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Barton County
Missouri

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G. W. Campbell was born in Schuyler County, ILL., May 24, 1852, and is the son of G. W. and Esther (Homey) Campbell, who were born in North Carolina and died in Hancock County, ILL., he in 1866, at the age of fifty six years, and she in 1883, when sixty eight years of age. They moved to Illinois in 1837, and, soon after the birth of their son G. W., moved to Hancock County, where they made their home until their respective deaths. Mrs. Campbell wedded Benjamin Gould after the death of Mr. Campbell. The latter was a successful farmer, a Democrat politically, and he and wife were members of the Christian Church. He was a son of John Campbell, who died in North Carolina. Six children were born to their union, four now living, of whom G. W. is the youngest. He received his education in the schools of Hancock County, and, being the youngest son, remained with his mother until her second marriage. November 6, 1873, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Worman, a daughter of D. D. Worman, of Hancock County, ILL., formerly of Pennsylvania, and made his home in that county until 1884, when he came to Barton County, Mo., where he owns 320 acres of good land, well improved. The spring after his arrival in the county, he was elected to the office of justice of the peace, and has served in that capacity ever since. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and politically he is a Democrat.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John Campbell, one of the most extensive farmers and stock dealers of Barton County, Mo., was born in Pennsylvania on the 10th of June, 1824, and is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Trimble) Campbell, who were born in Indiana and Lancaster Counties, Penn., in 1790 and 1805, respectively. The father moved from his native State to Ohio, where he resided about fifteen years, and then moved to Illinois, where he died in 1874. He was a carpenter by trade, and followed this occupation throughout life. His wife is still living, and resides in Bloomington, ILL., with a son and daughter. John Campbell is the second of three sons and two daughters, four of whom are now living. He made his home with his parents until thirty five years of age, marrying at this time Miss Margaret Rowland, who was born in Morgan County, Ohio, in 1835. She died in January, 1889, having borne a family of nine sons and two daughters: George, Robert, James, Lizzie, William, Mary, Charlie, Delivan, Jessa, Doc and Chapman, nine of whom are now living. Robert died at the age of five years in 1864, and Lizzie died at the age of thirteen years and nine months, in 1873. Mr. Campbell emigrated from Bloomington, McLean County, ILL., to where he now lives in 1881, and is at this time the owner of about 1,200 acres of land in Central and Lamar Townships, and also two thirds interest in the famous Iantha Roller Mills. He is a staunch Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk. He is an influential citizen, and is highly esteemed for his many good qualities.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


W. A. Carl is a son of William and Margaret (Chashman) Carl, who were of Scotch and English descent, respectively, and born in New York State, the former in the year 1822, and the latter in 1831. The father was engaged in farming for a number of years after his marriage, and moved to Iowa in 1857, where he entered land and resided until 1865, at which time he moved to Gentry County, Mo. In 1873 he again made a change of residence, this time moving to Kansas, where he remained until 1884, and from that time up to the time of his death, November 7, 1884, resided in Barton County on a farm of 160 acres he had purchased near Milford. His marriage was blessed with eight children, seven of whom are living: W. A., Charles H.; Adelia, the deceased wife of John M. Kennedy; Julia, wife of Pierce Smith; J. T., a farmer of Kansas; George L.; Mary E., wife of Joseph Brodist; and Edward, residing in Kansas City, Mo. Mr. Carl was a Democrat in politics. His wife, who is yet living, and resides with her son Charles, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. W. A. Carl began the battle of life for himself at the age of twenty one, and was first employed as a farm hand, and, with the exception of a time when he was in a store (owning and renting a store eighteen months), he has been engaged in tilling the soil all his life. He remained with his father until the latter went to Kansas, then came to Missouri and bought a farm, on which he remained twelve years, being also engaged in the stock business to some extent. He was married in 1872 to Miss Lizzie Kreemer, who was born in Germany, and came to America in 1851. To them were born six children: Ader, Lena, Julia D., Evelina, Ida and Lizzie. Mrs. Carl died on the 16th of March, 1888, having been a consistent member of the Catholic Church, and was deeply mourned by her husband and children, to whom she had ever been a faithful wife and mother. In 1889 Mr. Carl married his present wife, whose maiden name was Miss Mary E. Baker. In his political views he supports the principles of the Democratic Party. He is one of the well-to-do citizens of the county, being the owner of 240 acres of well improved land.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


E. S. Casner, a breeder of fine horses in Barton County, Mo., was born in Juniata County, Penn., September 17, 1846, and is a son of Thomas B. and Sarah (Stees) Casner, who were also Pennsylvanians, their parents coming from Germany. In 1847 they moved to Ohio, and ten years later to Indiana, where the father died in 1872, and the mother still lives. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he was a Republican in his political views, and during the late war served two years in the Sixty fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, United States Army. He was a mechanic by trade. E. S. Casner is one of three surviving members of a family of five children, and in his youth received a common school education. At the age of seventeen years he began clerking in a store, which occupation he followed five years, and in 1870 he came to Jasper County, Mo., and after farming three years, turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, continuing until 1880, when he began lead mining. In 1887 he moved to Lamar, and soon after opened a stable of fine breeding horses, owing three imported Percheron horses and a standard bred Hambletonian horse, all of them fine animals. In connection with managing his stable, he is engaged in mining, and all his property has been acquired by hard work and good management, and has been made since coming to Missouri, as he then had nothing. His first money was made by breaking prairie at $2.50 per acre. He is a Republican in his political views, and while in Jasper County held the office of councilman one term. January 1, 1873, he was married to Miss Nellie Gray, a native of New York, by whom he has three sons and one daughter.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


A. G. Cessford, grocer of Lamar, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., November 17, 1844, and is the son of Andrew and Mary (McCollum) Cessford. The father was born in Scotland, and when a young man came to America, where he married Miss McCollum, a native of New York. He was an architect and builder by profession. He died in 1853. The mother is still living on the farm opened by her grandfather prior to the Revolutionary War. Both Mr. and Mrs. Cessford were active members of the Presbyterian Church. In their family were four children, three now living, two sons and a daughter. The youngest but one of these children received a good English education, and in July, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Forty Fourth New York Volunteer Infantry, Federal Army, known as Ellsworth's Avengers, and was in the battle of Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill, second Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and a number of minor engagements. He was three times slightly wounded, at South Ann, at Upperville and at Gettysburg. When the regiment went out, it was 1,060 strong, and, when it was mustered out at the close of the term of service, (three years) there were but 134 men. During his entire service he was never from his command but six weeks, and never in the field hospital. At the close of the war he was employed as detective at Washington, and in 1865 came West and worked for the Government on the railroad in various capacities — machinist, engineer and conductor. For a time he was master mechanic, and subsequently purchasing agent for the Quincy, Missouri & Pacific Railroad. October 24, 1872, he married Miss Amanda Booth, a native of Illinois. On account of her ill health he went to the Rocky Mountains, where he also followed railroading. In 1873 he commenced merchandising at Albia, Iowa, where he continued about two years. In 1877 he opened a grocery store in El Dorado, Kan., which he ran until 1880, when he moved his stock to Lamar. He was one of the first aldermen of Lamar; is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a Knight Templar in the same; is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the G. A. R. To his marriage was born one child, Minnie, who is deceased. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Cessford was a Revolutionary soldier.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


A. F. Chapman was born in Brown County, Ohio, January 4, 1826, and is a son of Benjamin and Ann (Ellis) Chapman, who were also born in Brown County. Ohio, the father dying there.
He was a son of Henry Chapman, of Virginia, who came to Ohio during the first settlement of that State. Benjamin Chapman was a farmer all his life, and held numerous offices in his native State. Throughout his life he showed marked business ability, and was a successful financier. Politically he was a Democrat in his views. His wife died in Coles County, ILL. Two of their seven children are now living: A. F. and Samuel E., the latter a merchant of Coles County, ILL. A. F. Chapman attended the subscription schools of Brown County, Ohio, and when a boy of seventeen years left that State and went to Bracken County, Ky., where he was engaged in farming for seven years, with a cousin. In 1847 he was married, and moved to Illinois, locating in Coles County, then moved back to Bracken County at the end of two years, where he remained until 1869, at which time he located in Cass County, Mo. Here he made his home until 1882, since which time he has been a resident of Barton County, and has resided on his farm of 240 acres, situated in Pleasant Valley. When starting for himself he worked as a farm hand at $3 per month, but by industry and good management has made what property he now has. In 1847 he married Mary Porter, a daughter of Alexander Porter. She was born in Pennsylvania, and died in Bracken County, Ky., in 1861, leaving three children: Charles H., William F. and John L. Two reside in Lawrence County, Mo., and one in New Mexico. In 1861 he married Sallie Ann Ramley, a daughter of Samuel Ramley. She is a Kentuckian, and is still living, being the mother of three children: George M., a farmer of Barton County, Mo.; Samuel E. and Mattie. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Republican in his political views.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Lee Chiswell, of the firm of Chiswell & Brandon, editors and owners of the Lamar Democrat, was born in Frederick County, Md., October 11, 1848, and is the son of Capt. Joseph N.. and Eleanor (White) Chiswell, natives of Montgomery County, Md., where they spent the principal part of their lives, the mother dying in 1862, and the father in 1883. She was a member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Chiswell was of Scotch Irish descent; was a farmer by occupation, and was one of the prominent men of the county. He was captain of the militia before the war, and held various official positions in the county, being treasurer of the Grange for the States of Maryland and Delaware at the time of his death. The maternal grandfather, Benjamin White, was of Irish descent, and died in Montgomery County, Md. Lee Chiswell, the fourth of six sons and five daughters, grew to manhood on the farm, and attended the common schools until thirteen years of age, when he attended two years at Frederick Academy, one year at St. James College, and graduated at Columbia College, at Washington, D. C, soon after the war. He then studied law with Judges John A. Richie and John Lynch, two of Maryland's brightest and ablest jurists. Mr. Chiswell was admitted to the bar in 1869, and the next year he came West, locating at Lamar, and was soon thereafter elected prosecuting attorney, which position he held with marked ability until 1882, when he refused further honors. He then purchased the Progress, which he changed to the Lamar Democrat, and this he has owned partly ever since. Mr. Brandon has been his partner since 1888. Since his connection with journalistic work Mr. Chiswell has spared neither energy nor means to make his paper the equal of any in Southwest Missouri, and much of the improvement, intellectually, morally, and financially, of Lamar and vicinity, is due to the energetic measures taken by him. Although quite young at the breaking out of the war, he saw something of the hardships of war, both in the field and in prison. Two elder brothers, Benjamin and William, were in the Confederate Army; the former died at home during the war from exposure in service, and the latter served all through the war. Mr. Chiswell has been a Democrat all his life, and an active politician from youth. He is Past Master of Lamar Lodge No. 292, A. F. & A. M., and is also a member of Lamar Chapter and Commandery, and the A. O. U. W. He was married in 1873 to Miss Ann B. Hall, a native of Ohio, and the daughter of A. and Martha Hall, natives of Ohio, who came to Lamar in 1871, and are still living there. To Mr. and Mrs. Chiswell have been born four children, a son and three daughters.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John E. Cleveland, grocery man, and dealer in boots and shoes at Lamar, Mo., is a native of Orleans County, N. Y., where he was born January 6, 1841, being a son of John F. and Margaret (Lawrence) Cleveland, who were born in Massachusetts and York State, respectively. After their marriage they resided in York State until 1847, when the father died, having been a mechanic throughout life. In the fall of the same year the mother and her four children moved to Michigan, where she died. John E. is the eldest child, and, as his father died a poor man, he was put out to work at the early age of seven years. When sixteen years of age, he began working for wages, and after he was twenty one he learned the mason's trade, at which he worked somewhat irregularly for eighteen years, carrying on farming at the same time. In 1862 he married Maria Flatt, a native of Michigan, by whom he is the father of three children: George H. (deceased), Lillie M. and Willie H. Both he and wife are members of the Methodist Church, although in early life he united with the United Brethren Church. In 1865 he and wife moved to Hancock County, ILL., and here he worked at his trade until 1871, when he came to Barton County, and bought a farm, on which he worked until 1883, since which time he has resided in Lamar. In connection with S. J. Minnice he opened a grocery store, but in 1888 sold out to his partner, and bought another stock, which he is managing, and is doing a good business. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and in his political views supports the principles of the Republican party. Through his mother he inherits English blood.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Herbert F. Coffin, of the firm of McMurtry & Coffin, notion dealers at Lamar, was born on the 4th of July, 1867, and is the only surviving member of a family of three children born to the marriage of Reuben S. and Sarah (Pierson) Coffin, the former of whom was a carpenter by trade. He served in the Union army during the late war, and in his political views was a Democrat. His death occurred at the age of fifty eight years, but his wife still survives him. She is a member of the Congregational Church, as was her husband. Herbert F. Coffin was educated in the schools of Lamar, and, when about fifteen years of age, he entered a store as clerk, so continuing until January, 1889, when he became a member of the firm of McMurtry & Coffin. He is a young man of energy and intelligence, and, as he possesses excellent business qualifications, bids fair to become one of the wealthy citizens of the county. He is a Democrat, and a worthy member of the Congregational Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Hon. John Bryant Cole, attorney, and representative of Barton County, was born in Kanawha County, W. Va., October 29, 1854, and is the son of Samuel and Mary F. (Kennett) Cole, and grandson of John B. Cole, who was an extensive planter of Virginia, and who was the owner of many slaves, but freed them all before the war. He was of English descent, was in the Revolutionary War as commissary agent for the colonies, and was a man of education. He was a natural artist. His wife was a relative of Gen. Stark, of Revolutionary fame, and was of Scotch descent. Samuel and Mary F. (Kennett) Cole were married in Kanawha Valley, were they lived until 1866. In early life the father was a river pilot on the Kanawha, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. In 1866 he and his wife moved to Scotland County, Mo., and in 1883 to Lamar, where they are still residing, he in his seventy second year, and she about sixty. In their family were six children, three sons and three daughters. Hon. John Bryant Cole, the second child of the above mentioned family, received his literary education in the district schools of Virginia, in T. J. Musgrove's private school at Alexandria, Mo., and at the Missouri State University, graduating from the Normal course in 1874. For about seven years he taught school, spending his leisure hours in the meantime in reading law under Judge Ben. E. Turner, of Kahoka, Mo. He later turned his attention to editing newspapers, ran the Kahoka Gazette a year, and then the Kahoka Democrat two years.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri, Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Thomas H. Combs is a native of Perry County, Ohio, where he was born on the 6th of May, 1839, his parents being James and Mary A. (Stoker) Combs, the former a native of Maryland, and the latter of Pennsylvania. The grandfather, John Combs, came from England, and was one of the early settlers of Hagerstown, Md. In the early history of the State he moved to Perry County, Ohio. Grandfather Stoker was a German, who first set tled in Pennsylvania after coming to America, and later moved to Fairfield County, Ohio. The parents of our subject spent the most of their lives in Perry County, Ohio, and the father was an extensive farmer. He was a drummer in the Black Hawk War, and his drum is still in possession of the family. He was a Whig in politics, then a Republican, and for many years of his life was a member of the regular Baptist Church. He died at the age of fifty seven years. His wife was a Methodist, and died when seventy four years old. Thomas H. Combs is the fifth of their nine children, and attended the common schools in his youth. When his father died he left his property to his two eldest sons, with the understanding that they should educate and support the younger children and their mother, but the boys forgot their promise, and, at the early age of thirteen years, Thomas H. began earning his own living, working on a farm. In 1858 he emi grated to Knox County, Mo., and the following year to Sanga mon County, ILL. He then returned to Ohio, and October 11, 1861, enlisted in Company D, Sixty second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, U. S. A., and served a little over three years, and rose from a private to captain of his company. He was soon after transferred to Company H of the same regiment, and took part in the battles of Winchester, Port Republic and Fort Wagner. In the last named battle a charge was made after night, and all the officers of his regiment were either killed or wounded. He, as second sergeant, ordered his regiment across the ditch onto the fort, and he and another man, in the dead of night, carried the wounded of the regiment to a place of safety. In recogni tion of his meritorious conduct he was commissioned captain. After this he was in the battle of Deep Bottom, Va., and many minor engagements. Early in the service, while unloading goods, he injured himself for life. After receiving his discharge in Vir ginia he returned home, and was married, on the 28th of Feb ruary, 1865, to Miss Hattie N. Shaw, who was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, and by her became the father of these children: Tonah A., Dora B., Orpha O., Orrin P., Mary A. and Elmer C. Mr. and Mrs. Combs are members of the Methodist Church, and in his political views he is a Republican, and cast his first presiden tial vote for Abraham Lincoln. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. In 1865 he moved from his native State to Shelby County, ILL., from there to Kansas in 1867, and to Barton County, Mo., in 1869. Although he received very poor educational advantages, he has taken great interest in educating his children, two of whom are successful teachers.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Ex-Judge Isaac A. Comstock, late a well-to-do farmer and stockman of Barton County, was born in Scioto County, Ohio, in 1818, and is a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Fox) Comstock, who were born in New York State, and were married there in 1818, and removed to Scioto County, Ohio, the same year. In 1834 they removed to the "Hoosier State," and two years later went by ox-team to Iowa, the country at that time being full of Indians. Mr. Comstock was a member of the first county court of Muscatine County. In 1839 he went to Cedar County, being one of its first commissioners, and afterward went on horseback to Dubuque to enter the land on which to locate the county seat, and helped to lay out the town of Tipton. Here he died on the 19th of July, 1864, respected and esteemed by all who knew him. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was a son of Jeremiah Comstock, of Vermont. His wife died on the 10th of April, 1858, having been a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years. Her father, Daniel Fox, was born in New York State, and died in Madison County, Ohio. Isaac A. Comstock, the eldest of four sons and three daughters, was reared on the frontier of Ohio, Indiana and Iowa, receiving but little schooling. He was married in 1840 to Rebecca, a daughter of Goodwin and Jane Taylor, who were born in Virginia and North Carolina, respectively, and were married in the latter State, removing from there to Indiana when their daughter Rebecca was four years old. About 1837 they removed to Muscatine County, Iowa, thence to Cedar County, and afterward to Kansas. Mr. Taylor died in Nebraska in 1881, and his wife in 1879. He was a farmer and stock raiser, and held the offices of justice of the peace and postmaster, and represented Cedar County, Iowa, one term in the State Legislature. To Mr. and Mrs. Comstock ten children were born, eight being now alive: Andrew J.; Mary J., wife of G. W. Fall, of Iowa; Albert; Lewis C.; Laura, wife of George W. Harbour; Josephine, wife of Joseph Raber; Stephen, and Lawrence. Mr. Comstock resided in Cedar County, Iowa, until 1871, then came to Barton County, Mo., and purchased the finely improved farm of 300 acres, where his family now live, which formerly consisted of 800 acres. In 1850 he crossed the plains to California, but at the end of one year returned home via the Island of Cuba and New York City. While in Iowa he was in the mercantile business with his father-in-law, and at the age of twenty two years he was elected justice of the peace, which position he held many years. In the forties he served two years as county assessor of Cedar County. In 1882 he was elected judge of the county court of Barton County, serving two years. He was a Democrat all his life, and cast his first presidential vote for Franklin Pierce. He belonged to the Good Templars. Mrs. Comstock is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Com stock died June 19, 1889. His death was a severe loss to the county, and the position he occupied, in both private and public life, will be one hard to fill.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


R. A. Conrad, of the milling firm of Conrad, Cartmal & Co., was born in Perry County, Mo., in 1852, and is the son of R. B. and Anna M. E. (Schmalhurst) Conrad, the father a native of Perry County, Mo., and the mother of Prussia. R. B. Conrad was a miller in early life, but later engaged in farming in con nection with his milling interest. R. A. Conrad has been a resident of Barton County, Mo., since 1869. He was reared on the farm, and also assisted his father in the mill until the above mentioned date, when he came to Barton County. His father and the family followed the next year and settled in Barton Township, where they bought a raw piece of land, which they improved. R. A. Conrad remained at home one year after he was twenty one years of age, and then, in 1874, he, with a part ner, bought a mill in LeRoy Township, which they operated for five years. Mr. Conrad then engaged in farming again, con tinuing at this one year, after which he sold out and came to Golden City. In 1882 he purchased an interest in a mill which had been established in Golden City in 1881, by McCune & Boyd, and in 1885 Mr. Cartmal became connected with the same. The mill has a capacity of seventy five barrels per day, roller process, has all the latest improvements in machinery, and runs night and day half the year. The mill employs seven men, and does principally a local trade in adjoining counties and Kentucky. Mr. Conrad is also interested in the Greenfield Mills at South Greenfield, also a roller process mill of 100 barrels capacity. He was married in 1873 to Miss Mary E. Janes, a native of Indiana, and they have an interesting family of four children, Clyde, Anna, Lee and Franklin. Mr. and Mrs. Conrad are members of the Congregational Church, and he is a mem ber of the city council of Golden City, and a member of the I. O. 0. F.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


William B. Couchmah is a native of Nicholas County, Ky., where he was born on the 4th of March, 1840. His parents, Andrew and Julia (Henderson) Couchman, were also born in Nicholas County, and died in Kentucky and Barton County, Mo., in 1854 and 1878, at the ages of fifty four and seventy five years, respectively. Both were members of the Christian Church, and the former, when young, learned the tanner's and harness maker's trade, and afterward became quite an extensive manufacturer of saddles, harness, hats, etc., becoming quite wealthy. He was strictly temperate in his habits, and was one of the first to advo cate that cause in his neighborhood. Politically, he was a Dem ocrat. William B. Couchman is the fourth of six surviving members of a family of eight children, and resided in his native State until 1857, when he came to Missouri, and located first in Lafayette County, and in 1881 came to Barton County, where he is the owner of some valuable farming lands. In De cember, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private, and served until October, 1865, two years of this time being spent as lieutenant of Company E. He participated in thirty-five battles, and was wounded three times, first at Corinth, then at Kenesaw Mountain, where he received two wounds. He was taken prisoner on the battlefield at Corinth, but was only kept in captivity a short time. On the 10th of October, 1866, he was married to Miss Sarah Gum, a daughter of H. P. Gum, who was born in Allen County, Ky. To them were born three children: S. B., Mary and Charles B.; the two eldest of whom are school teachers. Mr. Couchman and family are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat, and was elected by that party to the office of township treasurer and trustee, which position he is still ably filling. He is a Mason. His wife was educated at Scottsville, Ky., and was engaged in teaching school for a num ber of years.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John H. Cook, one of the oldest residents of Newport, has been a resident of Barton County, Mo., since 1857, coming here at that date with his parents, John H., Sr., and Margaret Cook, who were native Germans, where our subject was also born, his birth occurring in 1844. They came to the United States in 1852, and settled first in Tennessee, and five years later came to Barton County, Mo., where the father died in i860, at the age of forty seven years, and the mother in 1869, aged fifty five years. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
John H. Cook, our subject, was the second of five children, and, after the death of his father, he commenced to fight his own way in the world, and began learning the blacksmith's trade, and followed this occupation till 1863, when he enlisted in the Union army, and served three months, after which he was in the employ of the Government until the close of the war. From that time he worked at his trade in Newport until 1869, then went to Randolph County, Ark., where he rented land and farmed seven years. From that time until the present he has resided in Newport, where he has been fairly prosperous in his calling, and is now the owner of eighty acres of land, and some town property. In 1870 he was married to Miss Susie Gaddy, a native of Clay County, Mo., by whom he has three children: John Lester, Clarence G. and Lena. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church, in which he is an active worker, and in his political views he is a Prohibitionist.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Frank Cranor, dealer in hardware and farming implements, was born in Wayne County, Ind., July 30, 1844, being a son of Stephen and Rebecca (Patty) Cranor, who were born in Wayne County, Ind., and Dayton, Ohio, in 1822 and 1825, respectively. After their marriage, in Indiana, whither the mother moved when young, they made their home in that State until 1883, when they came to Barton County, Mo., where the father is still living. He is a Democrat. The mother died in 1883, having been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years. Frank Cranor is the eldest of their four children, and received his edu cation in the common schools. In November, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Fortieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, U. S. A., and served until January 25, 1866, being in the battles of Corinth, Perryville, Stone River, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin, and Nashville. He was commissioned sec ond lieutenant in August, 1864, and first lieutenant in June, 1866. After the war he went back to Indiana, and farmed and dealt in timber. August 15, 1867, he was married to Miss Ettie Hiatt, a native of Randolph County, Ind., by whom he has four children: Bertha, Omer, Dora and Elbert. In 1883 he came to Barton County, Mo., and has been engaged in the hardware and imple ment business in partnership with M. R. Lawson, at Lamar, since 1885. He owns 160 acres of land, and a residence in Lamar. He is a Democrat, and belongs to the G. A. R.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


H. E. Cross, a farmer, residing near Lamar, Mo., is the owner of 120 acres of land, which place is well tilled, and denotes the thrift and enterprise which have ever characterized its owner's efforts. He was reared to a farm life, and at the early age of six teen years enlisted in the Forty eighth Missouri Infantry, U. S. A., and was in numerous skirmishes, but no regular engagements. After the close of the war he returned home and remained under the shelter of the paternal roof until twenty two years of age, when he rented land and began farming on his own responsibil ity. He continued to farm on rented land until 1881, when he came to Barton County, Mo., and bought eighty acres of land, which he has increased to 120 acres. In August, 1872, he was married to Miss Mary E. Vought, a native of the "Buckeye State," by whom he has three children: Edna, Frederick, and Nehemiah, all of whom are at home. In his political views Mr. Cross is a Republican and takes an active part in politics, as well as school and all worthy public enterprises. His parents, N. F. and Martha (Headen) Cross, were born in York State, and the father was of German descent. About 1858 he moved to McHenry County, ILL., where he rented a farm and lived two years, then moved to Miller County, Mo., and here made his home until the close of the war. He then bought a farm in Bates County, Mo., on which he made his home until his death, Feb ruary 14, 1877, at the age of sixty one years. He was a member of the I. O. O. F. His widow still survives him, and resides in Barton County, being a strict member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Their union resulted in the birth of six boys: William H., now a farmer in the State of Oregon, was a soldier in the Fourth Missouri Infantry and the Sixteenth Missouri Cavalry, and served five years; Henry E.; Joshua, a resident of Kansas City, was a soldier in the Forty eighth Missouri Infantry; Herbert, residing in the State of Oregon; Ambrose, a farmer of Barton County, Mo.; and Norman, also a farmer of this county.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


George G. Cunningham, one of the old and prominent mer chants of Lamar, was born in Washington County, Tenn., August 4, 1839, received his education in the common schools, and at the age of twenty one began farming for himself. Toward the close of the war he served a year in Company L, Sixteenth Missouri Volunteer Cavalry, U. S. A., and in 1866 came to Lamar with Dr. J. W. Wade, opened a drug store, and has been engaged in this business ever since. He is now sole proprietor of one of the largest drug stores in Lamar, and is one of the leading busi ness men of the place. He was married, March 27, 1876, to Miss Helen J. McArthur, a native of Canada. They have three children: Vida, George G. and Zada. Mr. Cunningham is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a Democrat in his political opinions. He owns the building in which he does business, and has made the most of his property by his own exertions. He is the fifth of twelve children, ten now living, born to James and Rebecca (Billingsly) Cunningham, both natives of East Tennessee, and both of Irish descent. They moved from their native State to Barren County, Ky., and in 1859 came to Laclede County, Mo., where they remained for some time, and then moved to Polk County. Here the father died in 1888. He was a farmer by occupation, and he and wife were members of the Baptist Church. He was a Democrat in politics. Mrs. Cunningham is still living, and is about seventy two years old.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


William H. Curless, a pioneer farmer of LeRoy Township, is a native of Clermont County, Ohio, his birth occurring in 1827. His parents, Joseph and Lucy (Hood) Curless, were born in New Jersey and Maryland, respectively, and at an early day were taken by their parents to Ohio, where they were married and made their home until 1846, when they moved to Fulton County, ILL., where Mr. Curless died in 1850. He was a glass blower in early life, but afterwards took up farming, which he continued until his death. His father, Asher Curless, was born in Scotland, and died in Brown County, Ohio, where he had been engaged in farming. The maternal grandfather was also a Scotchman, and died in Ohio. The mother of our subject died, in 1877, at the age of seventy years. William H. Curless is the second of ten children, and in his youth received a very limited education. He went with his parents to Illinois, but the next year returned to Ohio (1847), and was married to Zanetta, a daughter of Hugh and Margaret Kennedy, who were born in Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively, and were married in the latter State. Here the father died, having been a farmer and shoemaker by trade. His wife was born in 1800, and died in Douglass County, Kan., in 1886. Mrs. Curless was born in Brown County, Ohio, and is the mother of these children: Joseph; Catherine, wife of David Hessford; Frank; Josephine, wife of Albert Scovill; Mollie, wife of George Scovill; George, Nellie, Charley, Edward; and Jen nie, the wife of Arthur Guffee. Mr. Curless lived in Illinois until 1855, then removed to Douglass County, Kan., and in 1866, to Barton County, where he has since lived, being the owner of 320 acres of well improved land. He and his sons have property adjoining Liberal, which is underlaid with an abundance of fine building stone, and also a superior quality of coal, both of which are developed to some extent. When Mr. Curless first came to Barton County, there were only ten voters in three townships, LeRoy, Ozark and Center. At that time there was not a house between his home and Lamar. During the war he was in the Kansas State service. He is a Republican, though formerly a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Pierce, in 1852.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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