Welcome to
Barton County
Missouri

Biographies
~ H ~

Tom W. Harkless, mayor of Lamar, and a member of the firm of Harkless, Allen & Co., was born in Belmont County, Ohio, September 20, 1857, and is the son of James and Sarah J. (Mc-Conn) Harkless, natives of Ohio and West Virginia, respectively. The parents' courtship was rather romantic, culminating in flight and marriage. They settled in Ohio, where Mr. Harkless was engaged for some time in contracting on railroads; he helped build the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. He amassed quite a fortune, but lost the principal part of it before he went to Cole County, ILL., in 1860. He then had to begin almost anew, and turned his attention to farming, which he conducted successfully until he was in comfortable circumstances. The mother died at the age of forty seven, and, later, Mr. Harkless married again. His death occurred in September, 1883. He was a Republican in politics, and a member of the Methodist Church. Mrs. Harkless was a member of the Christian Church. To them were born six children, five now living, three sons and two daughters. James H. Harkless is a lawyer, and George A. is a partner in the above firm. Tom W. Harkless attained his growth on a farm, and received a good practical education in the common schools. In 1879 he left the farm, and, for about three years, clerked for McCutchen & Jones, and soon after became a member of the firm. Subsequently the other members dropped from the firm, and again formed a partnership, while Mr. Harkless and his partners assumed the firm title, Harkless, Allen & Co. They have the largest stock of dry goods and clothing in Southwest Missouri. January 29, 1882, he married Miss Edith E. Allen, daughter of William Allen, and to them have been born three children: Mabel, Kate, and Hazel. In April, 1889, Mr. Harkless was elected mayor of Lamar, having served two years previously as councilman. He is a staunch Republican in his political views; is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is a self made man in the true sense of the word.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John M. Harlow is a member of the real estate and loan firm of Gealy & Harlow. This business was established in 1874 by John M. Harlow, Sr., father of the subject of this sketch, who came to this county in May, 1870, and commenced in the dry goods business, which he continued until 1874, when he embarked in the real estate and loan business. He was a native of Augusta County, Va., born June 10, 1833, and came to Clark County, ILL., with his uncle, he being an orphan. He was there reared on a farm, and was there married to Miss Elizabeth Foglesong, a native of Indiana. He served in various offices in Clark County, and was deputy sheriff for some time. He came to Golden City in 1870, and remained here until his death, which occurred March 18, 1889, at the age of fifty five years. His wife died in 1879 at the age of about forty five years. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Harlow was a member of the I. O. O. F., and was justice of the peace for four years. He owned at his death 320 acres of land and con siderable town property, also property in other places in the West. He did a flourishing business in real estate for years, and was a man who was universally respected. John M. Harlow, Jr., is a native of Clark County, ILL., and came here with his parents in 1870. He was reared and educated in the public schools, and in 1885 was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Huly, a native of Illinois. To this union were born two chil dren, Mabel and Elizabeth. Mr. Harlow left this county in 1881, and moved to Clark County, serving as constable there for four years, after which he returned to Barton County. He then spent three years in Colorado, subsequently engaging in the real estate business at Lamar. In the fall of 1888 he returned and took charge of the interests of his father, and the firm is enjoying a liberal share of public patronage.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


William V. Hay, loan agent of Lamar, was born in Sangamon County, ILL., February 1, 1840, being a son of Eli and Armilda (Sterrit) Hay, who were born in Baltimore, Md., and Shelbyville, Ky., respectively. Grandfather Hay was born in Scotland, and, with two brothers, came to America. He settled in Maryland, a brother in Pennsylvania, and one in Ohio. The maternal grandfather was a Welshman, who was killed in the War of 1812, and Mrs. Hay was reared by an uncle. She and Mr. Hay were married in Lexington, Ky., and in 1836 moved to Sangamon County, ILL., when Springfield was a small village. Mr. Hay was a portrait painter by profession, and in those days did the fancy painting on the stage coaches. He was a Whig politically, and he and Abraham Lincoln were intimate acquaintances. He died May 6, 1851, followed by his wife May 23, 1868, her death occurring in Corydon, Iowa. The former was a Catholic, and the latter a Methodist. They were the parents of five children: William V. being the fourth of the family. He was educated in the old subscription schools, and in 1856 went with his mother to Wayne County, Iowa, and, at the age of sixteen years, began clerking, continuing three years. In 1859 he drove a team of mules to California, where he remained five years, being engaged in mining three years. He afterward made two more trips to that State, but from 1869 to 1880 was engaged in merchandising in Iowa. In 1881 he and John W. Hinds started the Fresno County Bank, and the following year came to Lamar, and has since been in the loan business. He is a Knight Templar in the Masonic fraternity, and is a Democrat politically. January 19, 1871, he was married to Alice I. Newell, a native of Monroe County, Iowa. They have no family.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Joseph M. Hazlitt, a prominent farmer and stock raiser, of Lamar Township, Barton County, Mo., is a native of Sussex County, N. J., born September 16, i8i6,and is the son of Alex ander and Sarah D. (Mackey) Hazlitt, both natives of New Jersey, he being of Scotch descent. Robert Hazlitt, the great grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a boatman, and the grandfather, John Hazlitt, was a captain of militia in Revolu tionary days, and took an active part in the stirring events of that period. Alexander and Sarah D. (Mackey) Hazlitt were married in New Jersey, and here Mr. Hazlitt followed the black smith business for many years, but later engaged in farming. Politically, he was a Democrat, and both were members of the Presbyterian Church. In 1837 they moved to LaSalle County, ILL., and two years later to Rock Island County, where Mrs. Haz litt died in 1842, at the age of fifty eight years. In 1849 he too passed away at the age of eighty one years. Their family con sisted of twelve children, six now living, three sons and three daughters. Joseph M. Hazlitt, the seventh child, received his education in the old subscription schools, and like a dutiful child he cared for his parents as long as they lived. December 27, 1849, he married Miss Caroline Leeds, a native of Clermont County, Ohio, born March 11, 1831, and the daughter of Felix and Mary A. (Doughty) Leeds, born, respectively, in New Jer sey and Ohio. When nine months old Mr. Leeds was taken by his parents to Ohio, where he grew to manhood and married Miss Doughty. About 1836 they moved to Ripley County, Ind., and six years later to Rock Island County, where she died in 1874, and he in 1883, aged sixty seven and seventy nine, respectively. After marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hazlitt lived in Illinois until 1873, when they moved to Barton County, Mo., and bought his present farm, three and a half miles northeast of Lamar. He owns 360 acres, and his wife 120 acres. To their marriage were born ten children: Felix L., Lewis M., Joseph M., Sarah P., Mary Z., Levi Y., Margaret E. (deceased); Frederick, James and Alexander. Mr. Hazlitt is a Democrat, politically; is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and is a successful and prominent citizen. Mrs. Hazlitt is a member of the Congregational Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Joseph H. Heath, editor and proprietor of the "Lamar Leader”. Among all classes and in every condition of life are those who excel in whatever they undertake, whether of a professional, agricultural or commercial nature, and no matter how disagree able the outlook on starting, they are sure to eventually reach the front and receive a share of the honor and credit due them. Among those whose early life was one of hardship and priva tion stands the name of Mr. Heath, who was left motherless at an early age, and whose educational advantages were very meager. He was born in Columbus, Ohio. September 21, 1848, and is the son of Hiram and Margaret (Taylor) Heath, natives of Ohio, where they grew up and were married. The mother died in 1857, in the prime of life, and left two children, Joseph H. and Lewis R. The father was a blacksmith, and followed this trade in Ohio for many years. Later he moved to Iowa, but is now living in Missouri. He served in the Union Army, during the late war. In 1861 Joseph H. Heath came to Iowa with an aunt, but in 1863, he went on to Denver, Colo., where he served an appren ticeship in the office of the Rocky Mountain News, and where he received the principal part of his education. Previous to leaving there he had charge of the press-room. October 25, 1870, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Baldwin, a native of Canada, and the daughter of Charles Baldwin, the great stockman of Colorado. After leaving Denver he went to Colum bus, Ohio, where he worked on the Ohio Statesman a time, and then started a job office. Three years later he went to Bur lington, worked on the “Burlington Hawkeye” for over a year, and then moved to Keokuk, Iowa, where he worked on the Gate City until 1877. He then bought the Clark County Gazette, which he ran until 1883, when he bought the Golden City Herald. This he continued running until 1888, when he came to Lamar and purchased the Lamar Leader, of which he is now editor and proprietor. To his marriage have been born five children; three sons and two daughters. He has always been a staunch Demo crat in his political views.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Jonathan Wesley Hendricks, collector of Ozark Township, is a native of Adams County, ILL., born in 1848, being a son of John and Elizabeth (Gilkey) Hendricks, who were born in Missouri and Kentucky, respectively, were married in Illinois, and in 1866 removed to Crawford County, Kan., and in 1877 to Barton County, Mo., where the mother died in March, 1887. Both parents were members of the Church of God, and he is still living and engaged in farming. His father, William Hendricks, was of German descent, and was one of the early settlers of Southeast Missouri but died in Illinois. Franklin Gilkey, the grandfather, was a Kentuckian, and also died in Illinois. Jonathan W. Hendricks, our subject, is the eldest of four children, and received a common school education in the State of Illinois. He removed with his parents to Kansas, and was married there in 1875 to Sarah E. Elliott, a daughter of Isaac and Eliza Elliott, who were Kentuckians and died in Kansas in 1886 and Indiana in 1865, respectively. Mrs. Hendricks was born in Indiana, and she and Mr. Hendricks are the parents of two daughters. In 1877 the family came to Barton County, Mo., and the next year located on their present farm, which consists of eighty acres. Mr. Hendricks is a Repub lican politically, and cast his first presidential vote for Grant, in 1872. In 1889 he was elected township collector for two years, and is at the present time a member of the Farmers' Alliance. He and wife are consistent members of the Church of God. His sisters are Mrs. Mary Boulware, Mrs. Nancy Frame and Mrs. Alice Venable, of Pike County, Mo.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


J. M. Herlocker, one of Barton County's prosperous mer chants, was born in the State of Pennsylvania in 1842, and made his home with his father until twenty years of age, when he joined the Eighty fourth Illinois Infantry, Company F, under Colonel Waters, and served until receiving his discharge in June, 1865, having been in the engagements at Perryville, Danville, Stone River, Chickamauga, where he was wounded in the leg by a gunshot, Franklin and Nashville. After the war he taught school until about 1881 in Illinois and Missouri, coming to the latter State in 1878, and purchased a partially improved farm in Newport Township. Then he engaged in his present business, his stock of goods being valued at from $3,000 to $4,000. He is doing a thriving trade, and has increased his capital about $3,000, his annual sales amounting to $6,000. In 1881 he was married to Miss Ida M. Hickman, of Pennsylvania, by whom he has two children, Bertha and Reed. Mr. Herlocker is a Demo crat politically, and has served his party as justice of the peace and township trustee. His early opportunities for acquiring an education were not of the best, but by self application he became a well educated man, and acquired a thorough knowledge of public affairs. His parents, Josiah and Margaretta (Swartz) Herlocker, were born in Pennsylvania in 1807 and 1817, respect ively, and the former has always taken a deep interest in church work, being, as was his wife, a member of the Christian Church. They were married in 1834, and were engaged in agricultural pursuits in Pennsylvania until about 1849, when they moved to Illinois, and settled on a farm in McDonough County. He is now eighty three years of age, but is yet strong and active, and has recently gone on a visit to his old home in Illinois, a distance of about 500 miles. Five of his eight children are living: Mary J., wife of W. A. Griffin, of McDonough County, ILL.; Henry, in Marshall County, Iowa; J. M.; George, also of Marshall County, Iowa; and D. A., a druggist, of Fulton County, ILL. The mother of these children died in December, 1887.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


J. W. Hicks, one of the oldest settlers of Benton County, came here with his parents, J. W., Sr., and Elizabeth (Thompson) Hicks, in 1853. He was born in Christian County, Ky., and both his parents were also born in that State. The father was a blacksmith by trade, and followed this occupation in Golden City until 1877, when he moved to Dallas County, Mo., where he still resides, engaged in that occupation. His wife died in 1872, at the age of forty five years. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and became the mother of eleven children, three of whom came to Barton County; J. W., our subject; Drucilla, who died at the age of fourteen years; and Josephine, the wife of Daniel French, of Golden City. J. W. Hicks learned the blacksmith's trade of his father, and became very skillful in that calling, and, in addition to horse shoeing, is engaged in the manufacture of wagons, car riages, etc., and employs two men in his shop. In 1869 he was married to Miss Maggie Hedrick, a native of Illinois, who died in 1872, having borne one child, which died in infancy. In 1874 Mr. Hicks wedded his second wife, Miss Anna Jones, who was born in Herefordshire, England, and by her has two children living; John W. and Kittie Oletha; Corda died in childhood. Mr. Hicks is a Democrat, and has held the office of constable. He is in good circumstances financially and owns considerable valuable town property, his shop being the second one erected in Golden City. He is a Master Mason, and is one of the well educated men of the county.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Joseph C. A. Hiller, farmer, of Barton County, Mo., and president of the Farmers' Alliance, was born in the Province of Silesia, in the Kingdom of Prussia, in 1855, and is the son of Anton and Theresia (Schoen) Hiller, who were also natives of that county, the former's birth occurring in 1824. He was a farmer by occupation, and, in 1869, came to America, settling in St. Louis County, Mo., but is now residing with his son, Joseph C. A. His wife is still residing in Germany, never having come to America. Joseph C. A. Hiller grew to manhood in St. Louis County, Mo., his days being spent in tilling the soil. In 1884 he settled in Barton County, where he and his brother, F. A. J. Hiller, purchased 160 acres of land, and has since been actively engaged in farming and stock raising. He was one of the chief organizers of the County Alliance, and, in February, 1889, was elected president of that body. He was married in St. Louis County, in 1876, to Miss Emma Elert, who was a native of that county, born in 1858. They have four children: Emma, Joseph, Ida C. and Mary. His brother, Frank A. J. Hiller, was also born in Prussia, his birth occurring in 1856. He came to America in 1870, and from early boyhood has been familiar with the details of farm life. He acquired a good education in the public schools, and since 1883 has been engaged in farming in Barton County. He takes a great interest in politics, and is chairman of the Rich land Township Democratic Committee. He is unmarried.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Dr. C. W. Hinchman, one of the leading physicians of Golden City, Mo., is a native of London, England, and a son of Charles and Jane (Green) Hinchman, who emigrated to America when the subject of this sketch was a small child, settling at Newark, N. J., where a short time later the mother died, leaving two chil dren. C. W. Hinchman then went to live with an uncle, but only remained a short time when he left, and, although a small boy, commenced working on his own responsibility. He strug gled along, working on the farm and at various occupations, educating himself as best he could at spare times. In 1850 he came to Charleston, ILL., where he engaged as a clerk in a store for a number of years. He then took up the study of medicine, and first located to practice at Quincy, ILL., where he remained four years, after which he then went to Kinderhook, ILL., prac ticed there two years, and then went to Macoupin County, of the same State, where he practiced his profession for twenty years, from i860 to 1880, most of the time in the county seat, Carlinville. He then came to Golden City, Mo., where he has since resided, and at this time has a good, substantial practice. He is a gradu ate of the American Medical College, of St. Louis, and has a special diploma on the eye and ear. He also bears certificates of scholarship from the Eclectic Medical College, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and from several other institutions. He was married in 1856 to Miss Zerilda Ingram, a native of Coles County, ILL., and daughter of John C. Ingram, a native of Kentucky. Dr. Hinchman is truly a self made man, having educated himself and made his own way from a poor orphan boy. His practice extends through Dade, Cedar, Jasper and Barton Counties.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


G. W. Holliday, a leading real estate agent of Golden City, has been a resident of Southwest Missouri for twenty years. He was born in Morgan County, ILL., and is the son of Hiram and Viana (McLaughlin) Holliday, natives of Virginia and Ohio, re spectively. The father was an early settler of Morgan County, ILL., and was the first postmaster at Whitehall, ILL., having named that town. He was a soldier in the late war, in the Sixty first Illinois Volunteers; was taken prisoner, and died at Macon, Ga., August 24, 1862, while in prison. The mother still lives at Waverly, Morgan County, ILL., and is seventy nine years of age. G. W. Holliday was reared on the farm, and received his education in the public schools of Greenfield, ILL. At the age of twenty one years, or on August 14, 1861, he enlisted in the Union Army, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, Company C, and served three years and four months. He participated in Grierson's raids, which con sisted of sixty battles, and was also at Port Hudson. He was principally engaged in scouting and skirmishing. After the battle of Franklin he was discharged, and returned to Illinois, where he remained until 1869, when he purchased a farm in Dade County, Mo., and two years later moved to it. There he made his home until 1880, when he moved to Golden City, and commenced the real estate business, which he still continues. He chose for his companion in life Miss Mary V. Garey, a native of Macoupin County, ILL., and this union has resulted in the birth of three children: Charles Frederick, Effie and Fannie. In his political views Mr. Holliday is a Republican. He is a member of the G. A. R. He owns 800 acres of land, carries on farming and stock raising, and has 100 head of cattle and sixteen head of horses. He is one of the prominent men of the county. Eighty acres of his land at Cross Timbers, Hickory County, is said to have good lead and silver ore in paying quantities if transporta tion was furnished.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Charles W. Huggins, postmaster of Lamar, Mo., was born in Liverpool, Penn., January 8, 1848, and is the second of five chil dren born to John and Anna M. (Reifsnyder) Huggins, both natives of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch and German descent, respectively. The father was collector of tolls on a Pennsylvania canal for many years. He died in 1859. The mother is still living, and is a resident of Pennsylvania. Owing to the death of his father, the education of Charles W. Huggins did not receive the attention merited, and he did not attend school after he was fourteen years of age. At the age of fifteen years he came to Logansport, Ind., to live with a rich uncle; but, not liking the appearance of that gentleman, he came on to Clark County, Mo., where he clerked in a store for several years. He then spent five years in the Black Hills and in the West, after which he returned to Clark County, Mo., and was there married to Miss Mary Folker, who bore him a son. Mr. Huggins followed farming in Clark County until 1882, when he moved to Lamar, bought the paper, “Barton County Progress”, and, in connection with Mr. Lee Chiswell, ran it until 1888, Mr. Huggins being business manager, and Mr. Chiswell editor. Although without experience, Mr. Huggins went to work, and soon could set up a column as quickly as anyone. The name of the paper was changed to “Lamar Democrat”, and the circulation increased from 450 to 1,500. In 1885 Mr. Huggins was appointed postmaster at Lamar. March 15, 1887, he married Miss Sarah Groves, a native of Illinois, who bore him one child, a daughter. He is an Odd Fellow, and, in his politics, affiliates with the Democratic party.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Mrs. Emily Hull, widow of the late J. W. Hull, was born in Logan County, Ohio, in 1830, and was reared and married in her native State, the latter event taking place in 1849. Her husband was born in 1829, and was reared to manhood in Lincoln County, Ohio, receiving his education in the common schools. After residing in different counties in their native State until 1869, they removed to Barton County, Mo., where Mr. Hull died on the 14th of March, 1875, the result of hard service and imprisonment during the Civil War. He was one of the noble "boys in blue," and first served in an artillery company, afterward joining the One Hundred and Thirty fifth Ohio National Guard, and was taken prisoner at North Mountain, Va., while guarding a railroad station. He lay for several months in Southern prisons, being at Andersonville, and at Charleston. S. C, and in the latter place was kept between the Federal gunboats and the city, in order to keep the Federal army from bombarding the bay. He was finally paroled at Goldsboro, S. C, and returned home, but never saw a well day afterward, owing to the privations he had to endure during his long term of imprisonment. His widow has received aback pension of $1,940, and receives twelve dollars a month besides. Their children are as follows: Sarah E., wife of G. W., Bowers; W. K., Philander, James E., Frank and Jennie. Mrs. Hull is a daughter of Matthias and Elizabeth (Greene) Williams, the former's birth occurring in Virginia, October 1, 1801. He was taken to Champaign County, Ohio, when four years old, and was there reared to manhood, his marriage taking place in Logan County. He was a farmer, and died in Union County, in the fall of 1865. His parents, John and Sarah (Wheeler) Williams, were born, reared and married in North Carolina, and afterward settled in Culpeper County, Va., and finally went to Ohio, and took up their abode in Logan County. J. W. Hull was the son of William and Sarah (Martin) Hull, who were Virginians, and early settlers of Ohio. The father was born in 1800, and died in Barton County, Mo., in 1875. He was the father of nine children, and three of his sons served in the Federal army during the late war.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John J. Humphrey, the oldest merchant but one of Lamar, was born in Licking County, Ohio, June 14, 1841,and is the son of Darwin and Marietta (Humphrey) Humphrey, the grandson of Philander Humphrey, the great grandson of Daniel Humphrey, the great, great, grandson of Michael Humphrey, the great, great, great, grandson of John Humphrey, the great, great, great, great, grandson of Sergeant John Humphrey, and the great, great, great, great, great grandson of Michael Humphrey. In the possession of the Humphrey family is a complete family history running back about 800 years. Michael Humphrey was the first to immigrate to America from England, and his arrival was some time prior to 1643. Of his direct descendants over 500 families are recorded; some have held high civil and military positions, and others have risen to distinction in the professions. David Humphrey, one of the descendants, was Gen. Washington's aid, and later was minister to Portugal, from which country he imported the first merino sheep to America. Daniel Humphrey was in the Connecticut Legislature during twenty seven sessions. Philander Humphrey was an eminent physician, who died at the age of fifty two years with the croup. He served several terms in the Connecticut Legislature. His wife, Anna Shelby, lived to be eighty three years of age. Darwin was born in Hartland, Conn., May 13, 1808, and at the age of twenty two began merchandising in his native town. In 1834 he married Miss Marietta Shelby, who was born in Connecticut February 14, 1812. In 1835 they moved to Granville, Ohio, where Mr. Humphrey followed mer chandising, and held the office of postmaster for many years. In 1869 he came to Missouri, locating at Lamar, and has lived a retired life since. Prior to the war he was a strong Democrat, but since then he has been an equally ardent Republican. He saw Gen. La Fayette in 1824, and is probably the only man in the county who has seen that celebrated officer. Mr. and Mrs. Humphrey are the parents of four children, two sons and two daughters. John J. Humphrey, the oldest, but one of this family, had excellent educational advantages in the public schools and at Dennison University, but says he liked fun too well to lose any time in acquiring an education. At the age of fifteen he be gan clerking in a country store, and by the time he was twenty years of age he became a partner with his father in a store in his native town of Granville. In 1866 he came to Missouri, and the following year to Lamar, engaging with Dr. Charles Van Pelt in general merchandising, which he continued until 1872, when he changed his line of business to hardware, stoves, furniture, etc., and, his brother becoming a partner, the style of the firm was changed to Humphrey Bros. In 1871 he married Miss Mary E. McCutchen, a native of Cooper County., Mo., and to them was born six children, five living, two sons and three daughters. June 26, 1888, Mrs. Humphrey died. While in college one of Mr. Humphrey's professors, in a moment of irritation, said to him, that he would never be anything or have anything. Visit ing Mr. Humphrey two or three years since, he was compelled to take back his prophecy, as Mr. Humphrey is one of the leading merchants and citizens of Lamar.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

Return to

Barton County

Missouri

Genealogy Trails

Copyright © Genealogy Trails
All data on this website is Copyright by Genealogy Trails with full rights reserved for original submitters.