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Barton County
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Gustavus A. Seyffert, proprietor of the Barton County Wagon and Carriage Works, was born in Saxony, Germany, July 12, 1845, being a son of William F. and Joanna (Knauf) Seyffert, who were also born in Germany, and resided in their native land until 1854, when they came to America, and located in St. Louis. The father was a turner of iron and brass, but the latter part of his life followed the occupation of farming, and died in Moniteau County when about sixty six years of age. His wife was over seventy at the time of her death. He was in the Revolution of 1848, being against the German Government. Gustavus A. is one of the three surviving members of their family of eleven children, and is the only one residing in Barton County. He was educated in Germany, and in the district schools of Missouri, and at the age of fifteen years went to St. Louis and served apprenticeship at his present trade. In the fall of 1863 he enlisted in Company G, Forty third. Enrolled Militia, but at the end of about four months his company was disbanded. He then worked in St. Louis and Sedalia until 1866, when he loaded a wagon with material for business, and came to Lamar, which then consisted of about a dozen houses. He built him a shop eighteen by thirty feet, and went to work, doing his own cooking for three years in a little room over his shop. His business steadily increased, and he now has an excellent two story shop, with two rooms below, one for woodwork and the other for iron. His paint and storage rooms are above, and adjoining is his commodious salesroom. He has the largest manufacturing establishment in Lamar, and furnishes employment to eight men. In 1870 he was married to Miss Amelia Blethroad, a native of Alleghany County, Penn., by whom he has four children: Linnie A., August H. H., Clara M. and Simon A. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is a staunch Republican in politics. He has been a member of the board of aldermen and the school board.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Calvin H. Shapley, a leading farmer of Barton County, Mo., was born in Madison County, N. Y. in 1832, and is a son of Calvin H. and Louisa (Sutherland) Shapley, both of whom were born in York State, the former in Madison County in 1800, and the latter in Chenango County in 1806. Calvin Shapley was a farmer, and a son of David Shapley, who was born in Connecti cut. The former died in McHenry County, ILL., in 1868, whither he had moved in 1839, and his wife died in Iowa in 1874. Cal vin H. Shapley, our subject, was the eldest of three children, and when about six years of age, was taken to Illinois, receiv ing his education and rearing in McHenry County. In 1853 he was married to Miss Melissa Carmichael, a native of Rens selaer County, N. Y., where she was born, in 1830. She died in Barton County, Mo., in 1871, having borne a family of seven children, all of whom are living: Alice, wife of Henry Hubbart, of Montana; Louisa, a school teacher of Montana; Isabelle, wife of Eugene Smith; Ruth, wife of Thomas W. Martin; Melissa, wife of Fillmore Hubbart; and Addie. In 1873 Mr. Shapley espoused Miss Kate Stowell, a native of Bloomington, ILL., her birth occurring in 1843. She was reared in Madison County, N. Y., and her union with Mr. Shapley has been blessed in the birth of two children: Lloyd and Walter. In 1866 Mr. Shap ley removed with his family from Illinois to where he now resides, his home farm here consisting of over 500 acres, besides which he has land in adjoining counties. His first presidential vote was cast for Fremont, and he has always been a Republican in his political views. He was twice a candidate on that ticket for State Senator, but being in a strong Democratic district, was always defeated. He took the census of Nashville Township in 1880. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and his wife is a member of the Baptist Church. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Fifteenth Illinois Infantry, as a private, afterward being promoted to the rank of lieutenant, serving until Septem ber, 1862; then became captain in Company B, Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, which position he retained until the close of the war, being mustered out on the 31st of December, 1865. He now belongs to the G. A. R.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


John Slavens, one of the leading citizens of Jackson County, Ohio, was born on the 9th of January, 1852, and is a son of Reu ben and Nancy (Stephenson) Slavens, and grandson of John Slavens, who was a Virginian and died in Henry County, Mo. Reuben was also born in Virginia, and when a young man moved to Ohio, locating in Jackson County, where he met and married Nancy Stephenson, a native of the State, and made that his home until 1858, then coming to Henry County, Mo., where they have since made their home. The father learned the miller's trade in his youth, but only worked at it a short time after coming to Missouri, then began farming and stock raising, and as such has been reasonably successful. In 1863 he enlisted in the Federal service, being on active duty until the close of the war. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and he is a Republican and always supports the principles of that party. Mrs. Slavens is a daughter of Samuel Stephenson, who was also a Virginian, and died in Jackson County, Ohio. John Slavens, our subject, has two sisters: Martha, wife of William H. Burnsides, of Henry County, Mo.; and Mary, who died when six years of age. John was educated in Henry County, and remained at home until eighteen years of age, and was afterward married to Miss Mollie Hill, a daughter of Alexander and Elbina Hill. She was born in Moniteau County, Mo., July 7, 1853, and she and Mr. Slavens became the parents of six children, five of whom are living: Ella, Harry, Alma R., Myrtle and Pearl. Tilla died when four years of age. Mr. Slavens is in good circumstances financially, and since 1883 has resided on his farm in Barton County. He is a Republican in politics, and he and family wor ship in the Missionary Baptist Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


W. W. Slinker, who has been a farmer of Newport Township since 1843, was born in Menard County, ILL., in 1832. His par ents, Joel and Elizabeth (Brug) Slinker, were born in Pennsyl vania and Kentucky, and died in Jasper County, Mo., in 1856, at the age of fifty five years, and in 1852, aged forty four years, respectively. In 1830 they moved to Menard County, ILL, where the father was engaged in farming and milling until 1849, then coming to Jasper County, Mo., where he and wife resided until their respective deaths. He was of German descent, and a member of the Baptist Church. W. W. Slinker was reared on a farm and educated at a private school in Jasper County. In 1854 he was married to Miss Dorinda H. Bastin, a native of Kentucky, and, after his marriage, entered eighty acres in Jasper County, which he began improving. He made that his home until 1862 (owning, at the time of his removal, 240 acres), then went to Kansas, and farmed on rented land one year. In 1863 he enlisted in the Union Army, Company I, Fourteenth Kansas Cavalry, and served until June 15, 1865, and took part in the engagements of Poison Springs, Saline River, and numerous minor engagements. After the war Mr. Slinker returned to Kansas, where he lived a few months, then came back to Jasper County, Mo., to his old home. This he afterward sold, however, and rented land there until 1874, then came to Barton County, and purchased a farm near Golden City, where he made his home two years. He purchased his pres ent farm of 120 acres, and has changed it from a raw state to a finely cultivated and improved farm. In 1862 his wife died, at the age of twenty five years, leaving four children: James W., a farmer of Barton County; Nancy A., wife of John Nixon; Oliver B., a farmer of Barton County; and Tilford P., who died in child hood. In 1867 Mr. Slinker wedded Mrs. Gilla (Williams) Carter, by whom he has two children: Ora G., who died when ten years of age; and Lon, who is still at home. Mr. and Mrs. Slinker have been members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church for many years, and are honored citizens of the county.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


W. C. Smith, a stockman and farmer of Barton County, Mo., is a son of John and Margaret (St. Clair) Smith, who were born in Pennsylvania in 1806 and 1821, and died April 18, 1869, and in 1855, respectively. The father learned the trade of shoemaker in his youth, and followed this in connection with farming the greater part of his life. At the time of his death he was a Republican in politics; his wife was a member of the Lutheran Church. Their children are as follows: W. C.; G. H., who is an engineer of Pittsburg, Kan.; J. P., who is a farmer of Barton County; Mary C., wife of Will Hope, of Alleghany County, Penn.; and C. L., wife of George Crooks, of Pittsburg, Penn. W. C. Smith, whose name heads this sketch, was born on the 7th of September, 1840, and began working for himself in 1859, being employed in the oil regions of Pennsylvania for about two years, after which he joined Company C, One Hundred and Thirty fourth Pennsylvania Infantry, under Capt. Anderson, and participated in the battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg, and with the regiment through the campaign. He next joined the Third Pennsylvania Artillery Veterans, Company I, under Capt. Watson, serving two years, and was in the siege of Petersburg, and was with Grant when Lee surrendered, besides being in several minor engagements; and, with the Yankees, skilled in martial rule, in November, 1865, he was discharged, and returned to the oil regions of Pennsylvania, where he remained four years, then came to Barton County, Mo., and purchased his present property, consisting of 192 acres of raw land, at a cost of four dollars per acre. It is now improved with excellent buildings and an orchard of ten acres, consisting of apple and peach trees, and is valued at twenty five dollars per acre. March 23, 1869, he espoused Miss Nancy J. Dolen, a daughter of John and Nancy (McCool) Dolen, to whom were born six children: Joseph, (deceased), Josiah (deceased): Margaret, wife of Ben Stover, of Pennsylvania; Lydia, wife of Jacob Bickel, also of Pennsylvania; Caroline, wife of E. Douglass, of Pennsylvania; and Levi, who also resides in that State. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the parents of the following children: R. O., who was born January 6, 1870; A. V., born October 26, 1871, and died October 21, 1874; Almeda G., born December 9, 1873; Charles N., born September 21, 1876, died August 26, 1877; Franklin, born July 7, 1878; Minnie S., born October 20, 1880; and Sidney B., born July 1, 1883. Mr. Smith was very much dissatisfied with Missouri after locating, but, after returning to Pennsylvania on a visit, he came back to Missouri well satisfied to remain. He has had no failure in his apple crops since his residence here, and, although his peach crop is not so successful, small fruit is abundant. Until recently he voted the Republican ticket, but has since affiliated with the Union Labor party. He is now filling the office of township trustee. He belongs to the G. A. R., the Knights of Labor, and the Farmers' Alliance, and he and wife are members of the Congregational Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Lynn B. Smith, the oldest grocery merchant of Barton County, was born in Madison County, Va., April 29, 1838, and received a good English education. In 1859 he married Miss Sue Gearhart, a native of Missouri, and then followed farming in Howard and Morgan Counties until 1869, when he came to Bar ton County, where he still continued tilling the soil. Previous to this, in 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate service, and con tinued in the same until the close of the war, when he surrendered at Shreveport, La. He was in the battles of Boonville, Pea Ridge, Jenkins' Ferry, Pleasant Hill, and many hot skirmishes. He was never wounded to amount to anything, nor was he ever taken prisoner. After the war he returned to Howard County, but later removed to Barton County, and in 1874 began mer chandising at Lamar, where he has continued the business since. In connection with a large amount of town property he owns two good farms, and is one of the prominent business men of the county. He has made all his property by his own exertions. He is treasurer of the Fair association, is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Knights of Pythias. When he first came to Benton County buffalo could be found within a day's ride of Lamar. Mr. Smith was the second of eight children, seven now living, six sons and a daughter, born to John M. and Brilla (Berry) Smith, both born and reared in Virginia. In 1856 the parents came to Missouri, locating in Howard County, but soon moved to Morgan County, where they still live, he being seventy-eight years of age, and she seventy six. Both are members of the Baptist Church. He has followed farming all his life, and is a Democrat in politics.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Robert P. Smith, of the firm of C. H. Brown & Co., was born in Crawford County, ILL., October 4, 1844, and is the son of Robert C. and Mary E. (Smith) Smith, both natives of Ken tucky. Mrs. Smith came with her parents to Illinois at an early day, and Mr. Smith came some time later. Both were of English descent. The maternal grandfather was a very early settler of Palestine, ILL., and was receiver of the land office. The paternal grandfather came from Virginia to Kentucky, at a very early day, and lived at Danville. Robert C. and Mary E. (Smith) Smith were married in Crawford County, and he followed farming as an occupation. He was a highly respected citizen, and died in the prime of life, when his son, Robert P., was only four years of age. The mother is still living, is seventy years of age, and is a mem ber of the Methodist Church. She was the mother of four chil dren, two of whom are now living, a son and daughter. Robert P. Smith, the second child, attained his growth on the farm, and received his education in the common schools, also at Marshall, ILL., and at Merom College, in Indiana. He then read law under Judge John Schofield, now on the supreme bench of Illinois, and later entered the Chicago Law School, where he graduated in 1866. Subsequently he located in Decaturville, Tenn., practiced a year, and then went to Texas. He followed a drove of cattle from there to Lamar, Mo., where he went into the employ of Brown & Avery, which firm is succeeded by the present firm of C. H. Brown & Co; of the latter firm he became a member in 1872. For twenty one years he has been a resident of this county. He is a Democrat in politics, and has been county treas urer three terms. July I, 1875, he married Miss Mary E. Culver, a native of Illinois, and they have three children: Guy, Eula and Reba. Mrs. Smith is a member of the Congregational Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Samuel N. Smoot, stock dealer and farmer, was born in Mason County, Ky., December 11, 1847, and is the youngest but one of six children, five sons and one daughter, born to William and by Eliza (Perrine) Smoot, both natives of Mason County, Ky. Grandfather and Grandmother Smoot were from Maryland, and among the early settlers of Kentucky. The grandparents on the mother's side were from New Jersey, and were also early settlers of Kentucky. William and Eliza (Perrine) Smoot were married in Kentucky, and there passed their entire lives. He was a farmer and stock raiser by occupation; enlisted in the Mexican War, but was not called out; was a Whig in his political views; and both he and his wife were members of the Christian Church. He lived to be seventy three years of age, and she lived to be seventy. Samuel N. Smoot was educated to a limited extent in the common schools, and, at the age of nineteen, he began for himself. October 15, 1874, he married Miss Ella Gor don, a native of Kentucky, and this union resulted in the birth of one child, Anna Marie. After living in Kentucky until 1884 Mr. Smoot came to Lamar, and has been engaged in the real estate business until the present. He owns 640 acres of land one mile south of Kenoma, Barton County, and fifteen acres adjoining Lamar, besides a number of lots in Lamar. He has been raising and shipping stock both in Kentucky and this State. On his farm are two springs and indications of lead. Both he and wife are members of the Christian Church. As a busi ness man, Mr. Smoot has been quite successful, having made the most he has by his own efforts. Politically he affiliates with the Democratic party.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


H. Snyder, of the firm of Snyder, Patrick & Horton Loan Company, of the wholesale liquor firm of A. H. Snyder & Co., was born in the State of New York, on the 5th of February, 1849, being a sort of C. G. and W. A. (Cuyler) Snyder, who were also born in York State. They resided in that State until 1855, when they moved to Northern Illinois, thence, in 1864, to Michigan, and, three years later, to Dade County, Mo., but are now resid ing in Kansas. The father has been engaged in merchandising the greater part of his life, but while living in Illinois followed the occupation of farming a part of the time. In 1874 he repre sented Dade County in the State Legislature, being elected by the Democrats, of which party he has been a member for many years. A. H. Snyder, the eldest of his two children, a son and a daughter, received his education in the common schools. Toward the close of the war a man offered $1,100 for a substi tute, and, although only sixteen years of age, Mr. Snyder imme diately accepted the offer, and enlisted in Company K, Fifteenth Michigan, and served until the close of the war. Upon his return home he entered Bryant & Stratton's Business College at Chi cago, ILL., graduating in 1867, and shortly after went to Dade County, Mo., where he first engaged in farming, then in mer chandising in Cedarville, and later in Stockton. In 1884 he came to Lamar, and, after merchandising for one year, engaged in the wholesale liquor business. In January, 1889, he, George Patrick and George Horton formed a loan company, and are still thus associated. Mr. Snyder is a Knight Templar in the Masonic fraternity, and in his political views is a Democrat. In 1867 he married Miss Harriet Enos, a native of Michigan, by whom he has two children: George and Mabel.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Alfred Spence, a merchant of Newport, Mo., has been a resident of Barton County since 1872. He was born in Ken tucky, and moved from there with his parents to Davis County, Iowa, in 1849, first coming to Golden Grove, where he bought a piece of land and resided until 1873, then moved to Round Prairie, where he bought some raw land and improved a farm. In 1879 he came to Newport, and in 1880 established his present business and has served as postmaster seven years. Jonathan and Elizabeth (McLean) Spence were born on Kentucky soil. The father was a farmer throughout life, and in 1849 removed with his family to Davis County, Iowa, where he died in 1886 at the age of eighty one years. The mother's death occurred in 1880, when seventy five years of age. They had long been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The following are their children: William, who was a soldier in the Mexican War, and held a captaincy in the late war, died in 1866; Hannah, wife of C. A. Thompson ; Thomas; Alfred ; Mary Jane, wife of George Moore; Malinda, wife of William James; Anna, wife of Dock Yates; and Andrew T. When twenty one years of age, Alfred Spence left home to engage in farming in Iowa, and in 1858 was married and moved to Grundy County, Mo.; then joined the Third Iowa Cavalry, and served four years and three days, participating in the following battles: Moore's Mills, Pea Ridge, Vicksburg. Helena, Little Rock, Gun Town, Tupelo, Price's raid through Missouri, Independence, Big Blue, Mine Creek, Wilson's Raid, Montevallo, Selma, Montgomery and Columbus. After the war he returned to Iowa, but in 1867 moved to Cherokee County, Kan., where he resided until 1872, moving from there to Barton County, Mo., where he owns eighty acres of land and some town property in Newport. He was first married in 1858 to Elizabeth J. Rayburn, a native of Indiana, who died in 1862 while her husband was serving in the army, and left two children: Jonathan, a teacher of Nevada, Mo.; and Melissa J., the wife of R. H. Fanning of Lamar. In 1864 Mr. Spence wedded his present wife, Martha E. Moore, who was born in Iowa, and by her became the father of seven children: Louisa, wife of A. Amick of Barton County; Milton L.; Thomas M.; Alfred N.; Martha E.; Anna A. and Emma A. Mr. and Mrs. Spence are members of the United Brethren Church, of which he has been a licensed minister since 1877, and was ordained in 1882. He is a Republican, and has held the office of justice of the peace for six years.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


H. H. Steele, mayor of Golden City, Mo., elected first in 1883, and who has served in that capacity continuously since, has been a resident of the above mentioned city since 1881. He is a native of Greene County, Mo., and the son of John P. and Jane (Ramsey) Steele, both natives of Tennessee, the mother of Scotch descent. The father was of Irish descent, and was one of the very early settlers of Greene County, Mo. He was a farmer by occupation, and remained in this county until 1888, when he moved to Lawrence County, bought a farm, and there he now resides. He is retired from active pursuits. He was a Union man during the late war, and was a guide for Generals. Lyon and Sigel. Mrs. Steele died when the subject of this sketch was a small lad. H. H. Steele was reared to farm labor, and re mained with his father until twenty five years of age, receiving his education in the public schools of the county. At the above mentioned age he engaged in the grain business at Brookline Station, Greene County, Mo., continued at this for three years, and then moved to Bois D'Arc, in the same county, where he en gaged in merchandising and also continued the grain business. At the end of three years he came to Golden City, where he re sumed his mercantile and grain interests, and for two years was in partnership with Mr. O. E. Coover, who took charge of the store, and Mr. Steele looked after the grain business. At present the latter is occupied in the grain business here and in Lockwood. He is also engaged in the hay business. He was married June 16, 1876, to Miss Cora Marlow, a native of Kentucky, who bore him two children: Pearl and Ethel. Mrs. Steele is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically Mr. Steele is a Democrat, and has always taken an active part in public affairs. He is the owner of considerable property in town.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


Dr. A. B. Stone, a practicing physician and surgeon at Iantha, Mo., was born in Platte County, Mo., September 12, 1849, his parents being Samuel and Catherine (Butler) Stone, who were born in Woodford and Frankfort Counties, Ky., in 1804 and 1810, respectively, and died in Platte County, Mo., in 1850. The father was a rope manufacturer the early part of his life, but after ward turned his attention to farming, in which he met with good success. He and wife became residents of Platte County, Mo., in 1846. Dr. A. B. Stone was the youngest of eight children, and was only one year old when his parents died. He was reared by William Broadhurst, and received a common school education in Platte and Clay Counties. In 1880 he graduated from the Missouri Medical College, of St. Louis, and first entered upon the practice of his profession at Webb City, Jasper County. He has been a resident of Barton County most of the time since 1859, and in 1875 taught one term of school. Since 1884 he has been a resident of the village of Iantha, where in connection with his practice he is engaged in selling drugs and stationery. In 1870 he married Miss Sarah Gaddy, who was born in Clay County, Mo., in 1855, and died in 1873, having been an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal, Church, South, for a number of years. To them were born two children, Delia and Minnie, both now de ceased. In 1875 the Doctor married Miss Mary C. Cook, who was born in Tennessee in 1855, a daughter of Henry Cook, a German. Their union has resulted in the birth of the following family: Bertie, Marvin, Kate, William and Gertrude. The Doc tor has always been a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was cast for Horace Greeley. He is coroner of the county, is treas urer of Central Township, was postmaster of Iantha during Cleve land's administration, is a member of the State Pharmacy Society, and is president of his home medical society. He is one of the leading physicians of the county, is a member of the A. F. & A. M., and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Epis copal Church.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]


J. F. Surbrugg, one of the oldest farmers of the township, is a son of John and Elsie (Surhur) Surbrugg, who were born in Switzerland, and came to America after their marriage, locating in Ohio, where they followed farming and dairying. After resid ing there for some time they moved to Ripley County, Ind., then went to Columbus of the same State, where they resumed farm ing and dairying, and here the father died in 1888, at the age of seventy nine years, still survived by his widow, who resides in that State. Nine of their ten children lived to be grown: Elsie, wife of Peter Shank, a farmer of Iowa; John, a farmer of Barton County, Mo.; Peter, a farmer of Indiana; J. F., our subject; Lizzie, wife of Jacob Brown, residing in Indianapolis, Ind.; Mar garet, wife of Ephraim Ross, of Indiana; Rosa, the deceased wife of George Carter, of Missouri; Christopher, a farmer of Indiana; Solomon, residing on the old homestead in Indiana; and Godfred, a farmer residing near Columbus, Ind. J. F. Surbrugg only attended the common schools in his youth, and left home when very young. The first work he did after starting out in life for himself was farm work, his wages being paid by the month, but his father collected his pay until he was twenty one years old. He then continued to labor by the month until the war broke out, when he enlisted in the Third Indiana Cavalry, under Capt. Cline, in Company K, and afterward served as orderly for General Nelson for about sixteen months, when he was discharged on account of sickness. He was at Fort Donelson and Shiloh, being taken sick immediately after the latter combat, and was sent home by order of Governor Morton. After recovering he went to Pomeroy, Ohio, and began working in a rolling mill, remaining here between eight and ten months. He then went to Rock Island, ILL., and began working for a nurseryman, and from there joined the One Hundred and Fortieth United States Infan try, Company G, being under Captain Wilmont, and after serving about six months was discharged, but again enlisted in the spring of 1864 in Company C, Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry, being on active duty until the fall of 1865. He was in the battle of Frank lin. After the war Mr. Surbrugg went to Indiana, but after farming there one year moved to Rock Island, where he also farmed one year. He then sold his crops and moved to Iowa, and was there married in 1867 to Miss Mary Worthin, moving soon after to Barton County, Mo., where he purchased raw land, and made a home. At the end of one year he had his land en closed, then sold out and bought eighty acres of unimproved land, which he also improved and sold. This farm cost him $5.50 per acre, and at the end of ten years he sold it at $25 per acre. Since that time he has resided on his present property, which consists of 200 acres, for eighty of which he paid $10.50 per acre, and for another eighty, $7.50. It is now worth $40 per acre, and is all in one body. He owns eighty acres in another tract. He and wife are the parents of three sons and two daugh ters: J. C., John W., H. E., Ada and Alice. Mr. Surbrugg is independent in his political views.
[Source: History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade, and Barton County Missouri,Goodspeed Publishing, 1889. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater]

 

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