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Joseph C. Parry, one of the oldest settlers of Lamar, Barton County, Mo., was born in Wales on the 25th of February, 1833, being a son of Thomas O. and Margaret Parry, the former a na tive of England, and the latter of Wales. They were married and resided in the latter country until 1839, when they came to Amer ica, and after living in New York for some time moved to Canada, where they both died at about the age of eighty four years. The father was a woolen manufacturer, but failed in that business, and during the latter part of his life turned his attention to mer chandising. Joseph C. Parry is the second of their nine children, and in his youth did not receive very good educational advan tages. He attended night schools and read newspapers until he became an exceptionally well informed man. At the age of fif teen years he began learning the blacksmith's trade, serving an apprenticeship of five years, and later learned the machinist's trade, at which he worked four years. He became a master work man, and followed this trade in Canada until about 1850, when he went to Louisiana and worked in several different places in that State. While there he married Josephine Ward, a sister of Ed ward G. Ward, whose sketch appears in this work, Judge Ward and himself at a time subsequent carrying on the dry goods and grocery trade. In July, 1852, they came to Jasper (now Barton) County, Mo., and located on a half section of land where Lamar now stands, buying from the Government, but under the Swamp Land Act it was given to the county, so Mr. Parry had to buy it again. He built the first blacksmith shop in the town, and was the first postmaster of Lamar, and the first assessor of the county. In 1861 he had a large store in Carthage. When the town of Lamar was laid off he gave fifty acres for a town site. In 1863-64 he served as County Treasurer and in 1873 was appointed by Governor Woodson as probate judge, and was also presiding judge of the county court. During the war he went to Kansas, where he served a short time in the State Militia as second lieu tenant, and was offered a captaincy, but declined it. After the cessation of hostilities he returned to Lamar, where he now owns 190 acres of land and a number of town lots. The first sawmill was erected by him in 1857. He is a Mason and a Democrat, and by his first wife, who died in 1860, he became the father of four children, two sons and two daughters. In 1863 he wedded Miss Nancy Oldham, by whom he became the father of ten children, four sons and three daughters now living. In an early day Mr. Parry ran the stage line from Sedalia to Neosho by way of Lamar and Carthage, carrying the mail for $3,000 per year. This he continued about two years, afterward selling the line to Parker & Smith, of Springfield, Mo., for $7,000.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Oscar A. Pelton, of Barton County, Mo., was born in Chit tenden County, Vt., in the town of Shelburne, on the 17th of February, 1832, being a son of Daniel and Lovina (Benson) Pelton, who were also born in that county, the former's birth occur ring in 1805, and the latter's in 1802. They were married in their native State, and, about 1835, moved to Syracuse, N. Y., where the father died in May, three years later, the mother's death occurring in Chicago, ILL., in 1874. The paternal grand father was born in Vermont, was a cooper by trade, and was killed, in 1805, by a falling tree. Oscar A. Pelton is the eldest of two surviving members of a family of four children, and, after his father's death, returned, with his mother, to Vermont. Here he remained, attending the district schools and working at farm labor until nineteen years of age, when he went to Leyden, Cook County, ILL., and there made his home until September 18, 1861, at which date he enlisted in Company D, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, and remained in the service just three years. He participated in the battles of Williamsburg, Second Bull Run. Antietam, Gettys burg, Fredericksburg and the Wilderness. After receiving his discharge he returned to Cook County, ILL., and began peddling milk in Chicago, continuing this occupation until 1870, when he married Miss Helen Webster, who was born in Geauga County, Ohio, November 3, 1840, a daughter of Andrew and Lorissa Webster, who were born in Canada and Massachusetts, respect ively, the former's birth occurring in 1812. To Mr. and Mrs. Pelton the following children have been born: Maud, born on the 23d of June, 1871, and is now deceased; Addie, born July 8, 1872; Bertha, born July 23, 1873; Grace, born August 6, 1874; Oscar, born March 15, 1879, and is now dead; Harry, born August 29, 1881 (deceased); and Helen, born January 26, 1884. On the 11th of April, 1882, Mr. Pelton and family arrived in Barton County, Mo., where he soon after purchased 220 acres of land, and also had 320 acres in Oregon County. He has since been actively engaged in tilling the soil, and is considered one of the first farmers of the county. He is a Republican in his polit ical views, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


A. D. Pittenger, a prominent man of Barton County, Mo., was born in Wayne County, Ohio, in 1835 and 1845, respectively. His father, Peter Pittenger, was of German descent, and was born in 1801. He was married to Miss Elizabeth McMillen, who was born in 1802, and their deaths occurred in Ohio, in 1850 and 1882, respectively. The grand father, Henry Pittenger, was born in Prussia. A. D. Pittenger is the sixth in his father's family. He received his education in the common schools of Ohio. In 1855 he went to Northern Illinois, and, at the end of two years, removed to Pike County, ILL., and remained there until the spring of 1859, when he went to Pike's Peak, in search of gold. When the war broke out he enlisted in Company I, Eighth Illinois Infantry, and, after remaining in the service three months, was discharged, and returned to Pike County, ILL. In November, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Fifth Illinois Cavalry, and was in active service three years and eleven months. He was mustered out as first lieutenant. He came to Barton County, Mo., in 1870, and engaged in school teaching, which occupation he followed six years, and then opened a drug store in Nashville, Mo. In 1885 he was married to Mary E. Ennis, who died in 1886. Three years later he wedded Miss Emma Sensney, a native of Illinois, born in i860. He has always been a Republican in politics, and was elected on that ticket in 1872 to the office of county super intendent of schools. He cast his first presidential vote for John C. Fremont. He was appointed postmaster at Nashville, in June, 1889. He is a member of the Masonic lodge at Lamar, and, in his relations with the public, has commanded the respect and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


C. Pittenger, A. D.’s brother, is the youngest of his father's family, and when the war broke out, like his brother he espoused the Union cause, and enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for the term of three years, and was discharged after serving ten months, on account of disability contracted in the service. He returned to Ohio, where he remained until February, 1870, when he came to Barton County, Mo., and taught the first school ever taught in the village of Nashville. In July, 1872, on account of poor health, he returned to Ohio, where he was married in October, 1874, to Miss S. A. Forster, who was born in Erie County, Ohio, in 1850. In 1882 he returned to Barton County, Mo., and was appointed notary public during the administration of Gov. T. T. Crittenden, and, in the spring of 1883, he was elected to the office of justice of the peace, and has served in both these capacities ever since. He is also a Republican in his political views, and cast his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John A. Pool & Sons, brokers of Lamar, Mo. Mr. Pool was born in Morgantown, West Va., December 12, 1820, and is a son of Reverend Asby and Valinda (Lanham) Pool, who were of Ger man and Irish descent, and were born in Virginia and West Vir ginia, respectively. They were married in Morgantown, W. Va., and the father's useful days were spent in preaching the gos pel, being an expounder of the Methodist doctrine, but later in life he gave his attention to farming, and died at the age of eighty years. His wife died while in the prime of life. John A. is the second of their nine children, and was educated in an academy at Morgantown. At the age of twenty one he began working by the day at fifty cents per day, and afterward turned his attention to farming, and then became a Baptist minister. After moving to Somerset County, Penn., he took charge of the Turkey Foot Baptist Church, one of the oldest churches in that State. Some years later he moved to Monroe, Greene County, Wis., where he spent ten years, and organized the First Baptist Church in that city. He next went to Indianola, Iowa, where he also organized the first church, and remained seven years. He next located at Warrensburg, Mo., remaining three or four years, then went to Neosho, where he remained about the same length of time, and then came to the First Missionary Baptist Church of Lamar. He now belongs to the Free Will Baptist Church, at Barton Center, and has retired from his ministerial duties, and has taken up his present business. He has been a successful financier, and is one of the largest landholders of Barton County, being the owner of twenty one good farms, besides considerable town property. In the fall of 1862 he enlisted in Company I, Twenty seventh Iowa Infantry, United States Army, and after serving one year, was discharged on account of disability. He is now a Republican in politics, and is a member of the G. A. R. In 1842 he was married to Miss Cassanda Brumage, a native of Middleton, W. Va., and by her became the father of five chil dren, two of whom are living: Ephraim, a real estate dealer and money broker, and Cassanda. After this wife's death in Penn sylvania, he married Miss Rebecca Spangler, of Maryland, and by her has four children: George W., a jeweler at Lamar; Kate E., wife of Rev. A. K. Wray; Charles, a harness maker, of Lamar; and Frank, at home.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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