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John M. Earp, agent for the Adams Express Company at Lamar, was born in Bowling Green, Ky., March 13, 1856, and is a son of Rev. J. D. and Dorcas C. (Cox) Earp, who were born in one of the New England States and Kentucky, respectively. The former removed to the mother's native State when young, and there he engaged in school teaching, afterwards becoming a Methodist minister. In 1857 they located in Montgomery County, Mo., and in 1869 in Barton County, where their home now is, he being sixty five years of age, and she sixty one. During the war he was falsely reported to be harboring Confed erate soldiers, and some Federal soldiers were detailed to inves tigate the matter. Thinking they saw some soldiers in his house, they opened fire, and he started to run from the house, but was fired upon, and Mr. Earp dropped, it was supposed, dead, and it was thus reported by the men. When it was found that he had not given aid to the Confederates, he was allowed to return home, and was offered any protection. John M. Earp is the sixth of his ten children, and was educated in Lamar. December 23, 1877, he was married to Miss Ida E. Maxwell, a native of John son, Iowa, and by her he has two sons and two daughters. After his marriage, Mr. Earp farmed two years, and then came to Lamar, and was engaged in the transfer business, obtaining in 1880 the contract for hauling all the express matter for the Adams Express Company. In 1885 he was appointed agent for the company at Lamar, and still holds the position, and also does all the transferring. He is local agent for the Consolidated Tank Line Company, and is quite an extensive dealer in salt. He is a Democrat, and a member of the A. O. U. W. and the K. of P.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Thomas Egger, cashier of the bank, the firm title being F. Egger & Sons, was born in Green County, Wis., in February, 1859, and is the son of Fredolin Egger, a native of Germany, who came to America when a young man and settled in Wis consin. After remaining in this country a time, he returned to his native country to find a wife in the person of Miss Anna Streiff, whom he brought with him to America. After mer chandising at New Glarus, Wis., until 1874, he moved to Appleton City, St. Clair County, where he opened a bank under the firm name of F. Egger & Co., which was subsequently changed to F. Egger & Sons, and in 1882 to the First National Bank of Appleton City, of which he is president. He became the father of six children, three sons and three daughters. Two of the sons are associated with the father in the Lamar Bank. Thomas Egger, the immediate subject of this sketch, received his educa tion in the common schools and at Milwaukee Academy. From the schoolroom he went into the Bank of Appleton City, but in 1882 the bank at Lamar was started with $25,000 capital, and he was given entire charge of the business. He is a competent business man and a prominent citizen. In his political views he affiliates with the Republican Party. In 1882 he married Miss Mary B. Fry, a native of Chester County, Penn., by whom he has three children, a son and two daughters. In connection with the banking business the firm also handles considerable grain.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Judge John V. Elder was born in Greencastle, Ind., April 11, 1835, being the son of William J. and Nancy (Vannice) Elder, who were born respectively in Kentucky and Ohio. When a young man, the father went to Hamilton, Ohio, where he was engaged in merchandising, and while there he married Miss Vannice, and in 1833 moved to Greencastle, Ind., where they died in 1841 and 1857, having been earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. John V. Elder, one of their six children, was educated in the public schools of Greencastle. When fourteen years of age, he learned the tinner's trade, at which he worked some twenty two years, coming to Lamar, Mo., in 1867. He was engaged in the hardware business until 1884, and has since followed the occupation of farming, being now the owner of 400 acres of land, all within a mile of Lamar. He is a staunch Republican in politics, and from 1868 to 1870 he was supervisor of registration, and from 1876 to 1878 was judge of the county court, and also filled the position of probate judge for some time. In the spring of 1862 he enlisted in Company D, Fifty fifth In diana Volunteer Infantry and was in the battle of Richmond, Ky., afterward enlisting in the Twentieth Indiana Battalion, Milton A. Osborn commanding, and was discharged at Indianapolis, Ind., in September, 1865. He took an active part in the battles of Nash ville, Jonesboro and Atlanta. He was twice wounded at Nashville, once very severely in the left arm, and slightly in the left side. May 31, 1868, he was married to Miss Mary J. James, a native of Janesville, Wis., who died March 4, 1889, leaving no family.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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