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G. W. B. Garrett, sheriff, was born in Loudoun County, Va., May 27, 1857, and is the son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Harden) Garrett, both natives of Loudoun County, Va., where they were reared and married. After living there until 1866, they moved to Northern Missouri, and in 1882 to Barton County, settling on a farm, and there the father is living at present. The mother was a worthy and consistent member of the Baptist Church, and died in the year 1888. The father is a Democrat in politics. In their family were twelve children, of whom four are now living, all sons. The educational advantages of G. W. B. Garrett were very meager in youth, but upon reaching manhood he earned the money by working on a farm to take a two years course at the Kirksville Normal. He then returned to the farm, and continued tilling the soil until 1888, when he was elected sheriff of Barton County. Previous to this he had held the office of justice of the peace of North Fork Township, for a period of two years. In politics he is a staunch Democrat. Of Mr. Garrett it may with truth be said that he is a man in every way fitted for the position he is now holding, brave and fearless in the discharge of his duty, honorable and conscientious in all his business relations, and a man universally respected.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


James T. Gealy, of the real estate and loan firm of Gealy & Harlow, of Golden City, Barton County, Mo., was born in Mercer County, Penn., Octobers, 1835, and came to Barton County in May, 1881, where he has since resided. He is a son of William J. and Matilda (Thoine) Gealy, both natives of Pennsyl vania. James T. Gealy was reared to farm life, receiving his educa tion in the common schools, and at Westminster College, in Penn sylvania. He studied law, and was admitted to the Venango County (Penn.), bar in 1875, and was admitted and licensed at the city of Lamar to practice law in the several courts of the State of Missouri, at the fall term of 1881. He has been three times married; first, in February, 1857, to Miss Lettice Perry, a native of Pennsylvania, who bore him four children: James I. (deceased), Calphurnice (deceased); Ettie, wife of T. A. Heady, of Springfield, Mo.; and Carrie. He was married the second time to Miss Lizzie Gray, a native of New York City, August 30, 1876. One child, Freddie (deceased), was born to this union. He was again married, in September, 1888, to Miss Emma Conrad, a native of Michigan. Mr. Gealy is an ancient member of the I. O. O. F. He has been city attorney since the origin of the city of Golden City; owns city residence, house and lot in the city of Lamar, Mo., and also property at Peabody, Kan.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Edwin Gilkey, farmer, and owner of the Gilkey coal bank in Ozark Township, was born in Adams County, ILL., in 1841, being the third of six children born to the marriage of Franklin Gilkey and Nancy Ford, who were born, reared and married in Ken tucky. A short time after the latter event they removed to Adams County, ILL., where Mr. Gilkey, who was of Irish descent, and a farmer by occupation, died in 1872, followed by his wife in 1883. Edwin Gilkey received but little education in his youth, and at an early day became familiar with the duties of farm life. When the war broke out he joined Company F, Seventy Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was in the Atlanta Campaign, and was present at the grand review at Washington, D. C. In 1866 he married Mary L., a daughter of William and Louisa Wallace, who were born in Canada and New York, respectively, and removed to Hancock County, ILL., at an early day, where Mr. Wallace is yet living. His wife died about 1882. Mrs. Gilkey was born in Hancock County, ILL., and her union with Mr. Gilkey resulted in the birth of nine children, two sons and four daugh ters now living. In 1870 Mr. Gilkey removed to Crawford County, Kan., and from there to Barton County, Mo., being one of the pioneer settlers of Ozark Township. They own a good farm of ninety two acres, one mile west of Liberal, on which is a valuable coal bank. He is a Democrat, casting his first presi dential vote for Seymour in 1868, and for the past eight years he has been constable of Ozark Township. Mrs. Gilkey is a mem ber of the Church of the Latter Day Saints.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Peter C. Glixner, proprietor of the cigar factory at Lamar, was born in Covington, Ky., February 18, 1861, his parents being John and Tracy (Felix) Glixner. The father was born in Bavaria, Germany, and on reaching manhood came to America and located at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he followed the blacksmith's trade, and was afterward married to Miss Felix. They moved to Ken tucky, but after a short residence in that State, moved to Jen nings County, Ind., where the mother died, having borne a family of two sons and two daughters. Mr. Glixner returned to Germany after the death of his wife. He was a fine horse shoer, and gained quite a widespread reputation in that line. Peter C. Glixner was the youngest of his father's family, and when about seven years old went to live with an uncle in Covington, Ky., and, when not attending school, worked in a cigar factory. While working at his trade he would take his dinner and books and go to the factory, which came to the knowledge of his uncle, and the latter told him he must go to school or leave. He chose the latter, and at the age of thirteen years started out to fight the battle of life alone. He worked at his trade in Indiana, Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas, and in 1882 came to Lamar, and after working a short time for John E. Rundell, he and W. M. Hart bought out Mr. Rundell, and Mr. Glixner soon after became sole proprietor, and as such continues. His estab lishment gives employment to five hands, and they turn out an annual product of over 300,000. All his property has been acquired since coming to Lamar, as he had but $25 on reaching the town. He finds a market for his products in Barton and ad joining counties. September 28, 1887, he was married to Miss Emma Sturdevant, a native of Illinois, who is an earnest member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Glixner is a Republican, a mem ber of the I. O. O. F. and the K. of P.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


P. R. Gray in giving a brief sketch of this gentleman, it is but the truth to say that he is one of the prominent men of the county, and has been quite successful in his enterprises. He was born in Switzerland County, Ind., October 7, 1836, and is the youngest of a family of eight children, six now living, born to Truman and Lorina (Bradford) Gray, who were born near Middlebury, Vt., and Massachusetts, respectively, the former's birth occurring in 1795. When a boy he moved with his parents to New York State, and was a resident of Lawrence County, where he was married when about twenty five years of age. They afterward located in Switzerland County, Ind., where the father was successfully engaged in tilling the soil. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, participating in the battle of Plattsburg, and was a Whig in his political views until 1879, when he became a Republican, and as such remained until his death in 1879. The mother of our subject was a daughter of Joel and Tryphena (Smith) Bradford, natives of Massachusetts. Joel was a son of Simeon and Phoebe (Whiting) Bradford; Simeon was the son of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Bartlett) Bradford; Ephraim, a son of Major William and his third wife Mary (Holmes) Brad ford; Major William was a son of Govenor William and Alice (Southwart) Bradford, Gov. William Bradford being one of the Puritans who came to this country in that famous old ship, the "May flower." Truman Gray was a deacon in the Presbyterian Church, him and his wife being a member of the Methodist Church. Their chil dren are as follows: Joel, a retired farmer of Washington, Iowa, is a stockholder in the First National Bank of that place; Robert, a farmer of Barton County, Mo.; Lucinda, widow of William Waite, now residing in Reynolds, ILL.; Theda, wife of John C. Moore, a retired farmer of Reynolds, ILL.; and P. R. Gray, whose name heads this sketch. The latter was educated in Switzerland County, Ind., principally, and when fifteen years of age went to Iowa, and farmed with an older brother for four years, after which he went to Rock Island, ILL., from there to the State of Missis sippi, then back to Indiana and Illinois, and in 1866 came to Barton County, Mo. While a resident of Rock Island he was engaged in the hotel business, but after coming to Barton County he turned his attention to farming and stock raising, and has been quite successful, owning at the present time 450 acres of as good land as there is in the county. On the 8th of June, 1863, he was married to Mary Walsh, a daughter of Daniel and Matilda Walsh, who were born in County Antrim, Ireland, and Pennsylvania, respectively. She was born in Indiana County, Penn., Decem ber 12, 1840; and her union with Mr. Gray has resulted in the birth of ten children: Norman C., Celina, Freeman W., Olive, Fred J., Mark Lee and Cora A., living; and Scott P., Eva, and Frank W., who died in childhood. Mr. Gray is a staunch Repub lican, a strict temperance man, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Joel Green, a well-to-do farmer and stockman of Newport Township, was born in Hardin County, Iowa, in 1848, and came to Missouri in 1880. He spent his early days in following the plow and attending the common schools, and made his home with his parents until twenty six years of age, at which time he began farming for himself, and now owns 120 acres of good land in Barton County. He was married in 1883 to Miss Mattie Lisk, who was born in Johnson County, Mo., and she is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Green takes an active interest in politics and public matters, and is a staunch Republican in his political views, as was his father before him. He is a successful farmer, and makes a specialty of raising a good grade of horses and mules. He belongs to the Farmers' Alliance. His parents, L. D. and B. (Miller) Green, were born in New York and Kentucky, respectively, and at an early day immigrated to Hardin County, Iowa, which State was at that time a Territory. The father was of English descent, and in 1880 came to Barton County, Mo., where he continued to make his home until his death. The mother is still living, and resides in Barton County. The following are their children: Alexander; J. S., now in Kan sas; Elizabeth F., wife of O. B. Slinker, of Barton County; Mary, wife of Samuel Bishop, of Dade County; Louisa J., wife of Willis Devine, of Kansas; and Joel, who is the eldest of the family.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


James Gregory, another successful farmer and stock raiser of Lamar Township, Barton County, Mo., is a native of York County, Penn., born February 22, 1822, and is the son of John and Elizabeth (LaRue) Gregory, both natives of Pennsylvania, he of Scotch-Irish descent, and she of German and French. Mr. Gregory was an extensive farmer, and died in 1852. In 1835 they moved to Morgan County, ILL., and in the days of militia he was colonel of a regiment. He was a Whig in politics, and was a member of the Presbyterian Church, as was also the mother, who died in 1862. Of their family of seven children, five sons and two daughters, James Gregory was the third in order of birth. He attained his growth on the farm, and, while growing up, learned the blacksmith trade, at which he worked for some time. After farming and trading until 1852, he went to California by way of South America, visiting Brazil, Chili, etc., and, after reaching California, he mined, ranched and freighted for two years. He then returned by way of Central America, Cuba and New York. In 1862 he again went West, and remained abroad until 1868, engaged in mining, ranching, freighting, saw-milling and dealing in stock. He has been in every Territory but Alaska, Arizona and New Mexico. He bought Brigham Young's cattle when he died, located in Carbon County, Wyoming Territory, and drove stock from Texas and west to St. Louis. Having located in Carbon County, Wyoming Territory, he here engaged in the stock business until 1877, when he moved to Barton County, Mo., and settled on his present farm of over 1,200 acres, which is situated five miles east of Lamar. He devotes his energies to the raising of fine stock of all kind, and principally short horned cattle. In i860 he married Miss Frances B. Guyatt, a native of Canada, and the fruits of this union are two children: James R. and Mary B. While in Illinois, Mr. Gregory served eight years as sheriff, deputy sheriff and constable, and while in Wyoming he was chosen by both parties to the Legislature, but refused the position. He takes an active part in politics, is a Republican, as are also all the members of his family. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and his son is a Knight Templar. He began in life a poor boy, and has made his property by his own industry. He has traveled fourteen times across the continent, is a self made man, and one of the influential citizens of the county.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


C. A. Griffin was born in Fayette County, Penn., and is a son of W. P. and Mary Ann (Gans) Griffin, who were also natives of the "Keystone State." The father was of German Welsh descent, and was by occupation a farmer and sheep raiser. Eleven of the thirteen children born to him and wife are as follows: Dr. Griffin, of Lamar; C. A., a farmer, of Newport; Mary L., the deceased wife of G. W. Hanna; N. R., a farmer and liveryman of Fayette County, Ohio; H. E., widow of a Mr. Harris, of Fayette County, Penn.; George, a resident of the same; Mrs. Em, wife of Clark Hess, of Penn.; Libbie, wife of L. D. Ramsey, of that State; Annie, wife of John Emery, a farmer, of Fayette County; and Flora, at home with her parents; and Addie, who is deceased. Mr. Griffin and wife still reside on the old home farm in Pennsylvania, and are hale and hearty, although advanced in years, he being eighty and she seventy seven years of age. In politics Mr. Griffin was formerly a Democrat, then became a Whig, and is now a Republican. He and wife are active workers in the Christian Church. C. A. Griffin was reared on a farm, and received a somewhat limited education, owing to the poor facili ties in his boyhood days, but afterward took a course in an academy, and since, by much reading and contact with business life, he has become one of the well informed men of the county. His birth occurred on the 27th of March, 1839, and in 1866 he came to Missouri, having previously served three years in the U. S. A., being a private one year in the Eighty fifth Pennsyl vania Volunteers, and the second year was transferred to the U. S. Signal Corps, from which he received his discharge in Septem ber, 1864. He participated in twenty one engagements, among which are: Fredericksburg (first battle), Bull Run (second battle), Harper's Ferry, South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, the seven days fight under Grant through the Wilderness, and Peters burg, receiving his discharge at the latter place. He was never wounded nor taken prisoner. After coming to Missouri in October, 1866, he and his brother and another gentleman pur chased 1,000 acres of land in Newport Township, and his first winter was spent in getting out house logs, and erecting a house in 1866-67. In September, 1868, he was married to Miss E. J. Franks, of Fayette County, Penn., and remained in his native state until the following spring, when he returned to Missouri, and began farming in connection with his brother, N. R., being also engaged in the saw mill business. He now owns about 600 acres of land, and on his home farm is erected a handsome resi dence with a fine lawn and shade trees, and his out buildings are also excellent. His wife was born on the 18th of December, 1841, and they are the parents of these children: Ira, born March 15, 1874; H. B., born March 30, 1876; and Pearl, born March 7, 1878. Mr. and Mrs. Griffin are members of the Baptist Church, and he is a liberal contributor to churches, schools, etc.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


George W. Grigsby, grocery man and Queens ware merchant, at Lamar, Mo., was born in Spencer County, Ind., September 13, 1838, and is a son of Charles and Matilda (Hawkins) Grigsby, who were born respectively in Indiana and Kentucky. The paternal great grandfather was born in England, and came to America at an early day, settling in Virginia, and afterward in the "Blue Grass State." Grandfather Grigsby was kidnapped when seven years of age by the Indians, and kept until thirteen years of age. He was one of the early pioneers of the "Hoosier State." Charles and wife were married and lived in Indiana until 1851, when they came to Carroll County, Mo. He was a farmer by occupation, and during the late war served in the militia, and after that time was a Republican in his political views, having previously been a Whig. He and wife were members of the United Brethren Church, and he died in 1887, at the age of eighty two years. His wife still survives him, and is seventy two years of age. Their family consisted of eleven sons and two daughters, seven of the sons serving in the Union army during the late war. George W. is their sixth child, and is the only one who resides in Barton County. He acquired his education in the old log school house, and, on reaching manhood, engaged in farming, which he continued until the opening of the war, when, in June, 1861 he enlisted in Company I, Twenty Second Missouri Vol unteer Infantry, which was afterward consolidated with the Tenth, and became the Tenth. He was an active participant in the two famous battles of Iuka and Corinth, besides numerous minor engagements, and late in the year 1862 was discharged on account of disability. Later he joined Company B, Tenth Indiana Vol unteer Cavalry, in which he served until June 20, 1865, being mustered out as sergeant, at Vicksburg, Miss. After the war he engaged in merchandising in Carrollton, Mo., for two years, then went to Kansas, where he learned railroad carpentering, at which he worked for some time, then returned to Carroll County, where he farmed seven years, and again betook himself to merchandis ing. In 1878 he moved to Texas, and was engaged in the cattle business two years, then returned to the farm in Carroll County. Since 1882 he has been a merchant of Lamar, and is doing a prosperous business. He is a Republican, a member of the G. A. R. and belongs to the I. O. O. F. In 1872 he married Miss Hannah L. Blocher, a native of Indiana, who died in January, 1889 having borne two children: William E. and Lonnie.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Oliver H. Grimes, a farmer and stock raiser, was born in Union, Ind., April 30, 1832, and is a son of Adam and Sarah (Littrell) Grimes, who were of German and English descent, and were born in Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively. Grandfather Grimes was a German who came to America and served seven years in the Revolutionary War, being one of the first settlers of Union County, Ind. They spent the most of their days in Union County, but died in Shelby County, when about sixty two and fifty eight, respectively. The father was a Whig and Republican in politics, and he and his wife were members of the Christian Church. Oliver H. Grimes is the fifth of their eight children, and received the education and rearing which is accorded the average farmer's boy. He worked for his father until twenty one years of age, then began learning the carpenter's trade, at which he worked for about twelve years. In 1856 he was married to Miss Mildred A. Joyce, a native of Shelby County, Ind., by whom he has the following children: Albert P. (deceased), Aus tin H., Missouri A., L. Blanche, Tessie M., Rollie Z., Scott A., and Claude H. Mr. and Mrs. Grimes are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. They moved to Barton County, Mo., in 1868, and soon after purchased the farm where they now live, which consists of 280 acres of excellent farming land. Mr. Grimes is a Republican.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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