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Barton County
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George Ackason, M. D., one of the earliest practitioners of Golden City, became a resident of Barton County in 1876. He was born in Greene County, Tenn., and is a son of J. H. and Letitia (Walker) Ackason, also natives of Tennessee. In 1856 the parents removed to Cedar County, Mo., and the father purchased a farm near Stockton, upon which our subject was reared. He received his early education in the common schools of the county, and, in 1872, entered upon the study of medicine. He attended Louisville Medical College, and, in 1874, located at Stockton, where he entered upon the active practice of his chosen profession. After remaining in Stockton nearly a year, he removed to Golden City, and here has since continued his practice, and ranks among the leading physicians of Barton County, enjoying a large and lucrative patronage, which is daily increasing. Dr. Ackason was married, in 1875, to Maggie Turner, a native of Missouri. They have one child, Frank. The Doctor has held the office of alderman of Golden City, and, as a citizen, ranks among the most prominent of the place.
Edmund H. Adams, president of the Adams Hardware and Furniture Company, was born in Rock County, Wis., September 18, 1850, and is the son of William P. Adams, a native of New York, and Susan E. (Doolittle) Adams, a native of Canada. In an early day the parents moved to Beloit, where the father followed merchandising for many years, and where he still lives. Edmund H. Adams is the only living child of their family. He received an ordinary education in the public schools of Beloit, and at the age of fourteen years commenced clerking in a store. In 1869 he went to St. Louis, where he spent seven years, three years as salesman, and four years in the Exchange Bank. In 1877 he came to Lamar, and has since been engaged in the hardware and furniture business.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Edmund H. Adams, president of the Adams Hardware and Furniture Company, was born in Rock County, Wis., September 18, 1850, and is the son of William P. Adams, a native of New York, and Susan E. (Doolittle) Adams, a native of Canada. In an early day the parents moved to Beloit, where the father followed merchandising for many years, and where he still lives. Edmund H. Adams is the only living child of their family. He received an ordinary education in the public schools of Beloit, and at the age of fourteen years commenced clerking in a store. In 1869 he went to St. Louis, where he spent seven years, three years as salesman, and four years in the Exchange Bank. In 1877 he came to Lamar, and has since been engaged in the hardware and furniture business.
(Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade and Barton Counties, Missouri, Publ 1889. Transcribed by Linda Rodriguez)


William Allen, of the firm of Harkless, Allen & Co., of Lamar, Mo., was born in Tippecanoe, county, Ind., May 15, 1833, and is the eldest of two surviving sons in a family of five children born to Alvin and Nancy (Jack) Allen, who were born in Bourbon County, Ky., and Preble County, Ohio, respectively. Alvin Allen and his father, William Allen, went to Tippecanoe County, Ind., ikn 1828, where they entered about 1,600 acres of land. Mrs. Allen's parents were Kentuckians, who crossed to Ohio when only the ferryman's house marked the site where Cincinnati now is. They too went to Tippecanoe County, Ind., in 1828, and settled on a farm adjoining William Allen's. Here the parents of our subject were married and lived for many years. The father was a farmer and Democrat, and his death occurred at the age of sixty-four years. The mother is still living, and, although over seventy-five years of age, does her own work. William Allen, whose name heads this sketch, was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one years began clerking in a store in Crawfordsville, Ind., and in 1856 was married to Harriet Harmon, a native of Ohio, soon after moving to a farm in Vermilion county. This he traded in 1860 for a stock of dry goods in Crawfordsville, and here he continued in business till 1880. In 1862 his wife died, leaving him with three children: Ida, Thomas E. and Edith, to care for. The following year he wedded Mary Harmon, a sister of his first wife, and by her has four children: Fannie, James, Mabel and Harriet. In 1880 he and wife came to Lamar, Mo., both invalids, and now a healthier couple could scarcely be found. For about five years after coming here he traded in stock and land, and sold buggies, sellling so many of the latter that he was given the nickname of "Buggy Allen." For some time past he has given his attention to merchandising, the firm being now composed of Mr. Allen, his son, Thomas E., and his son-in-law, Tom W. Harkless and Henry Tipton, and George Harkless. They have one of the largest stocks of goods in Southwest Missouri, and their trade extends for many miles around. Besides his interest in the store, Mr. Allen owns 320 acres of land, which he has earned by industry and good management. he is a Democrat politically.
(Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade and Barton Counties, Missouri, Publ 1889. Transcribed by Linda Rodriguez)


Orvilla Allen, who is prminently identified with the 'bus and transfer business at Lamar, was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, February 7, 1844, and is the son of James and Martha (Shane) Allen, both natives of Ohio, where they married and spent their days, he engaged in agricultural pursuits. He was a prominent man in Jefferson county, which he twice represented in the Legislature. He died in 1873, at the age of seventy years. Both he and wife were members of the Presbyterian Church. Grandfather Allen came from Pennsylvania to Ohio at an early day, as did also Grandfather Shane. Orvilla Allen, the subject of this sketch, is the only child born to his parents, and received his education principally by his own exertions, as his early educational advantages were limited. He attained his growth on the farm, and remained with his parents until 1865, when he came to North Missouri, and taught school a short time. March 15, 1866, he returned to Ohio, and there married Miss Mary J. Morrison, a native of Jefferson County, Ohio, who bore him three children: Hattie C., Ada E. and James f. In 1868 he moved to Greene County, Mo., wehre he followed farming. May 29, 1873, his wife died, and three years later he came to Lamar and for several years ran a livery stable. When the railroad was built to Lamar, he started the 'bus and transfer business, and is now the owner of two ;buses and two transfer wagons. June 20, 1877, he married Miss Tamer T. Ransey, a native of Mississippi, and to this union were born three children: May, Orville and Jesse. Mr. Allen is a Republican in politics, and is a Royal Arch Mason.
(Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade and Barton Counties, Missouri, Publ 1889. Transcribed by Linda Rodriguez)


Arnold, Frank DeWitt, postmaster of Lamar, and proprietor of the Lamar House, was born April 5, 1845, in New York, and received his education in the common schools. In 1850 his parents moved to Wisconsin, where he assisted his father on the farm until February, 1862, when, but sixteen years of age, he enlisted in Company I, Third Wisconsin Volunteer Cavalry, Federal Army, and served until March 1865. He participated in the battles of Prairie Grove, Cane Hill, Cabin Creek, Baxter Springs, Dripping Springs, and, besides, many minor engagements. In the Quantrell Massacre, October 6, 1863, at Baxter Springs, mr. Arnold was in Blunt's command, which was so badly cut to pieces. His horse having been shot from under him, and be assured that he would be treated as a prisoner of war, he surrendered, giving his revolver to a Confederate guerrilla, who shot him with the two remaining loads. As he still showed signs of life, another of the band shot him several times at short range, utterly riddling his head and face. Seven different times was he shot. Upon the supposition that he was dead, he was left on the field from two o'clock until ten o'clock in the night, then removed to the hospital, but given no attention until next morning, when it was discovered that life still lingered in the body. After sufficiently recovering, he was placed on detached service as a scout, and in that capacity served until discharged. In 1865 Mr. Arnold came to Lamar, and since then his business has been varied, working in clerk's office, running stage lines from Lamar to Fort Scott, Kan., Lamar to Nevada and Carthage, Mo; in the livery business, bakery, farming, and for two years was in the collector's office, and clerk in a store, etc. In 1874 he rented the Metropolitan Hotel (now Lamar House), and the following year built a livery stable in Dade County, Mo., and furnished it with two horses. He ran this so successfully that he soon brought away a good livery outfit, and with Dr. Charles Van Pelt opened a livery stable in Galena, Kan. Later he returned to Lamar, and continued that business for three years. After renting the Metropolitan Hotel for a year, he and a brother bought the house, then having eight rooms for guests. Since then he has enlarged it to a three-story, with forty rooms for guests, and everything in first-class style. he owns over 1,300 acres of land in Barton and STone Counties. He is a large stockholder and president of the Marble Cave Mining Company in Stone county; is treasurer and one of the directors of the Barton County Fair Association; is a member of the G.A.R., and is a stanch Republican in politics. He has taken the Canton degree in the I.O.O.F., and is a prominent man in the county. He takes a great interest in fine cattle, and has a small herd of throughbred Herefords on his farm. May 23, 1889, he was appointed postmaster of Lamar by President Harrison. Mr. Arnold has done much toward building up Lamar, and is ever ready to encourage every worthy enterprise. January 1, 1867, he married Miss Sarah J. Cartmel, daughter of R. T. Cartmel, a native of Kentucky, and Viola Gibbs, of Ohio. In war times Mrs. Arnold and another young lady drove an oxteam from Drywood, Kan., to Lamar, Mo., a distance of thirty miles, for her mother and other members of the family, who had their houses burnt. On reaching Lamar the two young girls were sent back alone with the team the same night for fear of the Confederates, who had threatened to take them off if found.
(Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade and Barton Counties, Missouri, Publ 1889. Transcribed by Linda Rodriguez)


Mrs. Susan F. Ash, widow of James Ash, and a resident of Newport Township, Barton County, is a milliner by trade, and carries a fine assortment of goods, her establishment being in the town of Newport. She was born in West Virginia, on the 17th of February, 1850, and is a daughter of William F. Clarke, and Sarah Ann (Batton) Clarke, natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania, born in March, 1810, and 1822, respectively. The father is still living, and resides in Nebraska, but the mother died in her native State, in 1864. Seven of their nine children are now living: John A. Clarke, who owns a steam saw and planing mill on Cheat River, Point Marion, Penn.; Edgar J. Clarke, a merchant, stock, and real estate dealer, of Nebraska; M. J. Clarke, a farmer and fine stock breeder, of Nebraska; Sarah A. Clarke, wife of Dan Chisholm, a merchant of Uniontown, Penn.; William M. Clarke, a farmer and stock raiser of Nebraska; Martha M. Clarke, wife of Rudolph Newman, a farmer of Nebraska; and Susan F. Clarke, who was married to James Ash, on the 22d of May, 1873, by whom she became the mother of three children, two now living: Martha E., who was born June 27, 1874, and is now in Pennsylvania attending school, where three generations of her grandparents of the Batton family passed away; and Charles Brown, who was born October 4, 1879. An infant died, unnamed, on the 14th of June, 1877. James Ash was born September 17, 1842, and died on the 29th of November, 1879, being a son of Abraham and Hannah (Logue) Ash, who were Pennsylvanians by birth, and at an early day moved from their native State to Ohio, from there to Indiana, and then to Dade County, Mo., where the father was engaged in farming until his death in 1874, still survived by his widow. He was twice married, and to his first union were born two sons: Joseph, living at Ozark, Mo.; and Amos, who was killed in the army. His second union resulted in the birth of twelve children: Annie, wife of John Ernest, of Miami County, Ind.; Telitha (deceased); James, Elizabeth, wife of Henry Lowery, of Dade County; Mary, wife of John Smith, of Indiana; Andrew, also in Indiana; Upton, who died leaving two children, one living in Dade County, and one in Greene County, Mo.; William, a farmer of Dade County; and Eliza, wife of J. L. Dantice; Atsey, wife of William Harmon; and Ella, wife of Joshua Ridge, are living Northwest, in one of the Territories. James Ash left his widow in good circumstances, and, to all appearances, she has proved as good a farmer as her neighbors. She has 175 acres of fertile land, on which are good buildings and orchards. Mrs. Ash is energetic and enterprising, and for a number of years has been a member of the Christian Church. She remained on her farm two years after her husband's death, and then purchased her present property, and engaged in millinery work, which enterprise has proven quite a success.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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