutchen, a leading merchant of Lamar, was born in Cooper County, Mo., April 1, 1846, and is the son of James C. and Sarah (Harris) McCutchen, both natives of Ken­tucky. In an early day both came to Missouri, where the father died in 1854, but where the mother is now living. The father was a farmer by occupation, a Democrat in politics, and a mem­ber of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The mother is also a member of the same church. In their family were five children, of whom only one is now living. Alonzo W. McCutchen received a good English education, and during the war served in the Confederate army, under General Joe Shelby, and surrendered at Shreveport, La., at the close of the hostilities. After this he clerked in Sedalia, where he remained until 1868, after which he came to Lamar, and with a partner opened a store. Although he has changed partners several times, he has always been at the head of the business. The firm title at the present is McCutchen & Jones, and they carry one of the best stocks of goods in town. September 6, 1868, he wedded Miss Fannie Thompson, a native of Cooper County, Mo., who bore him one child, James. In connection with his mercantile business, Mr. McCutchen is also interested in farming, and has a fine farm. As a business man he has been quite successful, and is now considered one of the prominent merchants of Lamar. He is the oldest dry goods merchant and the third oldest merchant in the town. He is a Democrat in his political views.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


H. C. McGown, a resident of Golden City, and one of the early settlers of Barton County, was born in 1821, in Culpeper County, Va. His parents were Daniel and Frances (Corley) McGown, natives, respectively, of Maryland and Virginia. Daniel McGown was a carpenter by trade, but always lived on a farm, and, in 1833, the family settled in St. Charles County, Mo., where the father died December 13, 1887, at the age of ninety two years; he served as a soldier in the War of 1812. The mother of our subject died in July, 1872, aged seventy five years; she was a member of the Baptist Church. H. C. McGown was reared to the pursuit of farming, and at the age of twenty one began that occupation for himself, renting land which he culti­vated. In 1847 he married Marian Boone, who was born in Callaway County, Mo. Mr. McGown lived in St. Charles County until 1850, when he went across the plains to California with a mule team; he remained in California, and engaged in farming until June, 1852, when he returned to his home in Missouri by way of Panama. He then moved to Greene County, Mo., where he bought a farm, and lived until the fall of 1865, then locating in Dade County, where he purchased a farm, and made his home until 1881, in the latter year settling in Golden City, Barton County, which is his present home. Mr. McGown's first wife died in 1857, leaving three children: Mary C, deceased, wife of John Bailey; Henry D., who died at the age of nineteen years; and Fannie D., at home. In July, 1861, Mr. McGown married Sarah J. Tompson. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., and the I. O. O. F., being one of the oldest members of the latter order in the county. He held the office of justice of the peace for twelve years in Dade County, and has led an active and, enterprising life. He owns some real estate in Golden City, and, though well along in years, takes an active interest in all public enterprises.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Judge D. T. McGown, one of the leading farmers of Barton County, Mo., has been a resident of Golden City Township for about nineteen years. He was born in Virginia in 1828, and is a son of Daniel and Frances (Corley) McGown, the former a native of Maryland, and the latter of Virginia. In the fall of 1833 the parents emigrated with their family to St. Charles County, Mo., where Judge D. T. McGown was reared to manhood on a farm. At the age of twenty one years he took the overland route to California, and was engaged in mining in that State for three years, meeting with reasonably good success. He returned to Missouri via the Isthmus of Panama and New Orleans, and pur­chased a farm in St. Charles County, on which he resided until 1858, when he sold out and established a general mercantile store at Foristell, which he conducted for three years. In 1864 he moved to Bartholomew County, Ind., but returned to St. Charles County, Mo., at the end of one year, and in 1870 came to Barton County, where he bought a 160 acre tract of raw land, which he has since nicely improved with good buildings, etc. In 1858 he was married to Agnes Gray, who was born near Madison, Ind., and by her is the father of the following children: George Q., a merchant of Wellington, Kan.; Minnie G., wife of M. Wright; Allie, wife of Elmer McGuffee, of Barton County; Mary, Fannie, Thomas and Harry. Mrs. McGown is a member of the Christian Church. Judge McGown is a Democrat politically, and has held various township offices, as well as county judge and assessor. He belongs to the I. O. O. F.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


James McGrath was born in Beaver County, Penn., in 1819, and since 1881 has been a resident of Barton County, Mo. He first moved from his native State to Illinois in 1834, and was there married to Miss Jane Haas, who was born in the Kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1830. To them were born eight sons and two daughters: Thomas G., John A., Samuel F., James W., Mary C, Charles H., William H., Phoeby A., Jessie G., and Birdy S. McGrath. Mr. and Mrs. McGrath own 320 acres of land in Hickory County, Mo., and eighty acres of land in Barton County, Mo., on which they reside. He is a Repub­lican in his political views. His father, Samuel McGrath, was born in Newtown Stewart, Tyrone County, Ireland, in 1788, and came to America in 1806, settling first in Philadelphia, and going thence to Harrisburg, where he worked at his trade as a shoe and boot maker, and later to Pittsburg, where he went into the sheep business. He served in the War of 1812, and was in the famous battle of Bunker Hill, and died at the age of ninety six, being active and energetic up to the last. His father, James by name, lived and died in Ireland, being a merchant on a small scale, in Newtown Stewart. Jane (Denning) McGrath, the mother of our subject, is of Scotch descent, her ancestors having moved from their native land to Ireland. One brother settled in the hills, and the other one in glens, and the latter had the word Glen prefixed to his name, making it Glendenning. Mr. James McGrath is a descendant of the fifth generation of the brother who settled in the hills.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


S. F. McGrath, constable and collector of Richland Town­ship, was born in Jo Daviess County, ILL., in 1855, his parents being James and Jane (Haas) McGrath. S. F. McGrath came with his parents to Missouri in 1864, and located first in Lewis County, then in Cooper County, and in 1867 went to Johnson County, and purchased a farm, remaining there until he doubled his money on his farm, then sold out and resided nine years in Henry County. Since 1881 he has resided in Barton County on his present farm. On the 5th of November, 1884, he was married to Miss Louella Wheeler, who was born in Hamilton County, ILL, in 1864, and by her has two children: Ola and Roy. From 1882 to 1884 he served as constable under the first town­ship organization, being elected to the office again in 1887 and 1889, which office he is ably filling at the present time. He is a Republican in his political views, and is a member of the Farm­ers' Alliance. In the spring of 1880 he went to Colorado, and after working there for some time returned home, where he has since remained. His father was born in Pennsylvania in 1819, and was married in Illinois. His father, Samuel McGrath, was born in Ireland, and emigrated to America, locating in Pennsyl­vania. The maternal grandfather was of German descent, and is still living, aged eighty seven years. Mrs. S. F. McGrath is a daughter of Henry and Margie (Brennon) Wheeler, who were born in Illinois in 1858 and 1840, respectively. They were married and farmed in Hamilton County until about 1873, when they came to Barton County, Mo., in which they own a good farm. The family attends the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are Democrats in their political views.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


James McMurtry, of the general notion store of McMurtry & Coffin, of Lamar, Mo., was born in Ireland on the 12th of April, 1853, being the ninth of eleven children (eight sons and three daughters) born to Thomas and Martha (Richey) McMurtry, the former having been born in Ireland, and the latter in Canada. Mr. McMurtry went to Canada when a young man, and engaged in the grocery business, marrying while there Miss Richey. Some­time after his marriage he returned to Ireland with his family to look after some property, and in 1859 emigrated to the United States, and settled in Randolph County, ILL, where he engaged in farming. He and wife belonged to the Presbyterian Church; and he was a Republican. He died in his eightieth year, but his wife is still living, and resides with her son James in Lamar, being sixty five years of age. James McMurtry received a common school education, and in 1882 came to Barton County, Mo., and was engaged in farming three years, after which he spent the same length of time clerking for A. G. Cessford. From that time until 1889 he was in the grocery business with William Earp, and has since been occupied in his present business, and is doing well. February 6, 1883, he was married to Pirenia Shelton, a native of Illinois, by whom he has three children: Elmer A., Ella M. and Artie. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church; and he is a Democrat in his political views.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


William A. McNary was born on the 17th of December, 1848, in Adams County, Ohio, and is a son of Ebenezer and Mary Catherine (Sprinkle) McNary, who were born in Pennsyl­vania and Ohio, respectively. The father was reared in Wash­ington County, and when a young man, moved to Ohio, where he was married and resided until 1848, then moving to Brown County, ILL, where he and his family made their home until 1869. Since that time they have resided in Barton County, Mo., the father being over seventy years of age, and the mother over sixty. Mr. McNary worked at the tailor's trade in Ohio and Illinois, but has farmed the latter portion of his life. He is of Scotch descent, a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. Their children are: William A. and George T. (twins), James E.; Maria Alice, wife of Arthur Corner; Albert H.; and Ella May, wife of John A. Croy, Those

de­ceased are: Mary M., wife of James Watson; Elizabeth M., wife of Albert Thurman; Tilly Louisa, Charles Henry, Frank E. and an infant. William A. McNary received his education in Brown County, ILL., and came with his parents to Barton County, Mo., and since 1878 has resided on his present farm, which he has greatly improved. October 15, 1878, he was married to Louisa Croy, a daughter of John Croy. She was born in Daviess County, Mo., reared in Montgomery County, Ind., and came with her parents to Vernon County, Mo., where she was married. She and Mr. McNary are the parents of four children: Harry E., Jessie E., Fred. C. and George E.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


B. C. McWilliams, stockman, farmer, and fruit grower, of Barton County, Mo., was born in Pennsylvania, October 13, 1843. and is a son of William and Fannie (Knauss) McWilliams, who were of Scotch and German origin, and were born in Northumberland County, Penn.; the former's birth occurring March 17, 1821. He was a farmer by occupation, and he and wife became the parents of the following family: B. C.; John, a resi­dent of Barton County; Francis M., a farmer of Ellsworth, Mo.; James A., also a farmer of Ellsworth; W. H., a miner and stone­mason, of Barton County; Mary, the deceased wife of W. L. Olley, Jr., of Pennsylvania; and Maggie E., attending school at Fort Scott. The paternal grandfather of our subject, John McWilliams, and his wife, a Miss Cruiser, were also born in the "Keystone State." The maternal grandfather, Benjamin Knauss, was born in Northampton County, Penn., and was reared in Bucks County, of that State. His father came in an early day to America from Holland with a brother, and served in the Revolutionary army. Benjamin Knauss served as lieutenant on the Canadian frontier in the War of 1812, and proved a trusty soldier. He was twice married, his second wife being a Miss Billmyer. His death occurred in Northumberland County, Penn. At the age of twenty years B. C. McWilliams embarked on the sea of life for himself, and joined Company F, Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, U. S. A., and served about twenty seven months under Capt. J. K. Robertson, and was in different Southern prisons for about thirteen months. He was in the battle of Sulphur Springs, and was captured at Catlett Station, and sent to Libby Prison, where he remained three days, and was then taken to Belle Isle, where he was retained four months, then spent six months and seven days at Andersonville, one month at Savannah, Ga., and the remainder of his prison life was passed at Miller. Twenty seven members of his regiment were cap­tured with him, and of those who were confined where he was only one besides himself survived the horrors of the Southern prisons, Mr. McWilliams and John Flowers, of Company I. He was paroled on the 19th of November, 1864, and was furloughed home. While in Andersonville he was water carrier for four months, and was the original owner of the Miller ax, for which he paid twenty five dollars, and which he used in building his hut, it being also used for the same purpose by many of his comrades. After the war he worked with the Enterprise Coal Colliery, Shamokin, Penn., but July 6, 1866, went to Belleview, Ohio, and from there to Clinton, Mich.; thence to Barton County, Mo, where he bought his present property of 168 acres. He only remained here a short time, as the country was but a vast rolling prairie, with no houses or improved farms, and went to Dubuque, Iowa, thence to Cedar Rapids, and was married at Danforth, Johnson County, Iowa, to Miss Mary A. Cloud, on the 24th of December, 1867. In 1869 he returned to his farm in Missouri, at that time there being no house between his and the county seat, Lamar, sixteen miles away and here has since remained and reared his children, whose names are as follows: Fannie E., born October 22, 1868; Rosa C, born December 10, 1869; Nellie May, born July 22, 1873; William H. and Samuel (twins), born February 16, 1875; Lena, born March 26. 1882; John F., born February 25, 1884; Bessie C, born June 16, 1887; and Benjamin H., born March 8, 1889. Mrs. McWilliams was born in Iowa, August 27, 1847, and is a daughter of Samuel and Eliza A. (Case) Cloud, who were born in Ohio and Virginia, respectively, and settled at Big Grove, Johnson County, Iowa, where Mrs. Cloud died July 20, 1882, and her husband, October 12, 1883. They were the parents of twelve children, ten of whom lived to be grown: Callie, wife of B. F. Hopkins, of Zenorsville, Iowa; Mrs. McWilliams; Nathaniel, who was killed in the battle of Shiloh; Rebecca, wife of Steve Almond, of Parker, Dakota; Fannie, wife of Richard Bissell, of Cass Co., Iowa; Frank, of Allendale, Mo.; Newton and Will S., of Iantha, Mo.; Rosa and John, of Danforth, Iowa. Mrs. McWilliams' paternal grandfather was born in Pennsylvania, and Mr. McWilliams' paternal great grandfather served through­out the Revolutionary War. Mr. and Mrs. McWilliams are members of the Church of God, and in his political views he is a Republican. His mother, sister and brother have settled here since he came, his father also coming a few years before his death, which occurred February 28, 1883.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


William M. Major, farmer, stockman, and grain and hay merchant at Kenoma, Mo., was born in Polk County, Mo., March 2, 1842, being a son of Alfred and Agnes (Adams) Major, a history of whom is given in the sketch of Benjamin P. Major. He was reared in St. Clair County, ILL, and was married at Lebanon of that State to Miss Elizabeth Rowlett, who was born in 1842, and died in Golden City, Mo., in 1878, having borne five children, who are also deceased. After his marriage Mr. Major resided and farmed in St. Clair County, ILL, until 1877, when he came to Barton County, Mo., and lived near Golden City two years, moving to his present farm in the fall of 1880, where he first engaged in sheep raising, having at one time as many as a thousand head. After a time he gave up this work and turned his attention to general farming, and is now the owner of 280 acres of land. Since 1886 he has been engaged in shipping grain and hay at Kenoma, and owns a large hay barn, and an interest in a mill. He ships South about twenty tons of prairie hay per day, and has shipped timothy hay as far South as Augusta, Ga. Mr. Major took for his second wife Mrs. Mollie E. Gray, who was born in Holt County, Mo., in 1852, and by her has the following children: Peter (deceased), Agnes, Jennie, Roy and Willie. Mr. Major is a Democrat in his political views.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Benjamin P. Major is one of the successful farmers and stock raisers of Barton County, Mo., his native birthplace being Polk County, of the same State, where he was born on the 1st of June, 1844. His father, Alfred Major, was born in Madison County, Va., in 1818, and when fourteen years of age moved with his parents to Christian County, Ky., where his father, who was a Virginian, died in 1856, and where he attained mature years, married, and became a wealthy planter and slave owner. In the year 1832 he concluded to seek a home farther west, and accord­ingly came to Greene County, Mo., where he entered a large tract of land and began dealing in stock, shipping to New Orleans, but lost money in this enterprise, owing to the boiler of the ves­sel bursting on which his stock was shipped. He then returned to his home in Polk County, and in 1843 took a large drove of mules and horses to North Carolina, selling principally on time, in which speculation he also lost heavily, but, nothing daunted by these misfortunes, he again engaged in stock trading, his location at this time being at Belleville, ILL, where he was induced to settle by two Virginian gentlemen, Messrs. E. M. and Benjamin West, and here he amassed a considerable fortune in hotel keeping, farming, and the livestock business. When the Civil War broke out he began selling horses to the Government, and, while in the city of St. Louis, was assassinated near the Wedge House on the night of October 25, 1862, and was robbed of $1,800 in money, which was the proceeds of a sale of horses and mules. No clue to the murder was ever discovered. He left 900 acres of valuable farm­ing lands near Lebanon, but, when the estate was settled, it was all utilized in the payment of notes which he had endorsed for friends, thus leaving his widow and seven small children in desti­tute circumstances. His wife's maiden name was Agnes Adams. She was born in Christian County, Ky., September 15, 1814, and is a daughter of James and Charlotte (Moding) Adams, a granddaughter of John Adams, and a great granddaughter of John Adams, the second President of the United States, and one of the immortal fifty six who signed the Declaration of Independence. John Quincy Adams, the sixth President of the United States, was her grand uncle. Her grandfather, John Adams, came West early in life, since which time this branch of the family has lived west of the Alleghenies. Owing to the early death of her parents, she was not able to get a very accurate history of her ancestry, but has always been aware of the facts here given. Several of her male relatives on both sides of the family were participants in the War of 1812, and also in the many Indian wars of early days. Mrs. Major is remarkably preserved for her years, and, although seventy five years of age, enjoys the best of health, and is a fine specimen of the few remaining pioneer women of Amer­ica. She has resided in St. Clair County, Mo., for the past forty two years, and her home is now in East St. Louis, 811 St. Louis Avenue. Throughout her career she has come in contact with all sides of life, but says she feels as independent in her poverty of today as she did when living in affluence. She is now supporting herself by selling tooth powers. She has four sons and two daughters living, five of whom are residents of Missouri, and one residing in the adjoining village of New Brighton. During the recent Centennial celebration of Washington’s inauguration, her modesty forbade her making her identity known to the managers; but, when the procession was formed, her patriotism was aroused, and she fell into line and marched on foot with the procession a distance of three miles, and afterward listened to the speeches. Her son, Benjamin F. Major, whose name heads this sketch, was married in 1868 to Miss Rosa Lee Belcour, who was born in Belleville, ILL., in 1850, and was there principally reared. The following are their children: Alfred; Don, who died at the age of two years and eight months; Lawrence, Benjamin, Edward, and Louise. Mrs. Major is a daughter of Francis and Sarah (Dingle) Belcour, who were born in Missouri in 1824 and 1831, respectively. The father was a merchant and express agent at Belleville, ILL., and after locating in St. Louis was a bookkeeper for many year, in the employ of J. Clark. The grandfather, John Baptiste Belcour, was born in Canada, and came to St Louis during the very early history of the place. His wife, Rosa Lecompte, was of Creole descent, and they were married in Canada. Mr. Major has a gold watch which was made for her by her husband after their marriage. In his political views the latter is a democrat.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Dr. A. E. Mardick was born in the State of Virginia, in February, 1816. His parents were Andrew C. and Bell (Quigg) Mardick, who were of Scotch descent; the father was a stockman, and when our subject was young, the parents moved to Westmoreland County, Penn., where he was educated in the private schools. At the age of seventeen he commenced the study of medicine, and completed a course in medicine in the University of Pennsylvania, from which institution he graduated in March, 1837, as a physician and surgeon. He then took a trip to St. Louis, where he remained a few months, and returning to Pennsylvania, he entered the Untied State Navy, on board the Missouri. He spent one year on the water, visiting South America and the West Indies, and, after his return, again went to St. Louis, where he opened a office and engaged in practice. The following year he received appointment as Assistant Surgeon of the United States Army, Second Dragoons, in which capacity he served seven years. He was wounded in the leg at Monterey, during the Mexican War, and was granted a furlough, when he returned to St Louis, and resumed his practice there. In 1850 he moved to Charleston, MO., where he devoted his attention to the profession until the outbreak of the late war, when he went to Helena, Ark., remaining one year, and, during the war, hav­ing passes from both armies, he did much to relieve the wounded, without compensation other than the gratefulness of those he cared for. Returning to Charleston, he remained there until 1865, spending the following two years on a farm in Mississippi County, Mo. He lived one year at Union City, Tenn., when he removed to Barton County, Mo., and, from 1874 to 1886, he was actively engaged in the practice of medicine. In the latter year he retired, on account of ill health, giving up a large and lucrative practice. The Doctor was married, in St. Louis, in 1848, to Miss Caroline O. Harra, a native of Canada, of English descent; she died in 1857, at the age of forty five years. The children by this marriage were: Laura, wife of Robert B. Ward, of Harrisonville, Mo.; Alex. E., a resident of Golden City, Mo.; John W., a grocer in Golden City; and Margaret C, wife of Charles Ford, also of Golden City. In 1858 Dr. Mardick married Rebecca Kendrick, a native of Virginia. They have one child, John Y., now a shorthand reporter of Charleston. The Doctor is a mem­ber of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and of the A. F. & A. M.  

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


S. N. Martin, M. D., physician and surgeon, of Newport, Barton County, Mo., has been a resident of this county since 1870. He was born in Gallia County, Ohio, June 27, 1845, and is the son of Presley and Lucinda (Halley) Martin, natives of Halifax County, Va., and Ohio, respectively. The father was a successful tiller of the soil, and this occupation continued the principal part of his life. Dr. S. N. Martin remained on his father's farm until sixteen years of age, as a boy being a very diligent student, and often, in the absence of candles, carrying pine knots to make a light by which he might study. March 9, 1862, he enlisted in the Union Army, Sixtieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company C, as a private, and served until November 10, 1862. In September of the same year he participated in the battle of Harper's Ferry, where he was taken prisoner in the sur­render of the post, under Col. Miles, to Gens. "Stonewall" Jack­son and A. P. Hill, September 15, 1862. By a fortunate parole on the field the prisoners escaped the tortures of a Southern pris­on and consequent horror. In November he returned to his home in Mercerville, Ohio, where he attended school one year. In the fall of 1863 he commenced teaching school, in which pro­fession he continued until 1875, but in the meantime studied med­icine under Drs. H. Halley and W. K. Patton, of Mercerville. He then attended the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons. Previous to this, in 1870, he came with his parents to Barton County, Mo., where the father rented a farm, and there resided until 1877, when he moved to Cedarville, near which town Dr. Martin had purchased a few acres. The Doctor followed teach­ing and stock raising from 1871 to 1875, and the last named year began the practice of his profession at Round Prairie (though physically very feeble from the effects of war service), where he continued until 1878, when he returned to Cedarville and practiced at that place two years. He then came to Newport, where he has continued ever since, and by industry and strict attention to business is the owner of several thousand dollars worth of property. He was first married in 1874, to Miss Frances J. Higgins, of Benton County, Ark., and the daughter of Bryant Higgins. She was born January 19, 1855, and died June 25, 1880. She was a member of the Baptist Church, and a devoted Christian. Their family consisted of three children: Eva A., aged fourteen; Lee, aged twelve, and Freddie, aged ten, all at home. The Doctor was married again in 1882, to Miss Berthena E. Polley, a native of Mercer County, Mo., and the daughter of Lafayette Polley, who was born in Indiana, and who came to Mercer County in 1865. By this last marriage Dr. Martin became the father of two children: Nannie L., aged five, and Norman P., one year old. The Doctor is a member of the Baptist Church, and his wife is a member of the United Brethren Church. He has held various township offices, and is at present township treasurer and township trustee for the second term. He is a Democrat in his political views. His father, Presley Martin, lives with him, and is sixty six years of age. The mother died April 23, 1886, of paralysis, at the age of sixty two years; both members of the Baptist Church. In their family were ten children, seven now living. Dr. Martin commenced life a poor boy, educated him­self and assisted in supporting his father's family. He is univer­sally respected, is a successful practitioner, and, aside from his practice, is interested in a general mercantile store at Newport. He takes an active part in public affairs, and assists in all laudable enterprises. The maiden name of the Doctor's mother was Hal­ley, and she was a great niece of General George Washington. She is a descendant of Colonel Fielding Lewis, who married Elizabeth Washington, only sister of General Washington. Her children were named as follows: S. N.; James M., now in Idaho; Elizabeth J., wife of J. C. Day, a stock dealer at Leavenworth, Kan.; Fannie, wife of Orris A. Morehouse, who is a son of Judge Morehouse, of Barton County; Presley S., a farmer and school teacher of New­port Township; Emily D., wife of Joshua Bayes, of Cedarville, Mo.; Sarah C., wife of C. J. Higgins, who is a farmer and school teacher, of Milford Township, Barton County, Mo.; and Mary L., wife of T. M. Gaddy. She died in Arkansas, in 1879. There were five school teachers in the family. Dr. Martin's paternal grandfather, Obediah Martin, was born, reared and lived all his life in Halifax County, Va. Fourteen children were in his family. He died at the age of sixty six; was of Irish descent, as was also his wife, formerly Tabitha Self, who, with eight of her children, moved to Gallia County, Ohio, in 183S, and there died when eighty eight years old. The maternal grandfather, Samuel Hal­ley, a Virginian by birth, was an early settler of Gallia County, Ohio, where he reared fifteen children. He died at the age of seventy eight. His wife, formerly Letty Thomas, was sixty two years old at her death. Presley Martin and family moved to Leavenworth, Kan., in 1865, but, owing to sickness, returned to Ohio about one year after. S. N. then engaged in lumbering, but lost the small sum he had saved, and upon arriving in Barton County, Mo., was pecuniarly "down," and his father but a little better off. However, he soon secured a school at forty dollars per month, and thus helped the family at a time when assistance was appreciated.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Walter J. Miller, capitalist and money lender of Lamar, Mo., is a son of John W. and Ida (Hendrickson) Miller, and was born in New York State July 5, 1852, his father being also a native of that State, and his mother of New Jersey. In 1871 he came to Jasper County, Mo., where he was engaged in merchandising two years, then moved to Lamar, and for the past fifteen years has been in the loan, insurance, and real estate business. He is now, however, chiefly engaged in looking after his own property, which consists of about 1,200 acres of well improved farms, besides owning some of the best business houses in the town. He was admitted to the bar in 1881, but has never practiced the legal profession. In 1876 he was married to Miss Ella M. Foudray, a native of Kentucky.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Samuel J. Minnice, grocery man, and glass and Queensware merchant at Lamar, Mo., was born in Benton County, Mo., December 20, 1845, being a son of David and Caroline (Bunch) Minnice, who were born, respectively, in Maine and Virginia, and were of Scotch and English descent. Both came to Missouri in their youth, and were married in Benton County, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father opened a large farm, and became one of the wealthy residents of the county. He was a Democrat, and he and wife were members of the Baptist Church. Samuel J. Minnice is the second of their five children, and in boyhood received a limited education in the district schools, but by personal effort secured sufficient education to enable him to teach school, and this occupation he followed for nine years with good success. He then began merchandising at Mount View, and in 1882 came to Lamar, and opened a grocery store, which he managed alone for one year, then was in partner­ship for five years with J. E. Cleveland. He then purchased Mr. Cleveland's interest, and has managed his store alone ever since. His own industry and perseverance have accumulated his present property, and he gives every promise of becoming in time one of the wealthy men of the county. In April, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, Seventh Missouri Volunteer Cavalry, U. S. A., and served until April, 1865, participating in the battles of Prai­rie Grove, Cass Hollow, Springfield, Jefferson City, Marshfield, Independence and Mound City, and during his entire service was neither wounded nor taken prisoner. In 1871 he was married to Mollie Jones, a native of Missouri, and by her has five children. He and wife belong to the Baptist Church, and he is a member of the G. A. R. and the Masonic fraternity.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Mrs. Abbie Morris, proprietress of the Golden City Hotel, is the widow of Franklin Morris, who was born in Ohio on the 21st of January, 1839, his parents being Thomas and Elizabeth Mor­ris, the former of whom was born in England, in 1810, and the latter in Kentucky. At an early day Thomas Morris came to Ohio, and died on the 17th of October, 1873. He and wife were the parents of the following children: John Franklin, born Jan­uary 21,1839; Richard A., born November 29,1841; Matilda A,, born March 3, 1844; Nancy C., born February 16, 1847; Lycurgus K., born May 23, 1850; and Emma Electa J., born December 29, 1853. The mother of these children died November 25, 1883, when in her sixty eighth year. Franklin Morris, the husband of our subject, came to Missouri in 1867, and settled in Barton County, and engaged in farming and stock raising, continuing this occupation for several years. He was a leading member of the Republican Party, and belonged to the Old School Presby­terian Church. In 1869 he met and married Miss Abbie Sanford, and to their union six children were born: W. T., born August 14, 1870; Elizabeth, born July 22, 1873; Alfred, born March 8, 1875; Clara M., born August 20, 1877; Franklin S., born May 23, 1880; and one child that died in infancy. Mr. Morris died on the 28th of January, 1881, and his widow after­ward tried farming for one year, then moved to Golden City and began keeping hotel, which business is netting her a fair income. Her parents were E. and Sarah A. (Luper) Sanford, both of whom were born in 1810, in Connecticut and Pennsylvania, respectively. In 1866 they came to Barton County, and settled on what is now a portion of Golden City, where they kept hotel. Mr. Sanford died May 12, 1885, having been an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His wife is yet living at the age of seventy three years, and resides with her daughter, Mrs. Morris. Their children are: Amos, Jacob, Sylvester, Lydia Ann, David, Albert, Abbie and Franklin. Four sons served in the Union army.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Judge Charles A. Morrow, of Barton County, Mo., was born in Wayne County, Ohio, September 23, 1840, being one of four children born to David and Ruth (Mitchell) Morrow, who were born in Carlisle and Lancaster Counties, Penn. When young they removed to Wayne County, Ohio, where they resided until 1850, then moving to Williams County, Ohio, where they are still residing. The father was engaged in farming for many years, and when the Farmers' National Bank of Bryan, Ohio, was established, he was chosen one of the directors, which office he has since held, and for a number of years was it’s president. For six years he was Commissioner of the Ohio Infirmaries, and in his political views was a Whig. He was a soldier in the Blackhawk War. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episco­pal Church. Grandfather Morrow came from Scotland to the United States, and served in the Revolutionary War. The mater­nal grandfather was bound out when a boy, but ran away from home and enlisted in the War of 1812, and also served in the Florida War and the Mexican War. When the late war broke out, although seventy one years old, he made a speech to the men of his county in regard to answering Lincoln's first call for troops, and said: "I have served the Government in three wars, and am ready for another," and stepped forward, being the first man to enlist in his county. He served about six months doing camp duty. He lived to be ninety eight years of age. Charles A. Morrow, the immediate subject of this sketch, received very inferior educational advantages in his youth, only attending school one summer when a small boy. At the age of eighteen he entered an academy, which he attended one year, and by pri­vate study he prepared himself for the profession of teaching. When the war broke out he served three months in the Ohio State Militia, then joined Company B, Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, U. S. A., for three years, and was elected first lieuten­ant, but on account of disability was never mustered into the service. He then taught school in Ohio and Indiana until 1865, then came to St. Charles County, Mo., where he followed the same occupation, and farmed on rented land for five years, paying five dollars per acre for the use of his land, which he says was one of the best bargains he ever made. November 14, i860, he married Lydia A. Field, a native of Missouri, and in 1871 they moved to Greene County, and three years later to Barton County, locating near Golden City. They now own 1,200 acres of land, besides property in Lamar and Golden City and St. Charles County. He is one of the county's most successful farmers, and for his many good qualities is esteemed by all who know him. Politically he is a Republican, and in 1886 was elected presiding judge of the county court, and in 1888 was appointed to super­intend the construction of the Barton County court house. He is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, and his wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church. They are the parents of the following children: William E., Walter S., Vashti E. and Carrie R.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Samuel Myers, the oldest butcher in Lamar, and son of Nicholas and Catherine (Carr) Myers, was born in Norwich, Conn., March 9, 1847. The parents were both natives of Germany, but came to America in early life, and settled in New York City, where the father kept a butcher stall in the old Washington market. They moved from New York to St. Louis, and here the father died in 1876, at the age of fifty nine years. The mother is still living, and makes her home in St. Louis. While living in the old country the father served in the French army, and was a brave and gallant soldier. Their family consisted of four children, three sons and a daughter, Samuel Myers, the second child was educated in the St. Louis schools, and while growing up learned the butcher’s trade, at which he has worked almost continuously since. From St Louis he went to Sedalia, where he married, May 6 1874, Miss Mollie H. Crowder, a native of Charleston, ILL., though reared in Missouri. They have no children. Having moved to Nevada, they made that their home until 1881, when they came to Lamar. In 1883 he opened a shop in that town, and has run one since. Mr. Myers is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the A.O.U.W.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Horatio Nelson, dealer in general hardware and furniture at Minden Mo., has been the successor of S. F. Smith since October, 1888, and was born in Fulton County, ILL., in 1854, being a son of General H. C. and E. J. Nelson, who were born in Maryland, married in Kentucky, and reared their family in Fulton County, ILL., whither they moved in 1842. They are still living, and are well-to-do farmers. When the war broke out, Mr. Nelson organized a company of cavalry, and was chosen its captain. He received various promotions until he arose to the rank of general, and did honorable and active service for three years and nine months. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church. Horatio Nelson is the fourth of three sons and four daughters, and was educated in the common schools, and reared on his father’s farm. In 1878 he was married to Miss Emma J., a daughter of David Ferry, who is now residing in Chicago, ILL., engaged in cabinet making. Mrs. Nelson was born in Pennsylvania, and she and Mr. Nelson are the parents of four children. In 1880 they came to Barton County, Mo., and farmed until 1888 on a fine farm of 160 acres, which was in a wild state when they located, and while engaged in farming gave considerable attention to raising a fine grade of cattle of the short horn breed. He is now doing well in the business in which he is engaged, and is considered one of the prosperous citizens of the county. He is a Republican in his political views, casting his first presidential vote for Hayes in 1876, and he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.

[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


REV. DEWITT CLINTON BOLTON

1846-1914

 

Religious Activity in Missouri  1874-1914

Rev. G. W. Hatcher, D. D.

 

            On June 17, 1846, there was born to Dr. Thomas L. Bolton and wife (nee Cassandra Glover), in Cole County, Missouri, a son to whom they gave the name De Witt Clinton.  For eight years after this event his father continued to reside in Cole County.  When five years of age, this boy lost his mother.  When he was eight years old his father moved to Lexington, in Lafayette County, where he lived until his death, many years after.

            When De Witt was ten years old his father married again, and when he died, he left two sets of children – three boys by his first wife, one girl and three boys by his last wife.

            In 1864 De Witt was converted and baptized by Rev. J. W. Warder, in Lexington.  If a faithful, consistent life is an evidence of genuine conversion, this boy was converted at that time.  There was no backsliding, letting go and taking hold in his life, but an upward, downward, outward growth of that which was then given him.

            He went to a private school in Lexington after his conversion, and then to Westminster at Fulton, and then to William Jewell College.

            The “Call to the Ministry” had gripped him, and to this he was looking, and into this he was being led, and for this he was equipping himself while in school.

            In 1874, ten years after his conversion, he was ordained at Lexington.  The Presbytery on the occasion was composed of Rev. Edward Roth, Rev. Geo. W. Smith and Dr. Henry Talbird, with representatives from the Second Baptist Church at Lexington.

            The first service rendered as a minister was given to the work of the Missouri Baptist Sunday School Convention as Secretary.  In this department he did faithful and conscientious service for one year, and then accepted the care of Fairville Church in Saline County.  This was a young, vigorous church.  Just the field for a young, promising preacher.  He was cultivating almost virgin soil, he being the second pastor that this church had called.  His work there was well done.  He gripped the people in such a manner as enabled him to “come back,” for after a short sojourn at Lamar, in Barton County, he was recalled at Fairville, and served them as faithfully as he had served during his first term.

            One the 17th day of November, 1881, he was married to Miss Lena Graves of Saline County, near Fairville.  Time revealed the fact that he made no mistake in selecting this woman to be his future companion, for she was suitable, congenial, helpful in all places at all times and in all things.

            From Saline County he moved to Carroll County and became pastor of some country churches; among them was Wakonda, Bethlehem, Morton and McCrookins Creek.  Among these people he moved as genial, warm, pure sunlight – a blessing to every home into which he went, and a friend to every person he met.  He was fully identified with the work in the entire county, as his interest in and attendance at all the 5th Sunday meetings proved.  His presence on these occasions was hailed with delight – and his absence was sorrowfully noted.

            From the country churches he was called to Norborne Church in Carroll County, where he made good as preacher, teacher and man.  In this town, as in every town, there was “lots” of devil.  Sometimes he got into the church, but he always met his foe in De Witt Bolton.  His pastorate at Norborne was a blessing to the church and community.  The purity of his life; the Scripturalness of his preaching; his firm, yet gentle, course, gave him him the confidence and sympathy of the community, which he used in lifting the cause of Christ to a higher plane.

            From Norborne he moved to Marshall, and took up country work again, serving Mt. Leonard, Napton, Nelson, and possibly others.  He was then called to Miami, where he served for five years.  During these five years he so lived among the people to whom he preached, as to give them an object lesson in practical religion.  He was a “living epistle,” which the humblest as well as the greatest could read and understand.

            After his sojourn in Miami, he moved back to Marshall, which was his last more, for he lived there until his death.

            During this second residence in Marshall he was recalled to Mt. Leonard, where he served for thirteen years, his longest pastorate, and the longest in the history of the church.  He was also pastor at Grand Pass and at Antioch, resigning the latter a short time before his death.  When called home, he was working in the interests of the “Home for Aged Baptists,” at Ironton, Missouri, in addition to his work as pastor.

            On Tuesday night, April 14, 1914, about 11 o’clock, after a very brief illness, this servant of God, was called to his rest and reward.  He died in Marshall, Missouri, where he had lived so long, and among the many friends he had made and kept.  His funeral was preached by the writer of this sketch, who had known him, loved him and worked with him for nearly forty years.  His burial was largely attended by men, women and children, representing all ranks and conditions of town, village and country people; showing the extent to which he had embedded himself in the confidence and affection of all who appreciate true merit and noble, Christlike manhood.

            He left a large family.  He was the father of nine children, seven of whom, with the mother, survive him.  To these he has left an untarnished name and an example worthy the imitation of all.

            Rising above the plane of his every day uniformly consistent life were mountain peaks that were attractive.  As a preacher, his strong points were not eloquence, oratory or fireworks.  What he lacked in these, if it be a lack, was more than compensated in his clear analysis and logical presentation of the truth.  It was impossible for him to sermonize without analysis, as it would be to make a stalwart human body without bones.

            As a man, he was true to what he conceived to be right.  For it, he contended, and with it, he stayed, regardless of consequences.  In extending to others the right to think and act for themselves, he never surrendered his right to exercise the same privilege.

            He was a clean, pure man.  In thought, speech and action he was as pure, as innocent and as guileless as a child.  This virtue often exposed him to the friendly jokes of his brethren.

            As a “resident minister” he was a help to church and pastor, and never a hindrance.  He was always at the mid-week prayer-meeting when at home, ready to assist in every possible way.

            His influence was known and felt in the Baptist ranks in County and State.  For sixteen years he was Clerk of Saline Association, and no man in that position ever filled it more faithfully or more efficiently.

            Just what this gentle, pure, consecrated life of 66 years accomplished in good can only be revealed in eternity, for while he rests from his labors, his work will follow him, accumulating in depth and power as the years roll on.

 

ADDED BY J. C. M –

            In preparing the sketch of the life of Rev. D. C. Bolton, Dr. Hatcher, solely because of a lapse of memory at the time of writing, failed to mention the History of the Baptist Churches of the Saline Association.

            This history is not only proof of the love of his own people on the part of the author, but also an evidence of the great industry that was characteristic of his life.  By careful research he collected all the facts from personal interviews, church records and minutes of the Associational gatherings, and then wrote them in his own matter of fact style.  It may be possible for some one in future to find additional truths bearing upon the history of these churches, but such facts must come from some source that was not within the reach of D. C. Bolton.  This history is thoroughly reliable.  The writing consumed much time, but the labor of gathering the data required much more exertion, but it was all done from motives of love.  He sought no other reward than that which comes to the heart of one who seeks to preserve the memory of those who serve the Lord, and the Lord’s people, and by recording the story of their unselfish toils give incentive to others to follow the example thus nobly set.

            Mr. Bolton’s life was an open book.  See the years of his residence in Marshall; he so lived that his daily walk proclaimed that the Christ lived in him and that he lived in the Christ.

            There was no service that he could render to aid the pastor and hedp the church when there was no pastor, that he did not readily perform.

            He was truly a good man, an able expositor of the Scriptures, with no question as to his faithful adherence to the teachings of the Baptists, and yet never an un-Christian thrust at any people who served the Lord and yet differed from him in their understanding of the inspired Word.

            His life and preaching showed how one can be faithful to the truth and yet not offensive to other good people.

(Source: Missouri Baptist Biography A Series of Life-Sketches Indicating the Growth and Prosperity of the  Baptist Churches As Represented in the Lives and Labors of Eminent Men and Women in Missouri Prepared at the Request of the Missouri Baptist Historical Society by J. C. Maple A.M., D.D. and R. P. Rider, A.M. Volume III; Published for The Missouri Baptist Historical Society, Liberty, Missouri by Schooley Stationery and Printing Co, Kansas City, Missouri (1918) transcribed by Mary Saggio]


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