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JAMES W. RECTOR
James W. Rector, of Rangely, in Rio Blanco county, one of the leading and most successful ranchers in the section, is a native of Barton county, Missouri, where he was born on August 29, 1862, and is the son of Jacob and Jane E. (Peery) Rector, the father a native of Kentucky and the mother of Illinois. After their marriage they located in Missouri, where they were prosperous farmers. The father died in 1869, and after that sad event James, who was the oldest of the four children, was obliged to work as soon as he was able to aid in supporting the family. His wages were small but of material assistance in this laudable desire. The other children are Jacob, who lives in Scott county, Kansas; Benjamin F., also of Scott county, Kansas, and Alice, wife of John Taylor, of Kansas. Under the circumstances surrounding his boyhood and youth it was impossible for Mr. Rector to get much education in the schools, but he managed to attend a few terms in the winter months. At the age of seventeen years he started out for himself, going to western Texas and making Colorado City his headquarters. There he was employed as a range rider until 1882. He then moved to a point one hundred miles north of Pacos, Texas, on Seven Rivers, in New Mexico, and continued range riding in the employ of William Adams, an extensive cattle-grower. From the spring of 1884 to the fall of 1885 he was engaged in bringing outfits over the trail. In the fall of 1885 he came to Colorado and pre-empted a ranch four miles west of Rangely, to which he has added by purchases from time to time, until now, in partnership with R.G. Peters, of Manistee, Michigan, he owns seventeen hundred acres, one thousand of which are now under cultivation in hay, grain and vegetables. The ranch has an abundant supply of water for this acreage and the land is highly productive and thoroughly cultivated. The improvements are extensive and valuable, being of an unusually ornate and costly order, and were all made by Mr. Rector who is the active manager of the property and business. The dwelling is one of the most imposing and beautiful in this section of the county, being in the midst of extensive grounds tastefully laid out and carefully tended. In political faith Mr. Rector is a firm and faithful Democrat, taking an earnest and helpful part in the councils of his party and always working with energy for its success. He has been a county commissioner since 1900, and the wisdom of the choice is manifested by the excellence of his work in the office. He belongs to the Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen, and in their workings he also takes an active interest. He was married on April 9, 1899, to Miss Rose M. McNew, who was born in Barton county, Missouri, and they have two children, James R. and Rubie L.
(Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)


Herbert L. Reed, a prominent merchant of Irwin, Mo., was born in Stark County, ILL., on the 16th of October, 1848, being a son of Isaac C. and Luna (Pomeroy) Reed, who were born in Litchfield County, Conn., and Vermont, in 1821 and 1824, respectively, and are yet living, enjoying fairly good health. Isaac C. learned the shoemaker's trade of his father, and in 1841 left Connecticut for Illinois. He worked at his calling until 1868, when he went to California, residing there eighteen months, and then came to Barton County in 1871, where he still resides. He has been engaged in farming since 1868, in which occupation he has met with well deserved success. He is a Chapter Mason and a Democrat. His parents, William A. and Amy Reed, were born in the "Nutmeg State" and moved to Illinois about 1841, where they died in 1882 and 1874, respectively. The former was of Scotch descent, a shoemaker by trade, and during the War of 1812 was an active participant in a number of engagements. Herbert L. Reed is the eldest of the following children: Herbert L.; Miles A., an engineer in Colorado, but whose home is in Weeping Water, Neb.; Sewell S., who is foreman of the Weep ing Water Stone Company, and superintends 365 hands; and Ernest A., who is an employee of the Denver Street Railroad Company. Herbert L. Reed received his education in the com mon schools of Stark County, ILL., and at the age of nineteen years began doing for himself, having previously learned the har ness maker's trade. In the year 1870 he came to Barton County and located in Union Township, where he engaged in farming and stock trading, and since 1885 has given his attention to the mercantile trade in Irwin. The same year he built a mill on his farm, which he has since operated. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., in his political views is a Democrat, and in 1886 was appointed postmaster of Irwin. November 3, 1872, he married Amanda O. Bickford, who was born in Fulton County, ILL., in 1852, and by her has these children: Edwin P., Laura, Pearl and Grover. Mrs. Reed is a daughter of John Bickford.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Cecil B. Rhodes, real estate, loan and insurance agent, at Lamar, Mo., was born in Fort Wayne, Ind., January 3, 1858, being a son of Marcus L. and Sarah E. (Harmony) Rhodes, who were born in Ohio and Pennsylvania, respectively. They were both taken to Indiana when young, and were there reared and married, the father being engaged in mercantile pursuits. When the war broke out he went out as captain of Company A, One Hundredth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was afterward promoted to the rank of colonel of his regiment. Shortly after being promoted he took the measles and died, at Memphis, Tenn., being only about thirty years of age. His widow is residing with her father in Barton County. Cecil B. Rhodes is the only surviving one of two children, and received his early education in the schools of Fort Wayne. When only fourteen years old he began clerking in a store, continuing five years, and then opened a store of his own at Concord, Ind., and later at Auburn, Ind., but was burned out at the latter place, losing everything. After traveling a year for a New York boot and shoe house, he resigned and came to Lamar, and in 1883 established his present business, in which he is doing well. He was $1,500 in debt on coming to the county, but is now the owner of 1,200 acres of land, besides town property. August 27, 1884, he was married to Miss Sallie B. Finney, a native of St. Louis and a daughter of Capt. William H. Finney, and by her has one child: Charley. Mrs. Rhodes is a member of the Episcopal Church. He is a Democrat, and a K. of P.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Frederick Richards, deceased, a well-to-do farmer and stone mason, was born in Germany in 1829, and in 1851 left his native land and came to the United States, locating in Decatur, ILL., where he resided until 1867, when he came to Barton County, Mo., and here died in February, 1884. He was an industrious, intelligent and successful farmer, and was quite fortunate in the accumulation of worldly goods. He was a member of the I. O. O. F., and served one term as collector of Barton County. He was married in Decatur, ILL., in 1855, to Miss Louisa Koehler, whose native birthplace was New York City, her birth taking place in 1837. Her parents, John W. and Martha Koehler, were both Germans, who came to the United States in 1836, and resided in New York City one year. They afterward moved to Decatur, ILL., and, in 1868, came to Barton County, where Mr. Koehler died in 1869. His wife is yet living. To Mr. and Mrs. Richards were born the following children: A. L., John W., Clara O., Emma; Sophia, wife of Newton Black; Christopher C, Charles, Frederick and Ollie. In 1884 Mrs. Richards moved to her present farm, about fourteen miles west of Lamar. It con tains 460 acres, and is in Central and Ozark Townships.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Alpheus Richards is a well-to-do farmer residing in Newport Township, and is the owner of 190 acres of well improved and fertile land. His native birthplace is Erie County, N. Y., and he is the son of John M. and Fannie (Moffet) Richards, who were born in Vermont and Connecticut, respectively. They moved to York State in 1818, and there the father was engaged in tilling the soil. His father, Daniel Richards, was a soldier in the Revo lutionary War, and the great grandfather was Humphrey Richards, a native of Wales. Alpheus was reared on a farm and had but a limited education. At the age of twenty years he left New York and went to Erie County, Penn., where he worked as a farm hand for about five years, and was there married to Miss Abigail Perry in 1857. She held a first class certificate in Erie County as a teacher, and had taught nine terms of school. He afterward purchased fifty acres of land in Erie County, and was engaged in tilling the soil on his own account there until 1868, when he emigrated to Whiteside County, ILL., and a year later to Polk County, Iowa, improving a farm and remaining in the latter place for five years. From that time until 1879 he resided in Crawford County, Kan., and at the lat ter date became a resident of Barton County, and bought the farm on which he is now residing. He and wife have six chil dren: Emma, wife of Dr. A. F. Huntoon, of Girard, Kan.; A. L., a farmer of the county; Delia, Harlie A., Alma E. and Mattie E. Mr. Richards and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a Republican in his political views, and has held the office of justice of the peace in Iowa as well as in Mis souri. He was a candidate, in 1882, for county judge. He and wife have been taking the Chautauqua course (C. L. S. C.) of studies, and will receive diplomas next year, 1890.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Clayton Rogers, a druggist and farmer of Milford, Mo., was born in Fayette County, Penn., in 1842, and has been a resident of Barton County, Mo., since 1874. His parents, Georgu P. and Eliza (Clayton) Rogers, were also born in the "Keystone State", the former in 1802, and the latter in 1814. When Southern Ohio was almost a wilderness, George P. Rogers moved there, and was one of the men who established the first iron furnace in the State, at Brush Creek, called the Brush Creek Furnace. He was an active politician, and, previous to the late war, was a staunch Whig. In 1862 he enlisted in the Union Army, but was too old for active service, and soon returned home, having merely joined in order to induce others to do so. In his political views he then became a Republican, and so remained until his death, in 1885. He was a great admirer of James G. Blaine. His wife is still living and enjoys good health. Clayton Rogers commenced business for himself in 1861, and then enlisted in the Thirty third Ohio as a private, and was mustered out in 1865 as first lieuten ant, having participated in the following battles: Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Pumpkin Vine, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta and Jonesboro, besides many minor combats and skirmishes, but was never wounded or taken prisoner. After the war he returned to Ohio, and entered a commercial college, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and afterward spent some time as a clerk in a clothing store. In 1868 he came to Missouri, and located at Bolivar, being engaged in teaching there, and then came to Stockton, where he was occupied in the photograph business and clerked in a drug store until 1874. Since that time he has resided in Barton County, engaged in his present business. He was married in Stockton, on the 17th of June, 1871, to Miss M. E. Brazier, a native of Missouri, and by her is the father of three children, two living: Lily Dell, who died December if, 1874; Maud, born June 17, 1874; and Ethel Lee, born April 13, 1879. Mrs. Rogers is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Rogers has been town ship treasurer and trustee two terms, being elected on the Repub lican ticket, of which he is a member, and has been postmaster of Milford for nine years. He is very public spirited, and gives lib erally to all worthy enterprises. He owns 120 acres of good farming land. His brothers and sisters are as follows: S. J., married, and living in Ohio; A. I., who is in the Pension Department, at Washington, D. C.; W. P., residing in Kansas; Hattie C, wife of F. L. Johnson, residing in Ohio; George P., a painter, of Cincinnati, Ohio; Mary C, wife of F. L. Lepage, of Ohio; Libbie C; and J. A., a boot and shoe merchant of Ironton, Ohio.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


George W. Rouse, a farmer of LeRoy Township, was born in Shelby County, Ind., in 1836, and is a son of William and Anna (Tanner) Rouse, who were born, reared, and married in Ken tucky, afterward removing to Indiana, where Mrs. Rouse died in 1841. Mr. Rouse afterward married again, and died in Johnson County, Ind., in 1883, having been a farmer through life. His father, Samuel Rouse, was of German descent, a Virginian, and died in Shelby County, Ind. George W. Rouse received but little schooling in his youth. He was married, in 1861, to Miss Martha, a daughter of Elias and Sarah Yoke, who were born in Kentucky, and died in Indiana. To Mr. and Mrs. Rouse nine children were born, four of whom are living: Leslie, Bert, Oscar, and Laura B. Their children that are dead are buried in Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri. In 1878 Mr. Rouse moved, with his family, to Barton County, Mo., and now owns an excellent farm of eighty acres, on which is a fine house and good buildings. In 1862 Mr. Rouse joined Company K, One Hundredth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, for three years, or until the close of the war, in the Army of the Tennessee, and was with Sherman in the battles of Jackson, Mission Ridge, the Georgia and Atlanta campaigns, and was present at the grand review, in Washington, D. C. He received his discharge at Indianapolis, Ind., and returned to farm life. One of his broth ers, Christopher C, served throughout the entire war, in the Twenty sixth Indiana Infantry, Rifle Corps; and, another, David, was in the Thirty third Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Mr. Rouse was reared a Democrat, but is now a Republican politically.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

John E. Rundell, county court clerk of Barton County, Mo., is a native of Macoupin County, ILL., born November 22, 1853, being the son of John E. and Roxanna (Fay) Rundell, natives, respectively, of New York and Illinois. When a young man, John E. Rundell, Sr., came to Illinois, and was here married to Miss Fay. He built the first house in Plainview, ILL., and there established himself in mercantile business. He died in the prime of life, and the mother afterward married John Loper, with whom she came to this county in 1873, and where she is still living. John E. Rundell is the only child living born to the first marriage. He received his education in the common school, and a course at Blackburn University, Carlinville, ILL. In 1874 he came to this county, served a year as deputy county court clerk, then, having clerked for a time in a store, he opened a grocery store on an extensive scale, doing an annual business of $25,000. After following this business for about six years, he found himself about $10,000 in debt, and, of course, thought it best to abandon the business. He was fortunate in liquidating all the debts, and afterward engaged in the loan, insurance and real estate business. In 1886 he was elected county court clerk, which position he is holding at the present time, and is one of the foremost men of the county. In his politics he affiliates with the Democrats. In 1878 Mr. Rundell married Miss Florence Smith, a native of Iowa, who bore him two children, a son and a daughter. Mr. Rundell has a fine poultry farm near Lamar, and takes great pride in his blooded fowls.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Milas Russel, farmer and stockman, was born in Tennessee, June 6, 1831, and is the seventh of eleven children born to the marriage of Thomas J. Russel and Mary Mone, who were born in South Carolina and Tennessee in 1789 and 1799, and died in Tennessee and Johnson County, Mo., in 1854 and 1879, respect ively. At an early day the father removed to Tennessee, and was there married and engaged in farming. His father, who also bore the name of Thomas, was of Irish descent (his father having been born in Ireland), and at the early age of sixteen he joined the patriot army and served in the Revolutionary War. Milas Russel received his education and rearing in Tennessee, and in 1858 left home and located in Jackson County, Mo., where he lived until 1867, then removing to Johnson County of the same State, and in 1884 came to where he now lives. He owns 240 acres of fine land in Barton County, and sixty six acres in John son County. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army, serving one year, and was a participant in the battles of Pea Ridge and Springfield. He was married in 1856 to Miss Lucinda H. Shook, who was born in Tennessee in 1831, and died in Ala bama in 1857, and in 1867 he took for his second wife Miss Martha J. Givins, who was born on Kentucky soil in 1835, and died in Johnson County, Mo., in 1877, having become the mother of the following children: Ella D., Robert A., Samuel C, John W., Nettie L. and Mattie M. Mr. Russel is a Democrat in politics, a strong temperance man, and since fifteen years of age has been a member of the Christian Church, his wives being also members of the same.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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