Welcome to
Barton County
Missouri

Biographies
~ F ~

John J. Fast, a successful agriculturist, was born in Greene County, Penn., October 16, 1814, and is the son of Christian and Elizabeth (Blosser) Fast, the father a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1796, and the mother a native of Vermont, born in 1794. Great grandfather Nicholas Fast came from Germany at an early day, and settled in Pennsylvania. Christian Fast, the grand father, a Revolutionary soldier, was captured by the Indians and held thirteen months. Grandfather Blosser was a sturdy Virginia farmer. After marriage, Christian and Elizabeth (Blosser) Fast moved to Richland County, Ohio, where he followed agricultural pursuits for many years. Both were members of the Christian Church. He was a Democrat, and died at the age of forty five years, from the effects of swallowing shot. The mother died at the age of forty one years. In their family were ten children, seven sons and three daughters. The eldest of this family, John J. Fast, was reared on a farm, and had very meager educational advantages, not attending school over a year altogether. By private study, however, he qualified himself for teaching, and followed this profession for some time. September 13, 1835, he married Miss Hannah Day, a native of New York, born October 12, 1818, and the daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Robbins) Day, natives, respectively, of Vermont and Massachusetts. Mr. Day was twice married, and was the father of eighteen children. To Mr. and Mrs. Fast were born twelve children, seven sons and five daughters, eleven of whom are living and married. In 1836 he and family moved to Fulton County, ILL., where they resided for thirty years, coming to Barton County in 1866. He was the first treasurer of the Lamar school board; was formerly a Democrat, but since the formation of the Republican Party he has voted that ticket. He and Mrs. Fast are members of the Free Will Baptist Church, and are much respected citizens. Mr. Fast is the owner of 500 acres of land, and much of his success in life is due to his good wife, who has been a true helpmate to him. When starting out for himself, he was obliged to go in debt for an ax, but by using that diligently, and his wife her spinning wheel, they were soon on the road to prosperity.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Charles H. Fink, nurseryman and farmer of Lamar Township, Barton County, Mo., was born in Lexington, Ky., February 14, 1822, and is the son of John and Matilda (Hammond) Fink, both natives of Virginia. Grandfather Fink was a native of Germany, and when a young man came to America, locating in Virginia. Grandfather Hammond was of English descent, and an early Virginia settler. The grandparents on both sides immigrated to Kentucky in an early day, and located near Lexington, where Mr. Fink's parents were married. When a young man, John Fink enlisted in the War of 1812, and was within a short distance of New Orleans when that famous battle took place. After his return from the war, he married Miss Hammond, and lived in Kentucky until 1830, when he moved to Greene County, ILL., and subsequently to Macoupin County, of the same State. He started a poor man, was a stone mason by trade, and after settling his family on his claim he went to Alton, where he worked at his trade, and sent back provisions, which never reached his family. Sickness prevented his return, and during his absence his family, consisting of his wife and eight children, were reduced to extreme want, living upon wild meat, acorns and nuts. After a pro tracted absence, home was made happy by his return. He was a thorough going farmer, and whatever enterprise he believed to be right he supported with all his might. Both he and wife were zealous members and earnest workers in the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he was a class leader for many years. Politically he was a Democrat until the Free Soil party sprang up, and after its dissolution he affiliated with the Republican party. He died at the age of seventy seven, and his wife at the age of seventy two. In their family were ten children, four sons and six daughters. The third child, Charles H., was reared to farm labor, and, owing to the deficiency of schools, and the demand for his services at home, he never attended school more than two weeks, and that after he was grown. His father and mother could read only indifferently, and so everything he received in the way of an education was obtained by individual labor. One spelling book went through the entire family, and any newspaper or tract was devoured by the subject of this sketch with avidity. For a slate he used the bleached jawbone of a horse they had brought with them from Kentucky, and for a copy book he appropriated the shoulder blade of the same. His pen and pencil were one, and made by rolling out a leaden bullet. At the age of seventeen he began to battle for himself, first working by the month, then farming for himself. December 15, 1843, he married Miss Martha A. Boggess, who lived about ten years, and bore him three children, two of whom, with his wife, died of cholera. For his second wife he chose Mrs. Elizabeth M. Ross sister to his first wife. She lived about ten years after marriage, and passed away leaving four children. In 1864 Mr. Fink married Miss Mary Trible, a native of England, who bore him two children. Mr. Fink and Mr. B. Boggess laid out and founded the flourish ing town of Girard, ILL. While in that State Mr. Fink was largely interested in the culture of fruit, and in the improvement of the town and county. In 1869 he moved to Lamar, Barton County, Mo., and started the first nursery in this section after the war. He has 160 acres in nursery stock, eighty acres in an orchard of apple and peach trees, also two farms in the county, besides property in other sections. He adheres to no political party, though he affiliated respectively with the Whig, Free Soil, Know Nothing, Republican and Greenback parties. He takes a deep interest in horticulture, being president of the Barton County Horticultural Society. He is a demitted Mason, and was presiding judge of this county a term. Of his first marriage one child is living, Elizabeth C; of his second marriage there are living Richard M., Martha M., Virginia E. and Robert L., and of his third marriage, Maud and Oliver H. Seven children are now living, all fairly educated, thrifty and enterprising.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Richard M. Fink, druggist at Lamar, was born in Macoupin County, ILL., December 15, 1852, and is the son of C. H. and Elizabeth E. (Boggess) Fink. He was reared to the nursery business, received his education in the public schools of Girard, ILL., and finished his schooling at the State University, at Colum bia, Mo. After leaving school he taught for
about two years, but came with his parents to Barton County, Mo., in 1869. In 1879 he commenced clerking for A. W. Atwood, druggist at Lamar, remained three years in this capacity, and then became his part ner. A year later he sold out to his partner, and purchased the store he now runs in 1883. He has a good stock, and does a good business. In 1884 he married Miss Sallie E. Harris, a native of Cooper County, and to them were born two children; Maggie Edith and Charles Harris. In politics Mr. Fink is a Republican. After leaving college he found himself in debt about $400, and began clerking at $25 per month and board. Having no bad habits, he saved some money, and gradually worked his way to the front. Before engaging in the drug busi ness he began the study of medicine with the intention of becom ing a physician, but, a position in Atwood's drug store being offered, he accepted that, and hence changed his course of life, He is a self made man in every respect.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


S. P. Finley, sheriff and farmer of Barton County, Mo., was born in Macoupin County, ILL., in 1840, and is a son of J. T. and L. B. (Bremion) Finley, natives respectively of Kentucky and Virginia. The father was one of the first settlers of Macoupin County, ILL., and in 1867 came to Barton County, Mo., where he spent the rest of his days, dying in 1878. He was a farmer by occupation and a Democrat politically. When a child the mother was taken to Illinois by her parents, and was there reared and married. She is still living, and resides in Lamar. S. P. Finley was reared to mature years in Illinois, and received a good education in the common branches in the public schools of that State. He came to Missouri with his parents, and engaged in farming, and has served a number of years as sheriff of the county. November 4, 1885, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Miller, who was born in Missouri in 1864. They own a good farm of 120 acres, and are among the thrifty farmers of the county. He is a Royal Arch Mason, a member of the Farmers' Alliance, and in his political views is a Democrat. His maternal grandfather, who was of Scotch descent, was born in Virginia, and died in Illinois.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


George W. Finley, proprietor of a livery stable at Lamar, Barton County, Mo., was born in Sangamon County, ILL., July 11, 1861, being a son of Zura N. and Sarah (Fields) Finley, natives, respectively, of Illinois and Ohio. The mother removed with her parents to Illinois when a child, and here she was mar ried to Mr. Finley, and made her home until 1866, when they came to Barton County, Mo., and are here residing on a farm. The father is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Congregational Church. In their family were two sons and four daughters, of whom George W. is the eldest. He attended the district schools and Eastman's Commercial College, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and was graduated from that institution in 1886. In the spring of 1887 he engaged in the livery business, in Lamar, with Judge John Bates, and then with J. M. Fisher, who suc ceeded Mr. Bates, and since August, 1888, has been associated with G. A. Mathews. Their establishment is supplied with eleven excellent vehicles, and they keep on an average sixteen head of horses, which are always in good condition, and ready for work. Mr. Finley is a Mason, and in his political views sup ports the principles of the Democratic Party.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

Return to

Barton County

Missouri

Genealogy Trails

Copyright © Genealogy Trails
All data on this website is Copyright by Genealogy Trails with full rights reserved for original submitters.