Welcome to
Barton County
Missouri

Biographies
~ B ~

Addison Baker. Among the residents of Barton County, Mo., who have won an enviable reputation in the estimation of their fellowmen, and deserve special mention, is Mr. Baker, who was born in White County, Tenn., November 15, 1840, and is one of eight children, four now living, born to the union of Kilby Baker and Jane Suttle, who were born in Ashe County, N.C. and White County, Tenn., in 1818 and 1817, respectively. Our subject's brothers and sisters are as follows: M. S., a farmer of Barton County; Henry S., ex-deputy sheriff, and now a hotel landlord at Lamar; and Elvira (McNary). Addison Baker was educated in McDonald County, and, in April, 1862, entered the employment of the Government in the quartermaster's department and the express department between Springfield and Cassville. The following year he enlisted in Company C, Third Indian Territory Infantry, and served until May 31, 1865, holding the rank of sergeant, and participating in a number of engagements. Before going into the regular army he was taken prisoner between Neosho and Mount Vernon, and was confined one month at Fort Smith. After being paroled he remained in St. Louis until December, 1862. In 1866 he came to Barton County, and has since been engaged in farming in the neighborhood of where he now lives. In 1877-78 he served as county assessor, and is now justice of the peace. On the 12th of March, 1876, he was married to Miss Sarah Bell Castor, a daughter of Stephen L. Castor, of Barton County, now a resident of Webster County, Mo. She was born in Fulton County, ILL., September 20, i860, and is the mother of six children, four living: Nora, Sarah, R. M. and George. Those dead are: John and Carrie. Mr. Baker is a Republican, and a member of the G. A. R., and I. O. O. F.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


H. O. Baker, a school teacher and farmer of Barton County, Mo., was born in Schuylkill County, Penn., June 25, 1850, his parents, William H. and Catherine (Thompson) Baker, being also natives of that State, and of Irish and English descent, respectively. The family came to America prior to the Revolutionary War, and in this struggle the grandfather took an active part, being a member of the American army. William H. Baker was a school teacher during his youth and middle age, following this occupation until he was nearly fifty years of age, and was superintendent of the schools of Tamaqua, Penn., for eight years, being one of the most thorough instructors of his day. In 1868 he came to Missouri and bought 240 acres of land in Barton County, on which he farmed and raised stock for seven or eight years, and then about 1877 went into the mercantile business, in which he was engaged at the time of his death at Verdella in 1885. His wife died in 1851, leaving two children: A. W., born August 9, 1847, and H. O.; and in 1856 he was again married, this wife's maiden name being Mary Olmstead, of Pennsylvania. She is still living, and resides on the old homestead in Barton County. William H. Baker was a Republican, but afterward became a faithful worker of the Union Labor party. H. O. Baker, whose name heads this sketch, began working for himself at the early age of fifteen years, and, after following the plow for one year, commenced teaching school, which occupation he has followed up to the present time. At the age of seventeen he took charge of a select school, and, since coming to Missouri, has won an enviable reputation as an able instructor in Wright, Barton, and other counties. In 1869 he went to Southern Kansas, among the Osage Indians, as preliminary surveyor for the Government, and was thus employed fourteen months. He was married in 1874 to Miss Laura Nichols, a daughter of Capt. J. W. Nichols, of Confederate States Service, who lost a leg at the battle of Wilson's Creek. Mrs. Baker died in 1875, and in 1881 Mr. Baker took for his second wife Miss Addie Russell, a native of Maine, by whom he has three children living: Leon, born August 23, 1882; Kingsley, born December 31, 1885; and Lawrence, born March 19, 1888. Mr. Baker and wife were members of the Baptist Church, but became firm believers and strong advocates of Substantialism as advocated by Dr. Hall. In his political views he is a Republican. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. He and wife were married in Texas County, Mo. She is a daughter of Eben Russell, and niece of B. F. Russell, editor of the Steelville Mirror, who is known throughout Southern Missouri as a poet of considerable merit.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Samuel Baker is a native of Shelby County, Ohio, and was born in 1838. His parents, George and Susan Baker, were married in Ohio, removing when our subject was a small boy to Morgan County, ILL, and afterward to Logan County of the same State, where they died. Mr. Baker was a farmer by occupation, and his wife was a member of the church. Samuel Baker is the sixth of twelve sons and two daughters, and was educated in the common country schools of Ohio, his boyhood days being spent on his father's farm. At the age of twenty years he began doing for himself, and, when the war broke out, left the plow to enlist in the army, joining Company C, One Hundred and Sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and operated in Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas, and in 1862, while at Jackson, Tenn., was captured while guarding a railroad, and was held in captivity in St. Louis for about nine months before he was exchanged. He rejoined his command at Little Rock, and participated in numerous skirmishes. He was mustered out at Pine Bluff, Ark., in July, 1865, and reached home just three years to a day after his enlistment. In 1866 he was married to Lucinda, a daughter of Thomas and Martha Simpson, the latter being a native of Illinois, in which State she also died. Mr. Simpson is residing at El Dorado Springs. In 1875 Mr. Baker removed to Bates County, Mo., and from there in 1877 to Barton County, and located on his present well cultivated farm of ninety three acres, which was then raw land. His farm is under laid with a good quality of coal, which he mines to a considerable extent at times, for neighborhood use. He and wife have five sons and two daughters.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Moses L. Barth, the leading clothier of Lamar, Mo., was born in Germany March 8, 1865, being a son of Solomon and Caroline (Lyon) Barth, also natives of Germany, where they are still living, the father being engaged in stock shipping and trading. Moses L. Barth received an excellent German education, and, when fifteen years of age, started for America, and, after arriving in Columbia, Mo., entered the State University, which he attended one year in order to acquaint himself with the English language. He then began clerking for his cousins, J. and V. Barth, in Columbia, and soon became head clerk. In 1887 he came to Lamar, where he has the largest clothing and gents' furnishing establishment in the city. He is a Knight of Pythias, a member of the I. O. O. F., and in his political views is a Democrat. On the 15th of February, 1888, he was married to Pauline Barth, who was born in Germany, and came to America when ten years of age. Her parents reside at Boonville, Mo.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Barton, David, first United States Senator from Missouri, and otherwise prominent in the early political history of the State, was born December 14, 1783, in Tennessee. He was descended from Scotch ancestry. His grandfather was Joshua Barton, whose parents settled in Maryland in the latter part of the seventeenth century, and his father was Isaac Barton, a prominent Baptist clergyman of the early days. David Barton graduated from Greenville College, Tennessee, and then entered tlie law office of Judge Anderson, a distinguished jurist of that State, from whom he received the training which aided in making him one of the ablest lawyers of his day In 1809, David Barton and his two brothers, Isaac and Joshua, all lawyers, came to Missouri, David settling in St. Charles, and his brothers in St. Louis. Isaac Barton soon returned to his native State.
Joshua became United States District Attorney in St. Louis, and was killed in a duel with Thomas C. Rector, on Bloody Island, in 1823. (See "Dueling.") David Barton was deeply affected by this, tragedy and sharply criticized the actors in the affair. When he first settled at St. Charles there was little law business to be done there and for a time he taught school. On the breaking out of the War of 1812, he entered the United States Army, and at the close of his military service, he established himself in the practice of his profession at St. Louis. He became Attorney General of the Territory of Missouri in 1813, upon its territorial organization under its' present name, and held the office for two years, when he was elected to the St. Louis circuit bench. In 1818, the Territorial Legislature then meeting in St. Louis, he became Speaker of the House of Representatives. In 1820, in the same city, he was chosen president of the first Constitutional Convention without opposition, and it was his hand that wrote the constitution adopted by that body, which was displaced by the Drake Constitution in 1866. In the first State Legislature, in 1821, he was chosen United States Senator by acclamation. In the same session, after a contest continuing for three days, Thomas H. Benton was elected by the vote of a sick man, Daniel Rails, who was brought into the chamber on a litter at the instigation of Barton, a friend of Benton. Senator Barton was for ten years a member of that august body in which his colleague, Senator Benton, served for thirty years. Their relationship toward each other was peculiarly interesting, and toward the last, when they had become somewhat unfriendly, there were incidents approaching the dramatic.
In politics David Barton was a Whig, while Benton was a Jackson Democrat. In the congressional session of 1829-30, the debate occurred upon the famous Foote resolution, in which Daniel Webster delivered his "Reply to Hayne," which became a classic in American literature. The Foote resolution looked to limiting the sale of public lands to those then on the market, and abolishing the office of Surveyor General. "There were giants in those days." Andrew Jackson was president, John C. Calhoun was vice president, presiding over the Senate, upon whose floor met in mighty contest Daniel Webster, David Barton, Thomas H, Benton, and many other bright intellectual lights. The debate upon the resolution drifted into personalities, and touched upon the Virginia resolutions, the Hartford convention, the slavery question, the Constitution, and the compact of the Union. During its progress, February 9, 1830, Senator Barton began his powerful and scathing arraignment and excoriation of his colleague, Senator Benton, in a speech of four hours, which critics have pronounced equal to Webster's reply to Hayne. This great speech appears in Gale and Seaton's Register of Debates in Congress, Volume 6, Part I, pages 146-159. It bristles with repartee, sarcasm and humor, abounds in constitutional law and historical reference, is adorned with rhetorical gems, and glows with oratorical fire and forensic power. It is curious to note the resentment of Senator Benton, as evidenced in the fact that in his "Thirty Years' View," he makes no mention of Senator Barton except in records of votes. It is mainly for this reason that Senator Barton has remained comparatively unknown, while the personality of Senator Benton stands out conspicuously.
After leaving the Senate, Barton was State Senator from St. Louis, and afterward circuit judge at Boonville, Missouri. He was small in stature, vivacious in temperament, and kind and charitable to a fault. His hair was almost black, with a brownish shade, his eyes were brown or hazel, and his nose was slightly Roman. He was never married. R. M. Barton, now judge of the Superior Court of Tennessee, is a great-nephew, and Levi Barton, of Howard County, Missouri, is a second cousin. David Barton died at Boonville, Missouri, September 22, 1837. He was there buried, in the old town cemetery, and a gray stone monument was erected over his grave by his admiring neighbors. Upon this was briefly outlined his distinguished career, and an estimate of the man, the expression of hearts filled with loving appreciation: "A profound jurist, an honest and able statesman, a just and benevolent man." The remains were afterward removed to the new cemetery, and over them was erected a fine marble shaft. The old monument was placed in the university campus at Columbia, by the side of that of Thomas Jefferson, and its Unveiling took place in June, 1899, in the presence of thousands of people. Among the speakers upon that occasion was the venerable editor and benefactor of the best of the institutions of Missouri, Colonel William F. Switzler, to whom more than to any other is due the credit of bringing out of oblivion David Barton, and giving him his proper place in public sight David Barton had been called "a forgotten statesman," because his modesty and unselfish affection for his adopted State permitted others to reap where he had sown, and to win the applause which rightfully belonged to him.
The statement of these facts, and appreciative recognition of the merit, talent and distinguished services of one of the greatest statesmen of Missouri, was eloquently expressed by Colonel Switzler. In the chamber of the House of Representatives in Jefferson City is a fine life-size oil portrait of Senator Barton, painted by C. Josephine Barton,, of Kansas City, by whose husband, A. P. Barton, a relative of Senator Barton, it was presented to the State. It is copied from an old oil portrait owned by Judge R. M. Barton, of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and was painted in 1822 by a French artist.
[Source: Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri: Edited by Howard Louis Conard; Publ. 1901; PgTranscribed by Andrea Stawski Pack]


John Bates, secretary of the Lamar Abstract and Trust Company, was born in Macoupin County, ILL., on September, 18, 1842, and is the youngest of two children born to James W. and Martha (Will) Bates, who were Tennesseeans by birth, born in 1812 and 1818, respectively. Both the paternal and maternal great grandfathers served in the Revolutionary War, and the former was born in Ireland, and came to America in 1877, settling in South Carolina. The grandfathers on both sides served under Jackson in the War of 1812, and were early settlers of Tennessee. James W. Bates moved to Greene County, ILL., with his parents, in 1834, and the mother, with her parents, in 1829. They married and spent their lives in that State, the father following fanning and school teaching, and died there in 1845. He was an old time Democrat. His widow still resides in that State. John Bates, the subject of this sketch, only received a few months schooling, and, when old enough, was put to the plow. He assisted on the home farm until nearly thirty years of age, but, from the time he was nineteen years of age until he was twenty nine, he was engaged in teaching school during the winter months. In November, 1869, he was married to Edna J. Johnson, who was born in Illinois, and in 1872 moved to Barton County, Mo., and improved a farm, which he sold for fifty dollars an acre, it being the first one in the county to bring that price. From 1881 to about 1888 he ran a livery stable in Lamar, and now owns 290 acres of land in the county. He is a member of the Union Labor party, and from 1878 to 1882 held the office of presiding judge of the county court. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


J. H. Baugh, a farmer, residing near Lamar, Mo., was born in St. Charles, Mo., in 1833, and has always been a resident of Missouri. His parents, James F. and Louisa (Baldridge) Baugh, were born in Kentucky and Missouri, respectively (J. F. moved to Missouri in 1829, and married in 1830), the paternal grandfather, William Baugh, being a Virginian, and the maternal grandfather, James Baldridge, a native of Ireland. William Baugh served in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. J. H. Baugh was reared to manhood on a farm in St. Charles County, Mo. At the age of twenty two years he was married to Mary Cahall, a Virginian, and soon after moved to Warren County, Mo., where he bought a farm, and lived twelve years. After one year's residence in Vernon County, he went to Montgomery County, and bought some raw land, which he afterward greatly improved, and resided here nine years; then moved to Barton County, and located on his present farm of 120 acres, which was then also raw land, but is now a finely cultivated farm. He is a blacksmith by trade, and now has a shop on his land. To his marriage three children have been born: Heale, who is attending school at Morrisville, Mo., and will enter medical college after graduating; J. D., in Nevada, Mo.; and James F., at home. Mr. Baugh and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, taking active interest in church work.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John Beam, principal of the school of Iantha, Mo., and commissioner of the public schools of the county, is a native of Hardin County, Ky., born September 22, 1856. His father, Simeon Beam, was born in Kentucky in 1833, and, in early life, was a farmer, but for the past twenty years has been a minister of the gospel, preaching the doctrine of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He located in Monroe County, Mo., in 1857, where he resided until 1884, since which time he has been a resident of St. Clair County. His parents, Jacob and Lucretia Beam, were born in Pennsylvania, and died in Kentucky in 1835 and 1861, respectively. Catherine Fields, wife of Simeon Beam and mother of our subject, was born in Kentucky in 1841, and became the mother of twelve children, of whom John is the fifth. He lived with his people until twenty one years of age, then entered the Collegiate Institute in Shelby County, Mo., which he attended two years, and spent the next two years in Colorado, after which he returned to Barton County. Since that time (1881) he has been engaged in teaching school and farming, and, since 1887, has been principal of the school at Iantha. His recent election to the position of commissioner of public schools (with headquarters at Lamar) was a well deserved compliment. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is a Democrat in politics, being elected on that ticket, in 1887, to the office of township assessor. In 1882 he was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Brown, who was born in Macoupin County, ILL, September 21, 1863, and is a daughter of Hon. Robert Brown, whose sketch appears in this work. She and Mr. Beam are the parents of three children, and are worthy and consistent members of the Christian Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


James K. Belk, a retired farmer residing at Liberal, Mo., was born in Russell County, Ky., in 1837, and is a son of John and Nancy (Stanton) Belk, who were born in Virginia and Kentucky in 1811 and 1815, respectively, and were married in the latter State. In 1839 they removed to Buchanan County, Mo., where Mrs. Belk died in the spring of 1856, and the family moved to Brown County, Kan., where the father is still living, having been a farmer throughout life, and a prominent man wherever he has resided. He is a German by descent, and is a member of the Methodist Church. James K. Belk is the fourth of eight children, and was reared to a farm life and received a fair education in the common branches. During the war he served in Northwestern Missouri with a battery of Missouri troops, under Major Josephs, and soon after the cessation of hostilities, he took the overland route to California and was engaged in teaming in that State for eight years. He then returned to Brown County, Kan., and a short time after to Smith County, Kan., in which county he built the first house. He was married there in 1874 to Miss Charity, a daughter of Aaron and Catherine Palmer, who were born in Ohio in 1815, and Kentucky in 1817, respectively, and removed to Indiana, thence to Iowa, and afterward to Smith County, Kan., where they have lived since 1873. Mrs. Belk was born in Indiana, in 1849, and she and Mr. Belk are the parents of one daughter, Lillian Myrtle, born in 1875. Since 1881 Mr. Belk has resided in Liberal, owning a fine farm of 120 acres adjoining the town, and four houses and about thirty acres in town. Besides this he owns 160 acres in Kansas. He is a Republican in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for Lincoln, in 1860. From July, 1883, to January, 1886, he was postmaster of Liberal, and while in Kansas was assessor and trustee for some years. He has been a successful financier, and is now looking after his real estate.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


William S. Boyd deserves honorable mention as one of the successful farmers and stockmen of the county. He was born in Fayette County, Penn., in 1828, being a son of William and Elizabeth (Stevens) Boyd, who were also born in that county. About 1841 they went to Pickaway County, Ohio, where they both died. The father held numerous county offices, among which was county judge, and was a farmer and stockman by occupation. In the War of 1812 he was on Commodore Perry's fleet on Lake Erie. His father, William Boyd, was born in Ireland, and when a young man came to America, and after his marriage spent his life in Fayette County, Penn. The maternal grandfather, Dr. Stevens, was a leading physician of that county, and there spent his life. William S. Boyd, the seventh of eleven sons and two daughters, five of the family being now alive, received his education in the common, schools, and was reared on a farm. He went with his parents to Pickaway County, Ohio, where he remained until 1849, then going to California via Cape Horn, and spent about five years engaged in mining and gardening in that State. He then returned to Ohio via the Nicaragua route, and shortly after went to Illinois, where he was occupied in farming for some time, then went to Kansas, but soon returned to Ohio. He again went from that State to Illinois, and in 1868 came to Barton County, Mo., where he has since lived, being now the owner of 160 acres of good farming land. He has broken about 1,300 acres of prairie land. In March, 1884, he returned to Ohio, and was married to Martha L. Stivison, who was born in that State, and was for eleven years one of Pickaway County's best school teachers. Her parents, Jacob and Margaret (West) Stivison, were born in Pickaway County, Ohio, in 1816 and 1820, respectively, and are still living in the house in which Mrs. Stivison was born, and only one and one half miles from where Mr. Stivison was born. They reared seven children. They are members of the Christian and United Brethren Churches, respectively, and he is a son of Jacob Stivison, of Pennsylvania. Mr. Boyd is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Pierce.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


C. W. Bozarth, M. D., was born in Jacksonville, ILL., December 25, i860, and is the son of Abram J. and Olive (Tickner) Bozarth, both natives of Illinois. Abram J. Bozarth was a trader and stock dealer by occupation; was a soldier in the War of 1812, and captain of a company in the Twenty seventh Illinois during the late war, being in twenty two engagements. He is still living, is a resident of Johnson County, Mo., and is sixty five years of age. The mother died in 1865. Mr. Bozarth is a Republican in politics. After the death of his wife he married again, and has one son. By his first union were born six children, of whom three are now living, two sons and a daughter. Of this family Dr. C. W. Bozarth is the eldest son. He received his literary education at the State Normal, Warrensburg, Mo., and when twenty two years of age began to read medicine with Dr. W. L. Hedges, Warrensburg, Mo. Later he entered Hahnemann Medical College, from which he graduated in 1884. He then located at Lamar, where he has since been continuously engaged in the practice of his profession. Although a young man he has worked up a good practice, and is accounted a substantial physician. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and in politics is a Republican.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Capt. M. Breeden is one of the earliest settlers of Barton County, Mo., having located near where Golden City now stands in 1856. He is a native of Putnam County, Ind., and was born January 28, 1830. His father, who was a shoemaker by trade, and also a farmer, emigrated to Missouri in 1840, settling near Springfield, where our subject grew to manhood, and December 16, 1850, married Miss L. R. Ward, a native of Virginia. He engaged in farming in Greene County, Mo., until 1856, when he removed to Barton County, settling one mile southeast of Golden City, where he entered 200 acres of land, which he improved. At that time the inhabitants of the county numbered not more than one hundred. Mr. Breeden made this his home until the outbreak of the war, when he enlisted, April 1, 1861, serving as a scout until the battle of Wilson's Creek, when he went to Fort Scott, Kan., making that his headquarters, and acting in the same capacity, under Lane and Montgomery, until March, 1862; he then returned to Missouri, and raised Company G, Fourteenth Missouri State Militia, of which he was chosen captain. This company was subsequently consolidated with another, and Mr. Breeden became Captain of Company L, Eighth Missouri Regiment, where he served until the close of the war. He then returned to Lawrence County, Mo., where he remained two years, and then located on his farm in Barton County, where he has since lived. He is now serving his fifth term as justice of the peace, and is serving his sixth term as Post Commander of the G. A. R. Capt. Breeden has always taken an active part in public affairs, and is a leading citizen of the county. He now owns a fine farm of 115 acres, and is at present devoting considerable attention to the real estate and loaning business at Golden City. His first wife died in 1862, the mother of five children; of whom John is a farmer in Dade County, Mo.; Elizabeth (deceased); George D., a farmer of Lawrence County, Mo.; Delaney, a widow, living at Pittsburg, Kan.; and James, who died in childhood. Mr. Breeden afterward married Margaret C. White, a native of Polk County, Mo., and eight children have been born to this union, viz: Virginia, an accomplished musician, who died in March, 1886, aged twenty years; Abraham L., who died at the age of ten years; Lydia Belle, deceased in childhood; Sherman, now in St. Louis, Mo.; Jackson, Peter Cooper and Alice, all at home; and Russell, who died in childhood.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Marcus Briley, one of the early residents and a substantial farmer of the county, residing in Central Township five miles west of Lamar, is a native of Sumner County, Tenn., born on the 25th of December, 1837, his parents being James and Jane (Bandy) Briley, and his grandparents Samuel and Rachel Briley. The latter couple was born in North Carolina, and were early settlers of Tennessee, in which State they died. James Briley was a farmer by occupation, and, after removing to Tennessee with his parents, there made his home until his death, in 1885. His wife was born in Virginia, and also died in Tennessee, her death occurring in 1866. To them were born six daughters and three sons, of whom our subject is the youngest. He lived with his parents until over thirty one years of age, and received his education in the common schools of Tennessee. In 1857 he was married to Miss Nancy A. Toliver, who was born in Robertson County, Tenn., and died in that State in 1868, having become the mother of three children: Charles T., James L. and Laura F. On the 9th of March, 1865, Mr. Briley was united in marriage to Miss Frances E. Senter, who was born in Sumner County, Tenn., February 22, 1841, being a daughter of Luke and Zoritha Senter. To this marriage six sons were born: William F., John F., Edgar D., Robert M., Leonard M. and Corry M. In 1867 Mr. Briley removed with his family to Saline County, Mo where he was engaged in farming until 1873, then moving to the farm where he now resides, which consists of acres of finely improved land, on which are three living wells. Mr. Briley is a Democrat, and his first vote was cast for Stephen A. Douglas for the presidency. Mr. Briley's father, James Briley, and also his second wife's grandfather, William Durham, served through the War of 1812 under Gen. Andrew Jackson, and took an active part in the battle of New Orleans January 8, 1815. Mrs. Frances E. (Senter) Briley's grandparents, William and Frances Durham, were born in North Carolina, and were among the first settlers in Sumner County, Tenn.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Professor George F. Brous, trustee of North Fork Township, and one of the prominent educators of the county, was born in Brown County of the "Buckeye State," in 1845, and is a son of L. N. and Catherine (Daley) Brous, who were born in Highland County, Ky., in 1823 and 1826, respectively. They were married in Ohio, and in 1871 came to Cass County, Mo., where the father was engaged in farming until his death, in 1876. He was a Democrat politically. The mother is still living in Cass County. The great great grandfather was born in Germany, and came to America and settled in West Virginia, where his son, the great grandfather of our subject, was born. The latter was a farmer, and was the father of four sons: John, who located in Portsmouth, Ohio, and reared a family: Adam, who moved to Indianapolis, Ind., and raised a family; Frederick, the grandfather of our subject, located near Hillsboro, Ohio; and Lewis, who also located near that place. Prof. George F. Brous is one of fifteen children (thirteen of whom lived to maturity) born to his parents, and resided in his native county until twenty six years of age, receiving his early education in the common schools, supplemented by a course in the schools of Georgetown and also at Fayetteville. In 1864 he entered the teacher's profession, and has continued that occupation ever since, with the exception of one year. In 1871 he came with his parents and located in Cass County, Mo., but came to Barton County at the end of four years, and has made this his home ever since. He was township clerk under the old organization, and has been trustee ever since, being now engaged in filling his fourth term. He owns a good farm of 160 acres, and is a member of the Farmers' Alliance, and is secretary of Rocky Mount Lodge. He was married in Brown County, Ohio, to Miss Hannah Prine, who was born in that State in 1848. They have seven living children: Eddie, a teacher in the college at Carthage, Mo.; Kinney; Bertie, also a teacher; Callie; Cary, who died at the age of ten years; Delia, Mabel and Raymond. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Charles H. Brown, banker at Lamar, is a native of Albany, N. Y., born July 3, 1842. He received a liberal education at Fredonia Academy, N. Y., and at the age of twenty years entered the Chicago Law School, from which he graduated in 1863, at the head of his class. He then opened an office at Monmouth, ILL., and in January, 1866, he came to Lamar. At that time there were but three lawyers at the Lamar bar, but a number of the ablest attorneys of the State resided at Springfield, and practiced throughout the circuit. Contact with such ability was very beneficial to the young lawyer, and with increase of knowledge and experience came additional practice, until he was accounted one of the busiest and most successful lawyers at the bar. In 1872 he withdrew from the practice and turned his attention especially to the banking business. In this business he has been associated with several different men, and the firm name has been several times changed, but in 1871 it took its present firm name of C. H. Brown & Co. Mr. Brown is a staunch Republican in politics, and an active worker in building up the county and Lamar. He has never been an office seeker, though in 1866 and 1867 he was prosecuting attorney for Barton County, and representative in 1874-75. In 1869 Mr. Brown married Miss Emma Wills, daughter of M. N. Wills. To this union were born three children, two sons and a daughter. Mr. Brown came to Lamar with little money, but with a wonderful stock of energy; now he is accounted one of the wealthy men of the county.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Hon. Robert Brown is a farmer of Central Township, and is a native of what is now Jersey (then Greene) County, ILL., where he was born on the 1st of October, 1829 being a son of Joseph and Mary (Piper) Brown, and grandson of Griffith and Penelope (Nations) Brown. The latter couple moved from the "Palmetto State" in 1797, and settled in St. Charles County, Mo., where they both died. Joseph Brown was born in South Carolina in 1794, and was reared and married in St. Charles County, Mo. He died in Jersey County, ILL., on the 5th of October, 1858, having moved there in 1812, being among the early settlers. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. His wife was born in Virginia in 1796, and also died in Jersey County, ILL. Her father and mother were of Irish and Scotch descent, and died in St. Charles County, Mo., and Jersey County, ILL., respectively. Robert Brown is the seventh of ten children, three now living, and made his home with his parents until he attained his majority. He was married on the 4th of May, 1852, to Miss Affa J. Armstrong, who was born in Jersey County, ILL., March 29, 1840, and died on the 28th of August, 1852. November 22, 1857, Mr. Brown married Margaret F. Fay, who was born in Madison County, ILL., in 1840. Their children are as follows: Affa J., wife of E. W. Perry; Florence D. (deceased), was the wife of Meridy Willis; Harriett E., wife of John Beam; Robert L. (deceased); Clara D., Douglas J. and William J. All were born in Illinois but one. In 1873 Mr. Brown came to Barton County, and has resided on his farm of 325 acres of finely improved land. In 1874 he was elected county and probate judge of the county, and served two years. In 1880 he was elected by the Democrats to represent Barton County in the State Legislature, and at the end of two years was re-elected, giving entire satisfaction to his constituents during his term of service. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Christian Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


WALTER BOWN resides about one mile southeast of Conconully, where he devotes himself to farming and stock raising. He was born in Sherbrooke, Canada, June 20, 1832, being the son of Henry and Jennette (Wilcox) Bown, natives of England and New York, respectively. When two years of age, our subject came to Columbus, Ohio, with his parents and when he was sixteen, the family moved to Peoria, Illinois. In 1857 he went to Johnson county, Kansas, and located a preemption on an Indian reservation. In the spring of 1860 he went to Pike's Peak and followed mining and freighting until the fall of 1863, when he enlisted in Company B, Third Colorado Infantry, which, one year later, was attached to the Second Colorado Cavalry. They were sent to Missouri and participated in the terrible battles against Price, and there our subject received a wound, the bullet entering his face and coming out at his neck, which though very serious kept him in the hospital only twenty days. He participated in a great many battles and skirmishes, the terrible fights with the bushwhackers, being the most dangerous of the war. In December, 1864, his regiment was returned to Leavenworth and then ordered to escort the United States mail from Larned, Kansas, to Fort Lyons, Colorado, a distance of two hundred and fifty miles. They did considerable fighting with the Indians but carried the enterprise through successfully and remained on duty until 1865. Then he was ordered to Fort Leavenworth, where he was honorably discharged, being first sergeant. Mr. Bown experienced much of the hardship of a soldier's life, it being especially rigorous on account of his being on the border and in constant service. On the day following his discharge he returned to Peoria county, Illinois, and at Lancaster, in that state, he married Miss Emma Minnick. In 1869 they moved to Barton county, Missouri. Four children have been born to them, Kate S., wife of Charles A. Philhour, a passenger engineer on the Santa Fe railroad living in LaJunta, Colorado; William W., a machinist operating an engine at the Stem Winder mill at Fairview, British Columbia; Frances Maud, a school teacher, living at home; Edward J., at home, now handling the mail from Conconully to Loomis. Mrs. Bown died on November 9, 1880, in Barton county, Missouri. In 1889 Mr. Bown came with his people to Sprague, Washington, and engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1890, he brought some cows to Conconully and operated a dairy there for two years. He located his present place when he first came here, which is a good piece of land and well improved. Mr. Bown is a member of the G. A. R., also the A. F. & A. M. He took a trip to Illinois in 1898 and visited his home lodge from which he had been absent for thirty years and found many of the old associates still in harness.
[Source: "An illustrated History of Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties in the state of Washington" Western Historical Publishing Company, 1904 - Tr. by Helen Coughlin]


Judge James S. Bryan, general merchant, at Kenoma, Barton County, Mo., was born in Polk County, Mo., in 1839, and is a son of Weston and Jane (Zumwalt) Bryan, who were born in Virginia and Missouri, respectively. The former came to St. Louis County, Mo., after reaching manhood, and, after residing there a short time moved to Polk, and from there to Dade County, where he died in 1844, at the untimely age of thirty five years. He was a plasterer by trade, and he and wife became the parents of eleven children, of whom Judge James S. Bryan is the fifth in order of birth. At the age of ten years he left home, and began making his own way in the world, and until the war broke out was engaged in carpentering. He then served three years and nine months in the Federal army, and received his discharge from the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, and is now receiving a pension of twelve dollars per month. After the close of the war he resided in the vicinity of Kansas City for about five years, and then located in Taney County, Mo., where he was elected probate judge and presiding judge of the county court for four years, but resigned before his term was finished, and went to Dade County, where he purchased land to the amount of 100 acres, which he was engaged in tilling for twelve years. He was then in the employ of the Gulf Railroad and the Adams Express Company for a short period, and has since been a resident of Kenoma. In 1858 he was married to Miss S. J. Harlin, who was born in Kentucky, and by her is the father of the following children: Jane E., wife of W. T. Cannon; James W., M. S. (deceased); Amanda J., wife of Mr. Jarrel; Ida B., wife of J. Byrket; Mary S., Rebecca T. and Sarah A. (both deceased), Martha E., G. G. (deceased), and Dora H. The mother of these children died in April, 1884, and in July, 1886, Mr. Bryan married Miss R. J. Wall, who was born in North Carolina. The Judge is a member of the G. A. R., a Republican in politics, a member of the I. O. O. F., and belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a licensed preacher, and an advocate of truth.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Reuben Bumgarner is worthy of being classed among the prosperous farmers and stockmen of the county. He was born in Pike County, Ohio, in 1835, and is the son of Reuben and Ellen (Carson) Bumgarner, who were born in Virginia and Pennsylvania, respectively, and at an early day removed with their parents to Ohio, and were married in Pike County, where they spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying in 1842, and the mother in 1872, both being earnest members of the Baptist Church at the time of their death. He was a cabinet maker, a carpenter and a farmer, and served as assessor a number of years. His father, Jacob, was a German, and an early settler of Pike County, Ohio, where he died. Robert Carson was a Pennsylvanian, and also an early settler of Pike County, Ohio, where he breathed his last about 1853. Reuben Bumgarner, the subject of this sketch, was the eighth of ten children, and received a common-school education in his native State. He remained with his widowed mother on the farm until eighteen years of age, then worked as a farm hand for some time, and in 1857 was married to Sarah Rader, who was born in Ohio, and died in March, 1865, having borne two sons and one daughter. In October, 1866 his second marriage was consummated, his wife's name being Elizabeth, a daughter of Adam and Nancy Rader, who were Virginians, and died in Pike County, Ohio, of which they were early settlers. They were the parents of his first wife also. To his last union eleven children have been born, five sons and five daughters living at the present time. In 1870 Mr. Bumgarner removed with his family to Cherokee County, Kansas and since 1871 they have been residents of Barton County, Mo. They own a good farm of 160 acres near Liberal, which is well stocked and improved. He voted first for Douglas for the presidency in 1860, and is a Democrat in politics. He is an active church worker, and is always interested in the up building of the country.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Andrew C. Burnett, prosecuting attorney of Barton County, Mo., was born in Randolph County, ILL., January 11, 1859, and is the son of Alexander and Martha J. (Parsons) Burnett. Alexander Burnett was born in Ireland, and, when thirteen years of age, his parents moved to America and settled in one of the Carolinas. Here he married Miss Parsons. Sometime after he moved to Illinois, ran a store, and was also engaged in farming. He died in 1868, but the mother is still living. In their family were twelve children, ten now living, four sons and six daughters. Andrew C. Burnett received a good practical education in the common schools, and graduated at Southern Illinois Normal University in 1879. The same year he came to Lamar, and, having clerked in a store until 1883, he began to read law with Thurman & Wray, and was admitted to the Lamar bar in 1884. In November, 1886, he was elected prosecuting attorney, and re-elected in 1888. He was married in October, 1881, to Miss Clara Frank, by whom he has one daughter, Blanche. Mrs. Burnett is a member of the Congregational Church. In his political views Mr. Burnett affiliates with the Democratic Party. He is a member of the A. O. U. W. He has, for five years, been a practitioner at the bar of Lamar, and, although just starting, has won a good reputation as a lawyer.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Alpheus M. Burton, real estate, loan and insurance agent at Lamar, Mo., was born in Greensboro, Guilford County, N. C, June 9, 1843, on the farm where the battle of Guilford Court House was fought. His, parents, Isaac W. and Lydia (Hedgecock) Burton were born in North Carolina, in 1818 and 1821, respectively. After their marriage they resided in that State until 1852, then moved to Centreville, Iowa, where they are still residing on a farm. The father is a Republican, has held the office of justice of the peace, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Joshua Burton, the great grandfather, was born in Ireland, and came to America about 1756, settling on the above named farm, which is still in possession of the family. He was a Revolutionary soldier. His son John, the grandfather of our subject, was an extensive planter and slaveholder, but gave his slaves their liberty in 1852. Alpheus M. Burton is the eldest of the six children born to his parents. He was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools, and, after reaching manhood, entered college at Oskaloosa, Iowa, where he remained two years. He then turned his attention to the hardware and implement business at Iconium, Iowa, for six years, and the following five years was in the real estate business at Allerton, Iowa. He served as mayor of this town two terms. In 1883 he came to Lamar, and has since been engaged in his present business. He is interested in farming, and owns 620 acres of land. He was married, in 1875, to Sadie E. White, a native of Centerville, Iowa, and by her has had three children: Roy, Lucille, and Fay (deceased). His wife is a member of the Methodist Church. He is a Republican in politics. His maternal great grandfather, Joshua Hedgecock, and two brothers, David and Samuel, came from England, and settled in Guilford County, N. C, about the same time as the Burton family.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

Return to

Barton County

Missouri

Genealogy Trails

Copyright © Genealogy Trails
All data on this website is Copyright by Genealogy Trails with full rights reserved for original submitters.