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Marion Dale, judge of the probate court of Barton County, was born April 14, 1843, in Hamilton County, Ind. His father, Samuel Dale, was born in Woodford County, Ky., in 1798. Samuel Dale spent four years of his early life serving an appren ticeship to the cabinetmaker's trade. It was in 1817 that, grow ing weary of working as an apprentice, he left his employer, went to Noblesville, Hamilton County, Ind., where he engaged in, and successfully prosecuted, the business for himself. In 1821 he was united in marriage to Miss Artamissa Sample, of which union five sons were born. Mrs. Dale died in 1836. He afterward married Miss Mary Messick, of Noblesville, and the subject of this sketch was the second of the five sons born of this marriage. Miss Mary Messick was born, reared and educated at Wilming ton, Del. She graduated from the old town school in 1832, and in 1834 went to Noblesville, Ind., and was engaged in teach ing until 1838, when she married Mr. Dale. During Samuel Dale's residence in Hamilton County, Ind., he was extensively engaged in farming, besides prosecuting his trade with good results; he was also honored with the office of justice of the peace for twelve years. In 1855 he moved to Taylor County, Iowa, and engaged in merchandising and farming. During the years 1857 and 1858 he served in the State senate as a representa tive for the senatorial district composed of Taylor, Page, Union, Fremont, Mills, Montgomery and Adams Counties. He moved to Lykins (now Miami) County, Kan., in 1859, and remained there during the Civil War, leaving and coming to Cass County, Mo., in 1866, where he lived to the time of his death, 1878. Mrs. Mary Dale died in 1876, at the age of sixty four, a con sistent member of the Methodist Church, South. Samuel Dale was a good business man, and in politics was a Jacksonian Demo crat. Of his ten sons, seven were in the Union army, two were killed in the battle at Kansas City, October, 1864, when Price made his last raid in Missouri; one was killed accidentally in Louisiana in 1863 by the cars running over him; one died from lung disease caused by exposure, and, of the three that were mustered out, one was severely wounded at Springfield in 1863. Judge Marion Dale, the subject of this sketch, was educated at the common schools, and, at seventeen years of age, learned the carpenter's trade, and worked at it for several years. During the war he was in the Kansas State militia, and at times saw service. He was engaged with his father in the merchandise business in Cass County, Mo., from the time of his father's removal there until the spring of 1870, when he went to La Cygne, Kan. While in Cass County, in 1868, he married Miss Jennie Sloan. He did not remain long in Kansas, but came, with his stock of goods, to Nashville, Barton County, Mo., in the following fall, and remained in his merchandise business until 1874. Here he lost, by death, his first wife in 1871, no children having been born to them. Judge Dale devoted himself to farming after 1875. He was collector for Nashville Township in 1877 and 1878, and postmaster at Nashville for four years. In 1874 he was mar ried to Miss Amanda J. Thompson, of Jasper County, Mo. Six children have blessed their union, of whom three are now living, two boys and one girl. The Judge came to this county when her population was about 4,500, and has grown up with her increas ing population, and devoted his means and talents toward has tening her growth. The county, in 1886, in recognition of his services, awarded him with the office which he now holds, judge of probate. Judge Dale is a painstaking, conscientious officer, and, since coming into the probate judgeship, has overhauled, classified and indexed all the papers in the office. He is always kind, courteous and attentive to those who have business in his court. In religion he and his wife are of the Holiness faith.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Henry R. Davis, stock dealer and a prominent farmer of Lamar Township, was born in Estill County, Ky., March 14, 1826, and is the fourth of twelve children, seven sons and five daughters, all of whom lived to be grown, born to the union of Martin W. and Nancy (Ricketts) Davis. Henry R. Davis was reared to farm life, and received limited educational advantages, never attending school over ten days after he was thirteen years of age. He remained at home until twenty six years old, and December 2, 1852, he married Miss Martha A. McKissick, a native of Clay County, Mo., who bore him four children: John M. C, Ella J., Maggie B. and Lillie M. In December, 1861,he enlisted in Daniel Stout's Company, State Troops, and served until the close of the war, being on detailed service nearly all the time. When the war closed, he was on Gen. McCullough's staff, and he then returned to Clay County, where he followed farming and dealt in stock until 1882, when he removed to Lamar, where he has made his home since. His wife died July 14, 1887, and August 9, 1888, he married Mrs. Mary J. Jones nee Edwards, a native of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Davis are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he has been an elder in the same since 1872, and is also now treasurer and trustee. He is the owner of 200 acres of land, and three houses and lots in town. Politically, he was for merly a Whig, but is now a Democrat. He started in life with limited means, and he now handles a great deal of stock, and is one of the substantial farmers of the county. His father and mother were born in Kentucky, in 1795, and 1799, respectively. The father served in the War of 1812, was a farmer, and followed this occupation in his native State until 1839. He then moved to Clay County, Mo., where he died at the age of ninety two. The mother lived to be seventy five years of age, and then died from the effects of a fall. Both were members of the Christian Church. The father was a Whig until the downfall of that party, since which time he has been a Democrat.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Augustus De Lissa, of Barton County, Mo., was born in St. Augustine, Fla., August 5, 1835, and is a son of Isadore Joshua and Matilda (Cohen) De Lissa, who were born in France, but came to America when young, and were married in St. Augustine, Fla. When their son, Augustus, was quite young, they moved to Albany, N. Y.; and Mr. De Lissa had a school at Troy, where he taught the French language. On Saturday, June 9, 1838, about 3 P. M., he was crossing the plank between the steamboats John Mason and Jonas C. Heartt, and meeting a lady he attempted to turn back, but was accidentally precipitated into the river, the current of which was so strong that all attempts to save him failed. The mother then moved to New York City, and about 1843 to Lexington, Ky., where she married John F. Bell, afterward moving to Iowa, and then to Louisville, Ky., where John F. Bell died of Bright's disease, January 22, 1882. Mr. A. De Lissa's mother is still residing in Louisville, being an earnest member of the Christian Church. Augustus De Lissa is the elder of two children (a son and daughter) born to his parents, and up to the age of fifteen years attended the common schools, after which he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for a number of years. In 1857 he went to Logan County, ILL., and was married the same year to Nancy, a daughter of Israel and Emily (Hope) Dyer, who were Virginians, and in 1858 Emily (Hope) Dyer died at her home in Logan County, ILL., and Israel Dyer died at the same home in July, 1863. Mrs. De Lissa was born in Circleville, Ohio, and became the mother of three sons and three daughters, namely, Matilda, Arminda, Emily, William, Edward and Leonard L. In 1872 Mr. De Lissa removed his family to Fort Scott, Kan., and was engaged in stock dealing until 1874, when he moved to Barton County, Mo., and purchased 1,140 acres of land in one tract, besides other tracts. He is also engaged in merchandising in Pedro, Mo., the firm name being De Lissa & Son.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


C. H. Deweese is the proprietor of the Commercial Hotel of Golden City, Mo., which house was established in 1881, and of which Mr. Deweese assumed management March 16, 1887. It has a sleeping capacity for eighteen persons, has a sample room attached, and is the only first class hotel in the city. Mr. Deweese was born in Warren County, ILL., and is a son of Cornelius and Helen (Davidson) Deweese, Kentuckians, who emigrated to Warren County, ILL., in 1832, where the father followed the occupation of farming until 1858, when he moved to Cass County, Mo., and improved a prairie farm. He made his home here until 1861, then farmed in Johnson County, Kan., till 1878, when he returned to Cass County, and resided in this place until his death, in 1880, at the age of seventy one years. His wife died in Johnson County, Kan., in 1868, at the age of fifty nine years. They reared the following family: Martha Jane, who died at the age of nineteen years; Josephus H., who is residing in Rich Hill, Mo.; Irene Frances, the deceased wife of Ira Connett, of Franklin County, Kan.; Elizabeth Lucinda, wife of J. G. Clinton, of Johnson County, Kan.; Josiah Franklin, who is in the hotel business in Olathe, Kan.; Sylvanus P., a farmer of Miami County, Kan.; C. H.; Mary Ellen, who died at the age of twelve years; and James S., farmer of Miami County, Kan. The parents of these children were earnest members and workers of the Christian Church, and all their children follow their example, except one. C. H. Deweese was educated in the common schools, and reared on a farm, and at the age of twenty left home and engaged in farming for himself, being occupied in that business until 1884, when he began keeping hotel in Sheldon, Vernon County, Mo. Twenty months after he went to Lamar, Mo., and took charge of the City Hotel of that place, continuing until 1887, when he assumed management of the Commercial Hotel at Golden City. He was married August 13, 1865, to Miss Charlotte Jamison, who was born in Jackson County, Mo., and by her has three children: Katie, John C, and Wilda L. He and wife, and daughter Katie, are members of the Christian Church. During the Civil War he served for two years in the State Militia.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John M. Dickenson, general merchant of Minden, Mo., and the successor to William A. Frazier since September, 1888, was born in McDonough County, ILL., in 1856, and is a son of James E. and Emma J. (Jackson) Dickenson, who were born in Ken tucky and were married in Illinois, where they made their home until 1880, when they came to Henry County, Mo., and in 1884 to Barton County, where they are still living, earnest members of the Christian Church. The father was born in Green County, Ky., in 1833. John M. Dickenson is their only child, and received a good education in the common schools of his native county. In 1880 he came with his parents to Missouri and, as above stated, engaged in his present business in September, 1888, his stock of goods being valued at $2,500. He is a Dem ocrat, and voted for Cleveland in 1884. He belongs to the K. of P., Minden Lodge No. 135, and is a member of the Christian Church. In 1888 he was married to Miss Belle, a daughter of William and Angeline Winter, of Tennessee, who came to South west Missouri when Mrs. Dickenson was a child. Her parents are now living, and reside on a farm in Barton County. The father served four years as a private in the United States army. Our subject's paternal grandfather, Charles Dickenson, was a Scotchman; and his maternal grandfather, Hon. John E. Jack son, was a Kentuckian, and a prominent and well known attorney of McDonough County, ILL., for many years. He was a member of the Illinois Legislature from that county, and died there in 1878. He was an active Jacksonian Democrat. His wife died in 1880.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Cyrus Dixon, farmer and stock raiser, was born January 27, 1840, in Ohio, in which State his parents, Peter and Elizabeth (Graham) Dixon, were also born, the former in 1803, and the latter in 1812. The paternal and maternal grandparents were of Scotch-Irish and Scotch descent, and were born in Maryland and Virginia, respectively. The parents were married in their native State, and became the parents of twelve children, nine of whom lived to be grown: Annie, the deceased wife of Jacob Lessers, whose children reside in Jackson County, Ohio; Tabitha, the deceased wife of Leander Keller, whose children reside in Har rison County, Mo.; Griffe, who is a farmer and stock raiser, of Jackson County, Ohio; Cyrus, farmer, at Verdella, Barton County, Mo.; Catherine, wife of Peter Weber, who resides in Livingston County, ILL.; Phoebe, the deceased wife of Frank Albert, of Jackson County, Ohio; Samuel (deceased), whose family live in Barton County, Mo.; Mahala E. (deceased); and Amos, a farmer of Western Kansas. Peter Dixon was a farmer and merchant by occupation, a Whig in his political views, and a member of the Newlight Church. He died in 1859, and his wife in 1856. Cyrus Dixon began working for himself at the age of twenty years, receiving, for ten months, thirteen dollars per month, and for about six months, sixteen dollars per month for his services. On the 2d of August, 1861, he joined Company A, Thirty third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. Curry, of the U. S. A., and, after serving twenty six months, received his dis charge, November 2, 1863, on account of a wound which he received at Stone River. He was in the raid through Kentucky, at Perryville, Bridgeport, and many minor engagements. He received a wound in the right side and hip by a musket ball, from which he still suffers. On the 25th of December, 1863, he was married to Miss Margaret J. Coles, a daughter of John and Mary (Wareham) Coles, who were the parents of the following chil dren: Mary, the deceased wife of Milton Smith; Jacob, a farmer of Cass County, Mo.; Samuel (deceased), whose family reside in Jackson County, Ohio; Elizabeth Ann, the deceased wife of Griffe Dixon; Margaret J., wife of our subject; Maria, wife of Frank Albert; John, a farmer of Barton County, Mo.; Matilda, wife of Jacob Weber, of Illinois; and George, residing on the old homestead in Jackson County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Dixon are the parents of five children: Mary Alice, born June 9, 1865, and died January 5, 1866; Oscar, born September 6, 1869; Huldah May, born May 27, 1873; John B., born August 7, 1875; and Charley, born April 7, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Dixon are mem bers of the Free Will Baptist Church, and he is a member of the Union Labor party. He also belongs to the I. O. O. F., the Knights of Labor, the Farmers' Alliance, and the G. A. R. He owns 240 acres of well improved land, eighty of which he bought for four dollars per acre, eighty at eight dollars per acre, and eighty at twelve dollars. This is now worth thirty dollars per acre. He has about seven acres in orchard.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Hamilton Doran, liveryman and stock dealer, of Golden City,. Mo., was born in Shelby County, Ind., in 1849, and is a son of John and Lucinda (Shaw) Doran, both natives of the "Keystone State." John Doran settled in Indiana at a very early period, when the Indians had not yet left that section, and here he entered 160 acres of land, which he afterward increased to 640 acres. He was a successful stock dealer also, and was an active politician, being one of the leaders of the Democratic Party. While not a church member, he was a friend to all religious organ izations. He died in March, 1873. His wife was a member of the Baptist Church, and died in November, 1886, having become the mother of a large family: Elizabeth, wife of G. Willard; Amanda, wife of D. Engler; Riding, a liveryman of Shelbyviller Ind.; Sarah, wife of B. F. Clayton; Kansas, wife of John Clark; Malinda, wife of Steve Fox; Martha, the deceased wife of Henry Farley; Mary (deceased), Mahala (deceased), and Hamilton. Up to the age of twenty four years the latter had resided in Indiana, but at that age he left home and came to Missouri, settling at Carthage, where he remained seven years, being first engaged in the liquor business, and afterward in the stock business. In 1880 he came to Barton County, and embarked in his present business at Golden City, and has been quite successful. He also owns eighty acres of land three miles south of Golden City, and a one half interest in eighty acres two miles south, both places well improved. His early educational advantages were very poor, but by much reading, close observation and contact with business life, he is regarded as one of the well informed and intelligent men of the county. He is a Democrat, a strict partisan, and takes an active part in the political affairs of the county. In June, 1879, he was married to Miss Sarah Graham, by whom he has three children: Myrtle, who was born in 1880, and died in infancy; Lula, who was born on the 12th of August, 1881; and Sadie, who was born October 14, 1883. Mrs. Doran was born in Canada in 1850.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Y. Duncan, a farmer and stock raiser residing five miles north of Golden City, Mo., has resided on his present farm since 1881, and has made valuable improvements thereon. He was born in Macoupin County, ILL., in 1837, and is a son of John and Uly Ann (Killian) Duncan, who were born, reared, and married in the "Old North State," and moved to Indiana in 1829. One year later they went to Macoupin County, ILL., of which they were among the first settlers, and there the father resided, engaged in farming, until his death, in 1851, at the age of sixty seven years. His wife died in Montgomery County, ILL., at the age of eighty four years. They reared a family of twelve children, eight of whom are now living : Eliza, who is the widow of Abel Prichard, and resides near Lincoln, Neb.; Charity, widow of John Chapman, resides in Montgomery County, ILL.; Andrew, residing at Litchfield, ILL.; Charlotte, the widow of Peter Kinder, also lives at Litchfield, ILL.; Sina, widow of James Trueblood, lives at Butler, ILL.: Martha, the widow of John Kane, lives in Saline County, ILL.; Daniel, residing in Montgomery County, ILL.; Absalom (deceased), and A. Y. The parents of these children were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and their home was used frequently in early times as a place of wor ship. A. Y. Duncan was fifteen years of age when his father died, and lived with his mother and cared for her until her death. He was first married in 1858, to Jane Corzine, a native of Jersey County, ILL., but his wife died three years later, leaving one child, Frances Bell, now the wife of W. J. Williams, of Clay County, Texas. In 1864, Mr. Duncan wedded Henrietta Kinder, a native of Macoupin County, ILL., and by her became the father of six chil dren, four now living: Jane Ann, wife of William Huskison, of Dade County, Mo.; Lizza, wife of Lee Wilson, of Clay County, Texas; Grant and Ollie May, at home. In 1873 his second wife died, and the same year he was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Coiner, who was born in Virginia. On January 26, 1851, Mr. Duncan moved to Barton County, Mo., where he has since made his home, and won an enviable reputation as a farmer and stock man. On August 12, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Twenty Second Illinois Regular Volunteers, and served three years as corporal, taking part in the battles of Fort Blakely, Nashville, Price's raid of forty one days, and numerous skirmishes. Mr. and Mrs. Duncan are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a Republican in his political views.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Albert A. Dye, M. D., son of R. K. and Rumina (Swift) Dye, was born in Waukesha, Wis., November 27, 1845. The father R. K. Dye, is a native of Johnstown, N. Y., of English French descent, and the mother originally from Rushford, Alle ghany County, N. Y., and of English ancestry. After marriage they moved to Wisconsin (1841), and here the father followed the occupation of a mechanic and farmer. Both he and his wife are enthus iastic Regular Baptists. Their family consisted of six children, four sons and two daughters, all now living and in a healthy, prosperous condition. Mrs. Dye is a blood relative of Commo dore Perry. Dr. Albert A. Dye, the second child of the above mentioned family, received his education in the High School of Fond du Lac, Wis. In February, 1864, he enlisted in Company A, Thirty eighth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, U. S. Service, and was in the battle of Cold Harbor and Petersburg, and his regi ment was the first to enter the mine after the explosion. He was also at Reams' Station, siege of Petersburg, when the town was taken, and assisted in the capture of Lee's army. After this he was on patrol duty at Washington to capture Booth. While at the assault on Petersburg, he was wounded by a piece of shell striking him on the head, inflicting a lasting injury. He enlisted as a private, and was second lieutenant when mustered out. He commanded his company when all were killed or missing but eight, and he, although only a sergeant, was the ranking officer. He was discharged at Delany House, D. C, March 26, 1865, and the next year graduated from the Fond du Lac High School. He then studied medicine with Drs. Wiley & Carey, of Fond du Lac, Wis., entered Rush Medical College at Chicago, and grad uated from the same in 1871. Previous to this, in 1868, he came to Missouri, locating at Lamar when there was but one physician in town, and here he has practiced ever since in a very successful manner, having taken a special course on the eye and ear at the Chicago Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, where he grad uated in 1871. He was on the school board of Lamar for eight years, and is a Knight Templar in Masonry. In 1877 he married Miss Bettie Smith, a native of Howard County, Mo., who bore him two children: Daisy R. and Rose I. Dr. Dye is a Repub lican in his political views, and cast his first presidential vote for Lincoln. He is a member of Barton County Medical Society, the National Association of Railway Surgeons, and the Missouri State Medical Association, and has been a very successful phy sician. Perhaps no man in Southwest Missouri has had a more extensive practice in the last twenty years than he. He has been examining surgeon for the government at Lamar for seventeen years, and president of the board of examiners since 1884.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


William Dye, recorder of Barton County, Mo., and one of the prominent men of the community, was born in Pulaski County, Ind., November 22, 1849, and is the son of William and Emily (Hollenback) Dye, natives, respectively, of Miami County, Ohio, and Franklin County, Va. The father, after growing up, mar ried Miss Meeks, who bore him a large family of children. After her death he married Miss Hollenback, and two children were the result of this union. Since then he has been married twice; four times all together. He is now living in Pulaski County, Ind., is eighty two years of age, and is enjoying com paratively good health. He is a Democrat in politics, though formerly a Whig; is a farmer by occupation, and a member of the United Brethren Church. William Dye, Jr., the only son by the second marriage, was educated in a public school, and at Logansport Seminary. At the age of nineteen he began teach ing school, and continued this occupation for five or six years. In 1874 he married Miss Maria Black, a native of Cass County, Ind., who bore him five children, two sons and a daughter of whom are now living. After marriage Mr. Dye resided in Cass County Mo., until 1878, when he came to this county and bought a farm, which he cultivated until 1882, when he was elected probate judge of Barton County, and held this position four years. In 1886 he was chosen recorder, which position he is now holding. He is truly a self made man, having made his own way in life since seventeen years of age, and when starting out for himself was obliged to teach and go to school by turns. He is a member of the school board, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in his political views is a Democrat.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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